Amendment Text: H.Amdt.460 — 111th Congress (2009-2010)

There is one version of the amendment.

Shown Here:
Amendment as Offered (10/22/2009)

This Amendment appears on page H11614 in the following article from the Congressional Record.



[Pages H11596-H11617]
                      SOLAR TECHNOLOGY ROADMAP ACT

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to House Resolution 846 and rule 
XVIII, the Chair declares the House in the Committee of the Whole House 
on the state of the Union for the consideration of the bill, H.R. 3585.

                              {time}  1219


                     In the Committee of the Whole

  Accordingly, the House resolved itself into the Committee of the 
Whole House on the State of the Union for the consideration of the bill 
(H.R. 3585) to guide and provide for United States research, 
development, and demonstration of solar energy technologies, and for 
other purposes, with Mr. Sablan in the chair.
  The Clerk read the title of the bill.
  The CHAIR. Pursuant to the rule, the bill is considered read for the 
first time.
  The gentleman from Tennessee (Mr. Gordon) and the gentleman from 
Texas (Mr. Hall) each will control 30 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Tennessee.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself such time as I 
may consume.
  I am pleased that we're considering H.R. 3585, the Solar Technology 
Roadmap Act sponsored by Science and Technology Subcommittee Chair 
Gabrielle Giffords. This bipartisan bill has a number of cosponsors 
including myself, subcommittee Chair Brian Baird, and Dan Lipinski, as 
well as committee members Michael McCaul and Roscoe Bartlett.
  I assume solar power is not the first name that comes to your mind 
when you think of the State of Tennessee; but over the last few years 
we have really seen firsthand the major potential that solar energy has 
to create new jobs across the country and reduce our dependency on 
foreign oil in the process.
  Recently, two major producers of special materials used in solar 
panels have chosen Clarksville and Cleveland, Tennessee, as sites for 
their next large factories, each with over $1 billion investment 
creating hundreds of jobs, plus many more jobs in larger investment 
with the supply chain, as well as universities now setting up courses 
in management for the solar panel industries. And this is happening all 
across the State and communities all across our Nation. And that's why 
we need a national plan, and that's why we are discussing this 
important bill today.
  H.R. 3585 establishes a comprehensive road mapping process for solar 
technology research, development, and demonstration activities 
conducted by the Federal Government in partnership with industry. The 
Secretary of Energy is also directed to award grants to carry out these 
programs by merit-based review specifically to provide awards to 
industry-led consortia research, development, and demonstration in 
solar manufacturing.
  The road map provision in the bill is molded on the successful 
National Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors, which has been 
instrumental in helping semiconductor technology advance rapidly over 
the past two decades.
  H.R. 3585 incorporates recommendations of the witnesses who appeared 
at the Science and Technology Committee, as well as input from a 
variety of academic, government, and industry experts. Science and 
Technology Committee staff closely consulted with the minority in the 
development of this bill. We accepted several minority amendments, and 
the vast majority of items in our manager's amendment in committee were 
also suggested or requested by the minority. The bill was voted out of 
committee on a bipartisan voice vote.
  H.R. 3585 has been officially endorsed by the U.S. Chamber of 
Commerce, the National Association of Manufacturers, the Solar Energy 
Industries Association, British Petroleum, IBM, Intel, and National 
Semiconductor.
  I look forward to voting for several good amendments today and 
strongly urge my colleagues here to support a bill that will help our 
country take back the leadership position in this fast-growing industry 
and put our best minds to work to meet our future energy needs.
  Once again, I want to commend Ms. Giffords, Mr. McCaul on their 
leadership on this issue. I would also like to take a moment to 
recognize staff who worked on this bill: Adam Rosenberg, Wyatt King, 
and Elaine Ulrich on the majority side; and Elizabeth Chapel and Tara 
Rothschild on the minority side. Without the hard work of the staff on 
both sides of the aisle, producing good bills like this one would not 
be possible.
  Mr. Chairman, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Speaker, I rise today, of course, to speak on 
H.R. 3585, the Solar Technology Roadmap Act.
  I would first like to thank the sponsor of the bill, Representative 
Giffords, and also Chairman Gordon, for working with our side of the 
aisle to address concerns and incorporating suggestions to the extent 
that you were able to. While we didn't come to an agreement on 
everything, we came to an agreement on a lot of things. But I do feel 
that we were given the opportunity to state our case and make our 
arguments. Unfortunately, the areas in which we were not able to reach 
an agreement remain of concern.

[[Page H11597]]

  Let me start by saying that as a conference, we're supportive of 
solar energy, and we have so voted--most of the people on my side of 
the aisle. We certainly see the great potential it has to be a 
contributor of energy to our constituents. However, as already stated, 
there's some lingering concerns in the bill before us today.
  First, the bill authorizes $2.25 billion over 5 years. This is not an 
insignificant amount, especially in our current financial climate. The 
question was raised during consideration of the bill in committee 
whether or not investment tax credits for solar energy, long-term 
incentives to develop renewable energy in general or an easing of 
burdensome regulations would be a better way to encourage the 
development and use of solar energy.
  Solar energy has been on the forefront for over 30 years, and it 
still only makes up 1 percent of the 7 percent of the renewable energy 
consumed in the United States according to the Energy Information 
Administration.
  This authorization, coupled with the requirement that the Secretary 
of Energy allocate at least 75 percent of funding to those solar 
research, development, and demonstration projects directed under the 
road map, leaves little flexibility for innovations that may be viable 
and yet not included as part of the road map.
  Second, the bill directs, not requests, it directs the Secretary to 
spend at least 30 percent in 2012 and culminating with at least 75 
percent in 2015. It could be as much as 100 percent on the research, 
development, and demonstration set forth by the road map committee.
  Moreover, at least one-third of the committee must be made up of 
industry members who are explicitly exempted from the Federal Advisory 
Committee Act. And this act, as you know, was intended to require an 
open and transparent process. While I support the Department of Energy, 
the university, and industry collaboration in the area of solar 
research, development, and demonstration, the optics of this 
examination are that you now have a committee, half of whose membership 
could be industry, telling the Department of Energy where to direct 
taxpayer money into R that could benefit their own companies while 
not having to answer to anyone or defend their recommendation to the 
entity that was set up to oversee and to require open and transparent 
processes.
  While I appreciate the inclusion at our suggestion of language 
dealing with potential conflicts of interests in regard to the road map 
committee membership, more transparency needs to be incorporated.
  During the full committee markup, Republicans attempted to address 
concerns through amendments that would have reduced the authorization, 
given the Secretary of DOE some discretion as to how much funding 
should go to the road map recommendations.

                              {time}  1230

  We had some suggestions to sunset the road map committee in 2015. 
While these amendments were all voted down, I remain hopeful that these 
issues can be addressed as we move forward.
  I would like to point out that the Department of Energy shares some 
of these same concerns with this bill, and it made the Science and 
Technology Committee aware of those concerns earlier this week. In 
particular, they expressed concerns with using the road map committee 
to direct DOE activities; the requirement of a percentage of funds to 
be used to support activities identified by the committee; the Federal 
Advisory Committee Act exemption for the committee; and potential 
conflicts of interest with the members of the committee.
  I support research and development into solar energy technologies, 
but believe me, this bill has a lot of room for improvement.
  With that, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. Mr. Chairman, I yield such time as she may 
consume to the passionate solar advocate and primary author of this 
bill, the gentlewoman from Arizona (Ms. Giffords).
  Ms. GIFFORDS. First of all, I would like to thank Chairman Gordon, 
also Ranking Member Hall, members of the committee, and our staff for 
helping to move this very important bill forward.
  Mr. Chairman, the United States has some of the best solar resources 
of any industrialized country in the world--enough power, in fact, to 
power the entire country several times over.
  These resources aren't unique or limited to the American Southwest. 
It turns out that our friends up north in the State of Alaska have 
about the same amount of solar resource energy as has the country of 
Germany. Yet, in 2006, Germany installed about seven times more solar 
power than we did here in the United States. Major companies in Europe 
and in China have been very aggressive over the last several years in 
building up their manufacturing capacities and in competing 
internationally to meet demand.
  If our policies and innovation models for solar energy don't change, 
the United States is simply going to transition from importing foreign 
oil to importing foreign panels.
  This country actually invented the first photovoltaic technologies, 
and we still have some of the smartest, most talented people in the 
world working to improve the efficiency and cost-effectiveness of solar 
cells today; but in order to use our precious research dollars as 
effectively as possible, these people--these patriots--need a serious 
road map. That's why I am so pleased to offer this bill today.
  After many substantive discussions with a wide range of industry and 
academic leaders, as well as with the Department of Energy, I believe 
there is a lot that the solar industry can learn from the experience of 
our national semiconductor industry.
  Twenty years ago, the United States was in danger of losing its 
semiconductor industry to Japan. In response, the industry created the 
technology road map for semiconductors. The focus of this initiative 
was to develop a road map to guide research and development efforts 
across the entire industry. By increasing communications between the 
diverse members of the supply chain, our American semiconductor 
industry was able to develop standards and to avoid the duplication of 
research efforts. These organized coordination efforts gave rise to the 
U.S. semiconductor giants like Intel and AMD, and the U.S. currently 
continues to lead the world in semiconductor development.
  Today's solar researchers in the United States find themselves in a 
very similar situation. To maintain a competitive advantage, they must 
come together to meet their common, precompetitive goals, whether in 
simulation activities, in developing new materials, in energy storage, 
in power, in grid management or even in weather forecasting.
  This bill would require the Department of Energy to engage diverse 
stakeholders in the solar community and to work across programs to 
create a comprehensive plan, a road map, to guide funding for the 
research needed to make the U.S. the global leader for solar 
innovation. The road map would be required to identify short-, medium- 
and long-term goals, and it would make recommendations on how to 
channel R resources to meet these goals. The bill would make the 
Department of Energy more responsive to our solar industry's needs, and 
it would encourage the needed collaboration and communication across 
technologies with well-vetted strategies.
  I would like to thank my colleagues on both sides of the aisle for 
their contributions that have made this bill a better bill. In fact, 
about 25 of the 28 changes in our manager's amendment in the Science 
Committee were suggested or requested by the minority. I also look 
forward to supporting several good amendments offered by my colleagues 
today. Another sign of the time and effort put together by so many were 
the endorsements. Chairman Gordon talked about that.
  I would like to remind members that the National Association of 
Manufacturers, the United States Chamber of Commerce, SEIA--the Solar 
Energy Industries Association--IBM, Intel, BP, and National 
Semiconductor are all behind this piece of legislation.
  Mr. Chairman, the United States has an opportunity to be the leading 
developer and exporter of clean solar technologies in the coming years 
and decades. This bipartisan bill is designed to advance that goal, and 
I strongly urge my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to support it.

[[Page H11598]]

  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Chairman, I yield 3 minutes to the gentleman 
from Texas (Mr. McCaul), who is a cosponsor of the bill.
  Mr. McCAUL. I thank the ranking member.
  Let me thank the author of the bill, Ms. Giffords, for her great 
leadership on what I consider to be one of the most important issues. 
That's energy independence.
  Mr. Chairman, I am proud to rise in support of this bill. I was proud 
to be a cosponsor of this bill.
  One thing is certain: the sun always rises, and it is important for 
us as a Nation to harness that energy. This is landmark legislation 
that, in my view, will make the United States a true leader in solar 
technology and in energy independence.
  What I particularly like about the bill is the collaboration between 
the academic, the environment, the universities, the Department of 
Education, and the private sector. I, personally, like the fact that 
the private sector is involved in this rather than just some bureaucrat 
behind closed doors in Washington, D.C., who is making those decisions.
  I recently met with the Stanford Research Institute, and I looked at 
their photovoltaic technology. The University of Texas at Austin, in my 
district, is also involved with the manufacturing of these 
photovoltaics, along with countless high-tech companies, like Applied 
Materials and many others.
  There is a lot of support for this bill in my district, and I think 
it's important to note that this bill has the support of the U.S. 
Chamber of Commerce, the National Association of Manufacturers, IBM, 
BP, Intel, and National Semiconductor. The Chamber recently urged us to 
vote for this, and said that the increased research, development and 
demonstration of solar technology is crucial to America's energy 
security needs.
  We talk a lot about energy independence around here, but today, we 
really have something tangible that we can do about it, and that is to 
support this legislation.
  As a former counterterrorism prosecutor, it disturbs me that we 
export $700 billion from this country to countries overseas which don't 
have our best interests at heart. We need to change our energy policy, 
and this is a critical piece to that. This is a great step forward for 
this Nation towards achieving that goal of energy independence.
  My district really represents the broad spectrum of the differences--
on the one hand, the Houston suburbs with oil and gas and, on the other 
hand, Austin, Texas, which is a green technology center. It's my view 
that we need all of this energy. We need to make more of this energy 
here in the United States, which will, in turn, create more energy for 
Americans and which will create more American jobs. In my view, we can 
have a hybrid energy policy, if you will. We can go green, and at the 
same time, we can drill.
  So, again, I think this bill is an important step forward towards 
that path to energy independence. Solar energy, in my view, is one of 
the best potentials for alternative energies out there, and it can be 
placed on rooftops, and transmission is not as much of an issue. We are 
on the cutting edge with a huge breakthrough in this country where we 
can harness the sun's energy and can provide the energy that this 
country desperately needs.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. Mr. Chairman, first, let me thank Mr. McCaul 
for his significant contribution to this and, more importantly, really, 
for the constructive role he has played on our committee.
  I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from Rhode Island (Mr. Langevin).
  (Mr. LANGEVIN asked and was given permission to revise and extend his 
remarks.)
  Mr. LANGEVIN. I thank the gentleman for yielding and for his 
outstanding leadership on solar technology issues.
  Mr. Chairman, I also, of course, want to rise in strong support of 
H.R. 3585, the Solar Technology Roadmap Act.
  I particularly would like to acknowledge Congresswoman Giffords for 
her leadership on this important issue and for her work to advance our 
Nation's efforts to become a world leader in solar technology.
  Clearly, this is an essential step as we work to transition our 
Nation off of our dependence on foreign oil and as we work harder to 
try to protect our environment.
  Beyond all of this, though, my home State of Rhode Island recently 
reported an outstanding unemployment rate of 13 percent. Congress' top 
priority right now must also be creating an environment where new jobs 
are developed and where new industries can flourish. The Solar 
Technology Roadmap Act does just that by establishing a committee of 
government and industry officials to set short- and long-term goals for 
the industry as well as by providing guidance to expedite the process 
of improving solar technologies right here at home.
  This bill is the right road map at the right time. It is visionary, 
and I urge my colleagues to vote ``yes'' on this important bill.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Chairman, I yield 3 minutes to the gentleman 
from Maryland (Mr. Bartlett).
  Mr. BARTLETT. Mr. Chairman, I recommend a ``yes'' vote for this good, 
bipartisan solar technology road map.
  I want to thank my Democrat and Republican colleagues for their 
collaboration that improved H.R. 3585 with amendments in subcommittee, 
in full committee, as well as in the manager's amendment and in other 
amendments to follow on the floor. This bill ensures that solar energy 
technologies will contribute to the strengthening of our country's 
economy, environment and national security.
  H.R. 3585 improves DOE policies by requiring the merit-based, 
competitive allocation of Federal funds. The solar road map committee 
will neither recommend nor select recipients of grant awards. The new 
solar technology road map committee will provide the DOE with advice 
from our national labs, universities, industry, and entrepreneurs on 
technological paths to accelerate the cost-effective implementation of 
solar power.
  I am a fiscal conservative as well as a scientist and engineer. I 
have studied and used solar energy for more than 40 years. This bill 
will not spend too much money. Our country has fallen way behind. The 
GAO has documented that the funding level in this bill only begins to 
reverse 20 years of underinvestment by the Federal Government in the 
research and development of solar power--a domestic alternative and a 
renewable source of energy.
  This bill will strengthen the ability of U.S. companies to regain 
America's world leadership in solar technology and exports. The bill 
expands the number of large demonstration projects over 30 megawatts, 
and it makes them technology neutral. The bill will reduce known 
vulnerabilities of our grid to natural disasters or to terrorist 
attacks by requiring demonstration projects to ``promote overall 
electric infrastructure reliability and sustainability should grid 
functions be disrupted or damaged.''
  This bill will also maximize benefits to society and to taxpayers 
from these demonstration projects by encouraging DOE to consult with 
DHS, DOD and other agencies to locate demonstration projects at 
facilities that ensure sustainable energy for the continuous operations 
of vital government missions and functions.
  Vote ``yes'' for H.R. 3585, the Solar Technology Roadmap. Using our 
sun to power American homes and businesses is a good bipartisan issue.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. Mr. Chairman, I yield 2 minutes to my friend 
from New Jersey, Mr. Pascrell.
  Mr. PASCRELL. Thank you, Mr. Gordon.
  Mr. Chairman, I rise today in strong support of this bipartisan H.R. 
3585, the Solar Technology Roadmap.
  I want to thank Chairman Gordon and Congresswoman Giffords for their 
tireless work in shepherding this legislation to the floor.
  In the 111th Congress, the House of Representatives has taken many 
important steps towards weaning our country off foreign oil and toward 
reducing the dangerous carbon emissions that create global warming. 
This bill would authorize $2 billion to new research partnerships and 
demonstration projects for solar energy technologies.
  Yet, Mr. Chairman, while the United States has some of the best solar 
resources of any industrialized nation in

[[Page H11599]]

the world and while America is currently a leader in solar technology 
development, other countries like Spain, Germany and China are devoting 
much more effort and attention to this field, putting the U.S. and its 
competitiveness within this industry in jeopardy. This is an important 
part of our country's clean energy future, and this legislation, which 
will spur the development of this renewable and efficient technology, 
is an important step in the right direction.
  In my home State of New Jersey, our Governor has embarked on an 
ambitious and forward-looking energy strategy, and solar development is 
a top priority. It may surprise many of my colleagues to know that New 
Jersey is second only to California in the number of solar 
installations and capacity, and it is first in terms of the amount of 
solar installed per square mile.
  Using innovative financing strategies, combined with a strong 
renewable portfolio standard, New Jersey recently reached the milestone 
of 100 megawatts of solar capacity generated from more than 4,300 solar 
projects Statewide.

