Amendment Text: H.Amdt.1281 — 112th Congress (2011-2012)

There is one version of the amendment.

Shown Here:
Amendment as Offered (06/08/2012)

This Amendment appears on page H3680 in the following article from the Congressional Record.


[Pages H3665-H3690]
From the Congressional Record Online through the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]




              LEGISLATIVE BRANCH APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2013


                             General Leave

  Mr. CRENSHAW. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that all Members 
have 5 legislative days within which to revise and extend their remarks 
and include tabular and extraneous material on H.R. 5882.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. Thompson of Pennsylvania). Is there 
objection to the request of the gentleman from Florida?
  There was no objection.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to House Resolution 679 and rule 
XVIII, the Chair declares the House in the Committee of the Whole House 
on the state of the Union for the consideration of the bill, H.R. 5882.
  The Chair appoints the gentleman from New Hampshire (Mr. Bass) to 
preside over the Committee of the Whole.

                              {time}  0915


                     In the Committee of the Whole

  Accordingly, the House resolved itself into the Committee of the 
Whole House on the state of the Union for the consideration of the bill 
(H.R. 5882) making appropriations for the Legislative Branch for the 
fiscal year ending September 30, 2013, and for other purposes, with Mr. 
Bass of New Hampshire in the chair.
  The Clerk read the title of the bill.
  The CHAIR. Pursuant to the rule, the bill is considered read the 
first time.
  The gentleman from Florida (Mr. Crenshaw) and the gentleman from 
California (Mr. Honda) each will control 30 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Florida.
  Mr. CRENSHAW. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.
  Ladies and gentlemen of the House, we bring before the House today 
the 2013 appropriations bill for the Legislative Subcommittee. This is 
a bill that spends $3.3 billion, which is approximately 1 percent less 
than last year. That's a $33.4 million reduction from last year.
  I think all of us know that we are living in difficult economic times 
in this country. Taxpayers want to know that when they send their money 
to Washington it's being spent wisely. We also know that government 
needs money to provide services, but right now government needs 
something more. The government needs a sense of discipline to rein in 
spending. The government needs a commitment to make sure that every 
task of government is accomplished and completed in a most efficient 
and most effective manner, more so than ever before.
  Our subcommittee took this philosophy to heart, and we had a series 
of hearings. We listened to the Agency heads as they came before us and 
talked about their needs, their wants, their priorities. We considered 
all of that and made some very difficult, some tough, but I think 
workable, decisions that allow us to move forward.
  I would remind the Members that over the last two cycles we have 
reduced spending on the Legislative Branch Subcommittee funding bill by 
almost 8 percent, and after we finish this bill, we will have decreased 
spending by nearly 9 percent.
  So let me just give you all a summary of the highlights of this bill.
  First and foremost, we fund the House of Representatives at $1.2 
billion. That's the same level as last year. It's the same level that 
was requested by the House of Representatives. When people say, ``Well, 
why didn't you reduce the House any further?'' I would remind Members 
that over the last two cycles we have reduced funding for our own House 
by 10.5 percent. The Members' office accounts--the so-called Members' 
Representational Accounts--are funded at last year's level. Once again, 
when people say, ``Why didn't you cut those again?'' I would remind 
Members that we have cut those. The appropriations have been reduced by 
13.5 percent for the office accounts. That takes us back to 2008 
levels, which is a substantial cut.
  We have certainly led by example. We have tightened our belts. We 
have reined in spending, and I think we can be proud of that. We also 
have language that allows Members, if they don't spend all of their 
office account, they can reduce the national debt with their leftover 
funds.
  The Capitol Police receive about a $20 million increase. That will 
allow them to reduce the backlog in training that they have. It will 
also alleviate some of the salary shortfalls, because this is a year 
where we have the two national conventions and we also have the 
inauguration.
  The Congressional Budget Office receives a very slight increase to 
acquire some much-needed equipment.
  The Architect of the Capitol, which we fund, actually receives the 
largest reduction, about a 10 percent reduction. The Architect brings 
to us a series of projects that he would like to see funded. We can't 
fund them all, but we give priority to those that deal with health and 
safety issues because so many people work in the Capitol complex, so 
many visitors come here every year.
  This subcommittee was concerned about the fact that we don't have the 
money right now to continue the rehabilitation of the Capitol dome, 
that great symbol of freedom that we see every day. We have spent $19 
million to begin that rehabilitation project, and it's about $100 
million to finish that. I'm confident we'll find the money very shortly 
and complete that project.
  If you look at the Library of Congress, they receive a very modest 
increase.
  The Government Accountability Office, the so-called watchdog of this 
Congress, they receive a slight increase to allow them to add 21 new 
full-time equivalent personnel. That will allow them to continue to 
write the reports that they write that tell us whether we're spending 
the money wisely or not.

