Amendment Text: H.Amdt.418 — 111th Congress (2009-2010)

There is one version of the amendment.

Shown Here:
Amendment as Offered (09/16/2009)

This Amendment appears on page H9582 in the following article from the Congressional Record.



[Pages H9570-H9588]
                ADVANCED VEHICLE TECHNOLOGY ACT OF 2009

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to House Resolution 745 and rule 
XVIII, the Chair declares the House in the Committee of the Whole House 
on the state of the Union for the consideration of the bill, H.R. 3246.

                              {time}  1245


                     In the Committee of the Whole

  Accordingly, the House resolved itself into the Committee of the 
Whole House on the State of the Union for the consideration of the bill 
(H.R. 3246) to provide for a program of research, development, 
demonstration and commercial application in vehicle technologies at the 
Department of Energy, with Mr. Pierluisi in the chair.
  The Clerk read the title of the bill.
  The CHAIR. Pursuant to the rule, the bill is considered read the 
first time.
  The gentleman from Tennessee (Mr. Gordon) and the gentleman from 
Texas (Mr. Hall) each will control 30 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Tennessee.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself such time as I 
may consume.
  H.R. 3246, the Advanced Vehicle Technology Act of 2009, is authored 
by the gentleman from Michigan (Mr. Peters) and co-sponsored by our 
colleague from Illinois (Mrs. Biggert). This legislation provides a 
comprehensive authorization for long-term, sustained funding of public-
private vehicle research, development, demonstration and commercial 
application activities in the Department of Energy Vehicle Technologies 
Program.
  From passenger cars to heavy duty long-haul trucks, we are all aware 
of the economic, environmental, and strategic importance of 
diversifying our Nation's vehicle sector through innovation in cleaner 
and more efficient technologies.
  However, the current economic situation has made it all the more 
difficult for companies to invest in the research and technology 
development to get us there. Department of Energy programs play an 
invaluable role in filling this critical gap.
  This bill provides a critical foundation of support to ensure U.S. 
leadership in developing and producing the next generation of advanced 
vehicle technologies. The bill instructs the Secretary to continue 
support for longer-term higher-risk technologies such as hydrogen, 
while recognizing the importance of research in areas that can deliver 
significant improvements in the near term, such as vehicle 
electrification.
  It also makes important investments in areas such as vehicle 
manufacturing and medium- to heavy-duty vehicles research. It 
accomplishes this goal through continued partnership with industry and 
strengthened DOE coordination with other Federal research agencies.
  This is a bipartisan bill reported from the Science and Technology 
Committee which incorporated a number of our Republican colleagues' 
suggestions. It follows on recommendations of the National Academies of 
Science and a diverse group of stakeholders and is endorsed by the 
likes of the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers, GM, Ford, Chrysler, 
the UAW, Motor and Equipment Manufacturers Association, the National 
Association of Manufacturers, and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, among 
many others.
  After a very productive and bipartisan process in the committee, I am 
looking forward to a constructive floor debate and passage of this very 
important bill.
  Mr. Chairman, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.
  I rise today in support of H.R. 3246, the Advanced Vehicle Technology 
Act of 2009. It has the stated objective to develop technologies that 
improve efficiency and emissions of vehicles, reduces reliance on 
petroleum, and supports vehicle manufacturing in the United States. 
Among other things, it develops cost-effective vehicle technologies for 
wide-scale utilization, enhanced commercial and passenger vehicle 
performance, allows for greater consumer choice, shortens technology 
penetration times, ensures balance and diversity in Federal R 
investment, strengthens public-private R partnerships, and probably 
many other things.
  I would like to thank Congressman Peters for the good job he did 
working with us and working with the Science

[[Page H9571]]

Committee on this bill, and for incorporating our suggestions and the 
suggestions of our chairman into his manager's amendment for ways to 
improve the bill during the full committee markup, including a 
provision in Title I that requires the Secretary to ensure that 
activities do not duplicate those of other programs within the 
Department of Energy or other relevant research agencies. In our 
country's tough financial situation, we want to ensure that taxpayer 
dollars are being used efficiently and responsibly and not being wasted 
or mismanaged as well.
  The manager's amendment, agreed to in the full committee, included 
bipartisan language supportive of applied and basic research and 
development of hydrogen and natural gas vehicle technologies.
  Congressman Teague offered an amendment that seemed to reiterate the 
spirit of comity, but it was unfortunately not made in order by a 
party-line vote at the Rules Committee hearing yesterday.
  As I said during the full committee markup, the cost of the bill 
gives me some pause; but I understand the costs associated with the 
level, degree, and scope of the bill that deals with research, 
development, and commercial application activities on materials, 
technologies, and processes of not only passenger vehicles, but also 
medium- to heavy-duty commercial and transit vehicles, including long-
haul class 8 truck and trailer platforms.
  With that said, I plan to vote for an amendment that will be offered 
by Representative Broun of Georgia to reduce the authorization amount 
in the bill by $650 million.
  The transportation sector uses 67.9 percent of the petroleum that is 
used in our country. If we want to reduce or wean our dependence on 
foreign sources of oil, we are going to need technological advances in 
the vehicles that Americans drive to help us reach that goal. The bill 
before us today will certainly help to achieve these advances.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. Mr. Chairman, I yield 3 minutes to the 
author of this excellent piece of legislation, Mr. Gary Peters from 
Michigan, and concur with Mr. Hall in saying that he did a terrific job 
in reaching out to all parties to make this a bipartisan bill that has 
great support both here in Congress, as well as throughout industry.
  Mr. PETERS. Mr. Chairman, I thank Chairman Gordon for those kind 
words.
  It is no secret that the global economic crisis has had an absolutely 
devastating impact on the automobile industry. Automobile and truck 
manufacturers and parts suppliers around the globe are struggling to 
deal with substantially decreased demand in vehicle sales.
  At the same time, we are in the midst of a transformation to a more 
energy-independent economy which will require the production of new 
vehicle technologies that will increase fuel efficiency and reduce 
harmful emissions. Development of advanced technologies for both heavy 
duty trucks and passenger vehicles is of vital national interest and 
requires a coordinated effort at the Federal level.
  That is why I am proud to have worked with Chairman Gordon to 
introduce the Advanced Vehicle Technology Act of 2009. This legislation 
will build upon the current research efforts of the Department of 
Energy and the private sector by providing an increased Federal 
investment in passenger and heavy duty vehicle research and 
development.
  By directing the Department of Energy to partner with industry 
stakeholders and agencies across the Federal Government, the bill will 
ensure that our investment leverages the maximum amount of talent and 
innovation and leads to faster development of new technologies that 
will help us meet our energy challenges and promote American innovation 
in the advanced vehicle technologies field.
  There is intense global competition right now to determine which 
countries will produce the cars and trucks of the future. There is no 
doubt that in the years ahead more Americans will be driving hybrids, 
plug-in hybrids, battery electric vehicles, and cars and trucks powered 
by hydrogen fuel cells. The only question is whether these new 
technologies will be researched, developed, and manufactured here in 
United States, creating American jobs, or whether this technology will 
be built overseas. The Advanced Vehicle Technology Act will help ensure 
that the American automobile industry will continue to be globally 
competitive and that we as a Nation will not trade our dependence on 
foreign oil for a dependence on foreign batteries and other emerging 
technology.
  This legislation has strong support from industry. It has been 
endorsed by the United States Chamber of Commerce and by the National 
Association of Manufacturers, who understand how important it is for 
our Nation to maintain its competitiveness in research and development 
and emerging technology in order to preserve our manufacturing base.
  H.R. 3246 has been endorsed by the Alliance of Automobile 
Manufacturers and by individual automakers like Chrysler, General 
Motors, Ford, and Daimler. It is strongly supported by the Motor and 
Equipment Manufacturers Association, which is the industry trade group 
representing auto parts suppliers, as well as key suppliers based in my 
congressional district like ArvinMeritor, Magna International, Delphi 
and Bosch.
  I am also proud to report that this bill has the support of organized 
labor, including my good friends at the United Auto Workers, and from 
the environmental community as well, including such organizations as 
the League of Conservation Voters, the Natural Resources Defense 
Council, and the Sierra Club.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman's time has expired.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. I yield the gentleman an additional 30 
seconds.
  Mr. PETERS. This bill's broad support includes the steel industry, 
which is excited by the opportunities this legislation will create for 
them to partner with the Federal Government on research projects that 
will continue to make steel lighter and stronger. High-mileage cars 
will need to reduce weight while keeping passengers safe, and the steel 
industry can and must play an important role in helping us achieve that 
goal.
  I thank Chairman Gordon and his staff for leadership on this 
legislation and for their helpfulness to both me and to my staff. And I 
would also like to thank my Republican colleagues on the Science 
Committee, especially Mrs. Biggert, for working with me to improve this 
important bill. And I would also like to thank the Democratic 
leadership, and in particular Majority Leader Hoyer, for working on 
this bill.
  The Advanced Vehicle Technology Act will help reduce our Nation's 
dependence on foreign oil and preserve and create manufacturing jobs in 
Michigan and across the country. I encourage my colleagues to support 
H.R. 3246.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Chairman, I yield 5 minutes to the gentleman 
from Indiana (Mr. Souder).
  (Mr. SOUDER asked and was given permission to revise and extend his 
remarks.)
  Mr. SOUDER. Mr. Chairman, I want to thank my friend from Texas.
  I strongly support this bill, but I do so with some reservations. I 
would like to discuss some of the pressures that the government has put 
on a region like mine. My district is number one in manufacturing jobs 
and number one in percent in manufacturing, and actually gained 
slightly over number two last year because we lost fewer jobs than 
other areas of the country in manufacturing.
  Without core value-added industries, our country is in deep trouble. 
I grew up in retailing. Retailing and service industry and so on 
circulate the money among themselves. To add value to our country, it 
can be in software, it can be in manufacturing or agriculture, but it 
has to be something that has a value-added addition to the economy.
  Now, the challenge we have in our country, for a variety of reasons, 
to improve our environment, to improve the safety of our workers, to 
make sure we have pensions and health care, our costs have soared 
compared to our international competition because government has put 
additional pressures because we as a society felt they should be there.
  But that means as the companies in my district go to make a product, 
they

[[Page H9572]]

start with costs that are higher than other countries start in their 
costs. We then watch China cheat on the currency, anywhere from 20 to 
80 percent, and we expect our manufacturers who are already 
disadvantaged in price competition to compete with countries that don't 
even play fair in international currency that further artificially 
lower their prices.

                              {time}  1300

  Now the challenge we have is that when we make a car or a pickup, we 
start with a huge disadvantage in price, and then compound that with 
currency changes, and then we wind up trying to sell more value-added 
units. In other words, just like a house gets most of the profits from 
adding a bigger kitchen, a bigger bedroom, we get value from making 
bigger cars, making bigger trucks, making SUVs and vans, in order to 
pay pensions and health care.
  Then, all of a sudden, the world shifts. We start to mandate that 
you're going to have to get higher mileage. And where are we to get R 
dollars to do that? How are we to reduce the cost to be able to 
compete; that as we look at the cap-and-tax bill in my area, the number 
one manufacturing area, we're 85 percent coal and 15 percent nuclear. 
We don't have a lot of wind and solar that's going to be able to employ 
many of these people who had a middle class lifestyle, the American 
Dream, because they worked at these different factories, they worked to 
upgrade them. They're doing every lean management technique they can 
possibly do in these companies. How are they supposed to keep their 
jobs if we raise the energy costs in the manufacturing area of the 
United States?
  It's not an accident that the four districts hardest hit are my 
district, Congressman Donnelly's in the South Bend area, Congressman 
Latta, just over to the other side of Ohio, and Congressman Jordan's, 
because of the energy use we have, combined with the heavy 
manufacturing.
  Then we look at additional health care costs on these companies. The 
question becomes how to survive. They have no dollars for the R to 
meet these new demands. A bill like this, then, becomes essential. We 
don't really have money right now to spend. In case anybody hasn't 
figured out, we have incredible deficits.
  I don't believe that this is really the role predominantly for the 
Federal Government to do. But I'm now left representing a district 
that, unless the Federal Government does this, and having piled on the 
mandates and having allowed China to cheat in international trade, 
unless we do this, I don't know how we survive. I don't know how the 
people in my district survive.
  This program authorizes $2.85 billion to conduct vehicle research and 
development. It has $1.75 billion to create a new demonstration program 
to find commercial applications to reduce or eliminate petroleum use 
and emissions in passenger and commercial vehicles. There's $1.1 
billion to implement a similar program that applies to medium- and 
heavy-duty commercial vehicles.
  I first want to thank my neighbor, friend, and colleague--it shows 
that you can do things in a bipartisan way--Congressman Joe Donnelly, 
along with Congressman DeFazio, for making sure that RVs were included 
in this. Between us, we have 58 percent--between Joe and I, and then 
Congressman DeFazio has another chunk--of the RV industry in America.
  This is a huge challenge. Guess what? Not only do you have these 
motor homes, of which 12 percent, I believe, of American people own 
either a towable or a mobile home, but you have to have a big vehicle 
to tow them. You can't tow them with a little, tiny car. We've got to 
figure out how we're going to deal with the mileage in that.
  I also have the largest pickup plant in the United States, a 
Silverado and Sierra pickup plant that's actually getting a plus-up 
that is heavily robotics. But they need the technology, even though 
they're some of the most efficient pickups sold by any company. If 
they're going to compete with the mileage standards and GM is going to 
survive, they need to find new breakthroughs.
  Navistar has just contracted to build electric delivery trucks in an 
abandoned RV plant in Elkhart County in Wakarusa, in my district. 
Alcoa, in Auburn, in my district, is working with aluminum to try to 
reduce the weight of the vehicles.
  The CHAIR. The time of the gentleman has expired.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Chairman, I'm glad to yield 3 more minutes to 
the gentleman, knowing of his interest in the RV industry, and his 
support.
  Mr. SOUDER. As we heard in steel, in my area I have two massive SDI, 
Steel Dynamics plants, as well as a whole bunch of supplementary 
facilities from OmniSource and others who provide recycled steel to 
them.
  I have five Nucor facilities in my district, that if our steel is 
going to compete and get the weight down and get different methods, 
we're going to have to have more innovation and research.
  Navistar also at this point has around 1,350 to 1,500 jobs in my area 
doing engineering and designing big trucks, military vehicles. We have 
a challenge in this in the military area, too, because the Humvee is 
done in Congressman Donnelly's district, but the engine blocks and the 
hood and a lot of those parts that we're constantly struggling with on 
weight, are in my district as well.
  I rise in support of this bill, even though I'm reluctant to have the 
government take over big parts of the R industry. We're in fact 
seeing other countries do this around the world. I don't know how we're 
going to achieve our goals to become greener, to get more efficient 
vehicles to help save our industrial base in the United States, if we 
don't do this.
  So I rise in support of this. It's why the manufacturing groups 
support it, why the Chamber supports it, it's why the unions support 
it, because without some assistance it is not clear how in the world 
we're going to save the manufacturing jobs in America that are so 
critical to the industrial base.
  And one last point. The industrial base that does the trucks, that 
does the RVs, that does the pickups, also does our military. And if we 
don't have the basic core manufacturing, it is not clear how we stay an 
independent Nation.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. Mr. Chairman, I yield such time as he may 
consume to the dean of the United States House of Representatives, and 
my mentor, the gentleman from Michigan (Mr. Dingell).
  (Mr. DINGELL asked and was given permission to revise and extend his 
remarks.)
  Mr. DINGELL. I rise to thank my dear friend, the gentleman from 
Tennessee, for his courtesy to me and for the expeditious way in which 
he has handled this bill. The Nation owes him a debt for this and for 
many other things. And I thank him.
  I also rise in strong support of H.R. 3246, the Advanced Vehicle 
Technology Act of 2009. I want to commend my colleague from Michigan, 
Mr. Peters, for the superb work that he and his staff have done on this 
important piece of legislation. And I want to also thank my colleagues 
on the Republican side, including the Republican coauthors and my good 
friend, the ranking minority member of the committee, the gentleman 
from Texas (Mr. Hall).
  The bill that we consider today is going to help America to grasp the 
new technology in automobile manufacturing and save jobs and 
opportunities for our people in the future.
  It will augment the Department of Energy's ability to research and to 
develop advanced technologies, which are necessary for the fuel-
efficient vehicles of tomorrow. I take no small degree of personal 
interest in this subject, as several of the companies, such as A123 
Systems, are located in my district, and they will produce new types of 
technologies under H.R. 3246 which will help them to foster these 
efforts, which are so much in our national interest.
  Not only do these technologies have the potential to reduce vehicle 
fleet emissions and national fuel consumption, freeing us from 
dependence on foreign oil, but also their production represents a 
growth industry, something of which my home State, Michigan, and which 
the entire country is in great need. H.R. 3246 is therefore both an 
environmental and an economic blessing.
  I urge my colleagues to vote in support of H.R. 3246, and I commend, 
again, my dear friend from Tennessee