                              {time}  1245

  Considering that 7 years ago our State only had six installations, 
this achievement is especially impressive.
  Great Falls of Paterson, New Jersey, my hometown, was once the source 
of power that helped build this Nation into an industrial power. Today, 
new solar panels are being installed at the Great Falls hydroelectric 
plant to make that building more energy efficient. New Jersey and its 
Governor have shown their commitment to solar energy development and 
reducing greenhouse gas admissions.
  I applaud the sponsors.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Chairman, I have no more speakers at this 
time.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  May I ask how much time we have under general debate and how many 
speakers Mr. Gordon has.
  The Acting CHAIR (Mr. Weiner). The gentleman from Texas has 21\1/2\ 
minutes remaining, and the gentleman from Tennessee has 19 minutes 
remaining.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. Mr. Hall, if the gentleman would yield, to 
answer your question, I have about six different speakers at about 2 
minutes for most of them.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. Thank you.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. Mr. Chairman, I yield 3 minutes to an 
outstanding member of our committee from Michigan, Mr. Peters.
  Mr. PETERS. Mr. Chairman, Michigan may not be considered an 
especially sunny State, and probably it does not immediately come to 
people's minds when we talk about the potential for solar energy in 
this country; however, my home State is currently a leader in the 
domestic manufacturing of solar cells. We are home to great companies 
like United Solar Ovonic, which support over 1,000 jobs in my area 
through two production facilities in Auburn Hills and global R 
headquarters in Troy. High-tech jobs like these are the source of hope 
in my State and provide workers an opportunity to apply their skills in 
a new industry and enter the workforce of the 21st century.
  Federal partnership is critical to effectively develop new, renewable 
energies, and these investments are key to restoring jobs lost in 
recent years. For this reason, I am pleased to see that the bill 
recognizes the impact Federal investment in emerging industries can 
have in depressed areas and ask the Secretary to consider States that 
have been hit hardest by the recession and which are experiencing high 
unemployment rates when providing awards under this program.
  We have a tremendous opportunity to revitalize our domestic 
manufacturing base by strengthening the domestic solar industry. While 
States like Michigan and many others certainly have the existing 
infrastructure and workforce to manufacture more solar technologies, 
the United States continues to lag behind China, Japan, and Europe in 
this field. We must commit at the Federal level to increase our 
domestic production, and I am pleased to see that the manager's 
amendment adopts language I worked on in the Science Committee that 
supports domestic solar manufacturing and assures that the R and 
manufacturing taking place under this bill will be carried out here in 
the United States.
  I applaud the committee's commitment to bolstering the U.S. solar 
industry and the development of this road map. I would like to thank 
the bill's author, Representative Giffords, Chairman Gordon, and 
Ranking Member Hall of the Science and Technology Committee for working 
with me on this bill, and I urge its full passage here today.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Chairman, I continue to reserve the balance of 
my time.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself such time as I 
may consume.
  We have a number of other Members who wanted to speak on this bill, 
because it is a good bill and they participated, but I do not see them 
at this time. I don't think it would be respectful to the minority to 
hold them up with just a filibuster by me.
  I yield to the gentleman to see whether he has anyone else who would 
like to speak.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. I would yield to the chairman my time if he needs 
it. I may be more friendly to this bill than he thinks I am.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. HARE. Mr. Chair, I rise today to voice my strong support for H.R. 
3585, the Solar Technology Roadmap Act. I thank my friend and colleague 
from Arizona, Representative Giffords, for being a leader on this issue 
and authoring this important piece of legislation, which moves our 
nation further down the path toward energy independence.
  Our country faces very serious challenges, and I believe that we need 
serious, common-sense responses to each of them. With increasing 
domestic energy costs and a continued reliance on foreign sources of 
energy, the challenge is clear. My hope is that with the passage of the 
Solar Technology Roadmap Act our response will be just as clear.
  This important legislation creates a unique program within the 
Department of Energy where stakeholders from the government, academia, 
the science fields, manufacturing and business leaders and many others 
can come together and work to help us realize the incredible potential 
of solar energy. This diverse group will study, conduct programs of 
scientific research and development, assess results and provide 
recommendations for how this nation can best move forward in utilizing 
solar energy. Because of this program's enormous potential, I strongly 
support the bill's creation of a ``blue ribbon'' panel to evaluate 
solar technologies and believe that their findings and actions 
undertaken as a result of their work will be beneficial for everyone 
from the average American to our friends at NASA.
  This bill authorizes $2.25 billion and lays the framework to 
encourage unprecedented innovation in solar activities. Other countries 
like Germany and Spain, along with emerging economic powerhouses China 
and India, have already taken the lead in utilizing solar capabilities 
to their maximum extent. Their governments decided long ago to make the 
crucial investments in solar technologies. It is absolutely critical 
that this legislation is enacted so that we can once more be the leader 
of the pack in the sciences, innovation and alternative energy 
solutions.
  I was disappointed to see that any reference in the bill to investing 
in solar technology for the purpose of combating climate change did not 
receive bipartisan support during markup in the Science and Technology 
Committee. On the contrary, I believe solar technology does, in fact, 
play a significant role in America's effort to lessen climate change, 
which is why I submitted an amendment to the overall legislation, which 
unfortunately was not accepted by the Rules Committee. My amendment 
would have added to the purposes of the Solar Technology Roadmap 
program to include suggestions on how solar technologies can better 
assist the U.S. in minimizing effects on climate change. Whether or not 
my colleagues believe in the legitimacy of man-made climate change, my 
amendment would have directed the solar panel to inform us all what 
exactly about solar works, what doesn't work, and how we could have 
improved its efficiency in minimizing our carbon footprint.
  Another amendment that I had wished to offer to this bill, but was 
not accepted by the Rules Committee for floor consideration was one 
that would have directed the Secretary of Energy to provide special 
consideration, in the awarding of grant funding in the bill, to 
colleges and universities, community colleges and vocational schools 
already offering clean energy or green jobs training, certificates, or 
degrees. Several institutions of higher learning within my District 
would have benefited greatly from this amendment and I regret that the 
House will not have an opportunity to consider it. I respectfully ask 
that the House allow me to submit a letter of support into the 
Congressional Record from Black Hawk College in

[[Page H11600]]

support of both of my amendments that were rejected by the Rules 
Committee.
  I am proud to have had the opportunity to join my colleagues, led by 
my friend, Mr. Hinchey of New York to introduce an amendment to this 
bill that would require that the Secretary of Energy ensure that the 
membership of the blue-ribbon panel be from diverse regions of the 
country, and that the solar demonstration projects awarded should not 
be concentrated in a single region. I was happy to learn that the 
distinguished Chairman of the House Committee on Science and 
Technology, Mr. Gordon, agreed with us and moved to include our 
proposal in the Manager's amendment. The Solar Technology Roadmap 
Committee's main objective is to study how using solar energy can 
improve the lives of all Americans, strengthen our commercial sector 
and help protect our environment. I believe this amendment makes a 
great bill even better, which is why I urge all of my colleagues to 
vote in favor of the Gordon amendment.
  As we all know, the beauty of solar energy is that it can be captured 
and put to work in every region of our country. The power of the sun 
can be harnessed not only in states like Arizona and California, but 
also in places like my home state of Illinois. Many Illinoisans are 
putting solar technologies to work for them, one of whom I'm proud to 
say is my constituents, Michael Smith of Springfield, Illinois. Mr. 
Smith has lived utility-free for over a decade and is proof positive of 
the benefits that are possible through solar energy. By investing 
responsibly in solar energy research and development, this Congress can 
move more Americans in the direction that Mr. Smith took long ago.
  With jobs still being lost all across our nation, the Congress can 
and must begin focusing on the next generation of innovation. Similar 
to the ``dot-corn'' era, it is inevitable that a ``green revolution'' 
is upon us and the U.S. must not be left behind. The time to invest in 
alternative and renewable energy solutions, like solar technologies, is 
now. This institution knows full well that solar power is abundant, 
does not create greenhouse gases and has the potential to power our 
lives for years to come. For these obvious reasons, I strongly believe 
we can not afford inaction any longer.
  Again, I applaud the efforts of Representative Giffords in leading 
the charge on this bill, which passed out of committee with strong 
bipartisan support and ask my friends on both sides of the aisle to 
join me in voting for the passage of the Solar Technology Roadmap Act.

                                          Office of the President,


                                           Black Hawk College,

                                     Moline, IL, October 20, 2009.
     Hon. Phil Hare,
     House of Representatives, Cannon HOB, Washington, DC.
       Dear Congressman Hare: I am writing in support of your 
     Amendments #1 and #2 relating to the Solar Technology Roadmap 
     Act H.R. 3585 and to thank you for introducing these most 
     important amendments.
       Recently we restructured the Engineering Technology Program 
     at Black Hawk College, Quad-Cities Campus. We believe this 
     program is important to many businesses and industries in our 
     service district. We now offer the following majors in the 
     Engineering Technology Program: 1. Electrical; 2. Mechanical; 
     3. Manufacturing Processes; and 4. Sustainable Energy.
       Item #4 represents a new option in the Engineering 
     Technology Program area, a Sustainable Energy Certificate 
     (first in Illinois). Students take the first-year common core 
     curriculum and complete their work with Sustainable I and II 
     (covers beginning and advanced topics in many areas of 
     sustainable energy: solar, biomass, wind, photovoltaic) and 
     complete with an industry-specific internship. Looking to the 
     future, we believe this will be a very important program. 
     Your amendments--if adopted and eventually signed into law--
     could provide much needed support to our Sustainable Energy 
     Program.
       Please continue to actively support these amendments. They 
     are critically important to the future of our country. Again, 
     many thanks and best wishes.
           Sincerely,
                                           R. Gene Gardner, Ph.D.,
                                                Interim President.
  Mr. MARKEY of Massachusetts. Mr. Chair, I rise in strong support of 
H.R. 3585, the Solar Technology Roadmap Act. The solar energy that 
strikes the earth in a single hour is enough to power the world's 
energy needs for a year. This bill will help America develop the 
technology to harness that massive solar energy potential. I commend 
Representative Giffords for sponsoring this legislation and Chairman 
Gordon for his leadership in moving it forward.
  The market for solar photovoltaics is growing 40 percent annually. 
This scaling up of production, combined with developments in the 
technology, has led to a rapid reduction in the cost of solar energy. 
While the cost of building conventional power plants has, in many 
cases, doubled over the last decade, the cost of solar has fallen 
nearly 30 percent. Many people within the industry now believe solar 
photovoltaics could be competitive with conventionally-generated 
electricity from the grid by 2015.
  Solar photovoltaic technology was born and developed in the United 
States. Our publicly-funded national laboratories and our universities 
such as MIT advanced this technology for decades until the private 
sector more recently adopted it and began manufacturing solar 
photovoltaics on a large scale. Unfortunately, we've recently watched 
this All-American technology become commercialized in Japan, Germany, 
and China. Today, only two of the world's ten largest solar companies 
are based in the United States. This means most of the new jobs and 
intellectual property in this rapidly growing field are accumulating 
overseas as well. The bill before us today would double down on our 
solar research program and ensure that solar technology can be 
developed here with an eye toward private-sector adoption and market 
deployment.
  But to fully reestablish American leadership in this and other 
rapidly growing clean energy industries and allow the United States to 
lead in the creation of a clean energy economy, we must also enact into 
law the American Clean Energy and Security Act, which was passed by the 
House in June. This legislation, which I authored with Chairman Waxman, 
would put the incentives in place to stimulate demand for solar and 
other renewable technologies here at home while unleashing American 
entrepreneurs to transform the entire energy sector into America's next 
high-tech, innovation industry.
  Ms. HARMAN. Mr. Chair, I rise today in strong support of H.R. 3585, 
the Solar Technology Roadmap Act. Advancing solar technology is vital 
to our Nation's energy security, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and 
establishing the United States as a leader in green technology. This 
bill will create a structured plan for pursuing solar research, 
development and demonstration, and will foster new public-private 
partnerships to make clean, renewable energy more affordable and 
accessible for all Americans.
  Solar power can help reduce greenhouse gas emissions and mitigate the 
effects of climate change. My home State of California is ahead of the 
curve: 67 percent of the United States total solar generation is in 
California.
  The Fortunato family in Hermosa Beach, a city I represent, is 
retrofitting their home to be the city's first ``net zero'' home and to 
power all their electricity needs through renewables--mostly through 
the use of solar panels for electricity and solar hot water for 
heating.
  In fact, throughout California's 36th Congressional District, my 
constituents are turning to solar energy as they continue the region's 
tradition of environmental leadership. Large installations at Harbor 
City College in Wilmington, BT telecommunications in El Segundo, and 
the Port of Los Angeles are setting the standard for solar excellence 
in the South Bay. At BT, flexible solar panels provide shade in the 
outdoor parking lot--something that could be widely copied. My family 
installed solar panels on our roof in Venice, California, over 8 years 
ago.
  I worked for President Jimmy Carter, who in 1979 mandated that by the 
year 2000, 20 percent of power generated in the United States should 
come from the Sun. Three decades later, we're still far from that 
visionary goal. Solar power accounts for just 1.2 percent of the U.S. 
mix. We can--and must--do far better.
  Mr. VAN HOLLEN. Mr. Chair, I rise in strong support of the Solar 
Technology Roadmap Act of 2009, and I commend my colleague 
Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords for bringing it to the floor today.
  The Solar Technology Roadmap Act of 2009 will focus and accelerate 
the Department of Energy's ongoing solar technology research, 
development and demonstration activities by creating a Solar Technology 
Roadmap patterned after the highly successful National Technology 
Roadmap for Semiconductors to guide the Nation's near-term, mid-term 
and long-range solar technology policy goals. The Solar Technology 
Roadmap will be developed by a Solar Technology Roadmap Committee 
appointed by the Secretary of Energy and comprised of at least 11 
members, one third of whom will come from the solar industry. This 
bipartisan and forward-looking legislation has been endorsed by the 
Solar Energy Industries Association, the National Association of 
Manufacturers, IBM, Intel, and National Semiconductor and will optimize 
the role that solar technology will play in America's clean energy 
future.
  I urge my colleagues' support.
  Ms. JACKSON-LEE of Texas. Mr. Chair, I rise today in support of H.R. 
3585, the Solar Technology Roadmap Act, a bill that establishes a 
comprehensive roadmapping process for solar technology research, 
development, and demonstration activities conducted by the federal 
government in partnership with the private sector.
  As the Member of Congress representing Texas' 18th Congressional 
District in Houston, solar technology is near and dear to me and my 
constituents. My state is facing an unemployment rate of around 7.5%, 
the highest it

[[Page H11601]]

has been in the past 16 years. While this is 2% less than the national 
average, Texas has not seen unemployment this high since 1993. In one 
month alone, Texas lost 40,600 jobs.
  As an energy capital of the world, it is critical for Houston to be 
at the forefront in the quest for clean, renewable energy. In addition 
to having energy companies as constituents, I have spent a career 
working in the energy sector, representing big and large oil companies 
alike. Further while Houston is home to some of the largest petroleum 
companies in the world, our city is also the headquarters for leading 
solar and wind power firms.
  While energy reform making its way through Congress offers 
significant opportunities for Houston, it also comes with a number of 
challenges, particularly for our city's longstanding petroleum 
community. Namely, petroleum companies stand to be significantly and 
adversely impacted as the nation shifts from petroleum fuels to 
alternative energy.
  Mr. Chair, I believe that America should have a diversity of energy 
sources, which include fossil fuels along side of wind, solar, and 
hydropower sources. As such, I am working diligently with our senate 
delegation to ensure that the current energy bill is improved to ensure 
that the petroleum sector remains as a valuable component of our 
nation's ``seamless'' energy policy.
  In the interim, I offered two amendments to this bill designed to 
assist Houston and the rest of Texas. Specifically, one of my 
amendments would have supported the installation of solar panels and 
other solar technology systems at hospitals, universities, and public 
safety facilities.
  * * * with solar panels, and by providing special consideration for 
grantees in Texas and other states that have a great potential for 
solar resources that have been adversely impacted by the nation's shift 
from fossil based fuels to solar power.
  For this reason, I proposed two amendments. My first amendment 
focuses on Section 105b(3)(I). This provision focuses on a provision in 
the bill that authorizes DOE to conduct at least 10 photovoltaic 
demonstration projects ranging from one to three megawatts in size and 
three to five solar projects greater than 30 megawatts in size. The 
bill also requires DOE to study the performance of photovoltaic 
installations and identify opportunities to improve the energy 
productivity of these systems. In addition, DOE must establish a 
program of RD related to the reuse, recycling, and safe disposal of 
photovoltaic devices.
  My amendment would have specifically designated hospitals, 
universities, and public safety facilities as potential selectees as 
infrastructure reliability projects. With this proposal, we would have 
had a chance to outfit hospitals with the latest in solar technology to 
create alternative power generation resources. These would prevent 
power disruptions that could threaten the lives of patients in 
hospitals in particular.
  This idea was inspired by the fact that many of the places in our 
community that provide health care services to the sick are located in 
buildings that are themselves sick. As we expand health care to 
millions of Americans, I hope to work with my colleagues to ensure that 
health care is dispensed in healthy buildings that employ the latest in 
solar and other green building designs.
  Universities could also benefit from these grants in a manner that 
would ensure that our institutions of higher learning could also 
continue operating in the event of power outages. Finally, jails, 
police stations, and other public safety facilities could also 
specifically benefit by serving as demonstration projects. Mr. 
Chairman, can I get your commitment to continue working with me to 
ensure that this proposal is incorporated as the bill proceeds in the 
legislative process.
  Mr. Chair, my second amendment would have provided special 
consideration to Texas and other states with high potential for solar 
energy production to help businesses affected by the nation's shift 
from fossil fuel based energy resources to solar and other renewable 
energy when making awards under the bill. This language would be 
inserted into Section 101 D. Under my amendment, the new language would 
have read: ``As a criteria for providing awards under this Act, the 
Secretary shall consider areas with high unemployment as well as 
grantees in Texas and other states with high potential for solar energy 
production to help businesses affected by the nation's shift from 
fossil fuel based energy resources to solar and other renewable 
energy.''
  Mr. Chair, given the potential for Houston and the rest of Texas to 
be benefitted or harmed by our shift to solar technology, can I get 
your commitment to incorporate this idea, at least in the conference 
report.
  Again, I want to thank you for the opportunity to speak on behalf of 
the bill and urge all my colleagues to vote for this legislation to 
ensure building a comprehensive road for solar technology research, 
development, and demonstration activities. Thank you Madam Speaker. I 
yield back the remainder of my time.
  Mr. LEVIN. Mr. Chair, I rise in strong support of the bill before the 
House, the Solar Technology Roadmap Act.
  The solar industry is one of the fastest growing energy industries in 
the United States. Solar companies, including United Solar Ovonic in 
Michigan, have been making cutting-edge advancements in both solar 
technology and manufacturing. The solar industry is already creating 
jobs in Michigan and across the country, and this energy resource has 
the potential to create thousands more jobs if we make the right 
investments.
  You can't begin a journey without knowing where you're going. If we 
want to expand solar energy and renewable energy jobs here in the 
United States, then we need to have a plan to guide solar energy 
research, development and demonstration. This legislation directs the 
Department of Energy to assemble a group of experts from industry, 
academia, and government labs to create a roadmap of
short-, medium-, and long-term goals to guide and accelerate the 
development and deployment of solar energy in America.
  A plan will only get us so far. In order for solar technology to 
reach its full potential, the federal government has to create a 
partnership with private industry, just as it has in other energy 
areas. In a word, working with the private sector, we need to invest 
wisely in this technology using the guidance provided by the research 
roadmap. The legislation calls for the Department of Energy to invest 
$2 billion on research, development and deployment of solar energy 
technologies over the next five years. It will be important for 
Congress to follow through and actually provide the funds to allow this 
to happen.
  I urge my colleagues to join me in voting for the Solar Technology 
Roadmap Act.
  Mr. KIND. Mr. Chair, I rise today in support of H.R. 3585, the Solar 
Technology Roadmap Act. This bill establishes an important energy tax 
title that will create the high-paying green jobs our economy needs, 
while simultaneously taking strong actions to help in our longer-term 
fight to combat global warming.
  Even with rapid growth in solar and wind installations, most clean 
technologies installed in the U.S. continue to be manufactured 
overseas. In the case of solar, the U.S. is steadily falling behind the 
rest of the world in manufacturing capacity, dropping from 22 percent 
in 2002 to a mere 7 percent in 2007. Similarly, European firms now 
account for more than 85 percent of the global wind component market, 
and the U.S. has only a modest share of global manufacturing of other 
clean technologies, ranging from fuel cells to advanced batteries. We 
cannot continue down this path.
  We are a nation of leaders and we need to start leading. We must 
cultivate a new mindset where sustainable technology and a clean 
manufacturing base are at the forefront. Initiatives like the Solar 
Technology Roadmap, which level the manufacturing playing field and 
incentivize investment, are what we need. This tax credit will create 
new manufacturing jobs--a need that cannot be understated given that 
the U.S. shed more than 1 million manufacturing jobs in the past 12 
months. Correspondingly, the credit will increase the tax base and 
improve our trade balance. These are key components to our nation's 
economic recovery and long-term economic growth. Other nations are 
making these investments and, to remain globally competitive, we need 
to do the same.
  I am pleased at the length to which this bill goes to create green 
jobs and urge my colleagues to support this measure.
  Mr. HOLT. Mr. Chair, I rise today in support of H.R. 3585, the Solar 
Technology Roadmap Act.
  The United States is currently the world's leader in solar power 
technologies. However, countries like China, Germany, and Spain are 
making major investments in this field, unless we increase our 
investment in research, development and demonstration, RD, into new 
solar technologies our global competitiveness will be at risk.
  The Solar Technology Roadmap Act would provide this much needed 
funding and create a comprehensive program to strengthen and coordinate 
the development and improvement of our Nation's solar energy 
technologies. The bill creates a Solar Energy Roadmap Committee 
comprised of representatives from industry, academia, and government 
researchers responsible for developing a long-term roadmap to guide 
solar energy research. The Roadmap Committee would identify the RD 
activities needed to improve the performance and reliability of solar 
technologies, decrease cost, and reduce water use. This research plan 
would guide the awarding of funds for solar energy RD by the 
Department of Energy and would help commercialize new solar 
technologies and create new public-private partnerships to make this 
clean, renewable energy source more affordable and accessible for all 
Americans.
  Unfortunately, the House Committee on Rules did not make in order two 
amendments