                              {time}  0920

  And I think it will allow them to continue to meet the ever-
increasing demands that we, as Members, place on them.
  The Government Printing Office receives a cut, again, for the third 
straight year. They're doing a much better job of dealing with binding 
and printing of the information that they provide for us.
  So, in a nutshell, Mr. Chairman, that summarizes the bill. I want to 
be sure and say thank you to all the members of the subcommittee, both 
the Democrats and Republicans, for the work

[[Page H3666]]

that they put in to bring this bill before us today.
  I want to say a special word of thanks to my colleague, Mr. Honda, 
the ranking member. I thank him for his bipartisan spirit as we work 
together to fund these agencies that we depend on every day.
  And, finally, I certainly want to express the gratitude of all the 
members of the committee to our staff, both the Democratic side and the 
Republican side, for the tireless effort they put in to bring this bill 
before us.
  So with that, Mr. Chairman, I reserve the balance of my time.

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[[Page H3670]]

  Mr. HONDA. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  I am pleased we are considering the fiscal year 2013 Legislative 
Branch appropriations bill. Chairman Crenshaw has been collegial in the 
development of this bill, and I appreciate his willingness to accept 
our input throughout the process.
  The chairman's mark before us funds the legislative branch at $3.3 
billion, a cut of 1 percent from fiscal year 2012, and this does not 
include Senate items. Even with a lower allocation, Chairman Crenshaw 
was able to level-fund and even increase several areas important to the 
operation of the legislative branch. The House, overall, is held flat 
at $1.225 billion. The Capitol Police will receive $360 million, a 
nearly 6 percent increase. The Congressional Budget Office is funded at 
$44.3 million, at $493,000 above the fiscal year 2012 level. And the 
Government Accountability Office is funded at $519.8 million--$8.5 
million, or nearly 2 percent, above fiscal year 2012.
  While the levels are adequate for some agencies, the allocation 
required the subcommittee to propose no funding to continue the 
rehabilitation of the Capitol dome, this Nation's great symbol of 
democracy. This bill's lack of funding for this critical project is a 
direct result of the House Republicans' unilateral decision to cast 
aside the funding levels agreed to under the Budget Control Act. The 
majority's decision required the Appropriations Committee to absorb $19 
billion in reductions across all of the bills.
  One issue that I continue to be concerned about is the House General 
Counsel's defense of the discriminatory Defense of Marriage Act, DOMA. 
With the limited funding available for the House of Representatives, I 
think there are far more worthy uses of the precious taxpayers' 
resources than funding contracts for outside counsel to defend the 
highly controversial--and two U.S. district courts and a Federal 
appellate court have ruled unconstitutional--DOMA. I am concerned that 
the scarce resources available to the House will continue to be 
siphoned off in order to defend a law that continues to be found 
unconstitutional in the courts.
  I am privileged to represent Silicon Valley, the center of 
technological innovation in this country. Since I joined the 
subcommittee, I have tried to push the House and other agencies to 
explore technological solutions to issues such as transparency, 
evacuation management, and data storage.
  As you probably know, Federal agencies, including our own in the leg 
branch, can be slow to change and develop new technologies. This is 
mentioned in the report, which includes language on the issue of bulk-
data downloads of legislative information, something I requested and 
secured language about in this bill in fiscal year 2009.
  This effort is now being championed by leadership on both sides of 
the aisle, as it is a way to increase transparency by allowing the 
public to easily download and analyze government data. There are some 
concerns about cost and the ability to authenticate the data that the 
language in the report tries to address. I think, however, that these 
are relatively simple matters to overcome, as data is already being 
compiled in a format that can be easily distributed, and technology 
support staff has indicated that only a simple procedure is needed to 
make the bulk data available.
  Furthermore, the GPO already employs an authentication standard for 
its own accessible bulk data through its FDSys, or the Federal Digital 
System, Web site that we could also utilize.
  The House majority recently announced that it will immediately create 
a task force, as described in this bill, to expedite a report and 
implementation of public access to bulk legislative data. While I 
believe the time to implement this is now, I expect to be included in 
these efforts as ranking member of the subcommittee and a longtime 
advocate since before 2009.
  In conclusion, Mr. Chairman, I want to reiterate my appreciation for 
the chairman's effort to work with my side of the aisle on issues where 
there was agreement. I am glad to see the congressional support 
Agencies, including the Congressional Budget Office, the Government 
Accountability Office, and the Congressional Research Service, are 
adequately funded.
  Mr. Chairman, I want to thank the hardworking professional staff that 
has helped to craft this bill and assisted the subcommittee in a 
bipartisan manner over the course of the year: Liz Dawson, Chuck Turner 
and Jenny Kesiah on the majority side, along with Michael Kirlin with 
Chairman Crenshaw's personal office, and Shalanda Young and Danny 
Cromer on our side of the aisle, along with Ken Takeda and Mark 
Nakamoto from my office.
  Mr. Chairman, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. CRENSHAW. Mr. Chairman, I yield 3 minutes to the gentleman from 
California (Mr. Lungren), the chairman of the House Administration 
Committee.
  Mr. DANIEL E. LUNGREN of California. I thank the gentleman for 
yielding.
  Mr. Chairman, I rise in support of H.R. 5882, the Legislative Branch 
Appropriations Act. As chairman of the Committee on House 
Administration, which oversees many of the agencies affected by these 
appropriations, I am pleased we are continuing to uphold our pledge to 
reduce government spending, while providing the necessary security and 
support for each Member to fulfill their constitutional 
responsibilities.
  Since taking control of the House, we've worked diligently to 
identify and eliminate wasteful spending and streamline and improve 
operations by using technology, thereby saving taxpayers millions. 
We've also worked to reduce spending on the production and printing of 
unnecessary publications, including an amendment offered by my 
colleague, Mr. Harper, to reduce the number of copies of the U.S. Code 
printed for the House.
  With the support of the Appropriations Committee, we will further 
improve House technology through an advancement of programs utilized by 
the Law Revision Counsel and the Office of the Legislative Counsel that 
modernize and improve their capabilities.
  Utilizing new technologies, we will continue to increase the accuracy 
and accessibility of legislative proposals and changes to the U.S. 
Code. As the people's House, it is imperative we continue to use 
technological innovations to foster transparency and provide our 
constituents with timely and accurate information.
  I'd like to thank the appropriators for their support in providing 
the resources necessary to enhance and streamline House operations and 
reduce overall expenses. And later, when we have an amendment on the 
floor that once again tries to make us go backward in our effort to get 
rid of waste produced in this House, I will stand and oppose that.
  We have had a successful program of converting waste to energy, one 
of the most innovative programs in the entire country. We've convinced 
the other side of the Capitol, the Senate, to join us. We have 
thousands of tons of waste now not going into landfills but being 
converted to clean energy, one of the best examples of a technology 
that the EPA says is one of the cleanest in the country. We ought to be 
thankful for that. We ought not to go backwards. We ought to 
understand.
  And in doing that, we have also given best or better customer service 
to those who utilize the various restaurants on the campus here in the 
Capitol. Those are things that we ought to be proud of and not be shy 
about the successes that we have had.
  So I'll still be here on the floor to talk about one of those 
amendments, as we did just a year ago.