[[Page H9573]]

and my friend from Michigan for their authorship and for their 
leadership of this important matter.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Chairman, I continue to reserve the balance of 
my time.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to my 
friend, the gentleman from Connecticut (Mr. Larson).
  Mr. LARSON of Connecticut. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I rise in strong 
support of H.R. 3246, the Advanced Vehicle Technology Act, and I want 
to especially applaud Congressman Peters and Chairman Gordon, who I 
have had the honor to serve with on the Science Committee, and the 
distinguished ranking member, Mr. Hall, for his continued and 
outstanding commitment to science and technology and innovation. That's 
what moves the Nation forward. It's where his political career has been 
invested, in making sure that we continue to see America be the 
preeminent military, social, cultural, and economic leader in the 
world, and largely because of the embrace of technology and innovation 
like fuel cell technology.
  We know, for example, that every time we replace a gasoline-powered 
bus with a fuel cell bus, it's equal to removing 77 cars from our 
roadways.
  Hydrogen and fuel cell industries support in Connecticut some 2,100 
jobs. With the vision that the chairman has laid out, that will only 
increase and expand across this country.
  We had a young visionary President in the sixties who said that we 
could put a man on the moon within 10 years. We actually did it in 
nine. With this technology embracing the most abundant element in the 
universe, you can't tell me that we can't heat and cool our buildings 
and get people back and forth to their jobs if we make the appropriate 
investment.
  When you look at the certification from NASA of our ability to 
utilize fuel cell technology in flight and also in our space station, 
you understand the great potential that it has. But unless you have the 
backing of a visionary leader like Bart Gordon, it will not come to 
fruition.
  The CHAIR. The time of the gentleman has expired.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. I yield the gentleman an additional 30 
seconds.
  Mr. LARSON of Connecticut. So, again, Mr. Chairman, I would like to 
thank you and the committee for your commitment to this very important 
technology that seeks to advance our country and wean ourselves from 
dependency on foreign nations and help bring our troops home.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. May I ask how much time I have? I continue to 
reserve, and I want to see if I might let the chairman have some of my 
time, if he needs it. He apparently has half a dozen or so other 
speakers over there.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Texas has 21\1/2\ minutes.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. I reserve the balance of my time
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. Thank you, Mr. Hall. Mr. Chairman, I yield 2 
minutes to a member of our committee, the gentleman from New York (Mr. 
Tonko).
  Mr. TONKO. I rise today in support of H.R. 3246, the Advanced Vehicle 
Technology Act. H.R. 3246 supports the key public policy goals of 
improving our Nation's energy security and our environment. 
Specifically, this legislation encourages research and development for 
a diverse range of near-term and long-term vehicle electrification 
technologies that will improve vehicle fuel efficiency, reduce 
emissions, and support the United States manufacturing and American 
workers.
  We must address our energy problems as we continue to address our 
economic problems. By doing so, I believe we can ensure that while our 
economy recovers, we will be competitive and secure in the energy 
sector as well. The passage of H.R. 3246 is indeed vital to addressing 
both of these concerns.
  As Congress moves through this session, we must continue to pass 
policies that will promote energy efficiency--policies which drill and 
mine efficiencies as we previously drilled for oil and mined for coal.
  Finally, we must continue to invest in research and development to 
ensure that our United States are at the forefront of the energy 
revolution: Creating jobs, embracing intellectual capacity, and 
promoting clean domestic energy.
  I urge my colleagues to join me today and vote in favor of H.R. 3246. 
I commend the sponsor for his vision.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Chairman, I yield 3 minutes to the gentlewoman 
from Illinois (Mrs. Biggert).
  Mrs. BIGGERT. I thank the gentleman for yielding, Mr. Chairman. I 
rise in support of H.R. 3246, the Advanced Vehicle Technology Act, and 
I'd like to thank the chairman of the committee, Mr. Gordon, and the 
ranking member, Mr. Hall, and my colleague particularly, Mr. Peters, 
for bringing to the floor such a good bill.
  H.R. 3246 will advance technologies of the future by reauthorizing 
the Department of Energy's vehicle technology program and build on an 
existing energy infrastructure to demonstrate and deploy more fuel-
efficient automobiles and heavy equipment.
  Over the years, the Department of Energy has worked with the industry 
to develop, demonstrate, and deploy vehicle technologies for 
automobiles and heavy-duty vehicles. Some of those research needs have 
been addressed through public-private research programs like the 21st 
Century Truck Partnership, the FreedomCAR, and Hydrogen Fuel 
Initiatives.
  Unfortunately, in the past, our research priorities have shifted 
inconsistently between passenger and heavy-duty vehicles. As a result, 
many long-term goals remain unfulfilled.

                              {time}  1315

  H.R. 3246 offers the research parity and focus to advance 
technologies all across transportation sectors by including medium- to 
heavy-duty trucks and nonroad equipment. While the total number of 
heavy trucks is small compared to passenger vehicles, their fuel 
consumption and emissions justify a consistent investment in basic 
research and development of hybrid models and other advanced truck 
technologies. There is no one-size-fits-all approach that will address 
the unique needs and demands on construction, industrial and 
agricultural equipment. Therefore, we must examine the full range of 
components within nonroad equipment systems to produce the greatest 
overall efficiency benefits at the least cost.
  I know everyone here recognizes the essential role nonroad equipment 
plays in improving our infrastructure. Fuel remains a primary driver in 
the cost of major construction and infrastructure projects. With 
advances in nonroad equipment technologies, we will further our drive 
for efficiency and fuel savings beyond the engine alone so that we can 
see tremendous benefits in project productivity and energy efficiency.
  For these reasons, Mr. Chair, I support H.R. 3246 and urge my 
colleagues to do the same.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. Mr. Chairman, I yield 3 minutes to the 
champion for Cash for Clunkers, the gentlelady from Ohio (Ms. Sutton).
  Ms. SUTTON. I thank the chairman for yielding the time, and I thank 
him for his strong leadership on this issue and on so many initiatives 
that are leading our country forward. I would like to commend my friend 
Congressman Gary Peters for his great work on this bill, which I am 
delighted to rise in support of.
  The Advanced Vehicle Technology Act provides this Congress with a 
great opportunity to help create green automotive jobs for American 
workers. Currently, almost all of the major components for advanced 
technology vehicles sold in the United States are imported. That needs 
to change. We must ensure that our workers are assembling the vehicles 
of tomorrow and producing the components and next-generation 
technologies right here at home.
  The Advanced Vehicle Technology Act invests in a diverse and 
comprehensive range of technologies and programs that will improve fuel 
efficiency and reduce harmful emissions. In my district, a startup 
company has been working on a process to recover engine waste heat to 
convert into electricity to power the very same vehicle. Under this 
bill, they could partner with the Department of Energy and other 
industry partners to further develop and commercialize this energy-
producing and saving technology.
  I'm also pleased that this bill has a provision for the research, 
development, demonstration and commercialization of lightweight 
materials.

[[Page H9574]]

Mr. Chair, Akron, Ohio, is the polymer capital of the world. There is a 
strong interest for research and commercialization of polymers and 
plastics by companies across the country. In addition, our steelworkers 
in the domestic steel industry can produce advanced high-strength steel 
which makes vehicles considerably stronger while requiring less mass 
and increasing fuel economy.
  Recently, with the overwhelming success of the CARS program, 
Americans demonstrated their desire to trade in their less efficient 
clunker for a more fuel-efficient vehicle. Thanks to the CARS program, 
nearly 700,000 clunkers were taken off the road and replaced with 
vehicles that had on average 58 percent increased fuel economy. The 
CARS program brought thousands of workers back to work, making autos 
and parts for more fuel-efficient vehicles. With this bill before us, 
we will take another step to help our environment and grow jobs. That's 
why this bill has earned the support of the UAW as well as Ford, GM, 
Chrysler and other industry and business groups.
  Mr. Chair, I'm also proud that we worked on an amendment that was 
added to this bill, working with Representative Chellie Pingree and 
Chairman Gordon, which is also supported by the UAW, requiring an 
annual report on the technologies developed from the Advanced Vehicle 
Technology Program. The report must disclose whether these technologies 
were successfully adopted for commercial applications; and if they 
were, whether these technologies are manufactured in the United States. 
With taxpayer dollars invested, we want them to be manufactured right 
here in the United States. I commend the gentlemen for their great 
work.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Chair, I continue to reserve the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. Mr. Chairman, I yield 2 minutes to the 
gentleman from New York (Mr. Maffei).
  Mr. MAFFEI. Thank you very much, to the distinguished chairman of the 
Science and Technology Committee, Bart Gordon. I also want to thank my 
colleague on the Financial Services Committee, a very distinguished new 
Member of the House, Gary Peters, the sponsor of this bill.
  By increasing the power of alternative and renewable energy, we have 
the opportunity to break our addiction to foreign oil, reduce global 
warming and create millions of new jobs in the process, ones that 
cannot be shipped overseas. In my own region, we are doing research in 
alternative fuels such as butanol at the School of Environmental 
Science and Forestry in Syracuse, and we have hydrogen fuel cell 
technology in Rochester institutions of higher education, as well as at 
a Delphi plant there. We're already using these new fuel vehicles, the 
ones that have already come out.
  On Monday I stood at an old train station in downtown Syracuse which 
had been abandoned for years, creating an eyesore. But using stimulus 
money, the Clean Communities Group will turn this building into a 
charging station for electric cars as well as an alternative fueling 
hub for CuseCar, an alternative fuel car sharing company in Syracuse. 
Under this bill, it can become a center for research on the practical 
use of these advanced technology vehicles.
  Our energy policy, Mr. Chairman, is heading in the right direction, 
and the Advanced Vehicle Technology Act ensures that we are charting 
the right course for our new energy future.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Chair, I continue to reserve the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. Mr. Chairman, I yield 2 minutes to the 
gentleman from Kentucky (Mr. Yarmuth).
  Mr. YARMUTH. I thank the chairman for his work and his committee's 
great work on this bill.
  Mr. Chair, I rise today in support of H.R. 3246. This bill is another 
example of Congress' commitment to reducing our dependence on foreign 
oil, creating green jobs to revitalize our economy, and reestablishing 
America as a global innovation leader.
  I have seen firsthand how our investments are paying off for my 
hometown of Louisville, Kentucky. There, 400 new jobs are being created 
thanks to Recovery Act funding that incentivized General Electric to 
move the production of an energy-efficient water heater from China back 
to the United States in Louisville.
  H.R. 3246 represents another step forward--this time, by ensuring our 
Nation's auto industry will drive innovation by developing clean and 
efficient technologies for every type of vehicle. This important 
legislation establishes research and development programs that will 
lower petroleum usage and emissions in heavy-duty vehicles that are key 
to commerce but are often recognized as some of the least efficient in 
operation.
  At the Kentucky truck plant, also in my hometown, hardworking 
employees produce the F-Series heavy-duty truck. By developing new 
technologies to make heavy-duty trucks more energy efficient, more fuel 
efficient and, therefore, more in demand, Ford will be able to expand 
operations and create new jobs.
  That's what this legislation is all about, investing in green 
technology to create good-paying U.S. jobs and to stimulate economic 
growth while continuing our efforts to ensure that America leads the 
world in the industry that will dominate the global economy for decades 
to come. We cannot afford to pass up this opportunity.
  I, therefore, urge all my colleagues to join me in supporting the 
Advanced Vehicle Technology Act.
  Mr. LEVIN. Mr. Chairman, I rise in strong support of the Advanced 
Vehicle Technology Act. I am proud to be an original co-sponsor of this 
important bill introduced by my colleague from Michigan, Mr. Peters.
  This legislation builds on the success of the Department of Energy's 
vehicle technology programs in collaborating with industry to develop 
the cars and trucks of the future. Hybrids, plug-in hybrids, pure 
electric cars, fuel cell vehicles, alternative fuel vehicles: these 
technologies all require enormous and sustained investments in R 
Through vehicle technology programs like FutureCar and the 21st Century 
Truck Partnership, DOE is partnering with industry to make this R 
more feasible and more fruitful.
  The bill before us would rationalize the authorization for DOE's 
varied vehicle technology programs and substantially increase the 
authorized funding levels. In total this bill authorizes $2.9 billion 
over the next 5 years to invest in vehicle technology. It will be 
essential for Congress to follow through and fully fund this 
authorization in the annual appropriations process.
  I am particularly pleased that this bill recognizes the enormous fuel 
savings potential in the medium and heavy duty market and specifies 
that up to $200 million per year be devoted to developing advanced 
technology medium and heavy duty trucks. This complements legislation 
I've introduced to extend the tax credits for the purchase of medium 
and heavy duty trucks for 5 years and double the amount of the credits.
  These vehicles move 80 percent of the goods transported in the U.S., 
serve as utility maintenance vehicles, and perform refuse collection 
services in our communities. It is estimated that the fuel consumption 
of the 90,000 refuse collection trucks in the U.S. is equivalent to 2.5 
million passenger vehicles. Putting as few as 10,000 hybrid electric 
trucks on the road would reduce diesel fuel use by 7.2 million gallons 
per year and reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 83,000 tons.
  In a word Mr. Chair, this bill is vital. It is a vital step toward a 
full partnership between the Federal Government and the domestic auto 
industry in developing the cars and trucks of the future and building 
them here in the United States. I urge all my colleagues to support it.
  Mr. AL GREEN of Texas. Mr. Chair, I wish to express my strong support 
for H.R. 3246, the Advanced Vehicle Technology Act of 2009.
  The global competition for producing the cars and trucks of the 
future is happening now. There is no question that in the years ahead, 
people will be driving hybrids, plug-in hybrids, battery electric 
vehicles, and cars and trucks powered by hydrogen fuel cells. The 
question is whether these technologies will be imported from abroad, or 
produced right here in the United States by a sustainable, cutting-edge 
American automobile industry.
  The global economic downturn and credit crisis have limited the 
resources that automakers and vehicle manufacturers can draw on to 
support their research and development activities. As American 
automakers struggle to become globally competitive and we race to make 
the best and most fuel-efficient vehicles, we have a chance to 
accelerate their development through the Advanced Vehicle Technology 
Act of 2009.
  The Advanced Vehicle Technology Act will reauthorize the Department 
of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program, through which the Department 
partners with industry to provide research, development, demonstration, 
and commercial application of advanced vehicle