[[Page H11602]]

that I offered. One of my amendments would have allowed the Secretary 
of Energy to use a portion of the $2 billion authorized for solar 
energy to study the factors affecting whether consumers choose to adopt 
and use solar power. Unless we understand these factors it will be 
difficult to understand how best to encourage the widespread 
utilization of solar energy. I also offered an amendment that would 
have required small businesses to be given preference when distributing 
the RD authorized in this act. I am sorry that these amendments were 
not debated today.
  My home State of New Jersey has made a strong investment into the 
deployment of solar energy. Through its Renewable Energy Incentive 
Program, REIP, New Jersey has encouraged the installation of over 4,300 
solar electricity systems in our State's businesses, homes, and public 
institutions. We have more solar installations per mile than any other 
State in the Union, and are the second largest solar market in the 
country. Our solar companies, including several located within my 
congressional district, are conducting innovative RD into cutting 
edge solar technologies and our solar installers, dealers, and project 
developers have created hundreds of clean energy jobs. Supporting an 
increased Federal investment into RD would help to continue this 
effort. I urge my colleagues to support this legislation.
  Mr. COHEN. Mr. Chair, I rise in support of this amendment.
  I would first like to commend Representative Giffords and the Science 
and Technology Committee for proposing this great piece of legislation. 
I would also like to thank Representatives Titus and Teague for their 
work on this very important amendment.
  The economic competitiveness and security of the United States depend 
upon our ability to develop clean, affordable alternatives to oil. But 
this will not be cheap and it will not be easy, so I commend this 
legislation's promise for significant investment in the research and 
development of solar technology. Solar technology holds tremendous 
promise and has the potential to put the United States on a path to 
energy independence and significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions. 
For in just 1 hour, enough sunlight hits the Earth's surface to supply 
the entire world's energy demands for 1 full year.
  With significant investment in the research, development, and 
implementation of solar technology, we will be well on our way to 
energy independence. However, one obstacle to solar technology exists 
that is currently not being discussed--the immense water usage of many 
leading solar technologies. Currently, plans exist for solar plants 
that consume 705 million gallons of water a year and are located in the 
heart of desert regions which receive scant rainfall and have little 
groundwater reserves.
  As the American population continues to grow and water demands 
continue to rise with our population, our water supply will be in even 
shorter supply. Thus, we cannot afford to use hundreds of millions of 
gallons of water a year to operate and maintain one solar site. It is 
imperative that we invest in research and development of solar 
technologies that are water efficient.
  While our Nation needs clean, affordable energy, we cannot produce it 
at the expense of our future water supplies. For these reasons, I 
strongly urge the passage of our amendment to the Solar Technology 
Roadmap Act.
  Mr. HASTINGS of Washington. Mr. Chair, we must get serious about 
producing more American-made energy in order to prevent skyrocketing 
energy and gas prices in the future, grow our economy and protect our 
national security. There is widespread and bipartisan agreement that we 
must move toward a cleaner, cheaper, more diverse energy system. That 
means expanding solar, wind, hydrogen fuel cell, biomass and other new 
energy sources, more hydropower, more nuclear plants, and tapping into 
our nation's oil and gas reserves.
  My district in Central Washington state is home to massive hydropower 
dams, the only nuclear power plant in the region, the Pacific Northwest 
National Lab which is conducting world-class energy research, wind 
farms, and solar.
  There is no question that solar power has a key role to plan in our 
energy future. The federal government should encourage and incentivize 
all types of solar power production and research. We must make tax 
credits for solar permanent and we must open up new opportunities for 
solar on our federal lands.
  It is with regret, today, that I cannot vote for H.R. 3585. I have 
long-supported solar energy--but it need not require an expansion of 
the federal government and $2.25 billion dollars at a time when 
Congress is already spending more than ever and our nation is facing 
historic levels of debt. In addition to the cost of this legislation, I 
am concerned that it does not provide a level playing field for all 
types of solar technologies. The federal government should not be in 
the business of picking winners and losers.
  I am a cosponsor and a supporter of H.R. 2846. This bill represents 
an all-of-the-above energy bill. Under the bill, a portion of federal 
government's revenue from offshore drilling would be used to provide 
funding for renewable energy programs such as solar, biomass, 
hydropower, clean coal, wind and others. In fact, over $8 billion would 
be directed to renewables in the first 10 years at zero cost to 
taxpayers.
  As we move forward, I am committed to finding new opportunities to 
encourage all solar technologies whether it is through research 
support, federal land options, tax incentives and other means.
  Mr. INSLEE. Mr. Chair, I thank Representative Giffords, the House 
Leadership and the Chairman for working to pass H.R. 3585 today, which 
a legislative priority for the Sustainable Energy and Environment 
Coalition. H.R. 3585, Solar Technology Roadmap Act will strengthen the 
American solar technology industry through a coordinated research and 
development program and public-private partnerships.
  The Solar Technology Roadmap Act will give even cloudy states like 
Washington a roadmap to solar technology deployment. The bill will help 
to ensure that federal funding for solar energy research is prioritized 
to commercialize new solar technologies to make this clean, renewable 
energy source more affordable and accessible for all Americans.
  Harnessing the power of the sun is an economic opportunity for 
America, with the potential to help create tens of thousands of clean 
energy jobs in neighborhoods across the country.
  The U.S. has some of the best solar resources of any industrialized 
nation in the world. Yet while America is currently a leader in solar 
technology development, other countries like Spain, Germany and China 
are devoting much more effort and attention to this field, putting U.S. 
competitiveness in this industry in jeopardy. This bill will strengthen 
America's solar industry and I urge its passage.
  Unfortunately, due to a matter in Washington, I will be absent for 
the vote on final passage of this important bill. Had I been present, I 
would have voted ``yes''.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my 
time.
  The Acting CHAIR. All time for general debate has expired.
  Pursuant to the rule, the amendment in the nature of a substitute 
printed in the bill shall be considered as an original bill for the 
purpose of amendment under the 5-minute rule and shall be considered 
read.
  The text of the committee amendment is as follows:

                               H.R. 3585

       Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of 
     the United States of America in Congress assembled,

     SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

       This Act may be cited as the ``Solar Technology Roadmap 
     Act''.

     SEC. 2. DEFINITIONS.

       In this Act:
       (1) Secretary.--The term ``Secretary'' means the Secretary 
     of Energy.
       (2) Solar technology.--The term ``solar technology'' 
     means--
       (A) photovoltaic technologies, including technologies 
     utilizing--
       (i) crystalline silicon;
       (ii) cadmium telluride;
       (iii) semiconductor materials containing copper, indium, 
     and selenium;
       (iv) thin film silicon;
       (v) gallium arsenide alloy and multijunctions;
       (vi) dye-sensitized and organic solar cell technologies;
       (vii) concentrating photovoltaics; and
       (viii) other photovoltaic methods identified by the 
     Secretary;
       (B) solar thermal electric technology, including linear 
     concentrator systems, dish/engine systems, and power tower 
     systems;
       (C) solar thermal water heating technology;
       (D) solar heating and air conditioning technologies;
       (E) passive solar design in architecture, including both 
     heating and lighting applications; and
       (F) related or enabling technologies, including thin films, 
     semiconducting materials, transparent conductors, optics, and 
     technologies that increase durability or decrease cost or 
     weight.

   TITLE I--SOLAR TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, AND DEMONSTRATION

     SEC. 101. PROGRAM.

       (a) In General.--The Secretary shall conduct a program of 
     research, development, and demonstration for solar 
     technology, including--
       (1) photovoltaics;
       (2) solar hot water and solar space heating and cooling;
       (3) concentrating solar power;
       (4) lighting systems that integrate sunlight and electrical 
     lighting in complement to each other in common lighting 
     fixtures for the purpose of improving energy efficiency;
       (5) manufacturability of low cost, high-quality solar 
     energy systems;
       (6) development of solar technology products that can be 
     easily integrated into new and existing buildings; and

[[Page H11603]]

       (7) other areas as the Secretary considers appropriate.
       (b) Awards.--The Secretary shall provide awards under this 
     section to promote a diversity of research, development, and 
     demonstration activities for solar technology on a merit-
     reviewed, competitive basis to--
       (1) academic institutions, national laboratories, Federal 
     research agencies, State research agencies, nonprofit 
     research organizations, industrial entities, or consortia 
     thereof for research, development, and demonstration 
     activities; and
       (2) industry-led consortia for research, development, and 
     demonstration of advanced techniques for manufacturing a 
     variety of solar energy products.
       (c) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that at 
     least 75 percent of funding for solar technology research, 
     development, and demonstration activities conducted by the 
     Department of Energy after fiscal year 2014 support a 
     diversity of activities identified by and recommended under 
     the Solar Technology Roadmap as described in section 102.
       (d) Special Consideration.--As a criteria for providing 
     awards under this Act, the Secretary shall consider areas 
     with high unemployment.
       (e) Competitiveness.--In carrying out section 105, the 
     Department of Energy shall strongly consider projects 
     utilizing solar technologies manufactured in the United 
     States.

     SEC. 102. SOLAR TECHNOLOGY ROADMAP.

       (a) In General.--Not later than 18 months after the date of 
     enactment of this Act, the Solar Technology Roadmap Committee 
     established under section 103 shall develop and transmit to 
     the Secretary of Energy and the Congress a Solar Technology 
     Roadmap that--
       (1) presents the best current estimate of the near-term (up 
     to 2 years), mid-term (up to 7 years), and long-term (up to 
     15 years) research, development, and demonstration needs in 
     solar technology; and
       (2) provides guidance to the solar technology research, 
     development, and demonstration activities supported by the 
     Federal Government for the purposes of meeting national 
     priorities in energy security, United States competitiveness, 
     mitigation of adverse environmental impacts, and energy 
     diversification.
       (b) Contents.--The Solar Technology Roadmap shall--
       (1) identify research, development, and demonstration needs 
     for a diversity of solar technologies to address--
       (A) the key solar energy production challenges of 
     intermittency, transience, storage, and scaling, including 
     determining--
       (i) which solar-related technological solutions are 
     appropriate for various applications, locations, and seasons;
       (ii) how to store excess solar energy in batteries, 
     supercapacitors, compressed air, flywheels, hydrogen, 
     synthetic fuels, thermal storage, or superconductors, or 
     through other means;
       (iii) how and when to integrate solar energy into the 
     electricity grid effectively, including--

       (I) the integration of solar technologies with a Smart 
     Grid;
       (II) electrical power smoothing;
       (III) microgrid integration;
       (IV) solar resource forecasting;
       (V) long distance transmission options, including direct 
     current and superconducting transmission; and
       (VI) ways to address arbitrage over minutes, hours, days, 
     weeks, and seasons with respect to the full range of project 
     scales; and

       (iv) how best to integrate solar technologies into 
     buildings;
       (B) modeling and simulation;
       (C) the design, materials, and manufacture of solar 
     technologies, as well as related factory sciences;
       (D) the development of standards;
       (E) the need for demonstration facilities;
       (F) optimized packaging methods;
       (G) environmental, safety, and health concerns including 
     reuse, recycling, hazardous materials disposal, and 
     photovoltaic waste issues; and
       (H) other areas identified by the Secretary;
       (2) identify opportunities for coordination with partner 
     industries such as those for semiconductors, lighting, energy 
     storage, Smart Grid, and wind that can benefit from similar 
     advances;
       (3) establish research, development, and demonstration 
     goals with recommended timeframes with respect to solar 
     technologies for--
       (A) improving performance;
       (B) decreasing cost of electricity generated;
       (C) improving reliability; and
       (D) decreasing potential negative environmental impacts and 
     maximizing the environmental benefits of solar technologies;
       (4) include recommendations, as appropriate, to guide solar 
     technology research, development, and demonstration 
     activities; and
       (5) outline the various technologies and practices 
     considered by the Committee and the benefits and shortcomings 
     of each, as appropriate.
       (c) Revisions and Updates.--
       (1) Revisions.--Once every 3 years after completion of the 
     first Solar Technology Roadmap under this Act, the Solar 
     Technology Roadmap Committee shall conduct a comprehensive 
     review and revision of the Solar Technology Roadmap.
       (2) Updates.--The Solar Technology Roadmap Committee shall 
     update the Solar Technology Roadmap annually as necessary.

     SEC. 103. SOLAR TECHNOLOGY ROADMAP COMMITTEE.

       (a) Establishment.--Not later than 4 months after the date 
     of enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall establish, and 
     provide support for as necessary, a Solar Technology Roadmap 
     Committee.
       (b) Membership.--
       (1) In general.--The Solar Technology Roadmap Committee 
     shall consist of at least 11 members. Each member shall be 
     appointed by the Secretary from among subject matter experts 
     representing--
       (A) different sectors of the domestic solar technology 
     industry, including manufacturers and equipment suppliers;
       (B) national laboratories;
       (C) academia;
       (D) relevant Federal agencies;
       (E) relevant State and local government entities;
       (F) private research institutions; and
       (G) other entities or organizations, as appropriate.
       (2) Terms.--
       (A) In general.--Except as provided in subparagraph (B), 
     the term of a member of the Solar Technology Roadmap 
     Committee shall be 3 years.
       (B) Original terms.--Of the members appointed originally to 
     the Solar Technology Roadmap Committee, approximately \1/3\ 
     shall be appointed for a 2-year term, approximately \1/3\ 
     shall be appointed for a 3-year term, and approximately \1/3\ 
     shall be appointed for a 4-year term.
       (3) Limit on terms.--A member of the Solar Technology 
     Roadmap Committee may serve more than 1 term, except that 
     such member may not serve a subsequent term unless 2 years 
     have elapsed since the end of a previous term.
       (4) Industry participation.--At least \1/3\ and not more 
     than \1/2\ of the members of the Solar Technology Roadmap 
     Committee shall be individuals described in paragraph (1)(A).
       (5) Chair.--The Secretary shall select a Chair from among 
     the members of the Committee. The Chair shall not be an 
     employee of the Federal Government.
       (6) Conflicts of interest.--The Secretary, in appointing 
     members to the Committee, shall make every effort to ensure 
     that--
       (A) no individual appointed to serve on the Committee has a 
     conflict of interest that is relevant to the functions to be 
     performed, unless such conflict is promptly and publicly 
     disclosed and the Secretary determines that a waiver is 
     appropriate;
       (B) the Committee membership is fairly balanced as 
     determined by the Secretary to be appropriate for the 
     functions to be performed; and
       (C) the final report of the Committee will be the result of 
     the Committee's independent judgment.