                              {time}  0930

  Mr. HONDA. Mr. Chairman, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from 
Washington, the distinguished ranking member of the Committee on 
Appropriations, Mr. Dicks.
  Mr. DICKS. First of all, I would like to pass along my appreciation 
to Chairman Crenshaw and to Ranking Member Honda for their willingness 
to work together in a very bipartisan manner. I also would like to 
commend the staffs of the majority and minority for their efforts in 
bringing this bill where we are today.
  This bill's allocation is just slightly below last year's and is well 
within the range of what would have been expected had the majority 
stuck to the discretionary number agreed to in the

[[Page H3671]]

Budget Control Act. But for the most part, this bill has been protected 
from Ryan budget austerity.
  Many programs and agencies important to the operation of Congress 
have been spared from harmful cuts. Support agencies, such as the 
Congressional Budget Office, the Congressional Research Service, and 
the Government Accountability Office are all adequately funded, which 
will allow them to continue operating without further reductions in 
staff or services. However, it is important to note that not every 
account has been spared.
  As we all know, the Architect of the Capitol is in the middle of an 
extensive restoration effort. This bill's allocation does not provide 
the funds needed to begin the second phase of that effort but, rather, 
cuts the Architect of the Capitol significantly below last year's 
funding level. As I'd mentioned during the committee markup, I'd rather 
the dome remain a monument to our Nation's greatness than become a 
symbol for shortsighted austerity.
  Mr. HONDA. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. CRENSHAW. I think this is a good bill. I think it has been 
adequately explained.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. BISHOP of Georgia. Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of the Fiscal 
Year 2013 Legislative Branch Appropriations bill.
  Although this measure is the smallest of the thirteen annual 
appropriations bills, it plays a giant role by funding some of the most 
vital areas of the United States Government.
  In fact, the Legislative Branch Subcommittee is responsible for more 
than just the operations of the United States Congress.
  The Subcommittee also is responsible for the preservation of our 
cultural heritage by the Library of Congress; the objective analysis of 
our budget and economic decisions by the Congressional Budget Office; 
the independent evaluation of the Federal Government's performance by 
the Government Accountability Office; and the publishing and 
dissemination of government information by the Government Printing 
Office.
  In short, none of us here in Congress could represent our 
constituents effectively and make informed decisions in the national 
interest without the resources provided for in this bill.
  As a Member of this Subcommittee, I want to commend Chairman Crenshaw 
and Ranking Member Honda for working together in a bipartisan fashion 
to craft this legislation.
  I know that both of you were dealt a difficult hand with your 
Subcommittee allocation. Nevertheless, I am pleased that you were able 
to either level fund or provide small increases in the budgets of most 
accounts.
  Many of the accounts under this Subcommittee's jurisdiction already 
have been cut to the bone. Further significant reductions would have 
seriously jeopardized their missions--some of which include finding 
cost savings and efficiencies throughout the government--and would have 
had an adverse impact on the services that we in Congress provide to 
our constituents.
  I am glad that we were able to hold the line and prevent further 
harm.
  I also am grateful by you and your staff's willingness to engage on 
the issue of the security of our District Offices and our District 
Staff.
  I am especially pleased by the inclusion of report language I 
sponsored along with Representative LaTourette directing the House 
Sergeant at Arms, in coordination with the United States Capitol 
Police, to develop a series of recommendations and best practices on 
security features or enhancements for House District Offices to be made 
available to new and returning Members prior to the start of the 113th 
Congress.
  Again, I want to thank Chairman Crenshaw and Ranking Member Honda on 
your work on this bill.
  The CHAIR. All time for general debate has expired.
  Pursuant to the rule, the bill is considered read for amendment under 
the 5-minute rule.
  The text of the bill is as follows:

