Amendment Text: H.Amdt.860 — 110th Congress (2007-2008)

There is one version of the amendment.

Shown Here:
Amendment as Offered (10/23/2007)

This Amendment appears on page H11905 in the following article from the Congressional Record.



[Pages H11900-H11908]
                 VIRGINIA RIDGE AND VALLEY ACT OF 2007

  Mr. RAHALL. Mr. Speaker, pursuant to House Resolution 763, I call up 
the bill (H.R. 1011) to designate additional National Forest System 
lands in the State of Virginia as wilderness or a wilderness study 
area, to designate the Kimberling Creek Potential Wilderness Area for 
eventual incorporation in the Kimberling Creek Wilderness, to establish 
the Seng Mountain and Bear Creek Scenic Areas, to provide for the 
development of trail plans for the wilderness areas and scenic areas, 
and for other purposes, and ask for its immediate consideration.
  The Clerk read the title of the bill.
  The text of the bill is as follows:

                               H.R. 1011

       Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of 
     the United States of America in Congress assembled,

     SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE AND TABLE OF CONTENTS.

       (a) Short Title.--This Act may be cited as the ``Virginia 
     Ridge and Valley Act of 2007''.
       (b) Table of Contents.--The table of contents for this Act 
     is as follows:

Sec. 1. Short title and table of contents.
Sec. 2. Designation of additional National Forest System lands in 
              Jefferson National Forest, Virginia, as wilderness or a 
              wilderness study area.
Sec. 3. Designation of Kimberling Creek Potential Wilderness Area, 
              Jefferson National Forest, Virginia.
Sec. 4. Designation of Seng Mountain and Bear Creek Scenic Areas, 
              Jefferson National Forest, Virginia.
Sec. 5. Trail plan and development.

     SEC. 2. DESIGNATION OF ADDITIONAL NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM 
                   LANDS IN JEFFERSON NATIONAL FOREST, VIRGINIA, 
                   AS WILDERNESS OR A WILDERNESS STUDY AREA.

       (a) Designation of Wilderness.--Section 1 of Public Law 
     100-326 (102 Stat. 584; 16 U.S.C. 1132 note), as amended by 
     Public Law 106-471 (114 Stat. 2057), is further amended--
       (1) in the matter preceding paragraph (1), by striking 
     ``System--'' and inserting ``System:'';
       (2) by striking ``certain'' at the beginning of paragraphs 
     (1) through (8) and inserting ``Certain'';
       (3) by striking the semicolon at the end of paragraphs (1) 
     through (6) and inserting a period;
       (4) by striking ``; and'' at the end of paragraph (7) and 
     inserting a period; and
       (5) by adding at the end the following new paragraphs:
       ``(9) Certain lands in the Jefferson National Forest, which 
     comprise approximately 3,769 acres, as generally depicted on 
     the map entitled `Brush Mountain and Brush Mountain East' and 
     dated February 2007, and which shall be known as the Brush 
     Mountain East Wilderness.
       ``(10) Certain lands in the Jefferson National Forest, 
     which comprise approximately 4,794 acres, as generally 
     depicted on the map entitled `Brush Mountain and Brush 
     Mountain East' and dated February 2007, and which shall be 
     known as the Brush Mountain Wilderness.
       ``(11) Certain lands in the Jefferson National Forest, 
     which comprise approximately 4,223 acres, as generally 
     depicted on the map entitled `Seng Mountain and Raccoon 
     Branch' and dated February 2007, and which shall be known as 
     the Raccoon Branch Wilderness.
       ``(12) Certain lands in the Jefferson National Forest, 
     which comprise approximately 3,270 acres, as generally 
     depicted on the map entitled `Stone Mountain' and dated 
     February 2007, and which shall be known as the Stone Mountain 
     Wilderness.
       ``(13) Certain lands in the Jefferson National Forest, 
     which comprise approximately 8,470 acres, as generally 
     depicted on the map entitled `Hunting Camp Creek and Garden 
     Mountain' and dated February 2007, and which shall be known 
     as the Hunting Camp Creek Wilderness.
       ``(14) Certain lands in the Jefferson National Forest, 
     which comprise approximately 3,291 acres, as generally 
     depicted on the map entitled `Hunting Camp Creek and Garden 
     Mountain' and dated February 2007, and which shall be known 
     as the Garden Mountain Wilderness.
       ``(15) Certain lands in the Jefferson National Forest, 
     which comprise approximately 5,476 acres, as generally 
     depicted on the map entitled `Mountain Lake Additions' and 
     dated February 2007, and which are hereby incorporated in the 
     Mountain Lake Wilderness designated by section 2(6) of the 
     Virginia Wilderness Act of 1984 (Public Law 98-586; 98 Stat. 
     3105).
       ``(16) Certain lands in the Jefferson National Forest, 
     which comprise approximately 308 acres, as generally depicted 
     on the map entitled `Lewis Fork Addition and Little Wilson 
     Creek Additions' and dated February 2007, and which are 
     hereby incorporated in the Lewis Fork Wilderness designated 
     by section 2(3) of the Virginia Wilderness Act of 1984 
     (Public Law 98-586; 98 Stat. 3105).
       ``(17) Certain lands in the Jefferson National Forest, 
     which comprise approximately 1,845 acres, as generally 
     depicted on the map entitled `Lewis Fork Addition and Little 
     Wilson Creek Additions' and dated February 2007, and which 
     are hereby incorporated in the Little Wilson Creek Wilderness 
     designated by section 2(5) of the Virginia Wilderness Act of 
     1984 (Public Law 98-586; 98 Stat. 3105).
       ``(18) Certain lands in the Jefferson National Forest, 
     which comprise approximately 2,249 acres, as generally 
     depicted on the map entitled `Shawvers Run Additions' and 
     dated February 2007, and which are hereby incorporated in the 
     Shawvers Run Wilderness designated by paragraph (4).
       ``(19) Certain lands in the Jefferson National Forest, 
     which comprise approximately 1,203 acres, as generally 
     depicted on the map entitled `Peters Mountain Addition' and 
     dated February 2007, and which are hereby incorporated in the 
     Peters Mountain Wilderness designated by section 2(7) of the 
     Virginia Wilderness Act of 1984 (Public Law 98-586; 98 Stat. 
     3105).
       ``(20) Certain lands in the Jefferson National Forest, 
     which comprise approximately 263 acres, as generally depicted 
     on the map entitled `Kimberling Creek Additions and Potential 
     Wilderness Area' and dated February 2007, and which are 
     hereby incorporated in the Kimberling Creek Wilderness 
     designated by section 2(2) of the Virginia Wilderness Act of 
     1984 (Public Law 98-586; 98 Stat. 3105).''.
       (b) Designation of Wilderness Study Area.--Section 6(a) of 
     the Virginia Wilderness Act of 1984 (Public Law 98-586; 98 
     Stat. 3108) is amended--
       (1) by striking ``certain'' at the beginning of paragraphs 
     (1) through (4) and inserting ``Certain'';
       (2) by striking the semicolon at the end of paragraphs (1) 
     and (2) and inserting a period;
       (3) by striking ``; and'' at the end of paragraph (3) and 
     inserting a period; and
       (4) by adding at the end the following new paragraph:
       ``(5) Certain lands in the Jefferson National Forest, which 
     comprise approximately 3,226 acres, as generally depicted on 
     a map entitled `Lynn Camp Creek Wilderness Study Area' and 
     dated February 2007, and which shall be known as the Lynn 
     Camp Creek Wilderness Study Area.''.
       (c) Maps and Legal Descriptions.--
       (1) Filing.--As soon as practicable after the date of the 
     enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Agriculture shall 
     file with the Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and

[[Page H11901]]

     Forestry of the Senate and the Committee on Natural Resources 
     and the Committee on Agriculture of the House of 
     Representatives a map and legal description of each 
     wilderness area designated or expanded by the amendments made 
     by subsection (a) and of the Lynn Camp Creek Wilderness Study 
     Area designated by the amendment made by subsection (b).
       (2) Force and effect.--The maps and legal descriptions 
     referred to in paragraph (1) shall have the same force and 
     effect as if included in this Act, except that the Secretary 
     of Agriculture may correct clerical and typographical errors 
     in the maps and descriptions. In the case of any discrepancy 
     between the acreage specified in the amendments made by 
     subsection (a) or (b) and the corresponding map filed under 
     paragraph (1), the map shall control.
       (3) Availability.--The maps and legal descriptions referred 
     to in paragraph (1) shall be on file and available for public 
     inspection in the Office of the Chief of the Forest Service.
       (d) Administration.--
       (1) New wilderness areas.--Subject to valid existing 
     rights, the Secretary of Agriculture shall administer the 
     lands in the Jefferson National Forest designated as a new 
     wilderness area by the amendments made by subsection (a) in 
     accordance with this section and the Wilderness Act (16 
     U.S.C. 1131 et seq.), except that, with respect to such 
     lands, any reference in the Wilderness Act to the effective 
     date of that Act shall be deemed to be a reference to the 
     date of the enactment of this Act.
       (2) Expanded wilderness areas.--Subject to valid existing 
     rights, the Secretary of Agriculture shall administer the 
     lands in the Jefferson National Forest designated as 
     wilderness and incorporated into an existing wilderness area 
     by the amendments made by subsection (a) in accordance with 
     this section, the Wilderness Act (16 U.S.C. 1131 et seq.), 
     and other laws applicable to that wilderness area, except 
     that, with respect to such lands, any reference in the 
     Wilderness Act to the effective date of that Act shall be 
     deemed to be a reference to the date of the enactment of this 
     Act.