     The Secretary shall require that individuals that are 
     appointed or intended to be to appointed to serve on the 
     Committee inform the Department of Energy of any individual's 
     conflicts of interest that are relevant to the functions to 
     be performed.
       (c) Expert Advice.--In developing the Solar Technology 
     Roadmap, the Solar Technology Roadmap Committee may establish 
     subcommittees, working groups comprised of experts outside 
     the membership of the Solar Technology Roadmap Committee, and 
     other means of gathering expert advice on--
       (1) particular solar technologies or technological 
     challenges;
       (2) crosscutting issues or activities relating to more than 
     1 particular solar technology or technological challenge; or
       (3) any other area the Solar Technology Roadmap Committee 
     considers appropriate.
       (d) Compensation and Expenses.--A member of the Solar 
     Technology Roadmap Committee shall not be compensated for 
     service on the Committee, but may be allowed travel expenses, 
     including per diem in lieu of subsistence, in accordance with 
     subchapter I of chapter 57 of title 5, United States Code.
       (e) Federal Advisory Committee Act.--The Federal Advisory 
     Committee Act (5 U.S.C. App.) shall not apply to the Solar 
     Technology Roadmap Committee.

     SEC. 104. INTERAGENCY COORDINATION.

       The Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy 
     shall review and coordinate Federal interagency activities 
     identified in and related to the Solar Technology Roadmap as 
     appropriate.

     SEC. 105. SOLAR TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION PROJECTS.

       (a) Establishment of Program.--The Secretary shall 
     establish a program to provide grants for demonstration 
     projects to support the development of solar energy 
     production, consistent with the Solar Technology Roadmap as 
     available.
       (b) Implementation.--In carrying out the demonstration 
     program under this section, to the extent practicable, the 
     Secretary shall--
       (1) include at least 10 photovoltaic technology projects 
     that generate between 1 and 3 megawatts;
       (2) include at least 3 but not more than 5 solar technology 
     projects that generate greater than 30 megawatts; and
       (3) make awards for projects that--
       (A) are located and can be replicated at a wide range of 
     sites;
       (B) are located and can be replicated in a variety of 
     regions and climates;
       (C) demonstrate technologies that address intermittency, 
     transience, storage challenges, and independent operational 
     capability;
       (D) facilitate identification of optimum techniques among 
     competing alternatives;
       (E) include business commercialization plans that have the 
     potential for production of equipment at high volumes;
       (F) improve United States competitiveness and lead to 
     development of manufacturing technology;
       (G) demonstrate positive environmental performance through 
     life-cycle analysis;
       (H) provide the greatest potential to reduce energy costs 
     for consumers;
       (I) promote overall electric infrastructure reliability and 
     sustainability should grid functions be disrupted or damaged; 
     and

[[Page H11604]]

       (J) satisfy other criteria that the Secretary considers 
     necessary to carry out the program.
       (c) Grant Awards.--Funding provided under this section may 
     be used, to the extent that funding is not otherwise 
     available through other Federal programs or power purchase 
     agreements, for--
       (1) a necessary and appropriate site engineering study;
       (2) a detailed economic assessment of site-specific 
     conditions;
       (3) appropriate feasibility studies to determine whether 
     the demonstration can be replicated;
       (4) installation of equipment, service, and support;
       (5) operation for a minimum of 3 years and monitoring for 
     the duration of the demonstration; and
       (6) validation of technical, economic, and environmental 
     assumptions and documentation of lessons learned.
       (d) Grant Selection.--Not later than 90 days after the date 
     of enactment of this Act and annually thereafter, the 
     Secretary shall conduct a national solicitation for 
     applications for grants under this section. Grant recipients 
     shall be selected on a merit-reviewed, competitive basis. The 
     Secretary shall give preference to proposals that address 
     multiple elements described in subsection (b).
       (e) Limitations.--Funding shall not be provided under this 
     section for more than 50 percent of the costs of the project 
     for which assistance is provided. Not more than a total of 
     $300,000,000 shall be provided under this section for the 
     period encompassing fiscal years 2011 through 2015.

     SEC. 106. PHOTOVOLTAIC PERFORMANCE STUDY.

       (a) In General.--Not later than one year after the date of 
     enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall transmit to the 
     Congress and the Solar Technology Roadmap Committee the 
     results of a study that analyzes the performance of 
     photovoltaic installations in the United States. The study 
     shall assess the current performance of photovoltaic 
     installations and identify opportunities to improve the 
     energy productivity of these systems. Such study shall 
     include--
       (1) identification of the average energy productivity of 
     current commercial and residential installations;
       (2) assessment of areas where energy productivity is 
     reduced, including wire loss, module mismatch, shading, dust, 
     and other factors;
       (3) identification of technology development and technical 
     standards that improve energy productivity;
       (4) analysis of the potential cost savings and energy 
     productivity gains to the Federal, State, and local 
     governments, utilities, private enterprise, and consumers 
     available through the adoption, installation, and use of 
     high-performance photovoltaic technologies and practices; and
       (5) an overview of current government incentives at the 
     Federal, State, and local levels that encourage the adoption 
     of highly efficient photovoltaic systems and practices.
       (b) Public Input.--The Secretary shall ensure that 
     interested stakeholders, including affected industry 
     stakeholders and energy efficiency advocates, have a 
     meaningful opportunity to provide comments, data, and other 
     information on the scope, contents, and conclusions of the 
     study. All forums for the Department to receive this input 
     from interested stakeholders shall be announced in the 
     Federal Register.

     SEC. 107. SOLAR ENERGY PROGRAM REAUTHORIZATION.

       (a) In General.--There are authorized to be appropriated to 
     the Secretary to carry out section 101(a)--
       (1) $350,000,000 for fiscal year 2011;
       (2) $400,000,000 for fiscal year 2012;
       (3) $450,000,000 for fiscal year 2013;
       (4) $500,000,000 for fiscal year 2014; and
       (5) $550,000,000 for fiscal year 2015.
       (b) Roadmap Identified Activities.--The Secretary shall 
     dedicate a percentage of funding received pursuant to 
     subsection (a) for research, development, and demonstration 
     activities identified by and recommended under the Solar 
     Technology Roadmap in the following percentages:
       (1) For fiscal year 2012, at least 30 percent.
       (2) For fiscal year 2013, at least 45 percent.
       (3) For fiscal year 2014, at least 60 percent.
       (4) For fiscal year 2015, at least 75 percent.
       (c) Solar Technology Roadmap.--The Secretary may use up to 
     $2,000,000 of the funds appropriated pursuant to subsection 
     (a) for each fiscal year to support the establishment and 
     maintenance of the Solar Technology Roadmap.
       (d) Extension of Authorizations.--Of funds authorized by 
     subsection (a), there are authorized to be appropriated to 
     the Secretary to carry out--
       (1) section 602 of the Energy Independence and Security Act 
     of 2007 (42 U.S.C. 17171) $12,000,000 for each of the fiscal 
     years 2013 through 2015;
       (2) section 604 of the Energy Independence and Security Act 
     of 2007 (42 U.S.C. 17172) $10,000,000 for each of the fiscal 
     years 2013 through 2015;
       (3) section 605 of the Energy Independence and Security Act 
     of 2007 (42 U.S.C. 17173) $3,500,000 for each of the fiscal 
     years 2013 through 2015; and
       (4) section 606 of the Energy Independence and Security Act 
     of 2007 (42 U.S.C. 17174) $2,500,000 for each of the fiscal 
     years 2013 through 2015.

     SEC. 108. EXISTING PROGRAMS.

       Except as otherwise specified in this Act, this Act shall 
     supersede any duplicative solar research, development, and 
     demonstration programs within the Department of Energy.

     SEC. 109. REPEALS.

       The following are hereby repealed:
       (1) The Solar Energy Research, Development, and 
     Demonstration Act of 1974 (42 U.S.C. 5551 et seq.), except 
     for section 10.
       (2) The Solar Photovoltaic Energy Research, Development, 
     and Demonstration Act of 1978 (42 U.S.C. 5581 et seq.).
       (3) Section 4(a)(2) and (3) of the Renewable Energy and 
     Energy Efficiency Technology Competitiveness Act of 1989 (42 
     U.S.C. 12003(a)(2) and (3)).

                    TITLE II--PHOTOVOLTAIC RECYCLING

     SEC. 201. PHOTOVOLTAIC DEVICE RECYCLING RESEARCH, 
                   DEVELOPMENT, AND DEMONSTRATION.

       (a) Definition.--In this section, the term ``photovoltaic 
     device'' includes photovoltaic cells and the electronic and 
     electrical components of such devices.
       (b) In General.--In order to address the issues described 
     in section 102(b)(1)(G), the Secretary shall award multiyear 
     grants for research, development, and demonstration 
     activities to create innovative and practical approaches to 
     increase reuse and recycling of photovoltaic devices and, 
     through such activities, to contribute to the professional 
     development of scientists, engineers, and technicians in the 
     fields of photovoltaic and electronic device manufacturing, 
     design, refurbishing, and recycling. The activities supported 
     under this section shall address--
       (1) technology to increase the efficiency of photovoltaic 
     device recycling and maximize the recovery of valuable raw 
     materials for use in new products while minimizing the life-
     cycle environmental impacts such as greenhouse gas emissions 
     and water usage;
       (2) expanded uses for materials from recycled photovoltaic 
     devices;
       (3) development and demonstration of environmentally 
     responsible alternatives to the use of hazardous materials in 
     photovoltaic devices and the production of such devices;
       (4) development of methods to separate and remove hazardous 
     materials from photovoltaic devices and to recycle or dispose 
     of those materials in a safe manner;
       (5) product design and construction to facilitate 
     disassembly and recycling of photovoltaic devices;
       (6) tools and methods to aid in assessing the environmental 
     impacts of the production of photovoltaic devices and 
     photovoltaic device recycling and disposal;
       (7) product design and construction and other tools and 
     techniques to extend the life cycle of photovoltaic devices, 
     including methods to promote their safe reuse;
       (8) strategies to increase consumer acceptance and practice 
     of recycling of photovoltaic devices; and
       (9) processes to reduce the costs and environmental impact 
     of disposal of toxic materials used in photovoltaic devices.
       (c) Merit Review.--Grants shall be awarded under this 
     section on a merit-reviewed, competitive basis.
       (d) Applications.--Each application shall include a 
     description of--
       (1) the project that will be undertaken and the 
     contributions of each participating entity;
       (2) the applicability of the project to increasing reuse 
     and recycling of photovoltaic devices with the least 
     environmental impacts as measured by life-cycle analyses, and 
     the potential for incorporating the research results into 
     industry practice; and
       (3) how the project will promote collaboration among 
     scientists and engineers from different disciplines, such as 
     electrical engineering, materials science, and social 
     science.
       (e) Dissemination of Results.--The results of activities 
     supported under this section shall be made publicly available 
     through--
       (1) development of best practices or training materials for 
     use in the photovoltaics manufacturing, design, refurbishing, 
     or recycling industries;
       (2) dissemination at industry conferences;
       (3) coordination with information dissemination programs 
     relating to recycling of electronic devices in general;
       (4) demonstration projects; and
       (5) educational materials for the public produced in 
     conjunction with State and local governments or nonprofit 
     research organizations on the problems and solutions related 
     to reuse and recycling of photovoltaic devices.
       (f) Photovoltaic Materials Physical Property Database.--
       (1) In general.--The Secretary shall establish a 
     comprehensive physical property database of materials for use 
     in photovoltaic devices. This database shall include--
       (A) identification of materials used in photovoltaic 
     devices;
       (B) a list of commercially available amounts of these 
     materials;
       (C) amounts of these materials projected to be available 
     through mining or recycling of photovoltaic and other 
     electronic devices; and
       (D) a list of other significant uses for each of these 
     materials.
       (2) Priorities.--The Secretary, working with private 
     industry, shall develop a plan to establish priorities and 
     requirements for the database under this subsection, 
     including the protection of proprietary information, trade 
     secrets, and other confidential business information.
       (3) Coordination.--The Secretary shall coordinate with the 
     Director of the National Institute of Standards and 
     Technology and the Administrator of the Environmental 
     Protection Agency to facilitate the incorporation of the 
     database under this subsection with any existing database for 
     electronic manufacturing and recycling.

  The Acting CHAIR. No amendment to the committee amendment is in order 
except those printed in House Report 111-304. Each amendment may be

[[Page H11605]]

offered only in the order printed in the report, by a Member designated 
in the report, shall be considered read, shall be debatable for the 
time specified in the report equally divided and controlled by the 
proponent and an opponent, shall not be subject to amendment, and shall 
not be subject to a demand for division of the question.


           Amendment No. 1 Offered by Mr. Gordon of Tennessee

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 1 
printed in House Report 111-304.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the 
desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Amendment No. 1 offered by Mr. Gordon of Tennessee:
       Page 4, line 21, amend paragraph (1) to read as follows:
       (1) photovoltaics and related electronic components, 
     including inverters, charge controllers, and energy monitors;
       Page 5, line 16, insert ``Federally-Funded Research and 
     Development Centers,'' after ``national laboratories,''.
       Page 6, lines 9 through 12, amend subsection (e) to read as 
     follows:
       (e) Limitation.--The Department of Energy shall provide 
     awards to projects for research, development, and 
     demonstration of solar technologies and solar manufacturing 
     in the United States.
       Page 8, line 9, strike ``and''.
       Page 8, line 11, insert ``and'' after the semicolon.
       Page 8, after line 11, insert the following new clause:
       (v) the technologies used to condition solar energy, 
     including inverters, DC/DC converters, and battery chargers;
       Page 8, line 21, strike ``; and'' and insert a semicolon.
       Page 8, line 22, redesignate subparagraph (H) as 
     subparagraph (I).
       Page 8, after line 21, insert the following new 
     subparagraph:
       (H) ways to reduce regional disparity in the use of solar 
     technologies; and
       Page 9, line 8, strike ``and''.
       Page 9, line 11, strike the semicolon and insert ``; and''.
       Page 9, after line 11, insert the following new 
     subparagraph:
       (E) improving the cost effectiveness and quality control of 
     domestic manufacturing of implements and devices used in the 
     production of solar energy;
       Page 9, lines 12 and 15, redesignate paragraphs (4) and (5) 
     as paragraphs (5) and (6), respectively.
       Page 9, after line 11, insert the following new paragraph:
       (4) identify best practices for Department of Energy 
     national laboratories in their collaborations with 
     institutions of higher education and private industry to more 
     efficiently and effectively bring new solar technologies to 
     the marketplace;
       Page 10, after line 3, insert the following new subsection:
       (d) Consultation.--The Solar Roadmap Committee shall 
     consult with the Department of the Interior, the National 
     Park Service, the Department of Defense, and the General 
     Services Administration on the potential for solar 
     demonstration projects on Federal lands.
       Page 10, line 15, insert ``, solar applications 
     developers,'' after ``including manufacturers''.
       Page 12, after line 21, insert the following new paragraph:
       (7) Geographic distribution.--The Secretary shall consider 
     individuals that represent diverse geographic regions of the 
     United States for membership of the Committee.
       Page 13, line 3, insert ``, applications,'' after ``solar 
     technologies''.
       Page 13, line 16, redesignate subsection (e) as subsection 
     (f).
       Page 13, after line 15, insert the following new 
     subsection:
       (e) Limitation.--The Committee shall provide guidance on 
     technological goals and activities but, consistent with 
     requirements for the selection of recipients of funding on a 
     merit-reviewed, competitive basis under section 101(b), shall 
     not recommend or select specific recipients of funds.
       Page 14, lines 17 and 18, amend subparagraph (A) to read as 
     follows:
       (A) are located in geographically dispersed regions of the 
     country and are not concentrated in any single geographical 
     region of country;
       Page 15, line 10, insert ``, as well as promote 
     accessibility and community implementation of demonstrated 
     technologies,'' after ``energy costs''.
       Page 16, lines 3 and 4, amend paragraph (5) to read as 
     follows:
       (5) operation for a minimum of 3 years, using a monitoring 
     methodology approved by Secretary; and
       Page 16, after line 19, insert the following new 
     subsection:
       (f) Organic Photovoltaic Cell Technologies.--At least 1 
     demonstration project awarded under this section during 
     fiscal year 2011 shall be for the demonstration of organic 
     photovoltaic cell technologies.
       Page 17, line 17, strike ``; and'' and insert a semicolon.
       Page 17, line 21, strike the period and insert ``; and''.
       Page 17, after line 21, insert the following new paragraph:
       (6) assessment of current financing models available to 
     consumers used to offset high upfront costs by accounting for 
     the long term economic benefits of solar energy.
       Page 18, line 5, and page 19, lines 18 and 22, redesignate 
     sections 107 through 109 as sections 108 through 110, 
     respectively.
       Page 18, after line 4, insert the following new section:

     SEC. 107. REPORT.

       Not later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this 
     Act, the Secretary shall commence a study evaluating 
     potential applications of micro power stations using solar 
     power technology in underserved communities lacking in basic 
     electric or traditional power infrastructure, and make 
     recommendations to Congress for increasing access to and 
     implementation of solar energy technology in such underserved 
     communities.
       Page 20, after line 9, insert the following new section:

     SEC. 111. SOLAR TECHNOLOGY EQUIPMENT THEFT.