                               H.R. 5882

       Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of 
     the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the 
     following sums are appropriated, out of any money in the 
     Treasury not otherwise appropriated, for the Legislative 
     Branch for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2013, and for 
     other purposes, namely:

                      TITLE I--LEGISLATIVE BRANCH

                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

                         Salaries and Expenses

       For salaries and expenses of the House of Representatives, 
     $1,225,680,000, as follows:

                        House Leadership Offices

       For salaries and expenses, as authorized by law, 
     $23,275,773, including: Office of the Speaker, $6,942,770, 
     including $25,000 for official expenses of the Speaker; 
     Office of the Majority Floor Leader, $2,277,595, including 
     $10,000 for official expenses of the Majority Leader; Office 
     of the Minority Floor Leader, $7,432,812, including $10,000 
     for official expenses of the Minority Leader; Office of the 
     Majority Whip, including the Chief Deputy Majority Whip, 
     $1,971,050, including $5,000 for official expenses of the 
     Majority Whip; Office of the Minority Whip, including the 
     Chief Deputy Minority Whip, $1,524,951, including $5,000 for 
     official expenses of the Minority Whip; Republican 
     Conference, $1,572,788; Democratic Caucus, $1,553,807. 
     Provided, That such amount for salaries and expenses shall 
     remain available from January 3, 2013 until January 3, 2014.

                  Members' Representational Allowances

   Including Members' Clerk Hire, Official Expenses of Members, and 
                             Official Mail

       For Members' representational allowances, including 
     Members' clerk hire, official expenses, and official mail, 
     $573,939,282.

                          Committee Employees

                Standing Committees, Special and Select

       For salaries and expenses of standing committees, special 
     and select, authorized by House resolutions, $125,964,870: 
     Provided, That such amount shall remain available for such 
     salaries and expenses until December 31, 2014.

                      Committee on Appropriations

       For salaries and expenses of the Committee on 
     Appropriations, $26,665,785, including studies and 
     examinations of executive agencies and temporary personal 
     services for such committee, to be expended in accordance 
     with section 202(b) of the Legislative Reorganization Act of 
     1946 and to be available for reimbursement to agencies for 
     services performed: Provided, That such amount shall remain 
     available for such salaries and expenses until December 31, 
     2014.

                    Salaries, Officers and Employees

       For compensation and expenses of officers and employees, as 
     authorized by law, $173,669,084, including: for salaries and 
     expenses of the Office of the Clerk, including not more than 
     $23,000, of which not more than $20,000 is for the Family 
     Room, for official representation and reception expenses, 
     $22,370,252; for salaries and expenses of the Office of the 
     Sergeant at Arms, including the position of Superintendent of 
     Garages and the Office of Emergency Management, and including 
     not more than $3,000 for official representation and 
     reception expenses, $12,585,000, of which $5,463,251 shall 
     remain available until expended; for salaries and expenses of 
     the Office of the Chief Administrative Officer including not 
     more than $3,000 for official representation and reception 
     expenses, $116,782,000, of which $3,937,000 shall remain 
     available until expended; for salaries and expenses of the 
     Office of the Inspector General, $4,692,000; for salaries and 
     expenses of the Office of General Counsel, $1,415,000; for 
     the Office of the Chaplain, $179,000; for salaries and 
     expenses of the Office of the Parliamentarian, including the 
     Parliamentarian, $2,000 for preparing the Digest of Rules, 
     and not more than $1,000 for official representation and 
     reception expenses, $2,060,000; for salaries and expenses of 
     the Office of the Law Revision Counsel of the House, 
     $3,258,000; for salaries and expenses of the Office of the 
     Legislative Counsel of the House, $8,814,000; for salaries 
     and expenses of the Office of Interparliamentary Affairs, 
     $859,000; for other authorized employees, $484,832; and for 
     salaries and expenses of the Historian, $170,000.