     SEC. 3. DESIGNATION OF KIMBERLING CREEK POTENTIAL WILDERNESS 
                   AREA, JEFFERSON NATIONAL FOREST, VIRGINIA.

       (a) Designation.--In furtherance of the purposes of the 
     Wilderness Act (16 U.S.C. 1131 et seq.), certain lands in the 
     Jefferson National Forest, which comprise approximately 349 
     acres, as generally depicted on the map entitled ``Kimberling 
     Creek Additions and Potential Wilderness Area'' and dated 
     February 2007, are designated as a potential wilderness area 
     for eventual incorporation in the Kimberling Creek Wilderness 
     designated by section 2(2) of the Virginia Wilderness Act of 
     1984 (Public Law 98-586; 98 Stat. 3105).
       (b) Map and Legal Descriptions.--
       (1) Filing.--As soon as practicable after the date of the 
     enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Agriculture shall 
     file with the Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and 
     Forestry of the Senate and the Committee on Natural Resources 
     and the Committee on Agriculture of the House of 
     Representatives a map and legal description of potential 
     wilderness area.
       (2) Force and effect.--The map and legal description 
     referred to in paragraph (1) shall have the same force and 
     effect as if included in this Act, except that the Secretary 
     of Agriculture may correct clerical and typographical errors 
     in the map and description. In the case of any discrepancy 
     between the acreage specified in subsection (a) and the map 
     filed under paragraph (1), the map shall control.
       (3) Availability.--The map and legal description referred 
     to in paragraph (1) shall be on file and available for public 
     inspection in the Office of the Chief of the Forest Service.
       (c) Management.--Except as provided in subsection (d) and 
     subject to valid existing rights, the Secretary of 
     Agriculture shall manage the potential wilderness area as 
     wilderness pending its incorporation in the Kimberling Creek 
     Wilderness.
       (d) Ecological Restoration.--
       (1) In general.--For purposes of ecological restoration 
     (including the elimination of non-native species, removal of 
     illegal, unused, or decommissioned roads, and any other 
     activities necessary to restore the natural ecosystems in the 
     potential wilderness area), the Secretary of Agriculture may 
     use motorized equipment and mechanized transport in the 
     potential wilderness area until its incorporation in the 
     Kimberling Creek Wilderness.
       (2) Limitation.--To the maximum extent practicable, the 
     Secretary shall use the minimum tool or administrative 
     practice necessary to accomplish ecological restoration with 
     the least amount of adverse impact on wilderness character 
     and resources.
       (e) Wilderness Designation.--The potential wilderness area 
     shall be designated as wilderness and incorporated in the 
     Kimberling Creek Wilderness on the earlier of--
       (1) the date on which the Secretary of Agriculture 
     publishes in the Federal Register notice that the conditions 
     in the potential wilderness area that are incompatible with 
     the Wilderness Act (16 U.S.C. 1131 et seq.) have been 
     removed; or
       (2) the date that is five years after the date of the 
     enactment of this Act.
       (f) Administration.--Subject to valid existing rights, upon 
     incorporation of the lands designated as wilderness under 
     subsection (e) in the Kimberling Creek Wilderness, the 
     Secretary of Agriculture shall administer the lands in 
     accordance with the Wilderness Act (16 U.S.C. 1131 et seq.) 
     and other laws applicable to that wilderness area, except 
     that, with respect to such lands, any reference in the 
     Wilderness Act to the effective date of that Act shall be 
     deemed to be a reference to the date on which the lands are 
     designated as wilderness under subsection (e).

     SEC. 4. DESIGNATION OF SENG MOUNTAIN AND BEAR CREEK SCENIC 
                   AREAS, JEFFERSON NATIONAL FOREST, VIRGINIA.

       (a) Establishment.--The following National Forest System 
     lands in the State of Virginia are hereby designated as 
     National Scenic Areas (in this section referred to as the 
     ``scenic areas''):
       (1) Certain lands in the Jefferson National Forest, which 
     comprise approximately 6,455 acres, as generally depicted on 
     the map entitled ``Seng Mountain and Raccoon Branch'' and 
     dated February 2007, and which shall be known as the Seng 
     Mountain National Scenic Area.
       (2) Certain lands in the Jefferson National Forest, which 
     comprise approximately 5,128 acres, as generally depicted on 
     the map entitled ``Bear Creek'' and dated February 2007, and 
     which shall be known as the Bear Creek National Scenic Area.
       (b) Maps and Legal Descriptions.--
       (1) Filing.--As soon as practicable after the date of the 
     enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Agriculture shall 
     file with the Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and 
     Forestry of the Senate and the Committee on Natural Resources 
     and the Committee on Agriculture of the House of 
     Representatives a map and legal description of each of the 
     scenic areas.
       (2) Force and effect.--The maps and legal descriptions 
     referred to in paragraph (1) shall have the same force and 
     effect as if included in this Act, except that the Secretary 
     of Agriculture may correct clerical and typographical errors 
     in the maps and descriptions. In the case of any discrepancy 
     between the acreage specified in subsection (a) and the 
     corresponding map filed under paragraph (1), the map shall 
     control.
       (3) Availability.--The maps and legal descriptions referred 
     to in paragraph (1) shall be on file and available for public 
     inspection in the Office of the Chief of the Forest Service.
       (c) Purposes of Scenic Areas.--The scenic areas are 
     established for the purposes of--
       (1) ensuring the protection and preservation of scenic 
     quality, water quality, natural characteristics, and water 
     resources;
       (2) protecting wildlife and fish habitat, consistent with 
     paragraph (1);
       (3) protecting areas that may develop characteristics of 
     old-growth forests; and
       (4) providing a variety of recreation opportunities, 
     consistent with the preceding paragraphs.
       (d) Administration.--
       (1) In general.--The Secretary of Agriculture shall 
     administer the scenic areas in accordance with this section 
     and the laws and regulations generally applicable to the 
     National Forest System. In the event of conflict between this 
     section and other laws and regulations, this section shall 
     take precedence.
       (2) Consistent use.--The Secretary shall only allow such 
     uses of the scenic areas as the Secretary finds will further 
     the purposes for which the scenic areas are established.
       (e) Management Plan.--Within two years after the date of 
     the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Agriculture shall 
     develop a management plan for the scenic areas consistent 
     with this section. The management plan shall be developed as 
     an amendment to the land and resource management plan for the 
     Jefferson National Forest, except that nothing in this 
     section requires the Secretary to revise the land and 
     resource management plan for the Jefferson National Forest 
     pursuant to section 6 of the Forest and Rangeland Renewable 
     Resources Planning Act of 1974 (16 U.S.C. 1604).
       (f) Roads.--After the date of the enactment of this Act, no 
     roads shall be established or constructed within the scenic 
     areas, except that this prohibition shall not be construed to 
     deny access to private lands or interests therein in the 
     scenic areas.
       (g) Vegetation Management.--No timber harvest shall be 
     allowed within the scenic areas, except as the Secretary of 
     Agriculture finds necessary in the control of fire, insects, 
     and diseases and to provide for public safety and trail 
     access. Notwithstanding the preceding sentence, the Secretary 
     may engage in vegetation manipulation practices for 
     maintenance of existing wildlife clearings and visual 
     quality. Firewood may be harvested for personal use along 
     perimeter roads under such conditions as the Secretary may 
     impose.
       (h) Motorized Travel.--Motorized travel shall not be 
     permitted within the scenic areas, except that the Secretary 
     of Agriculture may authorize motorized travel within the 
     scenic areas--
       (1) as necessary for administrative use in furtherance of 
     the purposes of this section;
       (2) in support of wildlife management projects in existence 
     as of the date of the enactment of this Act; and
       (3) on Forest Development Road 9410 and 84b during deer and 
     bear hunting seasons.
       (i) Fire.--Wildfires in the scenic area shall be suppressed 
     in a manner consistent with the purposes of this section, 
     using such means as the Secretary of Agriculture considers 
     appropriate.

[[Page H11902]]

       (j) Insects and Disease.--Insect and disease outbreaks may 
     be controlled in the scenic areas to maintain scenic quality, 
     prevent tree mortality, reduce hazards to visitors, or 
     protect private lands.
       (k) Water.--The Secretary of Agriculture shall administer 
     the scenic areas so as to maintain and enhance water quality.
       (l) Mining Withdrawal.--Subject to valid existing rights, 
     all federally owned lands in the scenic areas are withdrawn 
     from location, entry, and patent under the mining laws of the 
     United States and from leasing claims under the mineral and 
     geothermal leasing laws of the United States, including 
     amendments to such laws.

     SEC. 5. TRAIL PLAN AND DEVELOPMENT.