       (a) Pilot Program.--Not later than 1 year after the date of 
     enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Energy shall 
     establish a pilot program to make grants for projects to 
     protect against solar technology equipment theft, including 
     projects for mapping of large-scale solar projects and 
     equipment serial number registries.
       (b) Report to Congress.--Not later than 1 year after the 
     establishment of the pilot program under subsection (a), the 
     Secretary of Energy shall transmit to the Congress a report 
     on the effectiveness of projects supported under this 
     section, which shall include recommendations for the 
     continuation or alteration of the program under this section 
     or any other appropriate Federal legislation.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 846, the gentleman 
from Tennessee (Mr. Gordon) and a Member opposed each will control 15 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Tennessee.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself such time as I 
may consume.
  This amendment includes a number of good ideas from my colleagues who 
today were not fortunate enough to be on our committee, so I am happy 
to support them all, and I appreciate their contribution to making this 
a better bill.
  The amendment also incorporates important clarifying language that 
the our staff worked out with our committee colleagues and partner, Dr. 
Bartlett, to ensure that the road map committee only has the power to 
provide guidance on technological goals and activities and cannot 
recommend or select specific recipients of funds. This amendment 
provides further protection against any conflicts of interest on the 
road map committee, and I strongly urge my colleagues to support it.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Chairman, I rise to claim time in opposition 
to the amendment, although I am not necessarily opposed to all of them.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman from Texas is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Chairman, the manager's amendment includes 14 
separate amendments that were submitted to the Rules Committee. I am 
supportive of a number of the provisions, including those that promote 
solar demonstration projects on Federal lands and those that promote 
geographic diversity for members of the solar road map committee. Most 
of these amendments make minor changes, and I don't oppose those. I 
have some questions with a few of the provisions, which I hope the 
chairman might be able to speak to.
  Mr. Hastings' amendment would fund community implementation of solar 
technologies, which I am not sure is an appropriate use of funds in the 
bill. Mr. Polis' amendment seems to be the attempt to study financial 
incentives available to convince people to use solar energy, but I am 
uncertain what he really seeks to accomplish.
  Can the chairman shed some light on the need for this language and 
whether this is an appropriate use of funds in the bill?
  Finally, Mr. Thompson's amendment that would use funding in the bill 
for demonstration projects to protect against solar technology 
equipment theft, I am concerned about the cost of this project and 
whether or not this is

[[Page H11606]]

an appropriate research and development project for the bill, it is a 
research and development project, and how big of a problem is this and 
what types of products are being stolen.
  Mr. Chairman, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. Mr. Chairman, I yield to the gentlewoman 
from San Diego, Mrs. Davis, for as much time as she may consume.
  Mrs. DAVIS of California. I thank my colleague for yielding the time.
  Mr. Chairman, I rise today in strong support of H.R. 3585, the Solar 
Technology Roadmap Act. I think that it is so important.
  I am very proud of my community of San Diego because we are known, as 
everyone is aware, of our perennial sunshine. I also wanted to assure 
our colleagues that we are not just basking in those rays; in fact, we 
are putting them to work. San Diego has been working to put that sun to 
use for some time.
  Our city ranks first among California cities for use of solar energy 
according to a recent report by the Environment California Research & 
Policy Center. Our city's solar friendly policies, such as our quicker 
permitting for buildings that use solar power and a pilot program to 
offer homeowners incentives for solar installations, has made us really 
a bellwether for clean energy operations.
  The other very, very critical issue that I want to applaud is our 
military and our Navy, because the Navy Region Southwest has taken 
great advantage of this wonderful resource that we have in our sun by 
investing in solar panels throughout San Diego bases, saving both 
energy and taxpayer dollars. There are a number of parking lots that 
are shielded by solar panels, a number of the buildings that have been 
transferred over the years. So this kind of sustainability of many of 
our military installations and buildings in San Diego is critically 
important for us. It makes a huge difference.
  I certainly hope that other cities can take a look at what we have 
been able to accomplish and that San Diego's leadership can serve as a 
road map for other cities. As we guarantee our country's leadership for 
providing a road map for financial and structural investments in the 
research and development of solar energy, we can continue to move 
forward with the kind of momentum that is really critical, and that is 
what this bill is providing.
  The public-private partnerships that will result from this bill will 
help make solar energy more affordable and accessible for all 
Americans. I see in my own neighborhood the changes that are occurring, 
pilot projects, solar projects in front of homes throughout the 
community. That sends a very powerful message to people.
  I am thrilled to be a cosponsor of this legislation, and I encourage 
my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to support H.R. 3585.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Chairman, I continue to reserve my time.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself such time as I 
may consume.
  Ranking Member Hall, to respond to your question, the manager's 
amendment was a compilation of a variety of amendments that had been 
presented to the Rules Committee. In an effort to expedite the process 
here today, there was no mention of opposition to these. The minority 
staff had access to these amendments at the same time that we had them. 
We heard no opposition, so we tried to batch them together so that the 
process could move forward more expeditiously.
  Mr. Chairman, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. MITCHELL. Mr. Chair, I rise in support of the Manager's Amendment 
to the Solar Technology Roadmap Act, H.R. 3585.
  We're lucky in Arizona to enjoy over 300 days of sunshine. We have a 
real opportunity to brighten our state's future by investing in solar 
energy research and technology.
  As solar technology advances, I believe that Arizona will be a leader 
in clean, alternative energy production. Refocusing our energy 
production on alternative sources such as solar is critical for our 
national security and the environment.
  Moreover, investing in solar energy is vital to Arizona's economy.
  With the help of solar tax credits, Abengoa Solar and Arizona Public 
Service are developing the world's largest solar energy plant outside 
of Gila Bend. The Solana solar generating station will create 1,500 to 
2,000 jobs and provide clean, emission-free energy for 70,000 homes. 
Solana is expected to ultimately spur $1 billion in economic 
development.
  H.R. 3585, the Solar Technology Roadmap Act, is critical in order to 
spur further research and development of solar technology. This 
legislation would establish a Solar Technology Roadmap Committee tasked 
with creating a Solar Technology Roadmap to evaluate near-term, mid-
term, and long-term research, development, and demonstration needs in 
solar technology. This Committee would include stakeholders in the 
solar industry to provide insights on the deployment of this 
technology.
  I would like to thank Chairman Gordon for working with me to ensure 
that the Solar Technology Roadmap would also address an important 
obstacle blocking the advancement of solar technology today--namely 
that this technology is expensive.
  I offered an amendment to H.R. 3585 to ensure that the Solar 
Technology Roadmap includes research and development goals for 
improving the cost-effectiveness of domestic manufacturing of 
implements and devices used in the production of solar energy.
  The Chairman graciously agreed to include my amendment in the 
manager's amendment.
  If we are serious about making large-scale solar energy production a 
reality, it is critical that we focus our research efforts on ensuring 
that solar technology is affordable and competitive with other sources 
of energy.
  I would also like to take a moment to thank Congresswoman Giffords 
for her hard work on this bill.
  I urge my colleagues to support the manager's amendment as well as 
the underlying legislation.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my 
time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Tennessee (Mr. Gordon).
  The amendment was agreed to.


            Amendment No. 2 Offered by Mr. Broun of Georgia

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 2 
printed in House Report 111-304.
  Mr. BROUN of Georgia. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Amendment No. 2 offered by Mr. Broun of Georgia:
       Page 18, lines 7 through 12, strike ``section 101(a)'' and 
     all that follows through ``2015'' and insert ``section 101(a) 
     $250,000,000 for each of the fiscal years 2011 through 
     2013''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 846, the gentleman 
from Georgia (Mr. Broun) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Georgia.
  (Mr. BROUN of Georgia asked and was given permission to revise and 
extend his remarks.)
  Mr. BROUN of Georgia. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself as much time as I 
may consume.
  Energy independence and innovation are essential to America's 
national as well as economic security. Current rising energy costs only 
reinforce this critical need. Last summer's record-breaking prices of 
fuel exposed the consequences of the failure to have a comprehensive 
national energy strategy, one that makes America energy independent.
  Many believe the debate is oil and gas versus wind, solar, and 
renewable sources of energy. That assumption is absolutely false. We 
need all of the sources of fuel that we know about, both current and 
any possible ones that we can develop in the future.
  Today's bill focuses on one of those sources of very much needed 
energy, solar energy. The technological advances in solar-generated 
energy are growing every day. Specifically, during committee markup, 
our friend and colleague, Dr. Ehlers, shared with us an ingenious new 
technology that may only be a year away from the market, a solar 
shingle.
  These new shingles, which are being developed by the private sector, 
will be able to produce more than enough energy to power almost any 
modern home. I hope they get on the market very quickly. These shingles 
have dual purposes--the protection of the home on the roof and 
providing a clean energy source to the home. Further, the costs to the 
consumer would eventually be comparable to regular wood

[[Page H11607]]

shingles. This is the marketplace at its best.
  Despite my strong support of these innovative and cleaner 
technologies, this Congress must recognize a simple fact: We do not 
have enough money to do all the programs that we would all like to do.

                              {time}  1300

  In order to balance the noble goals of this legislation with the 
overwhelming pressures placed on the budget, I offer this amendment 
which would freeze the amount of money authorized in this bill to $250 
million a year for 3 years.
  In this fiscal year's Energy and Water appropriations bill, $225 
million was appropriated for solar energy programs. This is in addition 
to the $117 million that was appropriated in the so-called stimulus--I 
call it the ``nonstimulus'' bill--earlier this year.
  This is more than Congress can and should be doing for solar and 
other renewable resources, reduce and streamline regulatory burden in 
developing and building green technologies, actions which would not 
expand or increase our debt.
  I urge my colleagues to support this commonsense, economically 
responsible amendment and reduce the burden of adding to the debt which 
will be passed along to our children and grandchildren.
  Mr. Chairman, we have to stop the outrageous spending that this 
Congress is doing, and my amendment will help to do that.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. Mr. Chairman, I rise to claim time in 
opposition to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. I yield the gentlewoman from Arizona 3 
minutes.
  Ms. GIFFORDS. Mr. Chairman, I would like to respond to some of the 
concerns that are addressed in Mr. Broun's amendment.
  Mr. Broun's amendment would freeze the authorization level for solar 
R at $250 million per year, the same level last authorized for fiscal 
year 2009 in the Energy Policy Act of 2005. And note that at this 
funding level, it would almost be completely impossible to carry out 
the tasks of the robust demonstration program in this bill, in addition 
to the critical research that is required through the road map 
committee.
  But I frankly believe that the best justification for the proposed 
authorizations in this bill comes from taking a look backward in time 
at the historical levels of investment in energy R in this country.
  Mr. Chairman, between 1978 and fiscal year 2007, the United States 
Government spent $30 billion on R for nuclear energy alone. We spent 
another $24 billion on fossil fuel research. During that same time, 
however, we spent less than $6.5 billion on solar energy. And more than 
half of that research was performed prior to 1985.
  Now, maybe some people thing these disparities are appropriate. Maybe 
they think that solar does not merit the same levels of investment 
because it is not able to provide as much energy as those technologies. 
However, looking at the research and where we are with the technology 
today, that is simply false.
  Our solar resources are absolutely vast in scale, and they are 
capable of making a significant contribution to our energy needs. Using 
technology available today, solar power could meet the electricity 
demands of the entire United States on a square piece of land 100 by 
100 miles, or 10,000 square acres. That is just one-quarter of the land 
currently covered by artificial lakes behind hydroelectric dams, which 
provide less than 7 percent of our Nation's electricity.
  Scott Stephens, an engineer with the Solar Energy Technology Program 
at the Department of Energy, recently stated publicly that with the 
right incentives, solar power has the potential to provide 20 percent 
of America's electricity needs by 2030. That's equal to the amount of 
power currently provided by nuclear power plants. Yet to date, we have 
spent just one-tenth the resources developing solar technologies than 
we have spent in developing nuclear power. In the last 30 years, we 
have spent four times more money developing coal technology than solar, 
and burning coal is a technology that was developed 150 years ago.
  At the end of the term covered by my bill, it would authorize $550 
million to solar R At the peak of the energy crisis in the 1970s, we 
spent $3 billion a year on nuclear power development and $1.8 billion 
on fossil fuels, using 2007 dollars.
  Let me be clear. I fully support having strong research programs in 
other types of energy, whether it's nuclear or coal and a variety of 
other important energy options. The funding levels in this bill just 
recognize and help us properly take advantage of the enormous solar 
resources that we have in the United States.
  The Acting CHAIR. The time of the gentlewoman has expired.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. I yield the gentlewoman 1 additional minute.
  Ms. GIFFORDS. To properly take advantage of the enormous solar 
resources we have in the United States, and the potential to accelerate 
new clean energy for our economy, it is time for our investment to 
match the scale of opportunity. In fiscal year 2011, the Solar 
Technology Roadmap would authorize $350 million, which is only about 6 
percent of today's energy R budget.
  Mr. BROUN of Georgia. Mr. Chairman, I yield 2 minutes to my good 
friend, Mr. Hall from Texas.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Chairman, I rise in support of the amendment.
  Mr. Chairman, Dr. Broun's amendment is a fiscally conservative 
amendment that makes financial sense when our country is carrying a 
$1.4 trillion debt. Instead of authorizing a total of $2.25 billion, 
Dr. Broun's amendment would authorize $750 million, keeping the 
authorization level more in line with the incremental increases the 
solar program has been appropriated over the past several years, not to 
mention the $117.6 million that the program has already received in the 
stimulus bill. This could be the amendment that would make the bill 
more acceptable.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself such time as I 
may consume.
  Dr. Broun is a valued member of our committee and has well deserved 
credentials for looking after the taxpayers' dollars. But I really 
think in this case it is being penny wise and pound foolish.
  In the short time that I have, I want to make one quick point. The 
United States invented the technology for the solar industry now. Yet 
China is the largest manufacturer, exporter and deployer of solar in 
the world right now. The United States simply cannot compete with them 
in terms of wages. We do not want to work for $2 or $3 an hour. We do 
not want to have our kids to do that. So we have to be ahead of them in 
technology.
  For that reason, we are going to have to invest in that technology so 
that we can make our solar panels and our solar industry be such that 
we are not only manufacturing it, but we are also putting forth the 
best technology. That is why this investment is important. That is why 
this is an investment in our future and our kids.
  And with that, Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. BROUN of Georgia. Mr. Chairman, if the philosophy is that 
government has to supply all the money for all the research and 
development in this country, particularly for energy resources or 
anything else, then it makes sense to pour more and more money into 
this kind of development, but we are stealing our grandchildren's 
future. They are going to live at a lower standard.
  Mr. Chairman, we just simply have to stop the spending and control 
what we are doing. We cannot spend ourselves into economic prosperity. 
It's going to cost jobs in this country. We are going to go into an 
economic slump and a downturn if we don't stop spending money here in 
Congress.
  So my amendment will certainly continue to fund solar energy, which 
we desperately need; but the private sector, Mr. Chairman, can do that 
also. Government is not the only source of funds. The private sector is 
already developing things, as I stated in my opening statement for 
these shingles.
  We have to stop robbing our grandchildren's future.
  And with that, Mr. Chairman, I urge all Members on both sides to 
support my amendment. It's a commonsense, fiscally responsible 
amendment.

[[Page H11608]]

  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Georgia (Mr. Broun).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. BROUN of Georgia. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Georgia will 
be postponed.


           Amendment No. 3 Offered by Mr. Hastings of Florida

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 3 
printed in House Report 111-304.
  Mr. HASTINGS of Florida. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the 
desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Amendment No. 3 offered by Mr. Hastings of Florida:
       Page 10, line 22, strike ``and''.
       Page 10, line 23, redesignate subparagraph (G) as 
     subparagraph (H).
       Page 10, after line 22, insert the following new 
     subparagraph:
       (G) minority-serving institutions; and

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 846, the gentleman 
from Florida (Mr. Hastings) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Florida.
  Mr. HASTINGS of Florida. Mr. Chairman, I rise today to offer this 
amendment to H.R. 3585, the Solar Technology Roadmap Act, to guarantee 
minority-serving institutions are represented in the solar technology 
road map committee.
  Mr. Chairman, I'm a bit melancholy because I'm here with two 
colleagues that I cut my eye teeth in Congress with from the Science 
Committee, Mr. Gordon, the now-Chair, and the ranking member, Mr. Hall. 
And it seems that 19 years kind of like went real fast. Somewhere along 
the way, I had hair then, Mr. Gordon's hair was black, and Mr. Hall's 
hair was white; but he had more of it at that time. But it's a 
pleasure, and it's refreshing to see the comity that existed when I 
came here 19 years ago continuing on this committee. And I applaud them 
in that regard for bringing significant bipartisan legislation to the 
floor.
  As a Member representing the sunshine State of Florida, I feel that 
we must seize the opportunity to research and develop solar technology. 
Solar power is an innate source that can provide much advancement in 
the world of energy and technology. It is critical to ensure that 
members appointed to the solar technology road map committee are a 
diverse group of Americans who will carry out the mission of this act.
  I believe that minority-serving institutions have a history of 
technical expertise, where many are actually land grant institutions, 
thus they have significant extension efforts which translate research 
into applied resources for the communities they serve.
  My law school alma mater and the alma mater of Representative Corrine 
Brown and Representative Kendrick Meek, Florida Agricultural and 
Mechanical University in Tallahassee, Florida, has been a land grant 
institution educating African Americans and other Americans since 1890. 
The university offers an extensive catalog of degree programs with a 
strong and efficient research division. FAMU's research division has 
been involved in cutting-edge research that has led to numerous 
technological and scientific advancements.
  Mr. Chairman, essentially, this amendment reminds the Secretary of 
Energy, responsible for implementing the solar technology road map 
resulting from this legislation, to incorporate diverse expertise. 
Involving institutions such as FAMU will ensure a full spectrum of 
voices contribute to determining the best course for seizing the 
enormous potential of solar technology.
  I ask my colleagues for their support of this amendment, and I deeply 
thank Congresswoman Giffords for offering the underlying legislation.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Chairman, I rise to claim time in opposition 
to the amendment, although I am not opposed to it.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman is recognized for 
5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Chairman, this amendment seeks to ensure 
minority institutions are represented on the solar technology road map 
committee established in this bill. I certainly have no objections to 
this amendment.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. HASTINGS of Florida. Mr. Chairman, how much time do I have 
remaining?
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman has 90 seconds remaining.
  Mr. HASTINGS of Florida. Then I am pleased at this time to yield 90 
seconds to my friend, Mr. Cuellar.
  Mr. CUELLAR. Mr. Chairman, I rise again to support the Solar 
Technology Roadmap Act and of course Mr. Hastings and the work that he 
has done. I had offered an amendment that got included to authorize the 
Secretary of Energy to study micropower solar power technology used in 
underserved communities that lack basic electric and traditional 
powers.
  I think my friends from Texas are familiar with the colonias. They 
understand that this is important to provide power to those areas that 
have literally no electricity. And this particular bill and this 
particular amendment will go a long way to make sure that these 
communities are provided the support they need.