                        Allowances and Expenses

       For allowances and expenses as authorized by House 
     resolution or law, $302,165,206, including: supplies, 
     materials, administrative costs and Federal tort claims, 
     $3,696,118; official mail for committees, leadership offices, 
     and administrative offices of the House, $201,000; Government 
     contributions for health, retirement, Social Security, and 
     other applicable employee benefits, $272,548,016; Business 
     Continuity and Disaster Recovery, $17,112,072, of which 
     $5,000,000 shall remain available until expended; transition 
     activities for new members and staff, $4,125,000; Wounded 
     Warrior Program $2,175,000, to remain available until 
     expended; Office of Congressional Ethics, $1,548,000; and 
     miscellaneous items including purchase, exchange, 
     maintenance, repair and operation of House motor vehicles, 
     interparliamentary receptions, and gratuities to heirs of 
     deceased employees of the House, $760,000.

                       Administrative Provisions

       Sec. 101. (a) Requiring Amounts Remaining in Members' 
     Representational Allowances To Be Used for Deficit Reduction 
     or To Reduce the Federal Debt.--Notwithstanding any other 
     provision of law, any amounts appropriated under this Act for 
     ``HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES--Salaries and Expenses--Members' 
     Representational Allowances'' shall be available only for 
     fiscal year 2013. Any amount remaining after all payments are 
     made under such allowances for fiscal year 2013 shall be 
     deposited in the Treasury and used for deficit reduction (or, 
     if there is no Federal budget deficit after all such payments 
     have been made, for reducing the Federal debt, in such manner 
     as the Secretary of the Treasury considers appropriate).
       (b) Regulations.--The Committee on House Administration of 
     the House of Representatives shall have authority to 
     prescribe regulations to carry out this section.

[[Page H3672]]

       (c) Definition.--As used in this section, the term ``Member 
     of the House of Representatives'' means a Representative in, 
     or a Delegate or Resident Commissioner to, the Congress.
       Sec. 102. (a) Section 109(a) of the Legislative Branch 
     Appropriations Act, 1998 (2 U.S.C. 95d(a)) is amended by 
     striking the period at the end and inserting the following: 
     ``, and for reimbursing the Secretary of Labor for any 
     amounts paid with respect to unemployment compensation 
     payments for former employees of the House.''.
       (b) The amendment made by subsection (a) shall apply with 
     respect to fiscal year 2013 and each succeeding fiscal year.
       Sec. 103. (a) Section 101(c)(2) of the Legislative Branch 
     Appropriations Act, 1993 (2 U.S.C. 95b(c)(2)) is amended by 
     striking ``and `Allowances and Expenses' '' and inserting the 
     following: `` `Allowances and Expenses', the heading for any 
     joint committee under the heading `Joint Items' (to the 
     extent that amounts appropriated for the joint committee are 
     disbursed by the Chief Administrative Officer of the House of 
     Representatives), and `Office of the Attending Physician' ''.
       (b) The amendment made by subsection (a) shall apply with 
     respect to fiscal year 2013 and each succeeding fiscal year.


                oversight of office of inspector general

       Sec. 104.  (a) Oversight.--The Office of the Inspector 
     General of the House of Representatives shall provide the 
     Committee on Appropriations of the House of Representatives 
     with a copy of each audit and investigative report the Office 
     produces, and shall consult regularly with such Committee 
     with respect to the Office's operations.
       (b) Effective Date.--This section shall apply with respect 
     to fiscal year 2013 and each succeeding fiscal year.

                              JOINT ITEMS

       For Joint Committees, as follows:

                        Joint Economic Committee

       For salaries and expenses of the Joint Economic Committee, 
     $4,203,000, to be disbursed by the Secretary of the Senate.

                      Joint Committee on Taxation

       For salaries and expenses of the Joint Committee on 
     Taxation, $10,004,000, to be disbursed by the Chief 
     Administrative Officer of the House of Representatives.
       For other joint items, as follows:

                   Office of the Attending Physician

       For medical supplies, equipment, and contingent expenses of 
     the emergency rooms, and for the Attending Physician and his 
     assistants, including: (1) an allowance of $2,175 per month 
     to the Attending Physician; (2) an allowance of $1,300 per 
     month to the Senior Medical Officer; (3) an allowance of $725 
     per month each to three medical officers while on duty in the 
     Office of the Attending Physician; (4) an allowance of $725 
     per month to 2 assistants and $580 per month each not to 
     exceed 11 assistants on the basis heretofore provided for 
     such assistants; and (5) $2,603,000 for reimbursement to the 
     Department of the Navy for expenses incurred for staff and 
     equipment assigned to the Office of the Attending Physician, 
     which shall be advanced and credited to the applicable 
     appropriation or appropriations from which such salaries, 
     allowances, and other expenses are payable and shall be 
     available for all the purposes thereof, $3,467,000, to be 
     disbursed by the Chief Administrative Officer of the House of 
     Representatives.

             Office of Congressional Accessibility Services

                         Salaries and Expenses

       For salaries and expenses of the Office of Congressional 
     Accessibility Services, $1,363,000, to be disbursed by the 
     Secretary of the Senate.

                             CAPITOL POLICE

                                salaries

       For salaries of employees of the Capitol Police, including 
     overtime, hazardous duty pay, and Government contributions 
     for health, retirement, social security, professional 
     liability insurance, and other applicable employee benefits, 
     $297,133,000, to be disbursed by the Chief of the Capitol 
     Police or his designee.