       (a) Trail Plan.--The Secretary of Agriculture shall 
     establish a trail plan for National Forest System lands 
     described in this subsection in order to develop the 
     following:
       (1) Hiking and equestrian trails on the lands in the 
     Jefferson National Forest designated as wilderness by the 
     amendments made by section 2(a), in a manner consistent with 
     the Wilderness Act (16 U.S.C. 1131 et seq.).
       (2) Nonmotorized recreation trails within the Seng Mountain 
     and Bear Creek Scenic Areas designated by section 4.
       (b) Consultation.--The Secretary of Agriculture shall 
     establish the trail plan in consultation with interested 
     parties.
       (c) Implementation Report.--Not later than two years after 
     the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of 
     Agriculture shall submit to Congress a report on the 
     implementation of the trail plan, including the 
     identification of priority trails for development.
       (d) Trail Required.--The Secretary of Agriculture shall 
     develop a sustainable trail, using a contour curvilinear 
     alignment, to provide a continuous connection for non-
     motorized travel between County Route 650 and Forest 
     Development Road 4018 in Smyth County, Virginia.

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to House Resolution 763, the 
amendment in the nature of a substitute printed in the bill is adopted 
and the bill, as amended, is considered read.
  The text of the bill, as amended, is as follows:

                               H.R. 1011

       Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of 
     the United States of America in Congress assembled,

     SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE AND TABLE OF CONTENTS.

       (a) Short Title.--This Act may be cited as the ``Virginia 
     Ridge and Valley Act of 2007''.
       (b) Table of Contents.--The table of contents for this Act 
     is as follows:

Sec. 1. Short title and table of contents.
Sec. 2. Designation of additional National Forest System lands in 
              Jefferson National Forest, Virginia, as wilderness or a 
              wilderness study area.
Sec. 3. Designation of Kimberling Creek Potential Wilderness Area, 
              Jefferson National Forest, Virginia.
Sec. 4. Designation of Seng Mountain and Bear Creek Scenic Areas, 
              Jefferson National Forest, Virginia.
Sec. 5. Trail plan and development.

     SEC. 2. DESIGNATION OF ADDITIONAL NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM 
                   LANDS IN JEFFERSON NATIONAL FOREST, VIRGINIA, 
                   AS WILDERNESS OR A WILDERNESS STUDY AREA.

       (a) Designation of Wilderness.--Section 1 of Public Law 
     100-326 (102 Stat. 584; 16 U.S.C. 1132 note), as amended by 
     Public Law 106-471 (114 Stat. 2057), is further amended--
       (1) in the matter preceding paragraph (1), by striking 
     ``System--'' and inserting ``System:'';
       (2) by striking ``certain'' at the beginning of paragraphs 
     (1) through (8) and inserting ``Certain'';
       (3) by striking the semicolon at the end of paragraphs (1) 
     through (6) and inserting a period;
       (4) by striking ``; and'' at the end of paragraph (7) and 
     inserting a period; and
       (5) by adding at the end the following new paragraphs:
       ``(9) Certain lands in the Jefferson National Forest, which 
     comprise approximately 3,769 acres, as generally depicted on 
     the map entitled `Brush Mountain and Brush Mountain East' and 
     dated February 2007, and which shall be known as the Brush 
     Mountain East Wilderness.
       ``(10) Certain lands in the Jefferson National Forest, 
     which comprise approximately 4,794 acres, as generally 
     depicted on the map entitled `Brush Mountain and Brush 
     Mountain East' and dated February 2007, and which shall be 
     known as the Brush Mountain Wilderness.
       ``(11) Certain lands in the Jefferson National Forest, 
     which comprise approximately 4,223 acres, as generally 
     depicted on the map entitled `Seng Mountain and Raccoon 
     Branch' and dated February 2007, and which shall be known as 
     the Raccoon Branch Wilderness.
       ``(12) Certain lands in the Jefferson National Forest, 
     which comprise approximately 3,270 acres, as generally 
     depicted on the map entitled `Stone Mountain' and dated 
     February 2007, and which shall be known as the Stone Mountain 
     Wilderness.
       ``(13) Certain lands in the Jefferson National Forest, 
     which comprise approximately 8,470 acres, as generally 
     depicted on the map entitled `Hunting Camp Creek and Garden 
     Mountain' and dated February 2007, and which shall be known 
     as the Hunting Camp Creek Wilderness.
       ``(14) Certain lands in the Jefferson National Forest, 
     which comprise approximately 3,291 acres, as generally 
     depicted on the map entitled `Hunting Camp Creek and Garden 
     Mountain' and dated February 2007, and which shall be known 
     as the Garden Mountain Wilderness.
       ``(15) Certain lands in the Jefferson National Forest, 
     which comprise approximately 5,476 acres, as generally 
     depicted on the map entitled `Mountain Lake Additions' and 
     dated February 2007, and which are hereby incorporated in the 
     Mountain Lake Wilderness designated by section 2(6) of the 
     Virginia Wilderness Act of 1984 (Public Law 98-586; 98 Stat. 
     3105).
       ``(16) Certain lands in the Jefferson National Forest, 
     which comprise approximately 308 acres, as generally depicted 
     on the map entitled `Lewis Fork Addition and Little Wilson 
     Creek Additions' and dated February 2007, and which are 
     hereby incorporated in the Lewis Fork Wilderness designated 
     by section 2(3) of the Virginia Wilderness Act of 1984 
     (Public Law 98-586; 98 Stat. 3105).
       ``(17) Certain lands in the Jefferson National Forest, 
     which comprise approximately 1,845 acres, as generally 
     depicted on the map entitled `Lewis Fork Addition and Little 
     Wilson Creek Additions' and dated February 2007, and which 
     are hereby incorporated in the Little Wilson Creek Wilderness 
     designated by section 2(5) of the Virginia Wilderness Act of 
     1984 (Public Law 98-586; 98 Stat. 3105).
       ``(18) Certain lands in the Jefferson National Forest, 
     which comprise approximately 2,249 acres, as generally 
     depicted on the map entitled `Shawvers Run Additions' and 
     dated February 2007, and which are hereby incorporated in the 
     Shawvers Run Wilderness designated by paragraph (4).
       ``(19) Certain lands in the Jefferson National Forest, 
     which comprise approximately 1,203 acres, as generally 
     depicted on the map entitled `Peters Mountain Addition' and 
     dated February 2007, and which are hereby incorporated in the 
     Peters Mountain Wilderness designated by section 2(7) of the 
     Virginia Wilderness Act of 1984 (Public Law 98-586; 98 Stat. 
     3105).
       ``(20) Certain lands in the Jefferson National Forest, 
     which comprise approximately 263 acres, as generally depicted 
     on the map entitled `Kimberling Creek Additions and Potential 
     Wilderness Area' and dated February 2007, and which are 
     hereby incorporated in the Kimberling Creek Wilderness 
     designated by section 2(2) of the Virginia Wilderness Act of 
     1984 (Public Law 98-586; 98 Stat. 3105).''.
       (b) Designation of Wilderness Study Area.--Section 6(a) of 
     the Virginia Wilderness Act of 1984 (Public Law 98-586; 98 
     Stat. 3108) is amended--
       (1) by striking ``certain'' at the beginning of paragraphs 
     (1) through (4) and inserting ``Certain'';
       (2) by striking the semicolon at the end of paragraphs (1) 
     and (2) and inserting a period;
       (3) by striking ``; and'' at the end of paragraph (3) and 
     inserting a period; and
       (4) by adding at the end the following new paragraph:
       ``(5) Certain lands in the Jefferson National Forest, which 
     comprise approximately 3,226 acres, as generally depicted on 
     a map entitled `Lynn Camp Creek Wilderness Study Area' and 
     dated February 2007, and which shall be known as the Lynn 
     Camp Creek Wilderness Study Area.''.
       (c) Maps and Legal Descriptions.--
       (1) Filing.--As soon as practicable after the date of the 
     enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Agriculture shall 
     file with the Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and 
     Forestry of the Senate and the Committee on Natural Resources 
     and the Committee on Agriculture of the House of 
     Representatives a map and legal description of each 
     wilderness area designated or expanded by the amendments made 
     by subsection (a) and of the Lynn Camp Creek Wilderness Study 
     Area designated by the amendment made by subsection (b).
       (2) Force and effect.--The maps and legal descriptions 
     referred to in paragraph (1) shall have the same force and 
     effect as if included in this Act, except that the Secretary 
     of Agriculture may correct clerical and typographical errors 
     in the maps and descriptions. In the case of any discrepancy 
     between the acreage specified in the amendments made by 
     subsection (a) or (b) and the corresponding map filed under 
     paragraph (1), the map shall control.
       (3) Availability.--The maps and legal descriptions referred 
     to in paragraph (1) shall be on file and available for public 
     inspection in the Office of the Chief of the Forest Service.
       (d) Administration.--
       (1) New wilderness areas.--Subject to valid existing 
     rights, the Secretary of Agriculture shall administer the 
     lands in the Jefferson National Forest designated as a new 
     wilderness area by the amendments made by subsection (a) in 
     accordance with this section and the Wilderness Act (16 
     U.S.C. 1131 et seq.), except that, with respect to such 
     lands, any reference in the Wilderness Act to the effective 
     date of that Act shall be deemed to be a reference to the 
     date of the enactment of this Act.
       (2) Expanded wilderness areas.--Subject to valid existing 
     rights, the Secretary of Agriculture shall administer the 
     lands in the Jefferson National Forest designated as 
     wilderness and incorporated into an existing wilderness area 
     by the amendments made by subsection (a) in accordance with 
     this section, the Wilderness Act (16 U.S.C. 1131 et seq.), 
     and other laws applicable to that wilderness area, except 
     that, with respect to such lands, any reference in the 
     Wilderness Act to the effective date of that Act shall be 
     deemed to be a reference to the date of the enactment of this 
     Act.