[[Page H9575]]

technologies in the U.S. These programs have led to numerous successes, 
including a dual-mode hybrid transmission system used in transit buses 
and trucks manufactured in the U.S.
  Through supporting advanced vehicle technologies, this legislation 
also reaffirms our commitment to reducing energy use to combat global 
warming and increase America's energy independence by reducing the need 
for imported oil.
  Recognizing the importance of this legislation, H.R. 3246 has been 
endorsed by General Motors, Ford Motor Company, Chrysler, the UAW, 
Nissan, the Motor and Equipment Manufacturers Association, Daimler, 
Magna International Delphi, ArvinMeritor, Robert Bosch LLC, 
Caterpillar, Dueco Odyne, Achates Power, and the Engine Manufacturers 
Association.
  Let us invest in American energy independence, American jobs, a 
cleaner environment and cleaner communities by voting in favor of the 
Advanced Vehicle Technology Act of 2009. I urge my colleagues to 
support H.R. 3246.
  Mr. LARSON of Connecticut. Mr. Chair, I rise in support of H.R. 3246, 
the Advanced Vehicle Technology Act, and applaud the efforts of 
Congressman Peters, Chairman Gordon, and his colleagues on the Science 
and Technology Committee for their contributions to the future of 
advanced automobile technologies in the U.S. As long as we are 
exporting our dollars overseas in exchange for oil, our economic and 
national security are at risk. The future of the American auto industry 
and thousands of American jobs rest on the ability of domestic car 
companies to research, develop, and commercialize new, clean, efficient 
technologies, including hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, that will 
be the backbone of a new U.S. vehicle market and economy.
  Hydrogen fuel cells can provide power for a wide array of 
transportation applications. Fuel Cells are a proven technology and 
already in use today. In Hartford, CT, the transit department is using 
a fuel cell powered bus that emits no pollution. Every time we replace 
a gasoline powered bus with a fuel cell bus it is equal to removing 77 
cars from our roadways. The hydrogen and fuel cell industry already 
supports 2,100 jobs in Connecticut alone and with this bill is poised 
to add many others.
  Hydrogen fuel cells are clean and efficient and will allow us to 
become more energy independent while reducing carbon emissions. 
Supporting this bill will give us more options to create jobs in 
Connecticut, keep America competitive, and reduce pollution. I 
encourage a ``yes'' vote on this bill.
  Mr. VAN HOLLEN. Mr Chair, I rise in support of the Advanced Vehicle 
Technology Act of 2009.
  This bipartisan bill will provide long term, sustained funding for a 
comprehensive research and development program across a spectrum of 
vehicle sizes and advanced vehicle technologies. It will focus and 
better coordinate the ongoing work of our federal agencies, research 
institutions and private industry on this important task. And it will 
benefit all Americans by strengthening our energy security, reducing 
harmful emissions, providing consumers with more vehicle choice, 
boosting our manufacturing sector and enhancing our international 
competitiveness.
  I commend Representatives Peters and Biggert for crafting this 
forward-looking legislation. I urge my colleagues' support.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. I yield back the balance of my time. Thank you, 
Mr. Chair.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. Having no additional speakers, Mr. Chairman, 
I yield back the balance of my time.
  The CHAIR. All time for general debate has expired.
  Pursuant to the rule, the amendment in the nature of a substitute 
printed in the bill shall be considered as an original bill for the 
purpose of amendment under the 5-minute rule and shall be considered 
read.
  The text of the committee amendment is as follows:

                               H.R. 3246

       Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of 
     the United States of America in Congress assembled,

     SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

       This Act may be cited as the ``Advanced Vehicle Technology 
     Act of 2009''.

     SEC. 2. FINDINGS.

       Congress finds the following:
       (1) According to the Energy Information Administration, the 
     transportation sector accounts for approximately 28 percent 
     of the United States primary energy demand and greenhouse gas 
     emissions, and 24 percent of global oil demand.
       (2) The United States transportation sector is over 95 
     percent dependent on petroleum, and over 60 percent of 
     petroleum demand is met by imported supplies.
       (3) United States heavy truck fuel consumption will 
     increase 23 percent by 2030, while overall transportation 
     energy use will decline by 1 percent.
       (4) The domestic automotive and commercial vehicle 
     manufacturing sectors have increasingly limited resources for 
     research and development of advanced technologies.
       (5) Vehicle, engine, and component manufacturers are 
     playing a more important role in vehicle technology 
     development, and should be better integrated into Federal 
     research efforts.
       (6) Priorities for the Department of Energy's vehicle 
     technologies research have shifted drastically in recent 
     years among diesel hybrids, hydrogen fuel cell vehicles, and 
     plug-in electric hybrids, with little continuity among them.
       (7) The integration of vehicle, communication, and 
     infrastructure technologies has great potential for 
     efficiency gains through better management of the total 
     transportation system.
       (8) The Federal Government should balance its role in 
     researching longer-term exploratory concepts and developing 
     nearer-term transformational technologies for vehicles.

     SEC. 3. OBJECTIVES.

       The objectives of this Act are to--
       (1) develop technologies and practices that--
       (A) improve the fuel efficiency and emissions of all 
     vehicles produced in the United States; and
       (B) reduce vehicle reliance on petroleum-based fuels;
       (2) support domestic research, development, demonstration, 
     and commercial application and manufacturing of advanced 
     vehicles, engines, and components;
       (3) enable vehicles to move larger volumes of goods and 
     more passengers with less energy and emissions;
       (4) develop cost-effective advanced technologies for wide-
     scale utilization throughout the passenger, commercial, 
     government, and transit vehicle sectors;
       (5) allow for greater consumer choice of vehicle 
     technologies and fuels;
       (6) shorten technology development and integration cycles 
     in the vehicle industry;
       (7) ensure a proper balance and diversity of Federal 
     investment in vehicle technologies; and
       (8) strengthen partnerships between Federal and State 
     governmental agencies and the private and academic sectors.

     SEC. 4. DEFINITIONS.

       For the purposes of this Act:
       (1) Department.--The term ``Department'' means the 
     Department of Energy.
       (2) Secretary.--The term ``Secretary'' means the Secretary 
     of Energy.

     SEC. 5. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

       (a) In General.--The following sums are authorized to be 
     appropriated to the Secretary for research, development, 
     demonstration, and commercial application of vehicles and 
     related technologies, including activities authorized under 
     this Act:
       (1) $550,000,000 for fiscal year 2010.
       (2) $560,000,000 for fiscal year 2011.
       (3) $570,000,000 for fiscal year 2012.
       (4) $580,000,000 for fiscal year 2013.
       (5) $590,000,000 for fiscal year 2014.
       (b) Medium and Heavy Duty Commercial Vehicles.--From the 
     amounts authorized under subsection (a), there are authorized 
     to be appropriated for carrying out title II--
       (1) $200,000,000 for fiscal year 2010;
       (2) $210,000,000 for fiscal year 2011;
       (3) $220,000,000 for fiscal year 2012;
       (4) $230,000,000 for fiscal year 2013; and
       (5) $240,000,000 for fiscal year 2014.
       (c) User Facilities.--From the amounts authorized under 
     subsection (a), there are authorized to be appropriated for 
     carrying out section 104--
       (1) $35,000,000 for fiscal year 2010;
       (2) $30,000,000 for fiscal year 2011;
       (3) $20,000,000 for fiscal year 2012;
       (4) $15,000,000 for fiscal year 2013; and
       (5) $15,000,000 for fiscal year 2014.
       (d) Non-Road Pilot Program.--From the amounts authorized 
     under subsection (a), there are authorized to be appropriated 
     for carrying out section 204--
       (1) $20,000,000 for fiscal year 2010;
       (2) $20,000,000 for fiscal year 2011; and
       (3) $20,000,000 for fiscal year 2012.

               TITLE I--VEHICLE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

     SEC. 101. PROGRAM.

       (a) Activities.--The Secretary shall conduct a program of 
     basic and applied research, development, demonstration, and 
     commercial application activities on materials, technologies, 
     and processes with the potential to substantially reduce or 
     eliminate petroleum use and the emissions of the Nation's 
     passenger and commercial vehicles, including activities in 
     the areas of--
       (1) hybridization or full electrification of vehicle 
     systems;
       (2) batteries and other energy storage devices;
       (3) power electronics;
       (4) vehicle, component, and subsystem manufacturing 
     technologies and processes;
       (5) engine efficiency and combustion optimization;
       (6) waste heat recovery;
       (7) transmission and drivetrains;
       (8) hydrogen vehicle technologies, including fuel cells and 
     internal combustion engines, and hydrogen infrastructure;
       (9) aerodynamics, rolling resistance, and accessory power 
     loads of vehicles and associated equipment;
       (10) vehicle weight reduction;
       (11) friction and wear reduction;
       (12) engine and component durability;
       (13) innovative propulsion systems;
       (14) advanced boosting systems;
       (15) hydraulic hybrid technologies;
       (16) engine compatibility with and optimization for a 
     variety of transportation fuels including liquid and gaseous 
     fuels;
       (17) predictive engineering, modeling, and simulation of 
     vehicle and transportation systems;
       (18) refueling and charging infrastructure for alternative 
     fueled and electric or plug-in electric hybrid vehicles;

[[Page H9576]]

       (19) gaseous fuels storage system integration and 
     optimization;
       (20) sensing, communications, and actuation technologies 
     for vehicle, electrical grid, and infrastructure;
       (21) efficient use and recycling of rare earth materials, 
     and reduction of precious metals and other high-cost 
     materials in vehicles;
       (22) aftertreatment technologies;
       (23) thermal management of battery systems;
       (24) development of common standards, specifications, and 
     architectures for both transportation and stationary battery 
     applications; and
       (25) other research areas as determined by the Secretary.
       (b) Transformational Technology.--The Secretary shall 
     ensure that the Department continues to support activities 
     and maintains competency in mid- to long-term 
     transformational vehicle technologies with potential to 
     achieve deep reductions in petroleum use and emissions, 
     including activities in the areas of--
       (1) hydrogen vehicle technologies, including fuel cells, 
     internal combustion engines, hydrogen storage, 
     infrastructure, and activities in hydrogen technology 
     validation and safety codes and standards;
       (2) multiple battery chemistries and novel energy storage 
     devices, including electromechanical batteries and other 
     nonchemical batteries;
       (3) communication and connectivity among vehicles, 
     infrastructure, and the electrical grid; and
       (4) other innovative technologies research and development, 
     as determined by the Secretary.
       (c) Industry Participation.--To the maximum extent 
     practicable, activities under this Act shall be carried out 
     in partnership or collaboration with automotive 
     manufacturers, heavy commercial and transit vehicle 
     manufacturers, vehicle and engine equipment and component 
     manufacturers, manufacturing equipment manufacturers, 
     advanced vehicle service providers, fuel producers and energy 
     suppliers, electric utilities, universities, national 
     laboratories, and independent research laboratories. In 
     carrying out this Act the Secretary shall--
       (1) determine whether a wide range of companies that 
     manufacture or assemble vehicles or components in the United 
     States are represented in ongoing public private partnership 
     activities, including firms that have not traditionally 
     participated in federally-sponsored research and development 
     activities, and where possible, partner with such firms that 
     conduct significant and relevant research and development 
     activities in the United States;
       (2) leverage the capabilities and resources of, and 
     formalize partnerships with, industry-led stakeholder 
     organizations, nonprofit organizations, industry consortia, 
     and trade associations with expertise in the research and 
     development of, and education and outreach activities in, 
     advanced automotive and commercial vehicle technologies;
       (3) develop more efficient processes for transferring 
     research findings and technologies to industry;
       (4) give consideration to conversion of existing or former 
     vehicle technology manufacturing facilities for the purposes 
     of this Act; and
       (5) promote efforts to ensure that technologies developed 
     under this Act are produced in the United States.
       (d) Interagency and Intraagency Coordination.--To the 
     maximum extent practicable, the Secretary shall coordinate 
     research, development, demonstration, and commercial 
     application activities among--
       (1) relevant programs within the Department, including--
       (A) the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy;
       (B) the Office of Science;
       (C) the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy 
     Reliability;
       (D) the Office of Fossil Energy;
       (E) the Advanced Research Projects Agency--Energy; and
       (F) other offices as determined by the Secretary; and
       (2) relevant technology research and development programs 
     within other Federal agencies, as determined by the 
     Secretary.
       (e) Coordination and Nonduplication.--In coordinating 
     activities the Secretary shall ensure, to the maximum extent 
     practicable, that activities do not duplicate those of other 
     programs within the Department or other relevant research 
     agencies.
       (f) Federal Demonstration of Technologies.--The Secretary 
     shall make information available to procurement programs of 
     Federal agencies regarding the potential to demonstrate 
     technologies resulting from activities funded through 
     programs under this Act.
       (g) Intergovernmental Coordination.--The Secretary shall 
     seek opportunities to leverage resources and support 
     initiatives of State and local governments in developing and 
     promoting advanced vehicle technologies, manufacturing, and 
     infrastructure.

     SEC. 102. SENSING AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGIES.

       The Secretary, in coordination with the relevant research 
     programs of other Federal agencies, shall conduct research, 
     development, and demonstration activities on connectivity of 
     vehicle and transportation systems, including on sensing, 
     computation, communication, and actuation technologies that 
     allow for reduced fuel use, optimized traffic flow, and 
     vehicle electrification, including technologies for--
       (1) onboard vehicle, engine, and component sensing and 
     actuation;
       (2) vehicle-to-vehicle sensing and communication;
       (3) vehicle-to-infrastructure sensing and communication; 
     and
       (4) vehicle integration with the electrical grid.

     SEC. 103. MANUFACTURING.

       The Secretary shall carry out a research, development, 
     demonstration, and commercial application program of advanced 
     vehicle manufacturing technologies and practices, including 
     innovative processes to--
       (1) increase the production rate and decrease the cost of 
     advanced battery manufacturing;
       (2) vary the capability of individual manufacturing 
     facilities to accommodate different battery chemistries and 
     configurations;
       (3) reduce waste streams, emissions, and energy-intensity 
     of vehicle, engine, and component manufacturing processes;
       (4) recycle and remanufacture used batteries and other 
     vehicle components for reuse in vehicles or stationary 
     applications;
       (5) produce cost-effective lightweight materials such as 
     advanced metal alloys, polymeric composites, and carbon 
     fiber;
       (6) produce lightweight high pressure storage systems for 
     gaseous fuels;
       (7) design and manufacture purpose-built hydrogen and fuel 
     cell vehicles and components; and
       (8) produce permanent magnets for advanced vehicles.

     SEC. 104. USER TESTING FACILITIES.

       Activities under this Act may include construction, 
     expansion, or modification of new and existing vehicle, 
     engine, and component research and testing facilities for--
       (1) testing or simulating interoperability of a variety of 
     vehicle components and systems;
       (2) subjecting whole or partial vehicle platforms to fully 
     representative duty cycles and operating conditions;
       (3) developing and demonstrating a range of chemistries and 
     configurations for advanced vehicle battery manufacturing; 
     and
       (4) developing and demonstrating test cycles for new and 
     alternative fuels, and other advanced vehicle technologies.

    TITLE II--MEDIUM AND HEAVY DUTY COMMERCIAL AND TRANSIT VEHICLES

     SEC. 201. PROGRAM.