                            general expenses

       For necessary expenses of the Capitol Police, including 
     motor vehicles, communications and other equipment, security 
     equipment and installation, uniforms, weapons, supplies, 
     materials, training, medical services, forensic services, 
     stenographic services, personal and professional services, 
     the employee assistance program, the awards program, postage, 
     communication services, travel advances, relocation of 
     instructor and liaison personnel for the Federal Law 
     Enforcement Training Center, and not more than $5,000 to be 
     expended on the certification of the Chief of the Capitol 
     Police in connection with official representation and 
     reception expenses, $63,004,000, of which $2,700,000 shall 
     remain available until September 30, 2015 to be disbursed by 
     the Chief of the Capitol Police or his designee: Provided, 
     That, notwithstanding any other provision of law, the cost of 
     basic training for the Capitol Police at the Federal Law 
     Enforcement Training Center for fiscal year 2013 shall be 
     paid by the Secretary of Homeland Security from funds 
     available to the Department of Homeland Security.

                       Administrative Provisions

                     (including transfer of funds)


  authority to transfer amounts between salaries and general expenses

       Sec. 1001. During fiscal year 2013 and any succeeding 
     fiscal year, the Capitol Police may transfer amounts 
     appropriated for the fiscal year between the category for 
     salaries and the category for general expenses, upon the 
     approval of the Committees on Appropriations of the House of 
     Representatives and Senate.

           funds available for workers compensation payments

       Sec. 1002. (a) In General.--Available balances of expired 
     United States Capitol Police appropriations shall be 
     available to the Capitol Police to make the deposit to the 
     credit of the Employees' Compensation Fund required by 
     section 8147(b) of title 5, United States Code.
       (b) Conforming Amendment.--Section 1018 of the Legislative 
     Branch Appropriations Act, 2003 (2 U.S.C. 1907) is amended by 
     striking subsection (f).
       (c) Effective Date.--This section shall apply with respect 
     to appropriations for fiscal year 2013 and each fiscal year 
     thereafter.

                          OFFICE OF COMPLIANCE

                         Salaries and Expenses

       For salaries and expenses of the Office of Compliance, as 
     authorized by section 305 of the Congressional Accountability 
     Act of 1995 (2 U.S.C. 1385), $3,817,000, of which $527,500 
     shall remain available until September 30, 2014: Provided, 
     That not more than $500 may be expended on the certification 
     of the Executive Director of the Office of Compliance in 
     connection with official representation and reception 
     expenses.

                        Administrative Provision

       Sec. 1101. (a) The second sentence of section 415(a) of the 
     Congressional Accountability Act of 1995 (2 U.S.C. 1415(a)) 
     is amended to read as follows: ``There are appropriated for 
     such account such sums as may be necessary to pay such awards 
     and settlements.''.
       (b) The amendment made by subsection (a) shall apply with 
     respect to fiscal year 2013 and each succeeding fiscal year.

                      CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE

                         Salaries and Expenses

       For salaries and expenses necessary for operation of the 
     Congressional Budget Office, including not more than $6,000 
     to be expended on the certification of the Director of the 
     Congressional Budget Office in connection with official 
     representation and reception expenses, $44,280,000.

                        Administrative Provision

                acceptance of voluntary student services

       Sec. 1201. (a) Section 3111(e) of title 5, United States 
     Code, is amended--
       (1) by striking ``(e)'' and inserting ``(e)(1)''; and
       (2) by adding at the end the following new paragraph:
       ``(2) In this section, the term `agency' includes the 
     Congressional Budget Office, except that in the case of the 
     Congressional Budget Office--
       ``(A) any student who provides voluntary service in 
     accordance with this section shall be considered an employee 
     of the Congressional Budget Office for purposes of section 
     203 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (relating to the 
     level of confidentiality of budget data); and
       ``(B) the authority granted to the Office of Personnel 
     Management under this section shall be exercised by the 
     Director of the Congressional Budget Office.''.
       (b) The amendment made by subsection (a) shall apply with 
     respect to fiscal year 2013 and each succeeding fiscal year.

                        ARCHITECT OF THE CAPITOL

                         General Administration

       For salaries for the Architect of the Capitol, and other 
     personal services, at rates of pay provided by law; for 
     surveys and studies in connection with activities under the 
     care of the Architect of the Capitol; for all necessary 
     expenses for the general and administrative support of the 
     operations under the Architect of the Capitol including the 
     Botanic Garden; electrical substations of the Capitol, Senate 
     and House office buildings, and other facilities under the 
     jurisdiction of the Architect of the Capitol; including 
     furnishings and office equipment; including not more than 
     $5,000 for official reception and representation expenses, to 
     be expended as the Architect of the Capitol may approve; for 
     purchase or exchange, maintenance, and operation of a 
     passenger motor vehicle, $90,755,000, of which $999,000 shall 
     remain available until September 30, 2017.