     SEC. 3. DESIGNATION OF KIMBERLING CREEK POTENTIAL WILDERNESS 
                   AREA, JEFFERSON NATIONAL FOREST, VIRGINIA.

       (a) Designation.--In furtherance of the purposes of the 
     Wilderness Act (16 U.S.C. 1131 et seq.), certain lands in the 
     Jefferson National

[[Page H11903]]

     Forest, which comprise approximately 349 acres, as generally 
     depicted on the map entitled ``Kimberling Creek Additions and 
     Potential Wilderness Area'' and dated February 2007, are 
     designated as a potential wilderness area for eventual 
     incorporation in the Kimberling Creek Wilderness designated 
     by section 2(2) of the Virginia Wilderness Act of 1984 
     (Public Law 98-586; 98 Stat. 3105).
       (b) Map and Legal Descriptions.--
       (1) Filing.--As soon as practicable after the date of the 
     enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Agriculture shall 
     file with the Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and 
     Forestry of the Senate and the Committee on Natural Resources 
     and the Committee on Agriculture of the House of 
     Representatives a map and legal description of potential 
     wilderness area.
       (2) Force and effect.--The map and legal description 
     referred to in paragraph (1) shall have the same force and 
     effect as if included in this Act, except that the Secretary 
     of Agriculture may correct clerical and typographical errors 
     in the map and description. In the case of any discrepancy 
     between the acreage specified in subsection (a) and the map 
     filed under paragraph (1), the map shall control.
       (3) Availability.--The map and legal description referred 
     to in paragraph (1) shall be on file and available for public 
     inspection in the Office of the Chief of the Forest Service.
       (c) Management.--Except as provided in subsection (d) and 
     subject to valid existing rights, the Secretary of 
     Agriculture shall manage the potential wilderness area as 
     wilderness pending its incorporation in the Kimberling Creek 
     Wilderness.
       (d) Ecological Restoration.--
       (1) In general.--For purposes of ecological restoration 
     (including the elimination of non-native species, removal of 
     illegal, unused, or decommissioned roads, and any other 
     activities necessary to restore the natural ecosystems in the 
     potential wilderness area), the Secretary of Agriculture may 
     use motorized equipment and mechanized transport in the 
     potential wilderness area until its incorporation in the 
     Kimberling Creek Wilderness.
       (2) Limitation.--To the maximum extent practicable, the 
     Secretary shall use the minimum tool or administrative 
     practice necessary to accomplish ecological restoration with 
     the least amount of adverse impact on wilderness character 
     and resources.
       (e) Wilderness Designation.--The potential wilderness area 
     shall be designated as wilderness and incorporated in the 
     Kimberling Creek Wilderness on the earlier of--
       (1) the date on which the Secretary of Agriculture 
     publishes in the Federal Register notice that the conditions 
     in the potential wilderness area that are incompatible with 
     the Wilderness Act (16 U.S.C. 1131 et seq.) have been 
     removed; or
       (2) the date that is five years after the date of the 
     enactment of this Act.
       (f) Administration.--Subject to valid existing rights, upon 
     incorporation of the lands designated as wilderness under 
     subsection (e) in the Kimberling Creek Wilderness, the 
     Secretary of Agriculture shall administer the lands in 
     accordance with the Wilderness Act (16 U.S.C. 1131 et seq.) 
     and other laws applicable to that wilderness area, except 
     that, with respect to such lands, any reference in the 
     Wilderness Act to the effective date of that Act shall be 
     deemed to be a reference to the date on which the lands are 
     designated as wilderness under subsection (e).

     SEC. 4. DESIGNATION OF SENG MOUNTAIN AND BEAR CREEK SCENIC 
                   AREAS, JEFFERSON NATIONAL FOREST, VIRGINIA.

       (a) Establishment.--The following National Forest System 
     lands in the State of Virginia are hereby designated as 
     National Scenic Areas (in this section referred to as the 
     ``scenic areas''):
       (1) Certain lands in the Jefferson National Forest, which 
     comprise approximately 6,455 acres, as generally depicted on 
     the map entitled ``Seng Mountain and Raccoon Branch'' and 
     dated February 2007, and which shall be known as the Seng 
     Mountain National Scenic Area.
       (2) Certain lands in the Jefferson National Forest, which 
     comprise approximately 5,128 acres, as generally depicted on 
     the map entitled ``Bear Creek'' and dated February 2007, and 
     which shall be known as the Bear Creek National Scenic Area.
       (b) Maps and Legal Descriptions.--
       (1) Filing.--As soon as practicable after the date of the 
     enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Agriculture shall 
     file with the Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and 
     Forestry of the Senate and the Committee on Natural Resources 
     and the Committee on Agriculture of the House of 
     Representatives a map and legal description of each of the 
     scenic areas.
       (2) Force and effect.--The maps and legal descriptions 
     referred to in paragraph (1) shall have the same force and 
     effect as if included in this Act, except that the Secretary 
     of Agriculture may correct clerical and typographical errors 
     in the maps and descriptions. In the case of any discrepancy 
     between the acreage specified in subsection (a) and the 
     corresponding map filed under paragraph (1), the map shall 
     control.
       (3) Availability.--The maps and legal descriptions referred 
     to in paragraph (1) shall be on file and available for public 
     inspection in the Office of the Chief of the Forest Service.
       (c) Purposes of Scenic Areas.--The scenic areas are 
     established for the purposes of--
       (1) ensuring the protection and preservation of scenic 
     quality, water quality, natural characteristics, and water 
     resources;
       (2) protecting wildlife and fish habitat, consistent with 
     paragraph (1);
       (3) protecting areas that may develop characteristics of 
     old-growth forests; and
       (4) providing a variety of recreation opportunities, 
     consistent with the preceding paragraphs.
       (d) Administration.--
       (1) In general.--The Secretary of Agriculture shall 
     administer the scenic areas in accordance with this section 
     and the laws and regulations generally applicable to the 
     National Forest System. In the event of conflict between this 
     section and other laws and regulations, this section shall 
     take precedence.
       (2) Consistent use.--The Secretary shall only allow such 
     uses of the scenic areas as the Secretary finds will further 
     the purposes for which the scenic areas are established.
       (e) Management Plan.--Within two years after the date of 
     the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Agriculture shall 
     develop a management plan for the scenic areas consistent 
     with this section. The management plan shall be developed as 
     an amendment to the land and resource management plan for the 
     Jefferson National Forest, except that nothing in this 
     section requires the Secretary to revise the land and 
     resource management plan for the Jefferson National Forest 
     pursuant to section 6 of the Forest and Rangeland Renewable 
     Resources Planning Act of 1974 (16 U.S.C. 1604).
       (f) Roads.--After the date of the enactment of this Act, no 
     roads shall be established or constructed within the scenic 
     areas, except that this prohibition shall not be construed to 
     deny access to private lands or interests therein in the 
     scenic areas.
       (g) Vegetation Management.--No timber harvest shall be 
     allowed within the scenic areas, except as the Secretary of 
     Agriculture finds necessary in the control of fire, insects, 
     and diseases and to provide for public safety and trail 
     access. Notwithstanding the preceding sentence, the Secretary 
     may engage in vegetation manipulation practices for 
     maintenance of existing wildlife clearings and visual 
     quality. Firewood may be harvested for personal use along 
     perimeter roads under such conditions as the Secretary may 
     impose.
       (h) Motorized Travel.--Motorized travel shall not be 
     permitted within the scenic areas, except that the Secretary 
     of Agriculture may authorize motorized travel within the 
     scenic areas--
       (1) as necessary for administrative use in furtherance of 
     the purposes of this section;
       (2) in support of wildlife management projects in existence 
     as of the date of the enactment of this Act; and
       (3) on Forest Development Roads 9410 and 84b during deer 
     and bear hunting seasons and on that portion of Forest 
     Development Road 6261 designated on the map referred to in 
     subsection (a)(2) as ``open seasonally'' during deer and bear 
     hunting seasons.
       (i) Fire.--Wildfires in the scenic area shall be suppressed 
     in a manner consistent with the purposes of this section, 
     using such means as the Secretary of Agriculture considers 
     appropriate.
       (j) Insects and Disease.--Insect and disease outbreaks may 
     be controlled in the scenic areas to maintain scenic quality, 
     prevent tree mortality, reduce hazards to visitors, or 
     protect private lands.
       (k) Water.--The Secretary of Agriculture shall administer 
     the scenic areas so as to maintain and enhance water quality.
       (l) Mining Withdrawal.--Subject to valid existing rights, 
     all federally owned lands in the scenic areas are withdrawn 
     from location, entry, and patent under the mining laws of the 
     United States and from leasing claims under the mineral and 
     geothermal leasing laws of the United States, including 
     amendments to such laws.

     SEC. 5. TRAIL PLAN AND DEVELOPMENT.