                              {time}  1315

  What this calls for is for the Secretary to provide a study to take 
the resources that we have, especially in south Texas, the sunlight, 
and put it to work to power these communities.
  We have worked together to work and put some micro power stations to 
use in areas like Webb County in south Texas, and I believe that by 
getting these recommendations to be sent to Congress for increasing 
assets to solar energy and to help address the problems that exist in 
those low-income communities, this will go a long way. We can harness 
this 21st century technology to bring these areas out of 19th century 
conditions.
  Mr. Chairman, I want to thank you very much, and also Ms. Giffords, 
and our ranking member.
  I urge Members to vote for the Hastings amendment, and of course for 
this bill.
  Mr. Chairman, I rise today to encourage my colleagues to support the 
manager's amendment to the Solar Technology Roadmap Act.
  I authored an amendment, included in this manager's amendment, to 
authorize the Secretary of Energy to study micro power solar power 
technology use in underserved communities that lack basic electric or 
traditional power infrastructure.
  I thank the distinguished Chairman Ms. Giffords for including my 
amendment in the manager's amendment. This important amendment will go 
a long way towards helping communities along the southern border.
  In my home state of Texas, many of these communities are called 
colonias.
  They are commonly found on the United States/Mexico border, in 
underdeveloped areas across the state, and also in areas of New Mexico, 
Arizona, and California.
  These communities exist with conditions typically found only in 
developing nations--no plumbing, no roads, and no power.
  Texas has both the largest number of colonias and the largest colonia 
population.
  According to the State of Texas, about 400,000 Texans live in 
colonias.
  The development of Texas colonias dates back to least the 1950s, when 
developers created unincorporated subdivisions using agriculturally 
worthless land or land that lay in floodplains or in other rural 
properties.
  They divided the land into small lots, put in little or no 
infrastructure, and then sold them to low-income individuals seeking 
affordable housing.
  This study will hopefully take a resource that is vast in South 
Texas, sunlight, and put it to work to serve and power these 
communities.
  I have worked in the past to put these micro power stations to use in 
Webb County, to provide small, isolated communities with power, and 
this amendment builds on that to hopefully expand power to so many more 
families of South Texas.
  The manager's amendment includes my plan to direct the Secretary of 
Energy to present to Congress recommendations for increasing access to 
solar energy and to help address the problems that exist in these low 
income communities.
  We can harness this 21st century technology to bring these areas out 
of 19th century conditions.

[[Page H11609]]

  Mr. Chairman, I applaud your leadership on this important Manager's 
amendment, and I urge all my colleagues to vote ``yes.''
  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Florida (Mr. Hastings).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                 Amendment No. 4 Offered by Mr. Cardoza

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 4 
printed in House Report 111-304.
  Mr. CARDOZA. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Amendment No. 4 offered by Mr. Cardoza:
       Page 4, lines 1 through 3, amend subparagraph (B) to read 
     as follows:
       (B) solar thermal power technology, including linear 
     concentrator systems, dish/engine systems, power tower 
     systems, and other means;
       Page 14, line 15, strike ``and''.
       Page 14, line 16, redesignate paragraph (3) as paragraph 
     (4).
       Page 14, after line 15, insert the following new paragraph:
       (3) include at least 2 solar thermal technology projects, 
     with thermal storage, that generate between 1 and 3 megawatts 
     continuously for a 24-hour period from energy provided 
     entirely by the sun; and

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 846, the gentleman 
from California (Mr. Cardoza) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from California.
  Mr. CARDOZA. Mr. Chairman, I rise today in support of my amendment, a 
measure that expands the type of technologies that the Department of 
Energy should consider when planning for future solar.
  The Central Valley in California is home to many solar technology 
companies and to the University of California at Merced, a leader in 
solar research. However, my constituents tell me that they are unable 
to take advantage of several of the Department of Energy grant 
application processes because the Department has a very narrow view of 
the future of solar.
  As someone with solar panels on my home in my hometown of Atwater, I 
understand the tremendous benefit that solar power will have on our 
country and economy, and I want to ensure that our current planning is 
done correctly. Instead of limiting the potential of solar power, we 
should be expanding that potential and letting the full imagination of 
American ingenuity take charge.
  My amendment is very simple: it expands the type of technologies that 
the Department of Energy should consider when planning solar technology 
road maps, and it directs the Department to focus resources on 
different types of solar technology.
  Specifically, my amendment expands the definition of solar technology 
to include solar thermal power technology and not just electronic 
photovoltaic technology. This would facilitate the funding of solar 
projects and replace all types of polluting technologies, including 
diesel.
  Secondly, my amendment directs the Department of Energy's 
demonstration program to include solar thermal projects that operate 
using solar power only. Some solar plants are built with gas-fired 
plants next door to them to generate power when the sun is not 
available. If we as a country are going to wean ourselves away from 
dirty energy, then we must develop technologies that eliminate the use 
of pollutants completely and stop settling for hybrids. I know we can 
do better than this. And this amendment instructs the Department of 
Energy to look harder and wider at these technologies.
  I urge the passage of my amendment, and I reserve the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Chairman, I rise to claim time in opposition 
to the amendment although I am not opposed to it.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman is recognized for 
5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Chairman, this amendment would simply expand 
the types of technology the Energy Secretary can consider from solar 
thermal electric technology to solar thermal power technology and 
require the Secretary to include at least two solar thermal technology 
projects with thermal storage in the demonstration project funded under 
the bill. I see no problem with that, and I have no objection to the 
amendment.
  Mr. Chairman, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. CARDOZA. Mr. Chairman, I want to thank my colleague and my 
friend, the gentleman from Texas, for his support of this amendment.
  I would like to yield such time as she may consume to the gentlewoman 
from the District of Columbia (Ms. Norton).
  Ms. NORTON. I want to thank my colleague from California for this 
expansion, and my colleague on the other side for supporting his 
amendment.
  I come to the floor because, in my own work as chairman of a 
subcommittee that engages in construction of courthouses and of Federal 
buildings throughout the United States, we have been trying to make the 
United States lead by example. The cost of all of this, I say to my 
colleague, will go down tremendously if the Federal Government is in 
this big time.
  Your attention to thermal technology with regard to solar is very 
important. Just this morning, I went to speak to the International 
Brotherhood of Electrical Workers who are deeply engaged in this work 
in military institutions and the defense industries. Already we read 
that 30,000 jobs have come out of the stimulus just reported last week. 
And what is important about the stimulus is that every bit of 
construction is built around energy conservation; will not put on a 
roof, will not do an HVAC system, will not upgrade any part of a 
building unless at the center is energy conservation, because the 
taxpayers pay for this energy in leasing even. We do bulk leasing, 
which means we pay for the heat; we pay for the air conditioning. So to 
the extent that the gentleman is making us expand the horizons, he does 
the Nation a great service.
  The Chinese are way ahead of us in research. They have trumped us 
even in manufacturing. This rushes us to manufacturing and moves the 
Nation ahead so that we regain our leadership on technology, a 
leadership, I regret to say, that we have already lost in solar, but 
this bill and the gentleman's amendment helps us to quickly catch up.
  I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. CARDOZA. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from California (Mr. Cardoza).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                 Amendment No. 5 Offered by Ms. Kaptur

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 5 
printed in House Report 111-304.
  Ms. KAPTUR. Mr. Chairman, I rise to offer an amendment as designated 
amendment No. 5 in House Resolution 846.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Amendment No. 5 offered by Ms. Kaptur:
       Page 9, line 14, strike ``and''.
       Page 9, line 15, redesignate paragraph (5) as paragraph 
     (7).
       Page 9, after line 14, insert the following new paragraphs:
       (5) provide recommendations on the necessary steps required 
     to strengthen the link between solar technology research and 
     the commercialization of those technologies into full scale 
     manufacturing, including the retooling and reworking of the 
     Nation's existing technological and manufacturing base, as 
     well as coordinating the national strategy in regions where 
     solar technology clusters currently exist;
       (6) provide recommendations to Federal agencies on 
     corresponding strategies to accelerate domestic 
     commercialization of newly developed solar technologies; and

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 846, the gentlewoman 
from Ohio (Ms. Kaptur) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from Ohio.
  Ms. KAPTUR. Mr. Chairman, first let me thank the distinguished 
gentlewoman from Arizona, Congresswoman Giffords, for her leadership in 
developing this legislation, and the Democratic and Republican 
leadership of the Science and Technology Committee, Chairman Bart 
Gordon of Tennessee and Ranking Member Mr. Ralph Hall of Texas.

[[Page H11610]]

  Truly, for my region, which is one of the three leading solar centers 
in the hemisphere, Toledo, Ohio, and an area enduring great economic 
transition, solar energy is so much a part of our future.
  My amendment is very straightforward. It directs the committee 
charged with outlining the needs of the solar industry to consider the 
outcomes for domestic solar manufacturing and commercialization in the 
United States. The amendment also asks the committee to consider the 
policies of other Federal agencies for encouraging solar 
commercialization.
  We know that while the United States has long been the leader in 
research and development of solar technologies--and let me hold one of 
them up, one of the newest solar inventions from my region which is 
actually going to be on all our roofs someday. It doesn't have glass in 
it, but it's seven layers, and it is part of the future of solar 
building technologies in this country. Our children and grandchildren 
will come to know it very well.
  We have had a lot of creative geniuses out there developing solar 
patents and new technologies, but our country seems to have lost the 
lead in solar deployment and manufacturing. With dramatic advances in 
Germany, Spain, and China, our country needs a unified strategy for 
developing a competitive domestic solar industry.
  For the last 100 years, our community, which has been known as the 
glass center of the world, has been devoting our best minds to the 
exploration of traditional energy resources. We are now converting and 
building on what we've known in the past to something new and 
innovative.
  Regressive research and development practices and our reliance as a 
country on foreign oil helped precipitate our economic decline and 
strategic vulnerability. I have always believed that our dependence on 
imported petroleum is America's chief strategic vulnerability. In fact, 
in 2006 alone, $270 billion, or one-third of the total $836 billion 
U.S. trade deficit, resulted from imported petroleum. That's right, 
one-third of our trade imbalance is the result of imported oil and our 
oil addiction.
  The economic, political and environmental future of our country lies 
in our ability to transition our economy from traditional energy 
sources and to ensure we produce and manufacture the clean power 
sources here at home. That, coupled with conservation and our building 
technologies, can make tremendous strides.
  Between 1943 and 1999, the nuclear industry of our country received 
over $145 billion in Federal subsidies. But the solar industry, by 
contrast, which is our future, only got about $4.4 billion for solar 
energy development; that's less than 3 percent of what was received by 
the nuclear industry. If we are going to invest the billions needed in 
solar, and which we have no choice but doing, there needs to be a road 
map that guides our policies and promotes not just research and 
development, but leads to the creation of a domestic industry without 
outsourcing. We should be exporting, not outsourcing.
  We must ensure that Federal policy takes these technologies from the 
drawing board to the manufacturing line as we've done in so many other 
industries; otherwise, we will find that offshoring will occur as it 
has in other industries and that global trade practices will allow 
foreign imported solar production here, and our domestic manufacturers 
will not be able to keep pace.
  As my colleagues join me on the floor and wonder why an amendment 
like this is necessary, let me provide you with an example from my 
hometown of Toledo; and as I mentioned, it is now one of the leading 
three solar centers in the hemisphere. Toledo, Ohio is a city in 
transition. Throughout the 20th century we were known as the glass 
capital of the world. With the world's glass giants--Libby-Owens-Ford, 
Owens-Illinois, Owens-Corning and Libby--all headquartered in our 
district, the city provided reliable transportation, cheap natural gas, 
and silicate and limestone building materials. As the glass industry 
advanced, the titans of glass spun off glass technologies into some of 
the early solar technologies that local talent created. In fact, the 
hottest stock on Wall Street in the last couple of years has been First 
Solar that is headquartered in our district. It was spun off from 
research at our University of Toledo hand in hand with our glass 
industry leaders.
  Leaders coming from the glass and automotive industry in our region, 
such as Dr. Harold McMaster and Norman Nitschke, who were the founders 
of First Solar, and other entrepreneurs--Norm Johnson, Xunming Deng and 
his wife, Liwein Xu, Al Campaan--all of these wonderful Americans are 
helping to build our future in places like Toledo.
  The Acting CHAIR. The time of the gentlewoman from Ohio has expired.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Chairman, I rise to claim time in opposition 
to the amendment although I am not opposed to it.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman is recognized for 
5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. I yield the gentlelady 1 additional minute.
  Ms. KAPTUR. These private sector researchers at the University of 
Toledo have continued investing in these designs and have birthed new 
solar companies that will be the Fortune 500 of the next generation. 
Companies like Xunlight, Innovative Greenfields, Solar Fields, Calyxo, 
Willard & Kelsey--these were born because of an innovative incubation 
strategy that helped our researchers make the leap from science to 
manufacturing.
  Mr. Chairman, the base bill and this amendment provide the direction 
to transform our solar industry and breathe life into our idle 
industrial economy to produce the advanced energy products of tomorrow 
and to restore America's energy independence.
  I again compliment the gentlelady from Arizona for her leadership, 
and I thank both Chairman Gordon and Ranking Member Hall so very much 
for their time today.
  I urge a ``yes'' vote on the amendment and the base bill.

             [From the Wall Street Journal, Dec. 18, 2007]

               Toledo Finds the Energy To Reinvent Itself

                            (By Jim Carlton)

       Toledo, Ohio.--This city became famous in the last century 
     for being one of North America's leading glass centers. The 
     industry has been in decline since the 1980s, but Toledo 
     hopes to be known for its glass again. This time, though, the 
     glass is being coated with thin layers of chemicals to 
     produce ecofriendly ``solar cells.''
       Toledo is among several old-line industrial cities trying 
     to reinvent themselves--sometimes based on their older 
     industries--to cash in on the demand for alternative energy. 
     In 2006, solar start-up United Solar Inc. said it would open 
     thin-film factories in Auburn Hills and Greenville, two 
     Michigan towns hit hard by the automotive decline. And last 
     year, a wind-generation plant began construction on the 
     grounds of a shuttered Bethlehem Steel plant in Lackawanna, 
     N.Y.
       Industry officials say older industrial cities offer the 
     clean-tech industry some advantages, including less community 
     opposition to new plants. ``The good thing about the Rust 
     Belt is they want factories there,'' says Ron Kenedi, vice 
     president of Sharp Corp.'s Solar Energy Solutions Group, 
     which is based in Huntington Beach, Calif.
       Recently, Norm Johnston, a former executive at Toledo glass 
     companies, showed how Solar Fields LLC, a start-up he runs, 
     was leveraging the old glass industry. Walking to the back of 
     a 22,000-square-foot former machine shop in the nearby suburb 
     of Perrysburg, he patted the blue metal casing on a 100-foot-
     long production line, which his company has designed to coat 
     sheets of glass heated to more than 1,100 degrees with 
     chemicals to make solar cells.
       ``I started in glass, and now I'm back in glass,'' says Mr. 
     Johnston, whose start-up has recently been acquired by German 
     solar-panel maker Q-Cells AG.
       There is similar activity at several other sites in this 
     metropolitan area of 600,000. Companies from Phoenix-based 
     First Solar Inc. to Xunlight Corp. are opening factories in 
     and around Toledo to create electricity-producing ``thin-
     film'' solar panels on glass and other materials. While not 
     rated as efficient as the more prevalent silicon-based solar 
     cells, thin film has taken off in the last year because of 
     soaring demand for alternative energy and a world-wide 
     silicon shortage. It is also cheaper to make than silicon 
     cells.
       In addition to First Solar, which in 1999 built a factory 
     in Perrysburg that now employs about 600, the University of 
     Toledo is receiving state grants to expand its solar research 
     and incubate thin-film spinoffs. So far, the university has 
     incubated four solar start-ups, including Solar Fields, 
     Xunlight, Innovative Thin Films Ltd. and Advanced Distributed 
     Generation LLC. Toledo's Regional Growth Partnership, a 
     nonprofit economic development group, is also using state 
     grants to help fund solar and other alternative energy start-
     ups.

[[Page H11611]]

       ``I think alternative energy is one of the major hopes for 
     northwest Ohio,'' says John Szuch, chairman of Fifth Third 
     Bank of Northwestern Ohio.
       In Toledo, the repercussions of the new solar activity are 
     already being felt. Pilkington North America Inc., a Toledo-
     based unit of Japan's Nippon Sheet Glass Co., has become a 
     major supplier to First Solar, offsetting some of the 
     business it lost in the traditional glass industry. 
     Pilkington officials estimate thin-film sales have grown to 
     about 10% of revenue for its American building products 
     division, prompting the company to beef up a research 
     division that had been undergoing cuts. ``It's the biggest 
     thing going for us right now in terms of glass,'' says Todd 
     Huffman, vice president of strategic planning for Pilkington.
       But clean tech isn't necessarily a panacea. Only about 
     5,000 solar jobs have been created in the last five years in 
     Toledo. Meanwhile, the number of manufacturing jobs lost 
     since the 1980s is in the tens of thousands.
       Cities like Toledo may also have trouble competing with 
     domestic clean-tech hot spots like Silicon Valley, which are 
     in closer proximity to venture capital sources. In addition, 
     Toledo is competing against cheaper overseas locales. First 
     Solar, for instance, is building four manufacturing plants in 
     Malaysia. Company officials say the Perrysburg plant remains 
     ``critical'' to the firm's future success.
       Still, Toledo has come a long way. Stricken by 
     manufacturing declines in the automotive and other big glass-
     consuming sectors, the city has been in an economic malaise 
     for much of two decades. Its population loss in the 1990s was 
     one of the fastest in the U.S.
       Toledo acquired its Glass City moniker because of a long 
     history of innovation in all aspects of the glass business. 
     Owens-Illinois, Owens Corning, Glasstech and Tempglass have 
     extensive ties here. As the traditional glass industry 
     slowed, executives explored other uses for the material.
       In 1989, local inventor and glass entrepreneur Harold 
     McMaster invested some of his millions to launch one of the 
     city's first solar start-ups. ``He knew that sooner or later 
     we would have to come up with a clean source of energy,'' 
     says Alan McMaster, son of the now-deceased Mr. McMaster, an 
     icon in the industry. Mr. McMaster's company, Glasstech 
     Solar, became Solar Cells Inc., with research facilities at 
     the University of Toledo and in a nearby city. In 1999, Solar 
     Cells was acquired by a private-equity firm and became First 
     Solar.
       At the time, there was little demand in the thin-film 
     industry. In 2002, British oil giant BP PLC pulled the plug 
     on two thin-film plants it had had in the works for more than 
     10 years, amid issues including technical problems, according 
     to a January report by the Department of Energy's National 
     Renewable Energy Laboratory.
       But rising energy costs and other events--including the 
     blackout in the Northeast in August 2003--brought thin-film 
     and other alternative energies back into favor. ``We said, 
     `There's a business opportunity here if we had solar','' 
     recalls Solar Fields's Mr. Johnston. The university boosted 
     its emphasis on thin-film research in 2001, and this year it 
     shared in an $18.6 million state grant to fund the solar 
     industry.
       The school is now using the money to beef up solar research 
     in its McMaster Hall, where some labs have been packed with 
     equipment like a magnetron gun, which is used to spray thin-
     film chemicals on glass and other surfaces.
       Civic leaders in Toledo now say they have the ingredients 
     in place to turn solar into a thriving industry. In a seafood 
     restaurant overlooking the Maumee River one recent evening, 
     business and academic leaders discussed the city's rising 
     solar industry and traced back its roots. ``How in the hell 
     would we be in this business in the first place if it weren't 
     for glass?'' asked Harlan Reichle, a local real-estate 
     executive.
                                  ____


             Toledo's Makeover: Glass City to Solar Valley

                            (By Chris Bury)

       In Toledo, once the glass-making capital of the country, 
     most of the city's output over the years has gone into making 
     everything from windshields to windows for cars and 
     buildings.
       But as the auto and construction industries have declined, 
     so too, has Toledo's manufacturing sector.
       For Glen Eason, a manufacturing worker, supplying the auto 
     industry meant waiting for the ax to fall.
       ``I've been scared to death for the past 10 years, to tell 
     you the truth,'' said Eason, a Toledo native and 30-year auto 
     supply industry veteran.
       Marty Vick, 58, also spent 30 years working at an auto 
     supplier, making seats and dashboards, only to see his job 
     disappear. His company laid off 117 people in January.
       ``I never thought I'd see the day that GM, Ford and 
     Chrysler would be at the brink of bankruptcy,'' Vick said.
       That has left entire cities, including Toledo, on the 
     brink. With its smokestack industries dying out, Toledo saw 
     the writing on the wall and did something about it.