                            Capitol Building

       For all necessary expenses for the maintenance, care and 
     operation of the Capitol, $28,591,000, of which $3,500,000 
     shall remain available until September 30, 2017.

                            Capitol Grounds

       For all necessary expenses for care and improvement of 
     grounds surrounding the Capitol, the Senate and House office 
     buildings, and the Capitol Power Plant, $17,152,000, of which 
     $7,300,000 shall remain available until September 30, 2017.

                         House Office Buildings

       For all necessary expenses for the maintenance, care and 
     operation of the House office buildings, $83,964,000, of 
     which $19,362,000 shall remain available until September 30, 
     2017.
       In addition, for a payment to the House Historic Buildings 
     Revitalization Trust Fund, $30,000,000, shall remain 
     available until expended.

[[Page H3673]]

                          Capitol Power Plant

       For all necessary expenses for the maintenance, care and 
     operation of the Capitol Power Plant; lighting, heating, 
     power (including the purchase of electrical energy) and water 
     and sewer services for the Capitol, Senate and House office 
     buildings, Library of Congress buildings, and the grounds 
     about the same, Botanic Garden, Senate garage, and air 
     conditioning refrigeration not supplied from plants in any of 
     such buildings; heating the Government Printing Office and 
     Washington City Post Office, and heating and chilled water 
     for air conditioning for the Supreme Court Building, the 
     Union Station complex, the Thurgood Marshall Federal 
     Judiciary Building and the Folger Shakespeare Library, 
     expenses for which shall be advanced or reimbursed upon 
     request of the Architect of the Capitol and amounts so 
     received shall be deposited into the Treasury to the credit 
     of this appropriation, $108,616,000, of which $23,404,000 
     shall remain available until September 30, 2017: Provided, 
     That not more than $9,400,000 of the funds credited or to be 
     reimbursed to this appropriation as herein provided shall be 
     available for obligation during fiscal year 2013.

                     Library Buildings and Grounds

       For all necessary expenses for the mechanical and 
     structural maintenance, care and operation of the Library 
     buildings and grounds, $30,660,000, of which $4,900,000 shall 
     remain available until September 30, 2017.

            Capitol Police Buildings, Grounds, and Security

       For all necessary expenses for the maintenance, care and 
     operation of buildings, grounds and security enhancements of 
     the United States Capitol Police, wherever located, the 
     Alternate Computer Facility, and AOC security operations, 
     $20,867,000, of which $2,840,000 shall remain available until 
     September 30, 2017.

                             Botanic Garden

       For all necessary expenses for the maintenance, care and 
     operation of the Botanic Garden and the nurseries, buildings, 
     grounds, and collections; and purchase and exchange, 
     maintenance, repair, and operation of a passenger motor 
     vehicle; all under the direction of the Joint Committee on 
     the Library, $12,140,000: Provided, That of the amount made 
     available under this heading, the Architect of the Capitol 
     may obligate and expend such sums as may be necessary for the 
     maintenance, care and operation of the National Garden 
     established under section 307E of the Legislative Branch 
     Appropriations Act, 1989 (2 U.S.C. 2146), upon vouchers 
     approved by the Architect of the Capitol or a duly authorized 
     designee.

                         Capitol Visitor Center

       For all necessary expenses for the operation of the Capitol 
     Visitor Center, $21,276,000.

                        Administrative Provision

           funds available for workers compensation payments

       Sec. 1301. (a) In General.--Available balances of expired 
     Architect of the Capitol appropriations shall be available to 
     the Architect of the Capitol to make the deposit to the 
     credit of the Employees' Compensation Fund required by 
     section 8147(b) of title 5, United States Code.
       (b) Effective Date.--This section shall apply with respect 
     to appropriations for fiscal year 2013 and each fiscal year 
     thereafter.

                          LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

                         Salaries and Expenses

       For necessary expenses of the Library of Congress not 
     otherwise provided for, including development and maintenance 
     of the Library's catalogs; custody and custodial care of the 
     Library buildings; special clothing; cleaning, laundering and 
     repair of uniforms; preservation of motion pictures in the 
     custody of the Library; operation and maintenance of the 
     American Folklife Center in the Library; activities under the 
     Civil Rights History Project Act of 2009; preparation and 
     distribution of catalog records and other publications of the 
     Library; hire or purchase of one passenger motor vehicle; and 
     expenses of the Library of Congress Trust Fund Board not 
     properly chargeable to the income of any trust fund held by 
     the Board, $422,024,000, of which not more than $6,000,000 
     shall be derived from collections credited to this 
     appropriation during fiscal year 2013, and shall remain 
     available until expended, under the Act of June 28, 1902 
     (chapter 1301; 32 Stat. 480; 2 U.S.C. 150) and not more than 
     $350,000 shall be derived from collections during fiscal year 
     2013 and shall remain available until expended for the 
     development and maintenance of an international legal 
     information database and activities related thereto: 
     Provided, That the Library of Congress may not obligate or 
     expend any funds derived from collections under the Act of 
     June 28, 1902, in excess of the amount authorized for 
     obligation or expenditure in appropriations Acts: Provided 
     further, That the total amount available for obligation shall 
     be reduced by the amount by which collections are less than 
     $6,350,000: Provided further, That of the total amount 
     appropriated, not more than $12,000 may be expended, on the 
     certification of the Librarian of Congress, in connection 
     with official representation and reception expenses for the 
     Overseas Field Offices: Provided further, That of the total 
     amount appropriated, $7,068,000 shall remain available until 
     expended for the digital collections and educational 
     curricula program.