       (a) Trail Plan.--The Secretary of Agriculture shall 
     establish a trail plan for National Forest System lands 
     described in this subsection in order to develop the 
     following:
       (1) Hiking and equestrian trails on the lands in the 
     Jefferson National Forest designated as wilderness by the 
     amendments made by section 2(a), in a manner consistent with 
     the Wilderness Act (16 U.S.C. 1131 et seq.).
       (2) Nonmotorized recreation trails within the Seng Mountain 
     and Bear Creek Scenic Areas designated by section 4.
       (b) Consultation.--The Secretary of Agriculture shall 
     establish the trail plan in consultation with interested 
     parties.
       (c) Implementation Report.--Not later than two years after 
     the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of 
     Agriculture shall submit to Congress a report on the 
     implementation of the trail plan, including the 
     identification of priority trails for development.
       (d) Trail Required.--The Secretary of Agriculture shall 
     develop a sustainable trail, using a contour curvilinear 
     alignment, to provide a continuous connection for non-
     motorized travel between County Route 650 and Forest 
     Development Road 4018 in Smyth County, Virginia.

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. After 1 hour of debate on the bill, as 
amended, it shall be in order to consider the amendment printed in 
House Report 110-403 if offered by the gentleman from Virginia (Mr. 
Goodlatte) or his designee, which shall be in order without 
intervention of any point of order or demand for division of the 
question, shall be considered read, and shall be debatable for 10 
minutes, equally divided and controlled by the proponent and an 
opponent.
  The gentleman from West Virginia (Mr. Rahall) and the gentleman from 
Alaska (Mr. Young) each will control 30 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from West Virginia.
  Mr. RAHALL. Mr. Speaker, I yield to the gentleman from Virginia (Mr.

[[Page H11904]]

Scott) for the purpose of a unanimous consent request.
  (Mr. SCOTT of Virginia asked and was given permission to revise and 
extend his remarks.)
  Mr. SCOTT of Virginia. I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  Mr. Speaker, I rise today in support of H.R. 1011, the Virginia Ridge 
and Valley Act of 2007, introduced by my colleague from Virginia's 
Ninth Congressional District, Congressman Rick Boucher. I am proud to 
have been an original cosponsor of this important conservation 
legislation in this Congress and in the last Congress and I commend 
Congressman Boucher for all his hard work on this bill over the years.
  This bipartisan bill will protect approximately 54,000 acres of the 
Jefferson National Forest in Virginia through the designation of 
additional wilderness areas and the creation of new National Scenic 
Areas. Although mechanized traffic and equipment would be prohibited in 
much of these areas, recreational activities would be permitted and 
encouraged throughout these new designations contributing to the local 
economy of Southwest Virginia. Protecting these additional acres of 
pristine forest will ensure that future generations will be able to 
enjoy the natural beauty of Southwest Virginia. We must also be 
vigilant in protecting environmentally sensitive areas by promoting 
responsible land use plans, which this bill does.
  The bill before us today was reported out of the Natural Resources 
Committee by voice vote, is endorsed by the U.S. Forest Service, and is 
supported by Virginia Governor Tim Kaine, members from both parties in 
the Virginia delegation, both of Virginia's Senators, John Warner and 
Jim Webb, the Board of Supervisors in Bland County, Craig County, 
Montgomery County, and Smyth County, and various environmental 
organizations, including the League of Conservation Voters, the Garden 
Club of Virginia, the Natural Resources Defense Council, the Sierra 
Club, the Wilderness Society, and the Virginia Wilderness Committee.
  Mr. Speaker, this bill is vitally important to conservation efforts 
in the Commonwealth of Virginia and to guaranteeing that future 
generations of Americans can experience the natural wonder and beauty 
of Southwest Virginia. I applaud Congressman Boucher and his staff for 
all of their hard work on this bill. I encourage my colleagues to 
support the legislation and I encourage each of them to experience 
firsthand the pristine natural beauty of Southwest Virginia.
  Mr. RAHALL. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  H.R. 1011, the Virginia Ridge and Valley Act, was introduced by my 
friend and neighboring colleague, Representative Rick Boucher.
  The bill designates nearly 40,000 acres in the Jefferson National 
Forest as wilderness and nearly 12,000 acres as National Scenic Areas. 
These natural spaces represent some of the true wild gems of the 
Commonwealth of Virginia and my State of West Virginia.
  H.R. 1011 is a strong bipartisan measure that is cosponsored by 
several other representatives from Virginia. H.R. 1011 also has broad 
support from Governor Tim Kaine, both Virginia Senators, four county 
boards of supervisors, local businesses, State organizations, hunters 
and faith groups.
  Each of the areas within H.R. 1011 were either recommended for 
wilderness designation in the 2004 Jefferson National Forest Plan or 
have been endorsed by the local board of supervisors of the relevant 
county. All the areas of H.R. 1011 are located within the district of 
Representative Boucher, who has been a true leader and fighter for this 
legislation and deserves the commendation of us all.
  All are located within his District, as I said, with the exception of 
a 555 wilderness-acre addition that I am proud to note is in my 
congressional district in Monroe County, West Virginia. Wilderness 
designation is not new to this portion of Virginia. In addition to 
designating six new wilderness areas, the legislation provides for 
additions to six existing wilderness areas.
  The people of this area are well acquainted with wilderness, and H.R. 
1011 reflects their desire to preserve these natural treasures. By 
designating wilderness, the Congress has long recognized that there are 
some places that should be left to the management of Mother Nature and 
that the all-knowing Creator's careful handiwork is something worth 
conserving and cherishing.
  H.R. 1011 is a well-crafted and meritorious measure that has broad 
support for those who live in the area and their elected officials.
  Mr. Speaker, I urge adoption of the bill in the House today.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. YOUNG of Alaska. Mr. Speaker, I come from a State which has more 
of its land locked up in wilderness than any other State, 58 million 
acres. This is larger than the entire State of New York and accounts 
for 56 percent of all the wilderness in the United States, so I think I 
know wilderness. I know that a lot of wilderness in Alaska is 
designated for reasons that have little to do with the stated goals of 
the Wilderness Act.
  The designations have blocked vital uses of these lands and blocked 
access to State and private resources that we Alaskans were promised 
when we entered statehood. There have been and still are major 
consequences for what Congress did in 1980. In the East, where most of 
you come from, that is not always the case.
  All I can say is that if this is what Mr. Boucher and his 
constituents want in Virginia, then good luck. I can guess that one 
day, I think that one day they will regret this action. Given 
Virginia's population growth, the severe risk of forest fires, such as 
they are in California today, caused by sustained drought, I believe 
all but two counties have been declared disaster areas by the Governor 
last week, problems with gypsy moths and other agricultural threats to 
this area and the dampening effect that wilderness restrictions can 
have on the development of adjacent areas, you may wonder why you have 
brought this upon yourself. We should be looking to give the Forest 
Service more tools to manage our lands, not taking them away, which is 
exactly what wilderness does.
  Once this bill becomes law, our constituents, your constituents, may 
find that they may not be able to burn wood in their fireplaces that 
keep them warm in the winter because their quality of wilderness must 
be protected, or that a new school or hospital can't be built because 
the view shed for the wilderness could be affected. People are even 
talking about ``smellscapes'' when it comes to wilderness areas, so 
enjoy your Weber grill right now while you can.
  The committee should also know that H.R. 1011 designates nearly 
27,000 acres of wilderness above what was recommended by the Forest 
Service. This is contrary to the recently revised Jefferson National 
Forest Plan, which took 11 years, millions of dollars, and extensive 
public involvement to create. We asked for this study. They followed 
the rules, but now we are ignoring the professional land managers.
  In addition, H.R. 1011 will endanger citizens living near this 
proposed wilderness area by tying the hands of the Forest Service, who 
need to perform proactive treatments that could reduce the risk of 
wildfires. Wildfires, I keep stressing that because we are seeing what 
is happening in California. If they cleared off those forests around 
those homes, they would not be burning today, but that was prohibited.
  Nonqualifying areas are now being actively managed for endangered 
threatened species protection, and this could come to an end.
  The amendment filed by Mr. Goodlatte helps mitigate some of these 
issues, and I will strongly support the amendment. Most notably, the 
amendment will remove 26 acres which contain a power line and remove 
1,263 acres from the proposed designation to allow continued use of the 
Barton Gap Motorized trail and Wildlife Habitat Management in key 
areas.
  I could go on and on about this. I just want to warn people, it is 
not the area we are talking about; it is the Wilderness Act itself, and 
it should be upgraded. I encourage my chairman to do so so that we can 
address those problems that can occur from the designation of 
wilderness, taking care of gypsy moths, taking care of the fires, 
taking care of the ability to access and to have the availability of 
the area for public use. If we do not do that, then I think we are 
doing ourselves a great mistake.
  I do not live in this area. I am not affected by it. That's why, very 
frankly, I am not raising some of the objections that I should have 
raised to it.
  I think you will learn, though, in the long run, you are not doing 
yourselves a favor. The Forest Service themselves can manage this land 
in a manner that will take and provide for the people. It

[[Page H11905]]

does not have to be designated as a wilderness area.
  Again, it has already been done. We have moved it out of committee, 
and I will say, again, may I not be on this floor when you come back to 
say we have to revise it.
  Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.