         Watch the story tonight on ``World News'' at 6:30 p.m.

       To secure its future, Toledo, once known as the Glass City, 
     embraced its past; Toledo is where glass was first mass-
     produced for bottles, buildings, and cars. Now, the city is 
     turning those skills--and that tradition--to the sun.
       New solar energy-related businesses are taking hold in what 
     city officials and local executives hope will become Ohio's 
     ``solar valley.''
       ``We didn't envision there would be some bailout of Toledo, 
     so we had to do it ourselves,'' said Norm Johnston, CEO of 
     Solar Fields, a solar startup company. ``We want to move from 
     being the `rust belt' to being the `renewable energy belt.' 
     ''
       Solar Fields is on the forefront of the fast-growing 
     ``green industry,'' supplying panels that help power a 
     National Guard base. It is one of dozens of new companies in 
     Toledo that now make rivers of glass into solar cells, panels 
     and coatings.
       ``Our goal is to create jobs. What we like and what our 
     favorite color is--is green. But it's the green of cash that 
     gives you good jobs,'' Johnston said.


               Town Has Brighter Mission With Solar Power

       In Ohio's ``solar valley,'' 10,000 new jobs have taken 
     root. Companies, like Xunlight, founded by researchers at the 
     University of Toledo, are growing fast, working with experts 
     to manufacture solar products and hiring new employees to 
     become ``green collar'' workers.
       ``Last year, we grew 300 percent--from 20 employees to 80 
     employees today,'' said Xunming Deng, a physics professor-
     turned CEO of Xunlight Corp.
       Executives hired from rust-belt companies, who are 
     accustomed to downsizing, have a brighter mission in the 
     solar business.
       ``In the last position, it was about how do we get rid of 
     people,'' said Matt Longthorne, vice president of Xunlight. 
     ``And in this position, it's how do we hire people and get 
     bigger.''
       Many of Xunlight's workers once made auto parts: everything 
     from windshields to vinyl seats. Now they turn out thin, 
     flexible solar modules that power homes and businesses.
       What Vick gave up in hourly wages working for an auto 
     supplier, he's gained in a brighter future--working in the 
     solar industry, he has more job security than ever before.
       ``This is really high tech, cutting edge for me,'' Vick 
     said. ``It's really, really challenging and I like it.''
       Eason, who has also gone to a job in green technology, is 
     enthusiastic, seeing his native Toledo switching gears. 
     ``Just to be part of something that's growing and something 
     that's good for the planet and good for the people,'' Eason 
     said. ``Solar is going to be so immense. Solar is the new 
     oil.''
       Toledo is bailing itself out from the faded glory of the 
     Glass City to the shiny promise of the Solar Valley.
       ``You have all this wonderful energy that the sun is 
     sending to us for free and we're devising ways to capture it 
     and put it to use,'' Eason said. ``In this area, we're in the 
     forefront and everybody else is going to have to catch up 
     with us.''
                                  ____


                  [From the Economist, Aug. 13, 2009]

                         Greening the Rustbelt

       Xunlight Corporation, a small manufacturer of solar panels, 
     sits on a quiet street in Toledo. It has a professor as its 
     president, about 100 employees on its payroll--and a lot of 
     bigwig visitors. In October 2008 Sarah Palin, then the 
     Republican vice-presidential candidate, used Xunlight as the 
     setting for a speech on energy policy. Other guests have 
     included Ohio's governor, two senators and a congresswoman. 
     And no wonder: the firm provided evidence to support a 
     seductive hope, that the green economy can help to revive the 
     suffering rustbelt.
       As the battle over a cap-and-trade bill continues in 
     Congress, the industrial Midwest finds itself playing an 
     awkward role. The climate bill offers two big opportunities, 
     to reduce global warming and boost the green economy in the 
     process. And nowhere are green jobs more loudly promoted than 
     in the rustbelt. On August 5th Barack Obama and Joe Biden, 
     his vice-president, travelled to Indiana and Michigan, two 
     ailing swing states, to announce new grants to develop 
     electric cars. But hopes for those new green jobs are matched 
     by fears that traditional ones will be lost. With the Senate 
     due to debate a cap-and-trade bill next month, the rustbelt 
     and its politicians are at the heart of the battle.
       The industrial Midwest has long been in need of a 
     renaissance. Its factories have been losing jobs for decades, 
     since long before the recession hit. Michigan, home to 
     America's biggest carmakers, had a 15.2% unemployment rate in 
     June, compared with a national average of 9.5%.
       Green investment presents new hope. The University of 
     Massachusetts, Amherst, and the Centre for American Progress, 
     a think-tank, estimated in June that the federal stimulus 
     package and a climate bill would spur about $150 billion in 
     spending on clean energy each year for the next decade. That 
     spending, in turn, would create an estimated 2.5m jobs, from 
     academic researchers to factory workers making wind turbines. 
     ``This is an opportunity for American ingenuity to renew the 
     manufacturing base,'' argues Phyllis Cuttino of the 
     Environment Group at the Pew Charitable Trusts.
       There are already signs of activity. The Great Lakes Wind 
     Network, based in Ohio, helps local firms sell goods to the 
     wind business. Toledo remains one of the best examples of a 
     town moving from the old economy

[[Page H11612]]

     to a newer one. It has been a hub for the glass manufacturing 
     since the 19th century. Thanks to innovations in solar 
     technology at the University of Toledo, it is now home to a 
     cluster of firms such as Xunlight. State grants continue to 
     help the university hatch companies. The Regional Growth 
     Partnership, a local business group, provides venture 
     capital.
       In Michigan despair has bred particularly bold action. In 
     the past five years Jennifer Granholm, the Democratic 
     governor, has dangled more than $1 billion to attract 
     alternative-energy firms, with about $700m in tax credits to 
     develop electric-car batteries. Impressively, Michigan had 
     the third-highest number of clean-tech patents from 1999 to 
     2008, behind only California and New York, reckons Pew. That 
     number may rise. Last year Michigan passed a requirement for 
     power companies to boost efficiency, along with an order that 
     renewable sources account for 10% of the state's electricity 
     by 2015. Investments from the federal stimulus will help too. 
     In the share-out on August 5th, Michigan won more grants for 
     electric cars than any other state.
       Nevertheless, the clean-energy economy remains small. 
     Though green jobs are increasing in number, they accounted 
     for only 0.6% of jobs in Ohio in 2007, according to Pew. The 
     shares in Michigan and Indiana were even smaller, at 0.4% and 
     0.5% respectively. Manufacturing, for all its troubles, is a 
     behemoth in comparison, accounting for 14% of employment in 
     Ohio, 15% in Michigan and 18% in Indiana in 2007. And it is a 
     dirty giant, dependent on cheap coal. The Midwest emits an 
     outsize share of carbon, according to a report from the 
     Chicago Council on Global Affairs. Indiana is one of the 
     worst offenders, spewing out 4% of America's carbon emissions 
     in 2007 though it is home to only 2% of its population.
       The fear is that a cap-and-trade bill may expand a 
     promising new sector but devastate a struggling, larger one. 
     Mitch Daniels, the Republican governor of Indiana, has worked 
     hard to maintain his state's manufacturing base. A price on 
     carbon, he argues, would threaten it.
       The version of cap-and-trade passed in June by the House 
     was meant to appease such critics. It includes help for 
     manufacturers eager to retool for new industries. Allowances 
     would be given away, not auctioned. And at the urging of a 
     congressman from Michigan, the bill would, from 2020, tax 
     imports from countries that do not restrict emissions. But 
     some Democrats are still wary. Three of Indiana's five House 
     Democrats voted against the bill.
       Now a tough battle looms in the Senate. A new report from 
     the Energy Information Administration (EIA) forecasts that 
     the House bill would depress industrial shipments by 1% 
     between 2012 and 2030 (see chart). But that assumes a quick 
     expansion of nuclear plants, which is unlikely. In the EIA's 
     worst-case scenario, shipments would drop 3.2%. ``They're 
     huxtering,'' huffs George Voinovich, Ohio's Republican 
     senator, of the green enthusiasts. He wants more support for 
     nuclear power and fears the House bill will transfer wealth 
     from the heartland. On August 6th, ten of Mr Voinovich's 
     Democratic colleagues, including six from the Midwest, wrote 
     to Mr Obama fretting that a bill would cripple manufacturing 
     industry.
       But in Toledo Xunlight's president, Xunming Deng, looks 
     forward to a cap-and-trade bill. ``Of course there is a cost, 
     but this is an investment for our economy, for our future,'' 
     he says. There remains a danger, however, that compromise 
     will produce a clunker of a bill--one that does little to 
     slow climate change, little to revive the old economy and 
     little to boost a new one. Much now depends on a handful of 
     the states in the heartland.

  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Chairman, although I am not opposed to the 
amendment, I do have some concerns about this amendment.
  While I agree with its intent to help commercialize the technologies 
that come around as a result of solar technology research, I am 
concerned that we may not want to spend research dollars retooling and 
refurbishing manufacturing facilities, some of which may be represented 
on the Solar Roadmap Committee. That's my problem with it.

                              {time}  1330

  Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from Ohio (Ms. Kaptur).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from Ohio will 
be postponed.


                Amendment No. 6 Offered by Mr. Marshall

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 6 
printed in House Report 111-304.
  Mr. MARSHALL. I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Amendment No. 6 offered by Mr. Marshall:
       Page 14, line 15, strike ``and''.
       Page 15, line 15, strike the period and insert ``; and''.
       Page 15, after line 15, insert the following new paragraph:
       (4) evaluate the potential to establish large photovoltaic 
     facilities that produce at least 100 gigawatts, including an 
     evaluation of the electrical grid, current, voltage, and 
     energy storage requirements associated with large 
     photovoltaic facilities.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 846, the gentleman 
from Georgia (Mr. Marshall) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Georgia.
  Mr. MARSHALL. Mr. Chairman, the bill includes authorization for $300 
million to the Energy Department for programs that will establish 
demonstration grants for solar technology projects. What my amendment 
does is include a requirement that the Department use some of this 
money to evaluate the potential benefits of very large solar projects.
  The amendment is prompted by a January 2008 article that appeared in 
Scientific American, part of their Big Ideas series. Folks out there 
who want to read the article, I think you could probably just Google 
``Solar Grand Plan,'' Scientific American, January 2008, and you would 
see an excellent discussion by three scientists of the possibility that 
we could create in the Southwest a 3,000-gigawatt facility that 
delivers solar power to the Nation. It would produce enough solar power 
by 2050, according to these scientists, to meet 69 percent of our 
electricity needs and 35 percent of our overall energy needs.
  The idea is that some 30,000 acres, or square miles, I am not sure 
which, but a large hunk of land in the Southwest would be covered by 
solar facilities. The energy would be collected during the day, 
distributed nationwide on an improved grid, a lot of that grid would 
probably be direct current, stored during the day underground in high 
pressure underground caverns, with the pressure released overnight in 
order to provide the power overnight.
  One of the beauties of the suggestion is that it feeds back into the 
existing distribution facilities that we have, so we would not have to 
change, if we were using DC transmission, to DC power, but instead 
would continue using AC power in our existing facilities.
  I don't know whether something like this will work, but if these 
scientists are right, the costs seem quite reasonable for the reward 
that we would realize. The energy is completely clean, it essentially 
frees us from dependence upon foreign sources of energy, and 
consequently meets both the security need and environmental need at the 
exact same time.
  Big ideas like this require study and evaluation before they are put 
together in some sort of implementation project, and consequently we 
only contemplate in the amendment that there will be an evaluation of 
this kind of concept as opposed to actual demonstration projects.
  The $300 million that has been given to the Energy Department for 
these demonstration projects, no doubt they are going to be smaller 
projects, much smaller projects, than something as large as this. What 
we contemplate is that there be an evaluation of whether or not a 100-
gigawatt solar facility makes sense and should be supported somehow by 
the Federal Government.
  The authors of this Scientific American article printed in January of 
2008 estimated that the Federal investment to accomplish what in 
essence would free us altogether from foreign sources of energy, the 
estimate of the Federal investment over a 20-year period of time, would 
be $450 billion. Spread over a 20-year period of time, a $450 billion 
investment that would actually give us energy independence and an awful 
lot of clean energy seems to me to be something that we ought to be 
evaluating, and that is why I suggested the amendment.
  With that, I request the adoption of my amendment.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Chairman, I rise to claim time in opposition 
to the

[[Page H11613]]

amendment, although I am not opposed to it.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman is recognized for 
5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Chairman, this amendment would require the 
Secretary to evaluate the potential to establish large solar facilities 
and evaluate the electrical grid, current, voltage, and energy storage 
requirements associated with large solar facilities, which I think this 
is a good time for.
  We have no objection to this.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. MARSHALL. Mr. Chairman, I thank the gentleman from Texas. It 
could well be that some of these facilities wind up in your State. I 
have spent a fair amount of time in your great State, and I have 
observed many of the times that I have been there that you have a lot 
of land available that could be put to good use for this kind of 
purpose.
  Another thing in this article that these scientists point out is that 
once a solar facility like this is created, it requires a lot less 
continuing maintenance and care, unlike a lot of our other facilities 
that create power, and consequently it is just a win-win, and perhaps 
it will wind up being a win-win for Texas.
  I yield whatever time I have left to the chairman.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. Thank you, Mr. Marshall. I want to let you 
know that the author of the study that you put forth testified before 
our committee. It was made part of the record. And you are absolutely 
right, the sun doesn't shine 24 hours a day, so we need to also find 
ways to be able to have the storage. I think it is a two-fer with this 
proposal, and we gladly accept your amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The time of the gentleman has expired.
  The question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman from 
Georgia (Mr. Marshall).
  The amendment was agreed to.


            Amendment No. 7 Offered by Mr. Klein of Florida

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 7 
printed in House Report 111-304.
  Mr. KLEIN of Florida. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Amendment No. 7 offered by Mr. Klein of Florida:
       Page 5, line 9, strike ``and''.
       Page 5, line 10, redesignate paragraph (7) as paragraph 
     (8).
       Page 5, after line 9, insert the following new paragraph:
       (7) development of storage technologies that can be used to 
     increase the usefulness and value of solar technologies; and

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 846, the gentleman 
from Florida (Mr. Klein) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The gentleman from Florida is recognized.
  Mr. KLEIN of Florida. Mr. Chairman, I would like to start by thanking 
Congresswoman Giffords for introducing the Solar Technology Roadmap Act 
and Chairman Gordon for his leadership on bringing this important bill 
to the floor.
  As a cosponsor of this legislation, I believe it makes a timely 
investment in clean energy technology that will stimulate economic 
growth and create jobs nationwide. My amendment would clarify that 
research activities on the development of solar energy storage 
technologies are eligible for funding in this bill.
  Solar energy technology has significant potential to supply cheap, 
clean and renewable energy to American families and businesses. 
However, one of the major challenges with solar energy is that it can 
only be produced during daylight hours. That is obvious. Thus, it is 
only available at certain times, which may not necessarily correspond 
to the times it is most needed by the electric grid, when electricity 
is the most expensive, during peak hours, and the least efficient fuels 
are likely to be used.
  To use a metaphor, the distribution of solar electricity to date is 
like trying to distribute water from rain without having reservoirs to 
catch and hold the water.
  In my home State of Florida, we are known as the Sunshine State, and 
for good reason. Businesses in Florida have invested over $1 billion in 
solar technology over the past 3 years, building the largest 
photovoltaic solar plant in North America and installing more solar 
power than almost every other State in the country. But without cost-
effective storage technology, we cannot build upon this investment, not 
only in Florida but throughout the country, to eventually rely more 
heavily on solar power for our States' and our country's energy needs.
  There are emerging storage technologies, including batteries, thermal 
storage and others, that can take solar energy when it is produced, 
store it, and then provide electricity to the grid at opportune times. 
These technologies have the power to make solar power more reliable, 
more cost-efficient, and more widely used as an alternative to fossil 
fuels for our energy needs. They also have the potential to create 
thousands of new jobs right here in the United States as we develop 
technologies, manufacture products, and sell them all over the world.
  Storage technology may also have a substantial impact on the way we 
purchase energy to power our homes and businesses, regardless of the 
energy source. With more advanced and more affordable storage 
technology, we may one day be able to purchase energy from utility 
companies during off-peak hours, when energy costs are low, and store 
the energy for when we need it. This would allow utility companies to 
run more efficiently by reducing demand during peak hours and utilize 
their plants in the middle of the night when demand is low, thus 
helping businesses and consumers purchase the energy at the lowest 
energy cost.
  The development of solar energy technology will be critical to 
establishing solar power as a primary source of electricity in the 
United States and significantly altering the future of our energy 
infrastructure. Alternative renewable sources of energy, like solar, 
that can be generated right here in the United States will make 
household and business energy bills cheaper, improve our environment, 
and reduce our dependence on foreign oil, if we develop the technology 
to make it more efficient and cost-effective.
  This amendment will emphasize the importance of devoting Federal 
research dollars in this bill to further advancing storage technology 
that will propel storage technology to the next level.
  Mr. Chairman, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Chairman, I rise to claim time in opposition 
to the amendment, although I am not opposed to it.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman is recognized for 
5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Chairman, this amendment would simply include 
research on solar energy storage technology as eligible for funding 
under the research and development program established in the bill.
  I have no objection to this amendment.
  I yield back my time.
  Mr. KLEIN of Florida. Mr. Chairman, again, I would just yield myself 
such time as I may consume for purposes of closing.
  The legislation under consideration today, as I said, presents an 
incredibly exciting opportunity for Florida and all the States in our 
Union to propel this technology forward and one day establish our 
country as a global leader in clean, renewable energy technology 
relating to solar power. I am confident that the Solar Technology 
Roadmap Act will substantially advance solar technology in the United 
States, reduce its cost, and help America transition to a clean energy 
economy.
  I urge adoption.
  I yield the balance of my time to the gentleman from Tennessee.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. As my friend knows, even in Florida the sun 
doesn't shine 24 hours a day, so to make the most use of solar 
technology, storage is very important. I think there will be a 
combination there. That storage benefit, the technology, will also be 
used for wind power and other types of renewables.
  So I think you have an excellent amendment. It makes a good bill even 
better, and I appreciate your addition to this bill.