       (a) In General.--The Secretary, in partnership with 
     relevant research and development programs in other Federal 
     agencies, and a range of appropriate industry stakeholders, 
     shall carry out a program of cooperative research, 
     development, demonstration, and commercial application 
     activities on advanced technologies for medium- to heavy-duty 
     commercial and transit vehicles, including activities in the 
     areas of--
       (1) engine efficiency and combustion research;
       (2) on board storage technologies for compressed and 
     liquefied natural gas;
       (3) development and integration of engine technologies 
     designed for natural gas operation of a variety of vehicle 
     platforms;
       (4) waste heat recovery and conversion;
       (5) improved aerodynamics and tire rolling resistance;
       (6) energy and space-efficient emissions control systems;
       (7) heavy hybrid, hybrid hydraulic, plug-in hybrid, and 
     electric platforms, and energy storage technologies;
       (8) drivetrain optimization;
       (9) friction and wear reduction;
       (10) engine idle and parasitic energy loss reduction;
       (11) electrification of accessory loads;
       (12) onboard sensing and communications technologies;
       (13) advanced lightweighting materials and vehicle designs;
       (14) increasing load capacity per vehicle;
       (15) thermal management of battery systems;
       (16) recharging infrastructure;
       (17) complete vehicle modeling and simulation;
       (18) hydrogen vehicle technologies, including fuel cells 
     and internal combustion engines, and hydrogen infrastructure;
       (19) retrofitting advanced technologies onto existing truck 
     fleets; and
       (20) integration of these and other advanced systems onto a 
     single truck and trailer platform.
       (b) Leadership.--The Secretary shall appoint a full-time 
     Director to coordinate research, development, demonstration, 
     and commercial application activities in medium- to heavy-
     duty commercial and transit vehicle technologies. 
     Responsibilities of the Director shall be to--
       (1) improve coordination and develop consensus between 
     government agency and industry partners, and propose new 
     processes for program management and priority setting to 
     better align activities and budgets among partners;
       (2) regularly convene workshops, site visits, 
     demonstrations, conferences, investor forums, and other 
     events in which information and research findings are shared 
     among program participants and interested stakeholders;
       (3) develop a budget for the Department's activities with 
     regard to the interagency program, and provide consultation 
     and guidance on vehicle technology funding priorities across 
     agencies;
       (4) determine a process for reviewing program technical 
     goals, targets, and timetables and, where applicable, aided 
     by life-cycle impact and cost analysis, propose revisions or 
     elimination based on program progress, available funding, and 
     rate of technology adoption;
       (5) evaluate ongoing activities of the program and 
     recommend project modifications, including the termination of 
     projects, where applicable;
       (6) recruit new industry participants to the interagency 
     program, including truck, trailer, and component 
     manufacturers who have not traditionally participated in 
     federally sponsored research and technology development 
     activities; and
       (7) other responsibilities as determined by the Secretary, 
     in consultation with interagency and industry partners.
       (c) Reporting.--At the end of each fiscal year the 
     partnership shall submit to the Secretary

[[Page H9577]]

     and relevant Congressional committees of jurisdiction an 
     annual report describing activities undertaken in the 
     previous year, active industry participants, efforts to 
     recruit new participants, progress of the program in meeting 
     goals and timelines, and a strategic plan for funding of 
     activities across agencies.

     SEC. 202. CLASS 8 TRUCK AND TRAILER SYSTEMS DEMONSTRATION.

       The Secretary shall conduct a competitive grant program to 
     demonstrate the integration of multiple advanced technologies 
     on Class 8 truck and trailer platforms with a goal of 
     improving overall freight efficiency, as measured in tons and 
     volume of freight hauled or other work performance-based 
     metrics, by 50 percent, including a combination of 
     technologies listed in section 201(a). Applicant teams may be 
     comprised of truck and trailer manufacturers, engine and 
     component manufacturers, fleet customers, university 
     researchers, and other applicants as appropriate for the 
     development and demonstration of integrated Class 8 truck and 
     trailer systems.

     SEC. 203. TECHNOLOGY TESTING AND METRICS.

       The Secretary, in coordination with the partners of the 
     interagency research program described in section 201(a)--
       (1) shall develop standard testing procedures and 
     technologies for evaluating the performance of advanced heavy 
     vehicle technologies under a range of representative duty 
     cycles and operating conditions, including for heavy hybrid 
     propulsion systems;
       (2) shall evaluate heavy vehicle performance using work 
     performance-based metrics other than those based on miles per 
     gallon, including those based on units of volume and weight 
     transported for freight applications, and appropriate metrics 
     based on the work performed by nonroad systems; and
       (3) may construct heavy duty truck and bus testing 
     facilities.

     SEC. 204. NONROAD SYSTEMS PILOT PROGRAM.

       The Secretary shall undertake a pilot program of research, 
     development, demonstration, and commercial applications of 
     technologies to improve total machine or system efficiency 
     for heavy duty nonroad equipment, and shall seek 
     opportunities to transfer relevant research findings and 
     technologies between the nonroad and on-highway equipment and 
     vehicle sectors.

  The CHAIR. No amendment to the committee amendment is in order except 
those printed in House Report 111-255. Each amendment may be offered 
only in the order printed in the report, by a Member designated in the 
report, shall be considered read, shall be debatable for the time 
specified in the report, equally divided and controlled by the 
proponent and an opponent of the amendment, shall not be subject to 
amendment, and shall not be subject to a demand for division of the 
question.


           Amendment No. 1 Offered by Mr. Gordon of Tennessee

  The CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 1 printed in 
House Report 111-255.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the 
desk.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Amendment No. 1 offered by Mr. Gordon of Tennessee:
       Page 15, after line 9, insert the following new section:

     SEC. 105. REPORTING.

       Not later than 18 months after the date of enactment of 
     this Act and annually thereafter through 2015, the Secretary 
     of Energy shall transmit to Congress a report regarding the 
     technologies developed as a result of the activities 
     authorized by this title, with a particular emphasis on 
     whether the technologies were successfully adopted for 
     commercial applications, and if so, whether those 
     technologies are manufactured in the United States.
       Page 18, line 20, through page 19, line 2, amend subsection 
     (c) to read as follows:
       (c) Reporting.--At the end of each fiscal year, the 
     Secretary shall submit to the Congress an annual report 
     describing activities undertaken in the previous year, active 
     industry participants, efforts to recruit new participants, 
     progress of the program in meeting goals and timelines, and a 
     strategic plan for funding of activities across agencies.
       Page 20, line 13, strike ``heavy duty''.
       Page 20, line 13, insert ``mobile'' after ``nonroad''.

  The CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 745, the gentleman from 
Tennessee (Mr. Gordon) and a Member opposed each will control 10 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Tennessee.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself as much time as 
I may consume.
  The amendment I have offered has three parts. First, it makes a small 
technical change at the request of the Department of Justice to clarify 
that the Secretary shall report to Congress on the medium- to heavy-
duty vehicle program; second, it incorporates an amendment from my 
colleague from Maine (Ms. Pingree) to require a report on 
commercialized technologies from the overall vehicle technology 
program; and third, it incorporates the amendment offered by Mr. Hare 
of Illinois to ensure that a range of nonroad mobile equipment is 
eligible for the pilot program in section 204.
  This is a simple amendment which incorporates a few small changes 
suggested by my colleagues to make the bill even better. I urge its 
adoption.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Chair, I rise to claim the time on the Gordon 
amendment.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 10 minutes.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. I yield myself as much time as I may consume.
  I support the Gordon amendment with a caveat. I support the title II 
reporting requirement classification that the Secretary shall submit 
the annual report to Congress. In regards to the report requirement for 
title I, I would prefer the reporting language that is in 
Representative Broun's amendment as it's more comprehensive and mirrors 
the report language requirement in title II. Perhaps in conference, the 
two authors of the reporting amendments could agree to merge that 
language so that all bases are covered.
  The third part of Mr. Gordon's amendment deals with striking ``heavy 
duty'' from the Nonroad Systems Pilot Program in section 204 in the 
bill and adding the word ``mobile'' so that we are now referring to 
nonroad mobile equipment. I understand that there is some concern that 
the term heavy duty has a different meaning in the nonroad world than 
it does in the on-road world. So I appreciate the addition of 
``mobile'' in the section as well as Mr. Holt's upcoming amendment that 
would further clarify that the pilot program is intended to include 
agricultural and construction nonroad equipment.
  With that, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. Mr. Chairman, let me say to Mr. Hall, I 
understand his concern about the additional accountability with Mr. 
Broun, and he has an amendment that we will be supporting later. So 
hopefully those will be complementary, and we will have additional 
accountability and transparency.
  If the gentleman from Texas has nothing more to say, I don't either.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. I have a speaker on the way. I don't believe he's 
here yet.
  I would like to reserve my time. If you could take another 2 or 3 
minutes to do whatever you want to do or say.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. Well, if you would like to compliment me for 
a couple of minutes, I would be happy to accept that while we wait.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. Well, first I appreciate your trip to Texas 
Monday, up and back. And I appreciate Mr. Broun's position on this. You 
know, we had amendments, and Mr. Broun's amendment, I believe, was 
voted down by a party vote when we had the hearing. I may be wrong on 
that. But he's here to support the position that he's taken. I'd like 
to have some time for him to at least talk about how the two could fit 
together when we head to conference or any of the conference 
committees.

                              {time}  1330

  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. Well, I would say to Mr. Hall, certainly I 
think Mr. Broun is a constructive force, certainly in our committee as 
well as here. I think he has two amendments today. I would suggest this 
potentially to my friend; if whomever you have coming to speak, we 
could allow them to speak during another amendment if that would be 
consistent.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. I would ask unanimous consent that that be 
granted.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. If that's the case, then I think we can 
complete this amendment now.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman's request is not in order in the Committee 
of the Whole.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. Well, we don't really need a UC. Mr. Hall 
and I know that we can trust each other, and so if he has someone that 
wants to speak later, we will certainly make that available at any time 
they come in on whatever amendment it might be.
  Mr. Chairman, I reserve my time.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.

[[Page H9578]]

  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my 
time.
  The CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman 
from Tennessee (Mr. Gordon).
  The amendment was agreed to.


              Amendment No. 2 Offered by Mr. Hall of Texas

  The CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 2 printed in 
House Report 111-255.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Chairman, I rise as the designee for the 
amendment by the gentleman of Georgia (Mr. Broun).
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Amendment No. 2 offered by Mr. Hall of Texas:
       Page 6, line 8, strike ``$560,000,000'' and insert 
     ``$550,000,000''.
       Page 6, line 9, strike ``$570,000,000'' and insert 
     ``$550,000,000''.
       Page 6, line 10, strike ``$580,000,000'' and insert 
     ``$550,000,000''.
       Page 6, line 11, strike paragraph (5).
       Page 6, line 17, strike ``$210,000,000'' and insert 
     ``$200,000,000''.
       Page 6, line 18, strike ``$220,000,000'' and insert 
     ``$200,000,000''.
       Page 6, line 19, strike ``$230,000,000'' and insert 
     ``$200,000,000''.
       Page 6, line 20, strike paragraph (5).
       Page 7, line 2, strike paragraph (5).

  The CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 745, the gentleman from Texas 
(Mr. Hall) and a Member opposed each will control 5 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Texas.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Chairman, I yield such time as he may consume 
to the gentleman from Georgia, Dr. Broun, for his amendment.
  (Mr. BROUN of Georgia asked and was given permission to revise and 
extend his remarks.)
  Mr. BROUN of Georgia. Thank you, Mr. Hall.
  Mr. Chairman, I rise to support my amendment.
  Mr. Chairman, my amendment is very straightforward. To be blunt, I'm 
asking this body to show the tiniest sliver of fiscal restraint to 
freeze the authorization levels that this bill outlines at next year's 
levels.
  As the bill is currently written, next year this body will authorize 
$550 million for advanced vehicle technology. This is money in addition 
to the billions of dollars in funding already authorized and made 
available to the auto industry in the Energy Independence and Security 
Act of 2007, and the millions more made available to them just this 
year in the nonstimulus bill.
  Starting in 2011, and for the next 3 years, this authorization calls 
for $10 million in increases for each ensuing year. Surely, Mr. 
Chairman, we can all agree that with all of the money out there already 
and with the massive increases authorized in this bill, saving $30 
million is more than reasonable. Additionally, because of all the money 
that is already available to this program and similar programs, my 
amendment asks that we end this legislation's funding authorization 
after 2013.
  Mr. Chairman, we are spending money at record rates. And with a 
proposed health care reform bill, a potential highway bill, cap-and-
trade, and a whole slew of other bills that will be considered in the 
near future, there does not seem to be any end in sight. Surely we can 
all agree that showing just a tiny bit of fiscal responsibility is in 
all of our best interests.
  The American taxpayers and future generations are on the hook for 
trillions of dollars in spending, borrowing, and interest payments over 
the coming decades. I'm simply asking for us to show a modicum of 
restraint. For simply put, isn't $550 million a year for a program that 
already has multiple funding sources enough? I think so.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. Mr. Chairman, I rise in opposition to the 
amendment and claim the time.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Tennessee is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the 
gentleman from Michigan (Mr. Stupak).
  Mr. STUPAK. Mr. Chairman, I'd like to speak about the merits of this 
bill, the Advanced Vehicle Technology Act, which is an important step 
forward for revitalizing the auto industry in my district, in Michigan, 
and across our Nation.
  This legislation will authorize $550 million in essential research 
funding, with the emphasis on medium and heavy duty commercial trucks 
and trailers that have previously been overlooked. Through federally 
directed research and development, the auto industry can move toward 
better, more fuel-efficient vehicles through applied research and 
development of materials and technologies. This will directly benefit a 
number of existing companies in their transition toward new parts and 
technologies for the domestic auto industry, and encourages 
entrepreneurs with an innovative idea to enter the market. This 
includes a number of existing and potential auto part suppliers and 
manufacturers in my district and throughout Michigan.
  I would like to thank Chairman Gordon for yielding me the time, and I 
would also like to thank Congressman Peters and Congresswoman Biggert 
for introducing this important legislation. I would encourage all my 
colleagues to support this bill and support the chairman on the 
amendments.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.
  I rise in support of the Broun amendment to reduce the authorization 
level in H.R. 3246. As I mentioned during the full committee markup, I 
have concerns over the amount of money being authorized in this bill; 
$2.43 billion over the 2010-2014 period, and $423 million after 2014, 
according to the Congressional Budget Office.
  The Broun amendment would reduce the multiyear authorization by $650 
million. Where the bill authorizes an increase of $10 million over the 
previous fiscal year for sections 5(a) and 5(b), the Broun amendment 
keeps each fiscal year's authorization constant and removes the 
authorization for fiscal year 2014 in sections 5(a), (b) and (c).
  Mr. Chairman, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. Mr. Chairman, I reserve the balance of my 
time to close.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Chairman, I yield Dr. Broun an additional 2 
minutes.
  Mr. BROUN of Georgia. I thank my friend, Mr. Hall, from Texas for 
yielding me more time.
  Mr. Chairman, this legislation has support from both sides of the 
aisle, but as was made perfectly clear in our committee markup back in 
July, there are some serious concerns with the amount of money being 
authorized and where exactly it will go. In recent bills, such as the 
Wall Street bailout and the stimulus bill from earlier this year, we 
have provided a lack of appropriate oversight for the money being 
spent. I do not want to see us make the same mistake with this 
legislation.
  Most of us can agree that developing alternative fuel cell technology 
is a necessary precursor to taking control of our energy consumption 
needs, and all of us on both sides of the aisle have that philosophy 
and believe in that, but simply throwing money at a problem is never a 
solution, and my amendment is just a good, commonsense improvement, 
however minor, to this otherwise very noble legislation. So I ask my 
colleagues to support this amendment, and I thank Mr. Hall.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. Mr. Chairman, while my colleague from 
Georgia has another amendment which we will gladly support, I am afraid 
I must reluctantly oppose this amendment on the grounds that it freezes 
funding for the bill at the 2010 levels and cuts the final year of 
funding.
  I appreciate the gentleman's effort to keep costs down. He has been a 
champion, both in our committee and on this floor, for trying to make 
the government live in a more frugal way. However, in this situation, I 
need to point out that the funds that are authorized in this particular 
program do not duplicate any funds that are in the energy bill or the 
Recovery Act for this particular purpose.
  I also want to point out that the amounts authorized in this bill 
fall upon recommendations from the National Academies of Science review 
of the program, as well as testimony in the committee and historic 
trends in the programs. The annual increases provided for in this bill 
are very modest and necessary for it to fulfill its goals, and I think 
for that reason we

[[Page H9579]]

have an unusual situation where this amendment is opposed by both the 
National Association of Manufacturers and the UAW.
  Again, Mr. Broun is doing nothing but trying to make us justify, I 
think, our spending, as he should. He has been a champion for that. In 
this situation, I think that we have made that case, and his amendment 
should be opposed and our good bill should move forward.
  Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman 
from Texas (Mr. Hall).
  The question was taken; and the Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. BROUN of Georgia. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further proceedings on 
the amendment offered by the gentleman from Texas will be postponed.