                              {time}  1715

  Mr. RAHALL. Mr. Speaker, I'm very proud to yield 5 minutes to my dear 
friend and the very powerful subcommittee Chair of Energy and Air 
Quality, Mr. Boucher.
  (Mr. BOUCHER asked and was given permission to revise and extend his 
remarks.)
  Mr. BOUCHER. Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the gentleman from West 
Virginia (Mr. Rahall) who, with such distinction, chairs the Committee 
on Natural Resources, for his leadership and his very able assistance 
in bringing this measure to the House floor today.
  Earlier this year, I introduced the legislation, along with other 
members of Virginia's House delegation. In fact, original cosponsors of 
this legislation comprise a majority of Virginia's House delegation, 
and it is a bipartisan majority of that delegation. And I want to 
express my appreciation to our colleagues from Virginia, 
Representatives Wolf, Davis, Scott and Moran for coauthoring the bill, 
along with me, and for their strong support of this effort. I would 
also note, Mr. Speaker, that the legislation was coauthored by our 
recently departed colleague, Mrs. Davis as well.
  Again, on a bipartisan basis, Virginia's United States Senators have 
introduced a measure identical to the bill that is under consideration 
today.
  The Virginia Ridge and Valley Act offers needed protection to 53,000 
acres of national forest land in the congressional district that I have 
the privilege of representing. It extends protection to approximately 
550 acres of the Jefferson National Forest situated in our neighboring 
State of West Virginia, in the congressional district represented by 
Chairman Rahall.
  Of the total acreage protected, 43,000 acres will receive the 
wilderness designation, and 10,000 acres will become new national 
scenic areas. These designations confer both economic and environmental 
benefits that are of great importance to our region.
  Virginia's national forest provides an excellent outdoor experience 
with our State's highest mountains, fast-flowing rivers and superb 
hunting, camping, fishing, backpacking, winter sports and other 
activities.
  Our existing wilderness areas are treasured by a growing number of 
travelers who collectively are boosting Virginia's tourism economy. In 
fact, tourism is among the fastest growing of all the industries in my 
congressional district; and our existing wilderness areas, which are a 
haven for outdoor activities and recreation of various kinds, are a 
significant contributor to that current growth in the economy within my 
region.
  The protections we're extending today for lands containing rare 
treasures of Virginia's natural heritage and the permanent protection 
that will then be afforded will further enhance our region's travel 
economy. These designations also protect old-growth timber, wildlife 
habitat, and our region's clean water resources.
  Virginia has a long and proud history of resource conservation and 
protection of our diverse ecosystems. We have continual awareness of 
the unique role that our natural landscape plays in our culture and in 
our State's history. That awareness is reflected in the bipartisan 
support for this measure in both our House and Senate delegations. It 
is reflected in the endorsement of this bill by local governments in my 
congressional district, and it is reflected in the endorsements for the 
bill of numerous civic organizations and literally of scores of local 
businesses.
  With thanks to the six Virginia cosponsors, and all who have assisted 
us, and particular thanks to Chairman Rahall of the Natural Resources 
Committee, and his outstanding staff, I urge passage of the Virginia 
Ridge and Valley Act.
  Over the last several weeks, I have been engaged in discussions with 
my friend and colleague, the gentleman from our neighboring Sixth 
Congressional district in Virginia (Mr. Goodlatte) regarding the 
possibility of adjusting the boundaries of some of the areas receiving 
protection in this legislation.
  Mr. Goodlatte will be offering an amendment shortly that reflects our 
conversations and our agreement to adjust some of those boundaries. 
I'll be urging the adoption of Mr. Goodlatte's amendment when that 
amendment is offered later this afternoon.
  I, again, thank the gentleman from West Virginia for yielding this 
time to me.
  Mr. YOUNG of Alaska. Mr. Speaker, I appreciate the gentleman that 
just spoke and his presentation. I just, again, wish that people would 
understand it's not the wilderness itself; it's how the act has been 
written. And if you think you're going to make a living off of coffee 
shops and tourism, these are low-grade paying jobs. I've seen it 
happen. I've seen my town of Ketchikan. We created a forest that we 
can't harvest and we took $80,000 jobs now down to the minimum wage. 
That will happen too. So I just, and it's too late, it's your district. 
You believe in what you say, and I commend you for it. But this is not 
the economy which I see, serving those that come from the larger urban 
areas, the elitists, as I call it.
  And this area, by the way, was farmed at one time, as you know, and 
timbered and mined. People had jobs that provided and produced. We are 
rapidly becoming a Nation of consumption and of no production, of 
pleasure and no sweat.
  Having said that, I have no other speakers, and yield back the 
balance of my time.
  Mr. DAVIS of Virginia. Mr. Speaker, in 1964 Congress created the 
Wilderness Preservation System to recognize and protect pure, 
untarnished areas of land. With a wilderness designation, the land is 
off-limits to development, natural resource extraction and most forms 
of mechanized activity. Congress created this system as they witnessed 
these natural splendors continuing to disappear. Forty years later, 
lands remain eligible for such a designation, but Congress has failed 
to provide them protection.
  These areas are rarer today than ever before. Failure to protect them 
now would leave them vulnerable to actions that could jeopardize the 
inherent qualities that make them eligible to be classified as 
wilderness.
  With passage, the House will designate 43,000 acres of the Jefferson 
National Forest as wilderness and add 12,000 acres to the National 
Scenic Areas inventory. With this action we will ensure our nation's 
children and grandchildren visiting our great Commonwealth in the years 
to come, will have the same access to pristine lands as was available 
to us and those who preceded us.
  The solitude that can be found in these areas is something every 
American should experience. It harkens back to the founding of this 
great nation and provides an insight into the minds of those gone by.
  As we continue to experience economic gains, we can also expect 
continued population growth, sprawl and strain on our environment. With 
these combined factors, our untarnished lands grow increasingly 
vulnerable, but they also grow increasingly valuable.
  Let us act to protect them now. Protect them for their beauty. 
Protect them for their purity. Protect them for our children.
  Mr. RAHALL. Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. All time for debate on the bill has expired.


                Amendment No. 1 Offered by Mr. Goodlatte

  Mr. GOODLATTE. Mr. Speaker, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Amendment No. 1 printed in House Report 110-403 offered by 
     Mr. Goodlatte:
       Page 3, line 20, strike ``3,769 acres'' and insert ``3,743 
     acres''.
       Page 3, line 22, strike ``February'' and insert 
     ``October''.
       Page 12, line 23, strike ``6,455 acres'' and insert ``5,192 
     acres''.
       Page 12, line 25, strike ``February'' and insert 
     ``October''.
       Page 18, beginning line 6, strike subsection (d) and insert 
     the following new subsection:
       (d) Trail Required.--The Secretary of Agriculture shall 
     develop a sustainable trail, using a contour curvilinear 
     alignment, to provide for non-motorized travel along the 
     southern boundary of the Raccoon Branch Wilderness 
     established by section 1(11) of Public Law 100-326, as added 
     by (2)(a) of this Act, connecting to Forest Development Road 
     49352 in Smyth County, Virginia.  

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to House Resolution 763, the 
gentleman from Virginia (Mr. Goodlatte)

[[Page H11906]]