[[Page H11614]]

  Mr. KLEIN of Florida. I thank the chairman, and yield back the 
balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Florida (Mr. Klein).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. KLEIN of Florida. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Florida will 
be postponed.


                  Amendment No. 8 Offered by Ms. Titus

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 8 
printed in House Report 111-304.
  Ms. TITUS. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Amendment No. 8 offered by Ms. Titus:
       Page 5, line 9, strike ``and''.
       Page 5, line 10, redesignate paragraph (7) as paragraph 
     (8).
       Page 5, after line 9, insert the following new paragraph:
       (7) development of solar technology products that are water 
     efficient; and
       Page 8, line 21, strike ``and''.
       Page 8, line 22, redesignate subparagraph (H) as 
     subparagraph (I).
       Page 8, after line 21, insert the following new 
     subparagraph:
       (H) the development of solar technology products that are 
     water efficient; and

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to the rule, the gentlewoman from Nevada 
(Ms. Titus) and a Member opposed each will control 5 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from Nevada.
  Ms. TITUS. Mr. Chairman, I thank Chairman Gordon and Ms. Giffords for 
your leadership on the important issue of energy research, development 
and deployment in the area of renewables.
  My amendment, offered with Mr. Teague of New Mexico and Mr. Cohen of 
Tennessee, simply requires that the solar energy research, development 
and demonstration program and the solar technology road map that are 
authorized in this bill include an emphasis on the development of solar 
technology that is water-efficient.
  We know that some of the sunniest States in the country, like my 
State of Nevada, are also among the driest. So while I strongly believe 
we must make significant investments to expand solar energy development 
across the Southwest, I also believe that we must ensure that 
investments are made in research and development of new solar 
technologies that use less water.
  This point was brought out rather dramatically in a recent New York 
Times article entitled ``Alternative Energy Projects Stumble on a Need 
for Water.'' In fact, depending on the technology, some solar plants 
can use more than 1 billion gallons of water a year for cooling.
  It was quoted in the article, ``When push comes to shove, water could 
become the real throttle on renewable energy.'' This was a statement 
made by Michael E. Webber, an assistant professor at the University of 
Texas in Austin, who studies the relationship between energy and water.

                              {time}  1345

  Now, to date, this conflict between energy and water has occurred 
mostly in the Southwest, where there are dozens of multibillion dollar 
solar power plants that are planned for thousands of acres in the 
desert.
  While most forms of energy production include some kind of water, 
water's availability is especially limited in the sunny areas that are 
otherwise well suited for solar farms. So as we can see, this could 
possibly lead to a new-age version of a western water war. Long have we 
heard the saying in the West that whiskey is for drinking and water is 
worth fighting over. We don't want to see that happen again.
  And furthermore, as we see more solar development spread across the 
country, it's likely that the water efficiency of solar technology will 
become a key concern, not just in the Southwest, but in areas that 
haven't historically dealt with water issues up until this point. 
Investing in research that, as we develop solar technologies, are water 
efficient is a win-win for the environment. We will use less fossil 
fuel and less water.
  At the same time we do this, we have the potential to remove a major 
obstacle to the speedy siting of utility scale renewable energy 
projects. Those are occurring in States like mine where water concerns 
can slow the permitting process dramatically.
  Investments in the development of solar technology products that are 
water efficient will save water, they will save energy, and they will 
ultimately bring down the cost of these products so that we can move 
more quickly to a clean energy economy.
  So I thank you again, Mr. Chairman, and I reserve the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Chairman, I rise to claim time in opposition 
to the amendment, although I am not opposed to it.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman from Texas is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Chairman, I have no objection to this 
amendment. It's a good amendment, as solar energy can be a large user 
of water, and we're looking at ways to reduce the use of water in all 
forms of energy production. I think it's a very good amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Ms. TITUS. Mr. Chairman, as Daniel Kammen, who is the Director of the 
Renewable and Appropriate Energy Lab at the University of California at 
Berkeley, stated, ``As intensive renewable energy development spreads, 
water issues will follow.'' That's why I believe this amendment is an 
important addition.
  I want to thank Mr. Teague and Mr. Cohen for helping me with the 
amendment.
  At this time, I will yield to the chairman, Mr. Gordon.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. I thank the gentlelady from Nevada.
  Certainly, as we have had various hearings in the Science and 
Technology Committee, we've determined very easily that there is a 
nexus between water and energy. In most cases, it takes water to make 
energy and it takes energy to move water, and certainly in the area of 
large plants with solar thermal, there is a lot of use of water in that 
regard. To make those plants more efficient will help us to conserve 
water and help us with that nexus.
  And again, I thank the gentlelady for this good amendment to this 
good bill.
  Ms. TITUS. I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from Nevada (Ms. Titus).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Ms. TITUS. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from Nevada 
will be postponed.


                Amendment No. 9 Offered by Mr. Heinrich

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 9 
printed in House Report 111-304.
  Mr. HEINRICH. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Amendment No. 9 offered by Mr. Heinrich:
       Page 9, line 18, redesignate subsection (c) as subsection 
     (d).
       Page 9, after line 17, insert the following new subsection:
       (c) Public Input.--The Committee shall release a draft 
     Roadmap to the public at least one month prior to publication 
     in order to receive input from the public.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 846, the gentleman 
from New Mexico (Mr. Heinrich) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from New Mexico.
  Mr. HEINRICH. Mr. Chairman, I rise today as a proud cosponsor of the 
Solar Technology Roadmap Act of 2010, and I want to especially thank my 
colleague from Arizona (Ms. Giffords) for introducing and championing 
this important legislation.
  As a member of the Sustainable Energy and Environment Coalition, I'm 
particularly proud to support this coalition priority. My home State of 
New Mexico averages more than 300 days of

[[Page H11615]]

sunshine each year and is second in the Nation for solar energy 
potential, so I have a great appreciation for the positive impact that 
this bill will have.
  In New Mexico, even in the midst of this difficult recession, we are 
adding jobs in the solar energy sector. Many New Mexicans, myself 
included, power their homes using solar energy, and Sandia National 
Labs is a world leader in developing new solar technologies, such as 
Stirling engines and multijunction solar cells.
  The amendment I'm offering today would require the act's solar 
technology road map committee to release a draft road map at least 1 
month prior to publication in order to ensure that the public has the 
opportunity to provide their input. Our government works best when the 
American public is included in the decisionmaking process. This 
amendment will ensure that the road map reflects the wisdom and 
experiences of individuals and businesses that already work in this 
quickly growing industry.
  In order for our country to reach its potential in growing the clean 
energy economy, the Federal Government must invest wisely in research 
and development. Incorporating public comments will ensure that the 
solar road map is an efficient, effective blueprint for meeting our 
full potential in utilizing solar energy.
  Mr. Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Chairman, I rise to claim time in opposition 
to the amendment, although I am not opposed to it.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman is recognized for 
5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Chairman, in light of the exemption from the 
Federal Advisory Committee Act in this bill for the road map committee, 
I think it's a good idea to make the draft road map available to the 
public for input. This will help shed additional light on the decisions 
of the road map committee. I would support the amendment.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. HEINRICH. I would urge my colleagues' support.
  I once again want to thank Chairman Gordon and Representative 
Giffords for their leadership on this very important issue.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Chairman, I have no further requests for time, 
and I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. HEINRICH. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from New Mexico (Mr. Heinrich).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. HEINRICH. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from New Mexico 
will be postponed.


                 Amendment No. 10 Offered by Mr. Himes

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 10 
printed in House Report 111-304.
  Mr. HIMES. Mr. Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Amendment No. 10 offered by Mr. Himes:
       Page 4, line 24, insert ``, including both solar thermal 
     and concentrating solar photovoltaic technologies'' after 
     ``solar power''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 846, the gentleman 
from Connecticut (Mr. Himes) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The gentleman from Connecticut is recognized.
  Mr. HIMES. Mr. Chair, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  I'd like to begin by thanking Chairman Gordon for his excellent work 
on this very, very important bill guiding us towards where this country 
needs to be in energy in the coming years and generations.
  I rise today to offer an amendment which I think is about a topic at 
the forefront of everybody's minds right now, which is jobs, jobs, and 
jobs. This bill is about the creation of good, high-paying jobs for 
American workers and, in the process, restoring our competitiveness in 
one of the most important industries of the next century.
  Mr. Chair, every new solar panel system we install in this country 
creates new business for roofers, for electricians, for engineers, and 
for construction workers. But I'm most excited about what solar power 
can do for America's manufacturing.
  I refuse to believe that America's days as a world leader in 
manufacturing are over. An industry report by Duke University found 
that by 2016, only 7 years from now, solar manufacturing could replace 
500,000 jobs that have been lost, say, in the auto industry; 500,000 
jobs, the manufacturing sector of the 21st century, if we make the 
right investments now.
  Back when very few of us were talking about solar power, the U.S. was 
quietly leading the world in the production of solar technology. Well, 
through the 1990s, no country on Earth invested more in solar than we 
did. So how is it that here in 2009, only 5 percent, 5 percent of the 
world's solar panels are made in America? There's a one-word answer to 
that question, and that word is ``investment.''
  Look at China. Through their Golden Sun program, the Chinese 
Ministries of Finance, Science and Technology and the National Energy 
Administration are subsidizing half of the construction and connection 
costs for on-grid solar power plants and 70 percent of the cost of off-
grid installations from now until 2011. And American companies are 
following these investments.
  First Solar, of Tempe, Arizona, recently signed an agreement to build 
a 2-gigawatt plant, 2 gigawatts, one of the largest solar plants in the 
world, in Ordos City in Inner Mongolia. Now, I have nothing against 
Mongolia, but I, for one, would prefer to see those jobs in Bridgeport 
or Stamford or any of the other American cities that saw their 
manufacturing sectors decimated in the last 50 years.
  I'm especially excited about this bill because solar power is 
creating jobs right now in my district. Opel, Inc., of Shelton, 
Connecticut, is making and installing some of the most advanced solar 
technology anywhere on the market, and technology that is the subject 
of my amendment today.
  Concentrated photovoltaic or CPV systems employ lenses and tracking 
systems to focus sunlight into a small beam concentrated on a 
photovoltaic surface. This relatively new technology is already showing 
dramatic potential. In May 2008, IBM demonstrated a prototype CPV using 
computer chip cooling techniques to improve an energy density of 2,300 
suns.
  As we accelerate our efforts to raise the efficiency and lower the 
cost of solar power, it is worth pointing out that CPV systems provide 
greater power production--20 to 40 percent more kilowatt hours--with 
lower costs and less land usage than any solar technology science has 
yet produced.
  CPV technologies are an ideal source of scalable, utility-grade solar 
electric power production that will move solar energy faster toward 
grid parity costs. My amendment merely clarifies that these leading-
edge technologies will be included among those funded as part of the 
solar road map.
  The global race to a clean energy economy is on, Mr. Chair, and 
millions of new jobs are on the line. We may have fallen behind a bit, 
but this is our chance to catch up.
  I thank Mr. Gordon for his committee's excellent work, urge my 
colleagues to support this amendment, and reserve the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Chairman, I rise to claim time in opposition 
to the amendment, although I am not opposed to it.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman is recognized for 
5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. HALL. Mr. Chairman, this amendment would simply clarify that 
solar thermal technologies and concentrating solar technologies will be 
included within the scope of the research and development program 
authorized by the bill. I have no objection to it.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. HIMES. I would like to thank the gentleman from Texas (Mr. Hall) 
for his support.
  I yield back the balance of my time.

[[Page H11616]]

  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Connecticut (Mr. Himes).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. HIMES. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Connecticut 
will be postponed.


           Amendment No. 11 Offered by Mr. Murphy of New York

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 11 
printed in House Report 111-304.
  Mr. MURPHY of New York. Mr. Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Amendment No. 11 offered by Mr. Murphy of New York:
       Page 13, lines 10 and 16, redesignate subsections (d) and 
     (e) as subsections (e) and (f), respectively.
       Page 13, after line 9, insert the following new subsection:
       (d) Reporting.--Not later than 1 year after the date of 
     enactment of this Act, and annually thereafter, the Committee 
     shall submit a report to the Secretary and the Congress on 
     its activities over the prior 12-month period.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 846, the gentleman 
from New York (Mr. Murphy) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from New York.
  Mr. MURPHY of New York. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself as much time as 
I may consume.
  I rise today to offer a simple amendment that would require the solar 
technology road map committee to submit an annual report to the 
Secretary of Energy and to this Congress on its activities over the 
prior 12-month period.
  For far too long, our Nation has operated without a comprehensive 
energy strategy. As a result, we spent $475 billion importing foreign 
oil last year. That's more than our entire trade deficit. This is a 
crisis that we must address, and our working families and small 
businesses feel that every day as they see rising energy costs. And 
while I believe a successful energy strategy will require investments 
in a broad range of domestic energy sources--wind, solar, hydro, and 
nuclear--today's legislation is a critical step in the development of a 
strategy to more effectively develop and utilize solar technology and 
to move our Nation closer to energy independence.

                              {time}  1400

  I applaud Congresswoman Giffords, Chairman Gordon, Ranking Member 
Hall for their hard work on this important issue.
  Today's legislation creates a solar technology road map committee 
that will be charged with creating a road map to present the best 
estimate of the near-term, mid-term, and long-term research and 
development needs in the solar technology world, as well as provide 
guidance for solar technology research, development, and demonstration 
activities supported by our regular Federal Government.
  This is a critical path for us, and it's one we've been working on in 
New York with our own efforts for many years, and one that I'm familiar 
with. Our efforts at NYSERDA in New York really helped a lot of small 
businesses in the solar community and in other energy technologies, 
businesses that I worked with when I was an investor helping those 
small businesses grow. And as we heard Congressman Himes say a minute 
ago, this is the future of manufacturing in America, and this road map 
will be a critical element to moving us in the right direction.
  Specifically, this bill requires that 30 percent of the DOE solar 
research and demonstration funding is awarded based on the 
recommendations of the committee in 2012, and that will rise to 75 
percent in 2015.
  My amendment simply requires that the committee report back their 
activities to the Department of Energy and to this Congress so that we 
can better evaluate the growing potential of solar technology and how 
we're doing in terms of implementing that road map. I think that that 
kind of accountability is exactly what's been missing from our Federal 
Government for far too long, and this is the kind of information that 
we need as a Congress to hold people accountable for the spending of 
the Federal dollars that we're going to put there.
  We're making important investment decisions, but we also need to hold 
everyone who is involved accountable for making sure that those 
decisions are moving us forward on the road map and are aimed in the 
right direction. This strategy will help us do that. My report will 
allow us to hold everyone who is involved accountable for doing it and 
being successful. That's critical to the American taxpayers whose money 
is being invested here.
  With that, I would like to say thanks again to Chairman Gordon for 
his hard work and to Ranking Member Hall.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Chairman, I rise to claim time in opposition 
to the amendment although I am not opposed to it.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman is recognized for 
5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Chairman, the amendment by this young man from 
New York would require the solar technology road map committee to 
submit an annual report to the Secretary of Energy and to the Congress 
of its activities over the prior 12-month period. I think he has a good 
amendment. I think this is a good-government amendment, and I support 
it.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. MURPHY of New York. I appreciate the support from Ranking Member 
Hall.
  I would just close by saying it is incredibly important that we watch 
every taxpayer dollar in these tough times. And we're making important 
investments here. They're going to have an economic impact; they're 
going to create jobs in our communities. But we need to be responsible. 
This report will lead to that kind of accountability and 
responsibility.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. HALL of Texas. Mr. Chairman, in closing, I would like to make it 
perfectly clear that I support the use of solar energy and would like 
to see it become a larger player in supplying the energy needs of our 
country and of the world. I also want to make it perfectly clear I 
support further research and development to help solar energy achieve 
this goal.
  I also respect the author, Ms. Giffords, to the extent that I was the 
lone Republican to attend her field hearing in Arizona.
  However, I still have some reservations about certain provisions of 
the bill, mainly in the cost and some of the restrictions that it 
places on the Department of Energy and the Secretary. For those who 
choose to vote against the bill, such a vote is not a vote against R 
into solar technologies. It's simply a vote against the way this bill 
wants to dictate how solar R should be done at the DOE.
  With that said, I do plan to vote for the bill because I am so 
convinced of the value of even the slightest additional breakthrough 
solar energy-wise, and my observations of the very sincere and 
determined effort by the bill's author cause me to want to remain 
involved and hopefully continue to work with my colleagues to address 
our concern as the bill continues through the legislative process.
  With that, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from New York (Mr. Murphy).
  The amendment was agreed to.
  Mr. GORDON of Tennessee. Mr. Chairman, I move that the Committee do 
now rise.
  The motion was agreed to.
  Accordingly, the Committee rose; and the Speaker pro tempore (Mr. 
Murphy of New York) having assumed the chair, Mr. Weiner, Acting Chair 
of the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union, reported 
that that Committee, having had under consideration the bill (H.R. 
3585) to guide and provide for United States research, development, and 
demonstration of solar energy technologies, and for other purposes, had 
come to no resolution thereon.

[[Page H11617]]



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