            Amendment No. 3 Offered by Mr. Broun of Georgia

  The CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 3 printed in 
House Report 111-255.
  Mr. BROUN of Georgia. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Amendment No. 3 offered by Mr. Broun of Georgia:
       Page 15, after line 9, insert the following new section:

     SEC. 105. REPORTING.

       At the end of each fiscal year the Secretary shall submit 
     to the relevant Congressional committees of jurisdiction an 
     annual report describing activities undertaken in the 
     previous year under this title, active industry participants, 
     efforts to recruit new participants, progress of the program 
     in meeting goals and timelines, and a strategic plan for 
     funding of activities across agencies.

  The CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 745, the gentleman from 
Georgia (Mr. Broun) and a Member opposed each will control 5 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Georgia.
  Mr. BROUN of Georgia. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume and rise in support of my amendment.
  (Mr. BROUN of Georgia asked and was given permission to revise and 
extend his remarks.)
  Mr. BROUN of Georgia. Mr. Chairman, this amendment is very 
straightforward. In fact, it's just a small technical correction to the 
bill. As the bill is written, there are two titles. The first is 
specific to commercial and passenger vehicles, and the second is to 
medium-size and heavy duty vehicles. Both sections obviously deal with 
advanced vehicle technologies, but only one has a reporting 
requirement, title II. My amendment adds a reporting requirement to 
title I as well.
  If enacted, the Secretary of Energy will have to submit an annual 
report to the relevant congressional committees on the implementation, 
progress, and long-term goals of this program.
  This legislation authorizes a large amount of taxpayer dollars to a 
program that, like every other government program, is susceptible to 
waste, fraud, and abuse. The easiest way to combat that is through 
diligence and a certain amount of oversight and transparency. My 
amendment fits both of these requirements.
  Mr. Chairman, we need to exercise more caution with where taxpayer 
dollars are being spent. That entails both doing more research about 
the programs that we are funding before we write and pass legislation 
as well as exercising our oversight responsibilities after the money 
has been authorized. This amendment is very simple. The simple 
technical corrections go directly towards fulfilling the latter 
objective.
  Mr. Chairman, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. Mr. Chairman, I claim time in opposition to 
the amendment, although I am not opposed to the amendment.
  The CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman from Tennessee is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. Mr. Chairman, I want to thank Dr. Broun for 
bringing this constructive amendment to our attention. I think the 
additional transparency and accountability will make this good bill an 
even better bill, and for that reason I urge adoption of Dr. Broun's 
amendment.
  Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. BROUN of Georgia. I thank the chairman. He has been a great 
chairman for us, and I enjoyed working with Chairman Gordon on this 
issue. My dear friend from Texas, our ranking member, Mr. Hall, would 
like to speak, so I yield him 2 minutes. And I just very much 
appreciate the Chairman's acceptance of my amendment.

                              {time}  1345

  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Chairman, I rise in support of the Broun 
amendment. This amendment would require the Secretary to report to 
Congress on a yearly basis on the activities undertaken in the previous 
year under title I, such as active industry participants, efforts to 
recruit new participants, progress of the program in meeting goals and 
timelines, and a strategic plan for the funding of activities across 
agencies. This amendment allows the Congress and the public to monitor 
the success of activities in title I and to ensure that the money that 
is ultimately appropriated is being well spent.
  Now, while I realize the Gordon amendment added a title I report, as 
I stated earlier, I would prefer the reporting language that is in 
Representative Broun's amendment, as it is more comprehensive and 
mirrors the report language requirement in title II.
  I would again express my hope that, in conference, the two authors of 
the reporting amendments could agree to merge their language so that 
all bases are covered.
  Mr. BROUN of Georgia. Mr. Chairman, again, I thank Chairman Gordon 
for accepting my amendment. I greatly appreciate it. I think this is a 
commonsense amendment. It will offer more transparency and more 
accountability, which I think we ought to do in all legislation we 
pass. Unfortunately, there is not a lot of that around here with 
multiple branches of the Federal Government. I thank the chairman for 
accepting my amendment.
  I urge a ``yes'' vote for everybody.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman 
from Georgia (Mr. Broun).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                 Amendment No. 4 Offered by Mr. Peters

  The CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 4 printed in 
House Report 111-255.
  Mr. PETERS. Mr. Chairman, I rise as the designee for Mr. Polis, and I 
have an amendment at the desk.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Amendment No. 4 offered by Mr. Peters:
       Page 9, lines 11 and 14, redesignate paragraphs (24) and 
     (25) as paragraphs (25) and (26), respectively.
       Page 9, after line 10, insert the following new paragraph:
       (24) retrofitting advanced vehicle technologies to existing 
     vehicles;

  The CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 745, the gentleman from 
Michigan (Mr. Peters) and a Member opposed each will control 5 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Michigan.
  Mr. PETERS. Mr. Chairman, my colleague's amendment, which has been 
read, recognizes that it takes many years for a technology to be fully 
integrated into the Nation's vehicle fleet and that some technologies 
may actually be appropriate for the retrofitting of existing vehicles. 
Automakers have expressed some very strong concerns about how these 
aftermarket conversions are going to affect vehicles that are under 
warranty, and I share these concerns.
  However, I support Mr. Polis in the work that he is attempting to do 
with this amendment. I support the amendment, and I look forward to 
working with the gentleman to perfect the language in conference.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Chairman, though not opposed, I rise to claim 
the time on the Polis amendment.
  The CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman from Texas is recognized 
for 5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. I support the Polis amendment. The amendment would 
enable our constituents to continue driving the vehicles they currently 
own while taking advantage of

[[Page H9580]]

technology that would enable them to reduce their petroleum use perhaps 
faster than if they were to wait for a new vehicle to make its way from 
concept to showroom.
  Mr. POLIS. Mr. Chair, I rise in support of my amendment to H.R. 3246, 
The Advanced Vehicle Technology Act of 2009, which was offered by Mr. 
Peters, and the underlying bill. I would first like to thank 
Representative Gary Peters, Representative Judy Biggert, Science and 
Technology Committee Chairman Gordon, my colleagues on the committee, 
and the committee staff for crafting this legislation that will 
increase the efficiency of our nation's vehicle fleet while reducing 
our dependence of foreign oil.
  Mr. Chair, at a time when manufacturers are struggling with rising 
costs and foreign competition, all too often companies are forced to 
choose between research and the development of new clean technologies 
or keeping their factory doors open. No manufacturer can be blamed for 
choosing to not turn their employees' families loose into the winter of 
unemployment.
  America's talented workforce is our greatest resource and our 
manufacturing companies understand that preserving their workforce 
wherever possible is essential to weathering the storm of this 
recession. However, to best achieve economic recovery, we must not stop 
at merely creating jobs. We must restore America's role as a 
manufacturing leader. And this cannot be done without investing in 
innovation. H.R. 3246 will provide the research and design dollars 
essential to supporting innovation, and it will do so in a competitive 
process to ensure that the best technologies are supported and that 
America's transportation fleet is the most modern and efficient in the 
world.
  This bill's economic impact--increased production, reduced 
operational costs, and ease of both private and commercial 
transportation--is matched in its environmental benefits. The 
investments we will make in biofuels and electric drivetrains, as well 
as refinements to reduce the consumption of combustion engines--
including clean diesel--will clear our skies of smog while reducing our 
dependence on foreign oil. America's love affair with the automobile by 
right should continue; however, it is imperative that we take the 
initiative today to make vehicles cleaner and greener for tomorrow. 
Future generations should be able to take part in the tradition of the 
summer family road trip with a vehicle that not only meets the needs of 
a family, but is also powered by clean energy to preserve the pristine 
lands such as Rocky Mountain National Park in my home State of 
Colorado.
  These innovations, however, do not come without costs nor do they 
help us by sitting on a shelf. Our environment does not have time to 
wait for our nation's entire fleet of vehicles to cycle through their 
useful lives. Our economy cannot afford for these advancements to be 
available only to the wealthy. This legislation wisely recognizes this 
issue as it pertains to costly heavy duty vehicles used by industry and 
mass transit by investing in technologies that can be retrofitted to 
existing fleets.
  Mr. Chair, my amendment simply adds that we must invest in 
retrofitting passenger cars. Retrofit technology is essential to 
reducing our environmental impact, and it is so an issue of social 
equity. The financial relief from reduced fuel costs and the ability to 
choose clean domestic fuel over polluting foreign oil should be made 
available to all Americans, not only those who have the resources to 
buy a new car. My amendment ensures that the millions of Americans who 
are unable or uninterested in a new vehicle will benefit from this 
investment. Whether it is a beloved '69 Mustang or the family minivan, 
it is vital to our national economy and security to encourage private 
investment in our nascent biofuels industry, and most importantly, it 
is vital to our planet that every vehicle on the road is capable of 
being powered by clean, domestic energy.
  Mr. Chair, the Advanced Vehicle Technology Act will be the jumpstart 
our nation's manufacturers, large and small, need to make our nation's 
transportation network clean, green, and powered by energy made in 
America. I congratulate Chairman Gordon, Representative Peters, 
Representative Biggert and the Committee on Science and Technology on 
crafting this legislation and ask that my colleagues support my 
amendment and pass the underlying bill.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. PETERS. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman 
from Michigan (Mr. Peters).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                  Amendment No. 5 Offered by Mr. Posey

  The CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 5 printed in 
House Report 111-255.
  Mr. POSEY. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Amendment No. 5 offered by Mr. Posey:
       Page 15, after line 9, insert the following new section:

     SEC. 105. INNOVATIVE AUTOMOTIVE DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM.

       The Secretary shall establish an Innovative Automotive 
     Demonstration Program, within the existing Vehicle 
     Technologies Program, to encourage the introduction of new 
     vehicles into the marketplace that are designed in their 
     entirety to achieve very high energy efficiency but still 
     provide the capabilities required by the American consumer. 
     This program shall encourage introduction of new light duty 
     vehicles into the marketplace capable of achieving energy 
     efficiencies significantly greater than required under 
     current and pending Federal Corporate Average Fuel Economy 
     (CAFE) standards. This program shall also encourage the use 
     of materials and manufacturing techniques that minimize 
     environmental impacts. Awards under this section shall be 
     made on a competitive basis for demonstration of vehicles 
     that--
       (1) carry at least four passengers;
       (2) meet all Federal safety requirements;
       (3) achieve at least 70 miles per gallon or the equivalent 
     on the Environmental Protection Agency drive cycle;
       (4) provide vehicle performance that is judged acceptable 
     to the United States consumer;
       (5) be affordable to the American consumer;
       (6) use materials and manufacturing processes that minimize 
     environmental impacts;
       (7) meet all Federal and State emission requirements; and
       (8) provide new high technology engineering and production 
     employment opportunities.

  The CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 745, the gentleman from 
Florida (Mr. Posey) and a Member opposed each will control 5 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Florida.
  Mr. POSEY. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself such time as may be 
necessary.
  (Mr. POSEY asked and was given permission to revise and extend his 
remarks.)
  Mr. POSEY. I thank the chairman and the ranking member for their work 
on this bill. Creating advanced vehicles is important if we are to 
reduce our dependence on foreign oil and to reduce emissions.
  I am pleased to be joined by my colleague from Florida (Ms. Kosmas) 
in offering this amendment. Our amendment makes sure that we explore 
all near-term options for increasing vehicle fuel efficiency. There are 
very near-term technologies that can be applied to develop and produce 
very high-mileage vehicles. Unfortunately, the possibility has not been 
a priority for the Department of Energy, and it has not been 
incorporated into the vehicle technologies program. The Department has 
been doing some very good work, but that work is focused on longer-term 
possibilities.
  I think we need nearer-term solutions and interim advances. Our 
amendment would ask the Department to give full consideration to these 
nearer-term advances.
  I am aware of companies that are close to demonstrating very high-
mileage passenger vehicles. A partnership with the Department of Energy 
could be enough to make this a reality in a relatively short period. 
Our amendment asks the Department of Energy, within existing funds, to 
create a competitive program for demonstrating very high-mileage 
vehicles. These would be four-person vehicles that are affordable to 
the average family. We're talking about vehicles that would get 70, 80, 
90, maybe 100 miles per gallon or more, which is clearly in excess of 
three times the current CAFE standards.
  If there is a vehicle that could get that kind of performance and it 
could be made in America and could be on the market within 3 years, I 
think we definitely should explore that, and our amendment makes sure 
that the Department does explore that possibility.
  I urge you to support the Posey-Kosmas amendment, and I reserve the 
balance of my time.
  Ms. KOSMAS. Mr. Chairman, I rise to claim the time in opposition, 
although I do not oppose the amendment.
  The CHAIR. Without objection, the gentlewoman from Florida is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Ms. KOSMAS. I rise in support of the Posey-Kosmas amendment and of 
this bill, H.R. 3246, the Advanced Vehicle Technology Act.

[[Page H9581]]

  Our amendment would direct the Department of Energy to establish an 
Innovative Automotive Demonstration Program to award competitive grants 
for the purpose of demonstrating and for bringing to the market very 
high energy-efficient vehicles, achieving at least 70 miles per gallon 
in the near term.
  Creating opportunities such as this ensures that we are utilizing the 
expertise of both the Department of Energy and of those in the industry 
who have real-world experience. This program will help to ensure that 
our Nation remains competitive in the world automotive market. Here at 
home, it will not only help us to meet new mileage and emissions 
requirements but to far exceed them.
  Right now, companies across the Nation, including in central Florida, 
are researching and developing vehicles that will use lightweight 
materials and highly efficient engines, enabling them to potentially 
reach 100 miles per gallon. This program will help ensure that these 
companies are able to move past the R stage to demonstration and to 
full-scale manufacturing in the near term. Our Nation can lead the 
world in innovation and in technology achievements if we are willing to 
make the investment.
  I would like to thank my friend and colleague, Congressman Posey, for 
working with me on this important program which, I think, will be 
beneficial to consumers, which will help us to reduce our emissions and 
dependence on foreign oil, and which will lead to new jobs in central 
Florida and across the Nation.
  I urge my colleagues to support the bipartisan Posey-Kosmas amendment 
and the underlying bill.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. POSEY. Mr. Chairman, I yield to my colleague, the ranking member, 
the gentleman from Texas (Mr. Hall).
  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Chairman, I rise in support of the Posey 
amendment.
  Mr. Posey's goal is to direct the Department of Energy to give the 
same consideration to demonstrating vehicles using fossil fuels that 
can achieve 70 miles per gallon or more as they are to alternatively 
fueled vehicles and hybrids. I support that.
  Mr. POSEY. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Ms. KOSMAS. Mr. Chairman, I yield to Chairman Bart Gordon.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. Thank you, Ms. Kosmas.
  I appreciate your hard work on this amendment as well as Mr. Posey's. 
You've brought us an amendment that is consistent with the overall 
goals of the bill but which requires some fine-tuning as we move 
through the conference process. With that understanding, we would still 
like to work with the gentleman and gentlewoman on perfecting the 
language as we move forward, and I support the amendment and urge its 
adoption.
  Ms. KOSMAS. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman 
from Florida (Mr. Posey).
  The amendment was agreed to.