and a Member opposed each will control 5 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Virginia.
  Mr. GOODLATTE. Mr. Speaker, I rise today to offer an amendment which 
represents an agreement just referenced by my friend and colleague, Mr. 
Boucher, and myself regarding some of the concerns with regard to H.R. 
1011, the Virginia Ridge and Valley Act. And I'd like to thank 
Congressman Boucher and congratulate him for his hard work on this 
legislation over a number of years, and thank him for working with me 
to address some of these important issues.
  H.R. 1011, the Virginia Ridge and Valley Act, creates over 40,000 
acres of wilderness, wilderness study, and potential wilderness and 
over 11,000 acres of national scenic areas in the Jefferson National 
Forest in southwest Virginia.
  Mr. Boucher and I share the Jefferson National Forest between our 
districts. Although this bill affects only national forest land within 
Mr. Boucher's district, any change in how the forest is managed will 
impact my district.
  My amendment addresses three areas. First, it modifies the boundary 
of the Brush Mountain East Wilderness Area, removing 26 acres 
containing a power line which is not consistent with wilderness 
qualities.
  Second, the amendment changes the boundaries of the Seng Mountain 
National Scenic Area, removing 1,263 acres from the area to allow 
continued use of the Barton Gap Motorized Trail and to allow for 
wildlife habitat management.
  Finally, the amendment changes the trail language for the Raccoon 
Branch Area, allowing the Forest Service more flexibility when building 
the trail.
  While I'm pleased to offer this amendment, it does not resolve all 
the concerns I have with the bill. The fact still remains that this 
bill ignores the recommendations of the professional land managers 
working in the Jefferson National Forest by designating 15,000 
additional wilderness acres not recommended in the forest plan.
  When the House Agriculture Committee held a hearing on H.R. 1011 
earlier this month, several witnesses highlighted serious concerns with 
these additional wilderness areas. These experts noted forest health 
and wildfire risks, increased recreation conflicts, lack of suitability 
as wilderness and wildlife management needs.
  Mr. Speaker, there is a reason why Congress mandated that each 
national forest create a forest plan. Forest plans help the land 
management agencies find a balance among all the conflicting interests 
in national forests and factor in the latest science and cite specific 
qualities unique to each forest. Professional land managers then use 
this information to chart a path for managing each forest for the 
coming years.
  The Jefferson Forest Plan, finalized in 2004, was developed over a 
12-year period and involved countless scientists, land managers, 
interest groups and interested citizens. Throughout the process, the 
Forest Service held over 100 technical meetings and received over 
15,000 public comments.
  This local approach is what Congress intended when it established the 
national forests. Instead of resisting this localized process, H.R. 
1011 tells the professional land managers and the public participants 
that the forest plan is not important. It says that no matter how much 
discussion and compromise goes on at the local level, or how good the 
science is, Congress knows best how to manage the national forest.
  Mr. Speaker, this is not the best way to manage the Nation's public 
forests. And that's why I have worked with my colleague, Mr. Boucher, 
to try to rectify these concerns. Until this bill is more reflective of 
the local perspectives and expert opinions in the forest plan, I will 
continue to have concerns with H.R. 1011.
  I urge my colleagues to vote ``yes'' on this amendment, however, 
because I do think that the gentleman has been very forthcoming in 
working with us and hearing our concerns. And I hope that that will 
continue as this process moves forward, and I would hope that the 
chairman of the Resources Committee would work with us as well to 
continue to address concerns that we have as the bill moves through the 
other body.
  Again, I thank the gentleman from Virginia for his hard work on this 
legislation, for his willingness to work with me in addressing these 
concerns. I wish more had been addressed, but I thank him for where he 
has come.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. BOUCHER. Mr. Speaker, I rise to claim the time in opposition to 
the amendment.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is the gentleman opposed to the amendment?
  Mr. BOUCHER. I would say to the Speaker that I rise for purposes of 
claiming the time in opposition, although I will not actually oppose 
the amendment.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Without objection, the gentleman from 
Virginia is recognized for 5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  (Mr. BOUCHER asked and was given permission to revise and extend his 
remarks.)
  Mr. BOUCHER. Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the gentleman from Virginia 
(Mr. Goodlatte) for the good work that we have been able to do together 
on the amendment that he offers this afternoon. I want to thank him for 
the time that he and I have expended in conversations about the subject 
matter the amendment addresses, and for the considerable amount of time 
that his very capable staff and mine have also expended on this matter. 
The staffs have focused on it a bit more than we have.
  Collectively, I think we've done a very good job in addressing a 
range of the concerns that the gentleman from Virginia last expressed. 
These adjustments are being made in a manner which I think improves the 
bill, and it is my intention to urge that the amendment be adopted.
  Under the amendment, 26 acres will be removed from the Brush Mountain 
East Wilderness Area in order to ensure that an existing power line is 
not within the wilderness boundary.
  Another adjustment is of 1,263 acres, and that is in the Seng 
Mountain Scenic Area, which will carve out a motorcycle trail and an 
area appropriate for bear habitat management.
  Another portion of the amendment provides greater flexibility for the 
Forest Service regarding trail construction adjacent to the Raccoon 
Branch designated area.
  And as I indicated, these changes improve the legislation, and I urge 
adoption of the amendment which makes them.
  As for the underlying bill, I would point out that this is truly a 
bipartisan measure. It is cosponsored in this body by a majority of 
Virginia's House delegation, including three original Republican 
sponsors, three original Democratic sponsors.
  In the other body, both of Virginia's United States Senators, on a 
bipartisan basis, have introduced the identical measure. And so the 
construction of this legislation arises from a deep bipartisan 
conversation that has proceeded over a number of years.
  It also strongly reflects the desires of the people in the district 
that I have the privilege of representing. It is true that some of the 
areas added for protection in this measure go beyond what the forest 
plan devised by the Jefferson National Forest management had 
recommended.

                              {time}  1730

  But nowhere is it written that Congress making ultimate public policy 
is in some way disabled from adding areas for protection that go beyond 
what the agency suggests it would like to see.
  We have incorporated the recommendations made in the forest plan, and 
we have added selected additional acreages that have been endorsed by 
the local governments, by the elected boards of supervisors that 
reflect the will of the people and the counties where these added areas 
are situated.
  I would also note that large numbers of civic organizations and 
scores of locally owned businesses have endorsed the passage of this 
measure. And it clearly, given that broad base of support, bipartisan 
here, and among elected representatives, local businesses, civic 
organizations, and others in the district that I represent, clearly 
represents the will of what the people in that part of Virginia would 
like to have.
  So, Mr. Speaker, I hope that our colleagues will join us in approving 
this legislation and in adopting the amendment offered by the gentleman 
from Virginia.

[[Page H11907]]

  Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. GOODLATTE. Mr. Speaker, I yield the balance of my time to the 
gentleman from Alaska (Mr. Young).
  The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. Doyle). The gentleman has 30 seconds.
  Mr. YOUNG of Alaska. I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  And I do thank both the gentlemen from Virginia. This is a good 
amendment. I urge the passage of this amendment. It does help the bill 
somewhat, and I think my colleagues would be wise to vote for it.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to House Resolution 763, the 
previous question is ordered on the bill, as amended, and on the 
further amendment by the gentleman from Virginia (Mr. Goodlatte).
  The question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman from 
Virginia (Mr. Goodlatte).
  The amendment was agreed to.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the engrossment and third 
reading of the bill.
  The bill was ordered to be engrossed and read a third time, and was 
read the third time.


               Motion to Recommit Offered by Mr. Lamborn

  Mr. LAMBORN. Mr. Speaker, I offer a motion to recommit.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is the gentleman opposed to the bill?
  Mr. LAMBORN. Yes, in its current form.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The Clerk will report the motion to 
recommit.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       Mr. Lamborn moves to recommit the bill H.R. 1011 to the 
     Committee on Natural Resources with instructions to report 
     the same back to the House forthwith with the following 
     amendment:
       At the end of section 2, add the following new subsection:
       (e) Motorized Access in Emergencies.--The designation of 
     lands as wilderness or a wilderness study area by an 
     amendment made by this section does not prohibit the use of 
     motor vehicles, motorized equipment, or motorboats or the 
     landing of aircraft or other forms of mechanical transport, 
     on the designated lands when required in connection with an 
     emergency involving the health and safety of persons, 
     including search and rescue efforts or the response to an 
     Amber Alert.

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from 
Colorado is recognized for 5 minutes in support of his motion.
  Mr. LAMBORN. Mr. Speaker, the Wilderness Act is currently unclear as 
to when motorized access may be used for health and safety reasons in a 
wilderness area or in a wilderness study area.
  This motion to recommit removes any ambiguity regarding the legality 
of responding to health and safety emergencies within the wilderness 
area designated by this bill.
  Current law does not specifically authorize the use of motorized or 
mechanical equipment within wilderness areas in response to health and 
safety emergencies. The provision in the Wilderness Act dealing with 
health and safety issues is in parentheses and does not clearly define 
what types of motorized vehicles may be allowed for emergencies.
  The fact is that health, safety, and fire concerns merit more than a 
single phrase in parentheses, as is the case in the Wilderness Act of 
1964. There are 3,600 words in the Wilderness Act. A mere 15 words are 
devoted to health and safety.
  The bill we are considering, H.R. 1011, designates 15,000 more 
wilderness acres than what the Forest Service recommended in the 
Jefferson National Forest. This is far more than what Forest Service 
professionals think is warranted. So the bigger the area, the bigger 
the potential fire, the harder it is to find a missing child, for 
instance, when an Amber Alert is issued.
  We cannot stand by and risk even a single human life, which is why we 
must begin to update the law to state clearly that a wilderness 
designation does not stop motorized access from being used for 
emergencies. The current ambiguity in the language, which this motion 
to recommit fixes, is just simply unacceptable, Mr. Speaker.
  This amendment does not threaten the wilderness designation. It just 
puts our priorities in the proper order. Human life must always be 
first.
  Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. RAHALL. Mr. Speaker, I rise in opposition to the motion to 
recommit.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman from West Virginia is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. RAHALL. Mr. Speaker, the gentleman from Colorado's amendment 
would appear to be a restatement of what current law already is. And 
reading from that current law, it says, ``Except as specifically 
provided for in this act, and subject to existing private rights, there 
shall be no commercial enterprise and no permanent road within any 
wilderness area designated by this act and, except as necessary to meet 
minimum requirements for the administration of the area for the purpose 
of this act (including measures required in emergencies involving the 
health and safety of persons within the area), there shall be no 
temporary road, no use of motor vehicles, motorized equipment,'' et 
cetera, et cetera.
  So there are exceptions in current law for health and safety of 
persons. So I would say to the gentleman that the gentleman's 
recommittal motion is redundant with current law.
  Mr. LAMBORN. Mr. Speaker, will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. RAHALL. I yield to the gentleman from Colorado.
  Mr. LAMBORN. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  Just briefly in response, I would like to say that the parenthetical 
phrase ``including measures required in emergencies'' is, I believe, 
unacceptably vague. It should not have to be the case where a Forest 
supervisor has to go get attorneys and call the lawyers to say, In this 
case, here's the situation: Is a boat okay or do we have to use 
horseback or can we go on foot? It's just simply not clear enough.
  Mr. RAHALL. Reclaiming my time, Mr. Speaker, I would respond to the 
gentleman that if such were necessary, I would think that the Forest 
Service would come to us making these recommendations. But we have not 
received such recommendations from the Forest Service, and, therefore, 
the language is not necessary.
  Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Without objection, the previous question is 
ordered on the motion to recommit.
  There was no objection.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the motion to recommit.
  The question was taken; and the Speaker pro tempore announced that 
the noes appeared to have it.
  Mr. LAMBORN. Mr. Speaker, on that I demand the yeas and nays.
  The yeas and nays were ordered.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to clause 9 of rule XX, the Chair 
will reduce to 5 minutes the minimum time for any electronic vote on 
the question of passage.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--yeas 236, 
nays 178, not voting 18, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 994]