           Amendment No. 6 Offered by Mr. Gordon of Tennessee

  The CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 6 printed in 
House Report 111-255.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. Mr. Chairman, I rise as the designee for Mr. 
Kennedy, and I have an amendment at the desk.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Amendment No. 6 offered by Mr. Gordon of Tennessee:
       Page 10, line 12, insert ``qualified plug-in electric 
     vehicle manufacturers,'' after ``transit vehicle 
     manufacturers,''.

  The CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 745, the gentleman from 
Tennessee (Mr. Gordon) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Tennessee.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. Mr. Chairman, Mr. Kennedy's amendment seeks 
to recognize that the Nation's vehicle fleet encompasses more than just 
4-wheel passenger cars and large commercial trucks and that the ultra-
efficient 2-wheel and 3-wheel vehicles should also be considered 
eligible for Federal research activities. I support my colleague's 
amendment and urge its adoption.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mrs. BIGGERT. Mr. Chairman, I rise to claim time in opposition to the 
Kennedy amendment even though I am not necessarily opposed to the 
amendment.
  The CHAIR. Without objection, the gentlewoman from Illinois is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mrs. BIGGERT. Mr. Chairman, I just have a question of the designee, 
Mr. Gordon.
  I am not sure that this amendment is necessary as I believe that a 
qualified plug-in electric vehicle manufacturer is considered an 
automotive manufacturer.
  Do you think that there definitely needs to be something written into 
the amendment saying that a qualified plug-in electric vehicle 
manufacturer is considered an automotive manufacturer?
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. I will yield to Mr. Kennedy.
  Mr. KENNEDY. Yes. To answer the gentlewoman's question, obviously, 
with advanced technology and energy-efficient vehicles, we're looking 
at all sorts of modes of transportation. Of course, in Europe, these 
modes of transportation, for the most part, are these small motor 
scooters. In fact, if we're looking to become energy independent and 
efficient and if we're trying to incentivize in this country the 
production and manufacturing of vehicles that are going to reduce our 
dependence on foreign oil and are going to promote energy efficiency, 
we cannot do this and miss a large part of the market that the rest of 
the world is utilizing in order for them to become more energy 
independent and more energy efficient.
  That's why it is important that we actually put this in the language 
of the bill, because, otherwise, they will not be eligible for the 
incentives that we make available for 4-wheel vehicles. In fact, if the 
idea is to promote all of these kinds of vehicles, we ought to make 
sure that it says that distinctly in the language.

                              {time}  1400

  Mrs. BIGGERT. Reclaiming my time, as I said, I am not necessarily 
opposed. I just wanted clarification whether you thought that these 
vehicles would not be included in this bill, if they were not 
addressed.
  Mr. KENNEDY. We have found already that these vehicles have not been 
able to garner the loan assistance that has been already available in 
other pieces of legislation and in the stimulus bill and previous 
legislation because they don't come under the strict definition of a 4-
wheel vehicle.
  We have tried to make the regulations flexible enough to say that 
they are two and can be retrofitted to become four, but, of course, 
that's kind of a stretch in the fact that the manufacturing process can 
be expanded to make 4-wheel vehicles out of these 2-wheel kinds of 
systems, but it's not the intended purpose of these manufacturing 
facilities. That's why we want to put it in specifically to mention 2- 
or 3-wheel vehicles.
  Mrs. BIGGERT. Reclaiming my time, I would not oppose the amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. First let me thank Mrs. Biggert for the work 
she has done in bringing this bill to us, as well as the work for those 
legitimate questions that I think need to be answered, and I think Mr. 
Kennedy did answer.
  I yield the balance of my time to the gentleman from Rhode Island 
(Mr. Kennedy).
  Mr. KENNEDY. I appreciate the gentlelady, and thank the gentleman 
from Tennessee for yielding me this time.
  I won't go on any further than I have already explained except to say 
that obviously there are good green jobs. We talk about good green jobs 
in this bill. This is about good green jobs.
  These vehicles are already being sold to police departments as public 
safety vehicles all across America. These Vectrix vehicles that are 
made in my State are electrical vehicles that have enormous capacity in 
the metropolitan areas. And, frankly, they are obviously great for the 
environment, but they are also fuel efficient, and they provide a great 
alternative to vehicles that we have since relied on that create such 
pollution in our air.

[[Page H9582]]

  So I think this is good. It's creating good jobs here domestically.
  And if we provide the loans, then we can keep these manufacturing 
jobs here at home. Roughly, 16,000 jobs are anticipated, 
conservatively, within the next 5 years as a result of just loans that 
can be made through the Department of Energy as a result of this 
amendment.
  So I would ask that my colleagues favorably support this amendment.
  Mr. Chair, I rise in support of my amendment, offered by Mr. Gordon, 
an amendment to ensure that this valuable legislation includes all 
manufacturers of qualified plug-in electric vehicles.
  Right now, there are a dozen companies in our country that are 
designing and manufacturing 2- and 3-wheeled electric vehicles. They 
have not been able to participate in Department of Energy funding 
opportunities, not because they lack merit, but because they simply 
don't have 4 wheels.
  If these companies had access to Department of Energy loans on the 
same basis as the rest of their industry, they could create 900 green 
jobs in the next year and 16,000 jobs in the next 5 years. With our 
current unemployment, we cannot afford to leave one job on the table.
  My amendment is simple. It ensures that all manufacturers producing 
qualified plug-in electric vehicles are eligible under this 
legislation. In the past, innovative vehicles like electric motorcycles 
were left out simply because they did not conform to outdated 
definitions.
  My amendment clarifies that these ground-breaking vehicles and their 
manufacturers are eligible under the program using a definition from 
existing law.
  The electric vehicle industry has an opportunity to profoundly 
influence our nation's future. It can help to preserve our environment, 
revitalize our manufacturing base and help free us from our dependence 
on fossil fuels.
  I urge my colleagues in the House to join me in support of all plug-
in electric vehicles and adopt this amendment.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. I yield back the balance of my time.
  The CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman 
from Tennessee (Mr. Gordon).
  The amendment was agreed to.


           Amendment No. 7 Offered by Mr. Gordon of Tennessee

  The Acting CHAIR (Mr. Sablan). It is now in order to consider 
amendment No. 7 printed in House Report 111-255.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. Mr. Chairman, I rise as the designee for Mr. 
Holt, and I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Amendment No. 7 offered by Mr. Gordon of Tennessee:
       Page 20, line 13, insert ``including agricultural and 
     construction equipment,'' after ``nonroad equipment,''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 745, the gentleman 
from Tennessee (Mr. Gordon) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Tennessee.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. Mr. Chairman, Mr. Holt's amendment would 
further clarify the pilot program for nonroad equipment. It is meant to 
include large mobile equipment as found in sectors such as agriculture 
and construction. The technologies used in these sectors are analogous 
to those found in on-road medium to heavy-duty trucks, and greater 
transfer of technology between sectors would benefit all.
  This is a good amendment, and I urge the adoption.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mrs. BIGGERT. Mr. Chairman, I rise to claim the time in opposition to 
the Holt amendment, even though I am not opposed to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentlewoman from Illinois is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mrs. BIGGERT. Mr. Chairman, I support the Holt amendment. I think 
that this amendment makes clear that the pilot program was intended to 
include agricultural and construction nonroad equipment.
  Therefore, I do support the amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Tennessee (Mr. Gordon).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                Amendment No. 8 Offered by Mr. Marshall

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 8 
printed in House Report 111-255.
  Mr. MARSHALL. I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Amendment No. 8 offered by Mr. Marshall:
       Page 8, line 24, insert ``, including the unique challenges 
     facing rural areas'' after ``electric hybrid vehicles''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 745, the gentleman 
from Georgia (Mr. Marshall) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Georgia.
  Mr. MARSHALL. Mr. Chairman, the bill provides that the Secretary 
shall conduct research. It actually mandates that the Secretary conduct 
research that's designed to improve the efficiency of vehicles that are 
used in transportation and the infrastructure that refuels or recharges 
those vehicles.
  Mr. Chairman, it does not specifically, as it now stands, direct the 
Secretary to consider the unique challenges that face rural areas with 
regard to these issues. The population is not as dense. It can be more 
expensive to develop the infrastructure.
  The distances typically that have to be covered by those who are 
using vehicles are greater. The infrastructure is probably going to 
have to be a little denser to take that into account, relatively 
speaking.
  In rural areas you will find that many people use larger vehicles. 
Pickup trucks are very common, and it's not simply because folks like 
pickup trucks, it's because folks have heavy things to carry, large 
loads fairly regularly.
  These are unique challenges that face rural America. And rural 
America is also that portion of America that really doesn't have a lot 
of extra money in its pocket to meet transportation costs.
  So I think it's particularly appropriate that we specifically direct 
the Secretary to take into account the unique challenges facing rural 
America when it comes to transportation issues generally, and when it 
comes to our attempts to improve, make more efficient, make more cost 
efficient, make cleaner our use of transportation across the country.
  I think the amendment should be noncontroversial. I certainly hope 
so.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mrs. BIGGERT. Mr. Chairman, I rise to claim the time in opposition to 
the Marshall amendment, even though I am not opposed to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentlewoman from Illinois is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mrs. BIGGERT. Mr. Chairman, I am supportive of the Marshall 
amendment. As the amendment states, there are unique challenges facing 
rural areas, especially in regards to refueling and infrastructure for 
alternative-fuel vehicles, such as those that run on natural gas and 
hydrogen or electric or plug-in electric hybrid vehicles that require 
an electrical outlet.
  I thank Mr. Marshall for trying to ensure that rural Americans have 
the same benefits in this area as their urban counterparts.
  With that, I would support this amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. MARSHALL. I thank the gentlelady for her support. I think all 
rural Americans thank the gentlelady for her support.
  What I would like to do right now, Mr. Chairman, if I could ask, is 
yield some time to the gentleman from New Jersey (Mr. Holt) whose 
amendment was just considered and adopted. Mr. Holt couldn't be here at 
the time the amendment was considered, and I know he wants to speak a 
little bit about his amendment.
  Mr. HOLT. Mr. Chairman, I thank my respected friend from Georgia and 
also the chairman for their support of my legislation, this amendment 
that is really quite simple, and I appreciate their support of it.
  There is nothing in the bill that would prohibit the use of funds for 
advanced agriculture vehicles. My

[[Page H9583]]

amendment, as adopted, simply underscores the importance of research 
and development in this arena.
  Rising food costs have been one of the greatest burdens of America's 
struggling families, and the cost of fuel in transporting agricultural 
products has been a major factor in these costs increases.
  According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, prices for what the 
department calls ``food at home,'' which includes grocery stores, 
convenience stores and food at farmers markets, will rise 2 to 3 
percent this year following an increase of 6.4 percent last year, they 
say the highest jump in nearly two decades. Increasing food prices are 
expected to outpace increases in the Consumer Price Index.
  Granted, the cost of fuel is only one factor in these increases. But 
everything we can do to ease the burden of high fuel costs of 
agricultural products certainly will help. Coming from the Garden 
State, which has a long agricultural tradition, I feel that this is as 
important an issue for my constituents as for those in the other 49 
States.
  I will continue to work to find ways to make agricultural production 
less costly, more sustainable.
  Mr. Chair, I rise today in support of my amendment to the Advanced 
Vehicle Technology Act (H.R. 3246 which was offered by Mr. Gordon of 
Tennessee), to ensure that funding for the pilot program will be 
applied towards the development of more fuel efficient agricultural 
vehicles.
  There is nothing in the bill that would have prohibited the use of 
funds for advanced agriculture vehicles; my amendment simply 
underscores the importance of research and development in this arena.
  Rising food costs have been one of the greatest burdens on our 
struggling families, and the cost of fuel in producing and transporting 
agricultural products has been a major factor in these cost increases. 
According to experts from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, prices 
for what the Department calls ``food at home,'' which includes 
purchases at grocery stores, convenience stores and farmers' markets, 
will rise 2 to 3 percent this year, following an increase of 6.4 
percent last year, ``the highest jump in nearly two decades.'' 
Increasing food prices are expected to outpace increases in the 
Consumer Price Index.
  Granted, the cost of fuel is not the only factor behind the 
increasing price of food. But everything we can do to ease the burden 
of high fuel costs on agricultural production will help. Coming from 
the Garden State which has a long agricultural tradition, this is an 
important issue to my constituents.
  I will continue to work to find ways to make agricultural production 
less costly and more sustainable, because I believe it is critical to 
our food security. I urge my colleagues to support this amendment.
  Mr. MARSHALL. Mr. Chairman, I would like to yield 30 seconds to the 
chairman of the committee, who continues to regularly beat me in every 
running race we have, the gentleman from Tennessee.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. More importantly, I want to thank you for 
this very excellent, constructive amendment. It seeks to recognize the 
unique challenges faced by rural communities as we move toward greater 
electrification of the transportation sector.
  I too share the concern for my constituents in Middleton, Tennessee. 
This is an excellent amendment, an improvement to a good bill, and I 
urge its adoption.
  Mr. MARSHALL. If I could just wrap up, you know, I am no expert in 
this area, but I do know rural areas. And with the distances, the 
weights of vehicles, it seems to me that natural gas and natural gas 
distribution facilities and hybrid engines probably are what we are 
going to need in rural areas more than anything else, and that pure 
electric isn't going to work very well.
  But that's for the experts to figure out. What this amendment does is 
essentially direct the Secretary to make sure that the experts do focus 
on questions like that.
  Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Georgia (Mr. Marshall).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                  Amendment No. 9 Offered by Mr. Cohen

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 9 
printed in House Report 111-255.
  Mr. COHEN. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Amendment No. 9 offered by Mr. Cohen:
       Page 10, lines 1 through 3, amend paragraph (2) to read as 
     follows:
       (2) multiple battery chemistries and novel energy storage 
     devices, including nonchemical batteries and 
     electromechanical storage technologies such as hydraulics, 
     flywheels, and compressed air storage;

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 745, the gentleman 
from Tennessee (Mr. Cohen) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Tennessee.
  Mr. COHEN. I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  I would first like to commend Representative Peters and the Science 
and Technology Committee for sponsoring this forward-looking piece of 
legislation and, of course, Chairman Gordon for his outstanding work in 
bringing this to the floor.
  For more than a century the United States has been the home to 
automobile innovation. This innovation made the U.S.A. the world leader 
in automobile production and automobile design. Cars and the United 
States were almost synonymous.
  However in recent years the United States has fallen far behind Asian 
and European automakers and countries there with regard to vehicle 
innovation, especially when it comes to fuel efficiency. As gas prices 
continue to rise and American citizens become more concerned about 
global warming and energy security, they have responded by purchasing 
more fuel-efficient vehicles.
  So the American car manufacturer must meet that demand to stay active 
and viable. Finding a safe, affordable and clean alternative to oil 
will not be cheap nor easy. Public and private entities will have to 
work cooperatively to solve this technological problem. Old-fashioned 
American entrepreneurship will need to be working on the cutting edge 
of technological advancements to keep our automobile industry alive.
  From hydrogen fuel cells to electric cars, these innovators are 
leaving no stone unturned when it comes to finding energy solutions. So 
with such an array of technologies holding so much promise, we cannot 
afford to ignore any promising technology. With this in mind, Amendment 
No. 9 assures electromechanical storage technologies such as 
hydraulics, flywheels and compressed air storage are also allowed to be 
researched under this Department of Energy program.
  These technologies hold tremendous promise and need to be explored as 
energy alternatives. For example, existing compressed air cars average 
more than 115 gas-equivalent miles per gallon and can reach speeds of 
up to 90 miles an hour. Most importantly, these cars emit almost zero 
carbon dioxide and only cost $2 to $3 to fill up.

                              {time}  1415

  Technologies such as compressed air are not yet perfect; however, 
with the passage of the Advanced Vehicles Technology Act, these 
innovative technologies can receive the funding they need to transform 
a novel fuel source into an energy solution of the future. Doing so 
will spur development throughout the country in small scientific 
laboratories, and one in Memphis, Bioworks, in my district might be one 
that engages in this, as well as in the massive grounds of General 
Motors, Ford, and other American manufacturing plants.
  The economic competitiveness and safety of the United States depends 
upon the ability of American entrepreneurs to develop viable 
alternatives to oil. In order to ensure our future security, we must 
make a down payment on the future of our country by seriously investing 
in alternative energy research.
  For these reasons, I strongly urge the passage of this amendment to 
the Advanced Vehicles Technology Act, which simply gives another 
alternative to the Department of Energy to move us into the future in a 
progressive and sound way.
  Mrs. BIGGERT. Mr. Chairman, I rise to claim the time in opposition to 
the Cohen amendment even though I am not opposed to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentlewoman from Illinois is 
recognized for 5 minutes.

[[Page H9584]]

  There was no objection.
  Mrs. BIGGERT. Mr. Chairman, I do support the amendment. I think it 
simply lays out examples of electromechanical storage technologies to 
make sure that they are included in this bill.
  Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. COHEN. Mr. Chairman, I yield to the gentleman from Murfreesboro, 
Tennessee (Mr. Gordon), the chairman of the committee.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. I thank Mr. Cohen for yielding.
  I also thank him for presenting this good amendment to us. It seeks 
to recognize the full range of energy storage devices that can be 
incorporated into vehicles, including beyond batteries. We have worked 
with Mr. Cohen in perfecting the language. It's a good amendment, and I 
urge adoption.
  Mr. COHEN. Mr. Chairman, I urge a positive vote on the amendment, and 
I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Tennessee (Mr. Cohen).
  The amendment was agreed to.


            Amendment No. 10 Offered by Donnelly of Indiana

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 10 
printed in House Report 111-255.
  Mr. DONNELLY of Indiana. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the 
desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Amendment No. 10 offered by Mr. Donnelly of Indiana:
       Page 15, line 20, insert ``, recreational,'' after ``heavy-
     duty commercial''.
       Page 17, line 11, insert ``, recreational,'' after ``heavy-
     duty commercial''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 745, the gentleman 
from Indiana (Mr. Donnelly) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Indiana.
  Mr. DONNELLY of Indiana. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself such time as I 
may consume.
  Americans across the country have, for decades, taken their families 
and recreational vehicles to national parks, historic battlefields, and 
other tourist sites and towns that are uniquely American. Despite the 
recent economic downturn and increase in gas prices, thousands more RVs 
will continue to be sold each year.
  My amendment is simple: Include RVs as eligible for vehicle 
technologies research at the Department of Energy under section 201 of 
the bill dealing with medium and heavy duty and transit vehicles.
  The RV industry has been moving in the right direction with fuel 
efficiency research; however, just as with other medium and heavy duty 
vehicles, the costs of such research for RVs are high. High costs in a 
tough economic climate slow progress by making it difficult for 
companies to set sufficient research funding aside.
  Including RVs among medium and heavy duty vehicles makes sense 
because of their similar size, weight, and power train. H.R. 3246 
prioritizes making our vehicle fleet in the United States as fuel 
efficient as possible by developing and promoting new technologies, and 
our amendment clarifies that recreational vehicles should be part of 
these efforts, ensuring that the thousands of new RVs that drive onto 
America's roads each year are using the least amount of fuel possible.
  I strongly support H.R. 3246 and believe this amendment to include 
RVs will make the program more successful in ensuring medium and heavy 
duty vehicles are more efficient energy users.
  Mr. Chairman, I strongly support this bill, and I thank Chairman 
Gordon and Mr. Peters for their work on this legislation to help make 
the vehicles on our roads more fuel efficient and our auto industry 
more competitive for the future. I would also like to thank my good 
friends and colleagues Mr. Souder and Mr. DeFazio for their support of 
this amendment.
  I urge the House to support my amendment and also to support the 
underlying bill.
  Mr. Chairman, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mrs. BIGGERT. Mr. Chairman, I rise to claim time in opposition to the 
Donnelly amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentlewoman from Illinois is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mrs. BIGGERT. Mr. Chairman, I have some real concerns with this 
amendment. I just wonder if this bill is really the proper place for 
this amendment that includes recreational vehicles in a title of the 
bill that is intended to provide research, development, demonstration, 
and commercial application on medium to heavy duty commercial and 
transit vehicles, and I'm afraid that this amendment would divert funds 
from an area of research that would be more beneficial to the 
population at large. And I would have a question to ask of the sponsor 
for clarification.
  There is a definition of the recreational vehicle. Would this include 
not just a commercial truck or bus type of vehicle, but does this 
include all RVs that could be a pickup or a van that they would be 
attached to?
  Mr. DONNELLY of Indiana. If the gentlewoman will yield, this includes 
bus-like vehicles. This does not include towables or pickups.
  Mrs. BIGGERT. Reclaiming my time, so in other words, this would be 
the same kind of chassis that would be in one of the commercial trucks?
  Mr. DONNELLY of Indiana. It would be very similar to those chassis, 
yes, to fit in with the spirit of this section.
  Mrs. BIGGERT. Another concern is that this is for recreational 
vehicles and this is limited taxpayer money. Do you think that the 
American people would like to see this included as the type of research 
and development that we would be asking to designate----
  Mr. DONNELLY of Indiana. Will the gentlewoman yield?
  Mrs. BIGGERT. I yield.
  Mr. DONNELLY of Indiana. I absolutely think the American taxpayers 
would be in support of this because it creates jobs and it creates 
opportunity. So, yes, I do.
  Mrs. BIGGERT. Mr. Chairman, the RV is an optional purchase for a 
consumer, usually used for vacation purposes. We've been talking about 
recreational. And, again, I really have some concerns of spending 
taxpayer funds on research and development. If the gentleman could 
convince me that this would lower the fuel consumption so much that it 
would save--
  Do you have any idea how many recreational vehicles there are that 
would benefit from this research?
  Mr. DONNELLY of Indiana. Will the gentlewoman yield?
  Mrs. BIGGERT. Yes, I yield to the gentleman.
  Mr. DONNELLY of Indiana. We would have a lot more sold if we had 
better mileage. That's the attempt on this. We are trying to save 
millions of gallons of gasoline and of diesel each year and to create 
thousands and thousands of additional jobs and strengthen our economy, 
very much the same type of goals that we have had in the other programs 
that are part of this.
  Mrs. BIGGERT. I thank the gentleman. And I'm afraid I must still 
stand in opposition to this amendment.
  Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. DONNELLY of Indiana. Mr. Chairman, I yield 30 seconds to the 
chairman, the gentleman from Tennessee (Mr. Gordon).
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. I thank Mr. Donnelly for yielding.
  In this bipartisan amendment, my colleagues seek to recognize the 
unique requirements of the types of vehicles commonly known as 
recreational vehicles. They highlight an important industry within the 
medium to heavy duty truck sector, and I would point out that these are 
heavy users of fuel. If we can make them more fuel efficient, we 
certainly are going to make our country less dependent on foreign oil. 
I think that this is an excellent use of these research dollars, and I 
support the amendment.
  Mr. DONNELLY of Indiana. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my 
time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Indiana (Mr. Donnelly).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Mrs. BIGGERT. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by

[[Page H9585]]

the gentleman from Indiana will be postponed.


                Amendment No. 11 Offered by Mr. Altmire

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 11 
printed in House Report 111-255.
  Mr. ALTMIRE. Mr. Chairman, I rise as the designee of Congressman 
Sestak, the author of amendment No. 11.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Amendment No. 11 offered by Mr. Altmire:
       Page 14, line 5, insert ``advanced battery'' after 
     ``vehicle, engine,''.
       Page 14, line 16, strike ``; and'' and insert a semicolon.
       Page 14, line 17, redesignate paragraph (8) as paragraph 
     (9).
       Page 14, after line 16, insert the following new paragraph:
       (8) improve the calendar life and cycle life of advanced 
     batteries; and

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 745, the gentleman 
from Pennsylvania (Mr. Altmire) and a Member opposed each will control 
5 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Pennsylvania.
  Mr. ALTMIRE. Mr. Chairman, the legislation before us would 
reauthorize the Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program, 
which invests in advanced vehicle research and development. This 
program taps American ingenuity to create good-paying American jobs 
and, importantly, reduce our dependence on foreign oil.
  The Advanced Vehicle Technology Act requires the Energy Secretary to 
research and develop advanced automobile battery manufacturing. 
Automotive batteries for plug-in hybrids and electric vehicles are 
promising, but they are not yet fully competitive in the market.
  Congressman Sestak's amendment would require the Secretary to 
consider two additional factors in bringing advanced batteries for 
plug-in vehicles and electric cars to market.
  First, electric vehicle batteries are limited by the number of times 
they can be charged and depleted before the battery fails entirely. To 
extend battery life cycles, vehicle manufacturers oversize the 
batteries, often extending battery life but then sacrificing cost and 
efficiency in the process. The gentleman's amendment would require 
research and development of technology to efficiently increase battery 
life.
  Second, vehicle battery manufacturing is an energy-and emissions-
intensive process, which ultimately contributes to an electric 
vehicle's carbon footprint. Congressman Sestak's amendment would 
require the Energy Secretary to research and develop new technologies 
to increase efficiency in the battery manufacturing process.
  I thank Chairman Gordon, and I urge support for Mr. Sestak's 
amendment.
  Mr. Chairman, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mrs. BIGGERT. Mr. Chairman, I rise to claim the time in opposition to 
the Sestak amendment even though I am not opposed to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentlewoman from Illinois is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mrs. BIGGERT. Mr. Chairman, I rise in support of the Sestak 
amendment.
  As we conduct research and development and produce and manufacture 
advanced batteries, it makes sense to, at the same time, look into ways 
to not only reduce waste streams, emissions, and energy intensity, but 
also to improve the calendar life and cycle life of these advanced 
batteries.
  Mrs. BIGGERT. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. ALTMIRE. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Altmire).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                 Amendment No. 12 Offered by Mr. Massa

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 12 
printed in House Report 111-255.
  Mr. MASSA. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk made in 
order under the rule.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Amendment No. 12 offered by Mr. Massa:
       Page 11, lines 12 through 14, amend paragraph (4) to read 
     as follows:
       (4) give consideration to conversion of existing or former 
     vehicle technology development or manufacturing facilities 
     for the purposes of this Act, and support public-private 
     partnerships dedicated to overcoming barriers in commercial 
     application of transformational vehicle technologies that 
     utilize such industry-led facilities; and

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 745, the gentleman 
from New York (Mr. Massa) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from New York.

                              {time}  1430

  Mr. MASSA. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  The importance of this bill and the support for critical new vehicle 
technologies in the United States simply cannot be overstated. The 
future of the American automobile industry and its accompanying tens of 
thousands of American jobs rest on the ability of domestic car 
companies to research, develop and commercialize new, clean, efficient 
technologies that will be the backbone of a new U.S. vehicle market in 
the future and for future generations.
  We have achieved many breakthroughs in advanced vehicle technologies; 
and I am certain with the continued support from Congress and the 
American people, this progress will continue. Taking these 
breakthroughs from research to reality, however, has been an ongoing 
challenge for American innovators. Facing many barriers that prevent 
breaking new technologies getting to the marketplace, automobile 
companies have always had challenges commercializing advanced vehicles 
to help reduce our Nation's dangerous, if not critically dangerous, 
dependence on foreign oil, should I say hostile foreign oil.
  Much of the focus of the past efforts by the Federal Government has 
been on the research side. With this amendment, the equally important 
commercialization part will now receive attention.
  My amendment will help change this emphasizing the importance of 
those barriers to commercialization and by supporting new ways to help 
our domestic car companies bring advanced vehicle technologies online. 
Beyond support for research and development, we must follow through 
completely on our obligations to the American people to develop real 
solutions to our growing energy crisis. We cannot be satisfied with 
abandoning new technologies every time they leave the laboratory. We 
must help our automobile makers carry these technologies across the 
finish line or face the alternative as we have in the past and seen 
time and time again where U.S. innovation and research is picked up and 
developed by foreign competitors. Thus, we lose our market share and 
advantage in the marketplace.
  To support true, real change and to bring about a serious new change 
for new generations of advanced technology vehicles in the United 
States, we must focus on basic research and on public-private 
partnerships that utilize the expertise of industry to conquer the many 
impediments to commercializing these promising new technologies.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mrs. BIGGERT. Mr. Chairman, I claim the time in opposition to the 
Massa amendment, and I am not necessarily in opposition to the 
amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentlewoman from Illinois is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mrs. BIGGERT. Mr. Chairman, I do have some concerns about the 
gentleman's amendment. As I read the amendment, I note that Mr. Massa 
is adding language that would support public-private partnerships 
dedicated to overcoming barriers in commercial application of 
transformational vehicle technologies that utilize such industry-led 
facilities.
  Perhaps the gentleman could explain in a little more detail who would 
be able to take advantage of this change and what types of activities 
it would allow.
  Mr. MASSA. Would the gentlelady yield?
  Mrs. BIGGERT. I yield to the gentleman.
  Mr. MASSA. I think your question cuts to the core of what public-
private