                               YEAS--236

     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Bachmann
     Baker
     Barrett (SC)
     Barrow
     Bartlett (MD)
     Barton (TX)
     Biggert
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Blackburn
     Blunt
     Boehner
     Bonner
     Bono
     Boozman
     Boren
     Boustany
     Boyda (KS)
     Brady (TX)
     Brown (SC)
     Brown-Waite, Ginny
     Buchanan
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Buyer
     Calvert
     Camp (MI)
     Campbell (CA)
     Cannon
     Cantor
     Capito
     Cardoza
     Carney
     Carter
     Castle
     Chabot
     Chandler
     Coble
     Cole (OK)
     Conaway
     Costa
     Cramer
     Crenshaw
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Davis (KY)
     Davis, David
     Deal (GA)
     Dent
     Diaz-Balart, L.
     Diaz-Balart, M.
     Dicks
     Donnelly
     Doolittle
     Drake
     Dreier
     Duncan
     Edwards
     Ehlers
     Ellsworth
     Emerson
     English (PA)
     Eshoo
     Everett
     Fallin
     Ferguson
     Flake
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Fossella
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallegly
     Garrett (NJ)
     Gerlach
     Giffords
     Gilchrest
     Gillibrand
     Gingrey
     Gohmert
     Goode
     Goodlatte
     Granger
     Graves
     Hall (TX)
     Hastert
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayes
     Heller
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herseth Sandlin
     Hill
     Hobson
     Hodes
     Hoekstra
     Hulshof
     Inglis (SC)
     Jefferson
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones (NC)
     Jordan
     Kagen
     Kaptur
     Keller
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kirk
     Klein (FL)
     Kline (MN)
     Knollenberg
     Kuhl (NY)
     LaHood
     Lamborn
     Lampson
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Lewis (CA)
     Lewis (KY)
     Linder
     LoBiondo
     Lucas
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Mahoney (FL)
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marshall
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul (TX)
     McCotter

[[Page H11908]]


     McCrery
     McHenry
     McHugh
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Melancon
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mitchell
     Moore (KS)
     Moran (KS)
     Murphy (CT)
     Murphy, Tim
     Musgrave
     Myrick
     Neugebauer
     Nunes
     Pastor
     Pearce
     Pence
     Perlmutter
     Peterson (PA)
     Petri
     Pickering
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe
     Porter
     Price (GA)
     Pryce (OH)
     Putnam
     Radanovich
     Ramstad
     Regula
     Rehberg
     Renzi
     Reynolds
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Royce
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Salazar
     Sali
     Saxton
     Schmidt
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Sestak
     Shadegg
     Shays
     Shea-Porter
     Shimkus
     Shuler
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Skelton
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Souder
     Stearns
     Sullivan
     Tancredo
     Tanner
     Taylor
     Terry
     Thompson (CA)
     Thornberry
     Tiahrt
     Tiberi
     Turner
     Upton
     Walberg
     Walden (OR)
     Walsh (NY)
     Wamp
     Welch (VT)
     Weldon (FL)
     Weller
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wicker
     Wilson (NM)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wolf
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)

                               NAYS--178

     Abercrombie
     Ackerman
     Allen
     Andrews
     Arcuri
     Baca
     Baird
     Baldwin
     Bean
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berman
     Berry
     Blumenauer
     Boswell
     Boucher
     Boyd (FL)
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown, Corrine
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Carnahan
     Castor
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Conyers
     Costello
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Davis (AL)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     Davis, Lincoln
     Davis, Tom
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delahunt
     DeLauro
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Ellison
     Emanuel
     Engel
     Etheridge
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Frank (MA)
     Gonzalez
     Gordon
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hall (NY)
     Hare
     Harman
     Hastings (FL)
     Higgins
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Holden
     Holt
     Honda
     Hooley
     Hoyer
     Inslee
     Israel
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson-Lee (TX)
     Johnson (GA)
     Jones (OH)
     Kanjorski
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilpatrick
     Kind
     Kucinich
     Langevin
     Lantos
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lynch
     Maloney (NY)
     Markey
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum (MN)
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McNulty
     Meek (FL)
     Meeks (NY)
     Michaud
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Mollohan
     Moore (WI)
     Moran (VA)
     Murphy, Patrick
     Murtha
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal (MA)
     Oberstar
     Olver
     Ortiz
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Peterson (MN)
     Pomeroy
     Price (NC)
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reichert
     Richardson
     Rodriguez
     Rothman
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schwartz
     Scott (GA)
     Scott (VA)
     Serrano
     Sherman
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Snyder
     Solis
     Space
     Spratt
     Stark
     Stupak
     Sutton
     Tauscher
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Towns
     Tsongas
     Udall (CO)
     Udall (NM)
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watson
     Watt
     Waxman
     Weiner
     Wexler
     Wu
     Wynn
     Yarmuth

                             NOT VOTING--18

     Bachus
     Bilbray
     Bishop (NY)
     Bishop (UT)
     Broun (GA)
     Carson
     Cooper
     Cubin
     Feeney
     Hunter
     Issa
     Jindal
     Johnson, E. B.
     Obey
     Paul
     Reyes
     Wilson (OH)
     Woolsey


                Announcement by the Speaker Pro Tempore

  The SPEAKER pro tempore (during the vote). Members are advised 2 
minutes remain in this vote.

                              {time}  1807

  Messrs. JACKSON of Illinois, COHEN, HARE, ELLISON, SIRES, STUPAK, WU, 
HOYER, GORDON of Tennessee, COURTNEY, VAN HOLLEN, LINCOLN DAVIS of 
Tennessee, RUSH, HALL of New York, OLVER, PASCRELL, LEVIN, CONYERS, 
CARNAHAN, RANGEL, MILLER of North Carolina, and FARR, Mrs. MALONEY of 
New York, Ms. BERKLEY, Ms. CLARKE and Ms. CASTOR changed their vote 
from ``yea'' to ``nay.''
  Messrs. BROWN of South Carolina, KAGEN, CHANDLER, PETERSON of 
Pennsylvania, BOREN, KING of Iowa, KLEIN of Florida, EDWARDS, THOMPSON 
of California, LAMPSON, MURPHY of Connecticut, DICKS, RYAN of Ohio, 
SALAZAR, ROSS, WELCH of Vermont, CRAMER, BISHOP of Georgia, and Ms. 
ESHOO changed their vote from ``nay'' to ``yea.''
  So the motion to recommit was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                          Personal Explanation

  Mr. HALL of New York. Mr. Speaker, tonight, as part of consideration 
of the Virginia Ridge and Valley Act of 2007, the minority offered a 
motion to recommit forthwith with the proclaimed intent of clarifying 
the circumstances under which motorized vehicles can enter wilderness 
areas. However, I am concerned that the language of the motion may 
actually work at cross purposes with that goal.
  The MTR stated that: ``The designation of lands as wilderness or a 
wilderness study area by an amendment made by this section does not 
prohibit the use of motor vehicles, motorized equipment, or motorboats 
or the landing of aircraft or other forms of mechanical transport, on 
the designated lands when required in connection with an emergency 
involving the health and safety of persons, including search and rescue 
efforts or the response to an Amber Alert.''
  I don't know anyone who believes that we shouldn't be able to use 
motorized equipment in a wilderness to react to an emergency. It's 
common sense, and that's why it's already included in the underlying 
statute. In fact, the underlying law makes the allowance for motorized 
equipment in a health or safety emergency without enumerating specific 
types of equipment or circumstances, giving the widest possible scope 
of interpretation. I am concerned that by listing specific pieces of 
equipment and circumstances, the motion offered tonight could have 
caused more confusion and possibly limited the ability to respond to 
emergencies, despite any good intentions. For this reason, I voted 
against it.
  Mr. RAHALL. Mr. Speaker, pursuant to the instructions of the House in 
the motion to recommit, I report H.R. 1011 back to the House with an 
amendment.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       Amendment:
       At the end of section 2, add the following new subsection:
       (e) Motorized Access in Emergencies.--The designation of 
     lands as wilderness or a wilderness study area by an 
     amendment made by this section does not prohibit the use of 
     motor vehicles, motorized equipment, or motorboats or the 
     landing of aircraft or other forms of mechanical transport, 
     on the designated lands when required in connection with an 
     emergency involving the health and safety of persons, 
     including search and rescue efforts or the response to an 
     Amber Alert.

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the amendment.
  The amendment was agreed to.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the engrossment and third 
reading of the bill.
  The bill was ordered to be engrossed and read a third time, was read 
the third time, and passed, and a motion to reconsider was laid on the 
table.

                          ____________________