[[Page H9586]]

partnerships can do to help American industry. First, this is targeted 
at the domestic American automobile industry. As we have seen over and 
over again as our competitors around the world do everything they can 
to lower barriers to business competition and business 
commercialization, I seek to give that opportunity to our industries as 
well.
  You know, having spent some time in business running a factory line, 
I understand what it means to get to the finish line, have a great 
product and then face barrier upon barrier of unnecessary regulation 
when all I need is an open line of communication to be able to overcome 
these. This is the spirit in which this amendment is offered, to offer 
the maximum amount of opportunity to our domestic industry. I think 
that not only the American people but my colleagues and good friends 
across the aisle can join me in that spirit.
  Mrs. BIGGERT. Reclaiming my time, can you give me an example of a 
barrier?
  Mr. MASSA. Would the gentlelady yield?
  Mrs. BIGGERT. I yield.
  Mr. MASSA. As a specific opportunity, we all know that State and 
Federal governments have a tremendous amount of data capability to be 
able to do market research and understand how the marketplace operates. 
And yet many times, because a corporation or a company or a private 
manufacturer is private, they cannot readily access that information. 
That is a key example of the kinds of barriers to commercialization 
that we must remove. These are lessons that our good friends and allies 
across the world, who frankly are our economic competitors, have 
already realized and moved forward on. I seek to give our domestic 
manufacturers the exact same advantages.
  Mrs. BIGGERT. Reclaiming my time, you said it would help the American 
manufacturers. Is it one specific manufacturer, or who would this 
benefit? I want to make sure that it is not just a specific 
manufacturer.
  Mr. MASSA. Would the gentlelady yield?
  Mrs. BIGGERT. I yield.
  Mr. MASSA. Certainly the context of this amendment is offered with 
the specific focus of assisting domestic automobile manufacturers. But 
as I am sure the gentlelady would agree with me, automobile 
manufacturing is such a large and encompassing industrial activity, 
that this will not only go from the factory floor in Detroit but may in 
fact help the small mom-and-pop manufacturers that support that 
activity. So this will have a very broad benefit across a wide spectrum 
of economic activities, ultimately focused on helping advanced vehicle 
technologies.
  Mrs. BIGGERT. Reclaiming my time, I just want to make sure that we 
all understand the intent so we can make an informed decision as to 
whether it is appropriate to this bill.
  Could you give me a little more on who benefits from this and the 
barriers?
  Mr. MASSA. Would the gentlelady yield?
  Mrs. BIGGERT. I yield to the gentleman.
  Mr. MASSA. I can certainly do that, perhaps with your concurrence, by 
offering a specific example.
  As we face new technologies, be they hybrid, be they new fuel sources 
like second-generation ethanol or hydrogen, those technologies as they 
mature across a pilot production line will ultimately produce a vehicle 
that will be offered to the American people. The business model of 
going from the laboratory to the actual showroom floor is as complex as 
the research and development.
  This amendment seeks to recognize that and lower those barriers. 
Visualize, if I might offer this: as the vehicle rolls out of the 
laboratory, and we have all raised children, I have a teenager. I know 
how to get that teenager through college. And by golly, that is what 
this concept does. It helps that vehicle stand on its own so it can be 
proudly purchased by Americans.
  Mrs. BIGGERT. Reclaiming my time, I know you are talking about the 
commercialization, which is what we sometimes call the ``valley of 
death'' for companies to get out beyond the demonstration to the 
marketplace which is probably the hardest for so many companies. And 
you think that this will help a lot of different companies be able to 
do that?
  Mr. MASSA. Would the gentlelady yield?
  Mrs. BIGGERT. I yield.
  Mr. MASSA. Based on my personal experience of having run production 
lines in factories, I am certain that this will help in the 
commercialization of American-made products and thus help the American 
manufacturing sector.
  Mrs. BIGGERT. With that, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. MASSA. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1 minute to the Chair and the 
individual who is responsible for allowing me the honor of presenting 
this amendment, the gentleman from Tennessee (Mr. Gordon).
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. Let me thank Mr. Massa for bringing this 
excellent amendment to our attention. It makes a good bill better. I 
support it.
  Let me conclude by saying that this bill moved relatively smoothly 
today. This is a very important bill, but it didn't happen by accident. 
I want to thank Mrs. Biggert and Mr. Hall for working with Mr. Peters 
in really a collegial way to bring this important bill before us.
  But as all Members of Congress know, if it wasn't for diligent, 
dedicated staff, we could not bring this type of important legislation 
before us. So I want to thank Chris King, who is the staff director for 
the Energy Subcommittee on the Science and Technology Committee, and 
for leading a good team of John Piazza, Hillary Cain, Elizabeth Chapel, 
and for working with Jonathan Smith from Mr. Peters' office. Without 
your work, we could not have brought this bill, and I thank you for it.
  Mr. MASSA. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from New York (Mr. Massa).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. MASSA. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from New York 
will be postponed.


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, proceedings 
will now resume on those amendments printed in House Report 111-255 on 
which further proceedings were postponed, in the following order:
  amendment No. 2 by Mr. Hall of Texas,
  amendment No. 10 by Mr. Donnelly of Indiana,
  amendment No. 12 by Mr. Massa of New York.
  The Chair will reduce to 5 minutes the time for any electronic vote 
after the first vote in this series.


              Amendment No. 2 Offered by Mr. Hall of Texas

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Texas (Mr. 
Hall) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which the noes 
prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 179, 
noes 253, not voting 7, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 705]

                               AYES--179

     Aderholt
     Adler (NJ)
     Akin
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barton (TX)
     Berry
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Blackburn
     Blunt
     Boehner
     Bono Mack
     Boozman
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bright
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (SC)
     Brown-Waite, Ginny
     Buchanan
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Buyer
     Calvert
     Campbell
     Cantor
     Cao
     Capito
     Carney
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Castle
     Chaffetz
     Childers
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conaway
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Davis (KY)
     Deal (GA)
     Dent
     Diaz-Balart, L.
     Diaz-Balart, M.
     Doggett
     Dreier
     Duncan
     Emerson
     Fallin
     Flake
     Fleming
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen

[[Page H9587]]


     Gallegly
     Garrett (NJ)
     Gerlach
     Gingrey (GA)
     Goodlatte
     Granger
     Graves
     Guthrie
     Hall (TX)
     Harper
     Hastings (WA)
     Heller
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Himes
     Hunter
     Inglis
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan (OH)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kirkpatrick (AZ)
     Kline (MN)
     Kratovil
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Lee (NY)
     Lewis (CA)
     Linder
     LoBiondo
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Maloney
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McMahon
     McMorris Rodgers
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller, Gary
     Minnick
     Mitchell
     Moran (KS)
     Murphy (NY)
     Myrick
     Neugebauer
     Nunes
     Olson
     Paul
     Paulsen
     Pence
     Petri
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Putnam
     Radanovich
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Scalise
     Schock
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shadegg
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Skelton
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Souder
     Stearns
     Sullivan
     Taylor
     Teague
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiahrt
     Tiberi
     Walden
     Wamp
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)

                               NOES--253

     Abercrombie
     Ackerman
     Andrews
     Arcuri
     Austria
     Baca
     Baird
     Baldwin
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Bean
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berman
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Boccieri
     Bonner
     Bordallo
     Boren
     Boswell
     Boucher
     Boyd
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown, Corrine
     Butterfield
     Camp
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carson (IN)
     Castor (FL)
     Chandler
     Christensen
     Chu
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Costello
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Dahlkemper
     Davis (AL)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     Davis (TN)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delahunt
     DeLauro
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Driehaus
     Edwards (MD)
     Edwards (TX)
     Ehlers
     Ellison
     Ellsworth
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Etheridge
     Faleomavaega
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Foster
     Frank (MA)
     Fudge
     Giffords
     Gonzalez
     Gordon (TN)
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffith
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hall (NY)
     Halvorson
     Hare
     Harman
     Hastings (FL)
     Heinrich
     Herseth Sandlin
     Higgins
     Hill
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hodes
     Hoekstra
     Holden
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Inslee
     Israel
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson-Lee (TX)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E.B.
     Kagen
     Kanjorski
     Kaptur
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilpatrick (MI)
     Kilroy
     Kind
     Kirk
     Kissell
     Klein (FL)
     Kosmas
     Kucinich
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Markey (CO)
     Markey (MA)
     Marshall
     Massa
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McCotter
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Meek (FL)
     Meeks (NY)
     Melancon
     Michaud
     Miller (MI)
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Mollohan
     Moore (KS)
     Moore (WI)
     Moran (VA)
     Murphy (CT)
     Murphy, Patrick
     Murphy, Tim
     Murtha
     Nadler (NY)
     Napolitano
     Neal (MA)
     Norton
     Nye
     Oberstar
     Obey
     Olver
     Ortiz
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Perlmutter
     Perriello
     Peters
     Peterson
     Pierluisi
     Pingree (ME)
     Polis (CO)
     Pomeroy
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Rodriguez
     Rogers (AL)
     Ross
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sablan
     Salazar
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schauer
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (GA)
     Scott (VA)
     Serrano
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Shuler
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Snyder
     Space
     Speier
     Spratt
     Stark
     Stupak
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Towns
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Upton
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watson
     Watt
     Waxman
     Weiner
     Welch
     Wexler
     Wilson (OH)
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Yarmuth

                             NOT VOTING--7

     Barrett (SC)
     Capps
     Gohmert
     McHugh
     Schmidt
     Sestak
     Tanner

                              {time}  1507

  Messrs. WALZ, ROTHMAN of New Jersey, SALAZAR, DICKS, POLIS of 
Colorado, Ms. WOOLSEY, Messrs. BRALEY of Iowa, McCOTTER, HOEKSTRA, 
McDERMOTT, DAVIS of Tennessee, CAPUANO, Mrs. McCARTHY of New York, 
Messrs. BONNER, LYNCH, FALEOMAVAEGA, MOLLOHAN, and Ms. TSONGAS changed 
their vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  (By unanimous consent, Mr. Baca was allowed to speak out of order.)


                             Roll Call Cup

  Mr. BACA. Mr. Chair, on Monday we had a match, which is the Roll Call 
Cup, between the Democrats and the Republicans, our Ryder Cup, and 
we've had a series of matches. In the past, the Republicans have won it 
4 years in a row. This year the Democrats won it to make it 4 years in 
a row by winning the series 12-5.
  I want to thank both of the team captains who have worked so hard on 
the Ryder Cup, and that's Zach Wamp on the Republican side for doing a 
good job and John Tanner, who has been the representative for us.
  But the real winners here are First Tee and Roll Call because this 
really goes out to help many underprivileged kids here in Washington, 
D.C., with the ability to play golf.
  So again, on behalf of the Democrats who retain the cup for the 
fourth year in a row, thank you very much.
  At this time I would like to yield some time to Zach Wamp.
  Mr. WAMP. Mr. Chairman, I just would like to add that we want to 
thank Dan Tate, Sr. with the PGA. We want to thank the First Tee 
program, which is much more than golf, ladies and gentlemen. It is a 
leadership, development and training program for young people. They now 
have First Tee facilities compliments of, frankly, the Congress at 
military bases all across the country and in 19 foreign countries.
  The only highlight of this year's loss was that our three freshmen, 
Mr. Roe of Tennessee, Mr. Rooney of Florida and Mr. Hunter of 
California, performed admirably. So there is hope for next year and for 
the future. With that, congratulations to the Democrats. It is now 4-4. 
We look forward to raising money for First Tee in the future. From this 
year and in previous years, this event in 7 years has raised well over 
$1 million for the First Tee program, and for that, we should all be 
grateful.
  I yield back to the gentleman from California.
  Mr. BACA. Thank you very much.
  Mr. Chair, if I may thank the Democrats who participated, and that is 
John Yarmuth, John Tanner, Chet Edwards, Jim Clyburn, Albio Sires, Jim 
Cooper, Mike Doyle, Bart Stupak, Chris Carney and Ed Perlmutter. I want 
to thank the Ryder Cup team for their participation.


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, 5-minute voting will continue.
  There was no objection.


          Amendment No. 10 Offered by Mr. Donnelly of Indiana

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Indiana 
(Mr. Donnelly) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 5-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 369, 
noes 62, not voting 8, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 706]

                               AYES--369

     Abercrombie
     Ackerman
     Aderholt
     Adler (NJ)
     Akin
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Andrews
     Arcuri
     Austria
     Baca
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Baird
     Baldwin
     Barrow
     Bean
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berman
     Berry
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blackburn
     Blumenauer
     Blunt
     Boccieri
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boozman
     Bordallo
     Boren
     Boswell
     Boucher
     Boyd
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Braley (IA)
     Bright
     Brown (SC)
     Brown, Corrine
     Brown-Waite, Ginny
     Buchanan
     Burton (IN)
     Butterfield
     Buyer
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Cao
     Capito
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Chandler
     Childers
     Christensen
     Chu
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coffman (CO)
     Cohen
     Cole
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Costello
     Courtney
     Crenshaw

[[Page H9588]]


     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Cummings
     Dahlkemper
     Davis (AL)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (KY)
     Davis (TN)
     Deal (GA)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delahunt
     DeLauro
     Diaz-Balart, L.
     Diaz-Balart, M.
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Dreier
     Driehaus
     Duncan
     Edwards (MD)
     Edwards (TX)
     Ehlers
     Ellison
     Ellsworth
     Emerson
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Etheridge
     Faleomavaega
     Fallin
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Forbes
     Foster
     Frank (MA)
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Garrett (NJ)
     Gerlach
     Giffords
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gonzalez
     Goodlatte
     Gordon (TN)
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffith
     Grijalva
     Guthrie
     Gutierrez
     Hall (NY)
     Halvorson
     Hare
     Harman
     Harper
     Hastings (FL)
     Herger
     Herseth Sandlin
     Higgins
     Hill
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hodes
     Hoekstra
     Holden
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Hunter
     Inslee
     Israel
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson-Lee (TX)
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Jordan (OH)
     Kagen
     Kanjorski
     Kaptur
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilpatrick (MI)
     Kilroy
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kirk
     Kirkpatrick (AZ)
     Kissell
     Klein (FL)
     Kline (MN)
     Kosmas
     Kratovil
     Kucinich
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Lee (CA)
     Lee (NY)
     Levin
     Lewis (CA)
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Mack
     Maffei
     Maloney
     Manzullo
     Markey (CO)
     Markey (MA)
     Marshall
     Massa
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McClintock
     McCollum
     McCotter
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McMahon
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meek (FL)
     Meeks (NY)
     Melancon
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Minnick
     Mitchell
     Mollohan
     Moore (KS)
     Moore (WI)
     Moran (VA)
     Murphy (CT)
     Murphy (NY)
     Murphy, Patrick
     Murtha
     Myrick
     Nadler (NY)
     Napolitano
     Neal (MA)
     Norton
     Nye
     Oberstar
     Obey
     Olson
     Olver
     Ortiz
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paulsen
     Payne
     Pence
     Perlmutter
     Perriello
     Peters
     Peterson
     Pierluisi
     Pingree (ME)
     Pitts
     Platts
     Polis (CO)
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Price (NC)
     Putnam
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Rodriguez
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sablan
     Salazar
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Schakowsky
     Schauer
     Schiff
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (GA)
     Scott (VA)
     Serrano
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Shuler
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sires
     Skelton
     Slaughter
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Snyder
     Souder
     Space
     Speier
     Spratt
     Stearns
     Stupak
     Sutton
     Taylor
     Teague
     Terry
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Tiberi
     Titus
     Tonko
     Towns
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Upton
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walden
     Walz
     Wamp
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watson
     Watt
     Waxman
     Weiner
     Welch
     Westmoreland
     Wexler
     Whitfield
     Wilson (OH)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)

                                NOES--62

     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Biggert
     Bishop (UT)
     Boehner
     Boustany
     Broun (GA)
     Burgess
     Cantor
     Carter
     Castle
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Conaway
     Dent
     Doggett
     Flake
     Fleming
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Gallegly
     Gohmert
     Granger
     Graves
     Hall (TX)
     Hastings (WA)
     Heinrich
     Heller
     Hensarling
     Inglis
     Issa
     Johnson, Sam
     Kingston
     Lamborn
     Linder
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Marchant
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     Miller, Gary
     Moran (KS)
     Murphy, Tim
     Neugebauer
     Nunes
     Paul
     Petri
     Poe (TX)
     Pomeroy
     Radanovich
     Rohrabacher
     Rooney
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shadegg
     Stark
     Sullivan
     Thornberry
     Tiahrt
     Tierney

                             NOT VOTING--8

     Barrett (SC)
     Capps
     Clarke
     Davis (IL)
     McHugh
     Schmidt
     Sestak
     Tanner

                          ____________________