                            Copyright Office

                         salaries and expenses

       For all necessary expenses of the Copyright Office, 
     $52,136,000, of which not more than $28,029,000, to remain 
     available until expended, shall be derived from collections 
     credited to this appropriation during fiscal year 2013 under 
     section 708(d) of title 17, United States Code: Provided, 
     That the Copyright Office may not obligate or expend any 
     funds derived from collections under such section, in excess 
     of the amount authorized for obligation or expenditure in 
     appropriations Acts: Provided further, That not more than 
     $5,582,000 shall be derived from collections during fiscal 
     year 2013 under sections 111(d)(2), 119(b)(2), 803(e), 1005, 
     and 1316 of such title: Provided further, That the total 
     amount available for obligation shall be reduced by the 
     amount by which collections are less than $33,611,000: 
     Provided further, That not more than $100,000 of the amount 
     appropriated is available for the maintenance of an 
     ``International Copyright Institute'' in the Copyright Office 
     of the Library of Congress for the purpose of training 
     nationals of developing countries in intellectual property 
     laws and policies: Provided further, That not more than 
     $4,250 may be expended, on the certification of the Librarian 
     of Congress, in connection with official representation and 
     reception expenses for activities of the International 
     Copyright Institute and for copyright delegations, visitors, 
     and seminars: Provided further, That notwithstanding any 
     provision of chapter 8 of title 17, United States Code, any 
     amounts made available under this heading which are 
     attributable to royalty fees and payments received by the 
     Copyright Office pursuant to sections 111, 119, and chapter 
     10 of such title may be used for the costs incurred in the 
     administration of the Copyright Royalty Judges program, with 
     the exception of the costs of salaries and benefits for the 
     Copyright Royalty Judges and staff under section 802(e).

                     Congressional Research Service

                         salaries and expenses

       For necessary expenses to carry out the provisions of 
     section 203 of the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1946 (2 
     U.S.C. 166) and to revise and extend the Annotated 
     Constitution of the United States of America, $107,668,000: 
     Provided, That no part of such amount may be used to pay any 
     salary or expense in connection with any publication, or 
     preparation of material therefor (except the Digest of Public 
     General Bills), to be issued by the Library of Congress 
     unless such publication has obtained prior approval of either 
     the Committee on House Administration of the House of 
     Representatives or the Committee on Rules and Administration 
     of the Senate.

             Books for the Blind and Physically Handicapped

                         salaries and expenses

       For salaries and expenses to carry out the Act of March 3, 
     1931 (chapter 400; 46 Stat. 1487; 2 U.S.C. 135a), 
     $50,775,000: Provided, That of the total amount appropriated, 
     $650,000 shall be available to contract to provide newspapers 
     to blind and physically handicapped residents at no cost to 
     the individual.

                        Administrative Provision

               reimbursable and revolving fund activities

       Sec. 1401. (a) In General.--For fiscal year 2013, the 
     obligational authority of the Library of Congress for the 
     activities described in subsection (b) may not exceed 
     $178,958,000.
       (b) Activities.--The activities referred to in subsection 
     (a) are reimbursable and revolving fund activities that are 
     funded from sources other than appropriations to the Library 
     in appropriations Acts for the legislative branch.

   authority to transfer amounts between categories of appropriations

       Sec. 1402. (a) In General.--During fiscal year 2013 and any 
     succeeding fiscal year, the Librarian of Congress may 
     transfer amounts appropriated for the fiscal year between the 
     categories of appropriations provided under law for the 
     Library of Congress for the fiscal year, upon the approval of 
     the Committees on Appropriations of the House of 
     Representatives and Senate.
       (b) Limitation.--Not more than 10 percent of the total 
     amount of funds appropriated to the account under any 
     category of appropriations for the Library of Congress for a 
     fiscal year may be transferred from that account by all 
     transfers made under subsection (a).

                       GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE

                   Congressional Printing and Binding

                     (including transfer of funds)

       For authorized printing and binding for the Congress and 
     the distribution of Congressional information in any format; 
     expenses necessary for preparing the semimonthly and session 
     index to the Congressional Record, as authorized by law 
     (section 902 of title 44, United States Code); printing and 
     binding of Government publications authorized by law to be 
     distributed to Members of Congress; and printing, binding, 
     and distribution of Government publications authorized by law 
     to be distributed without charge to the recipient, 
     $83,632,000: Provided, That this appropriation shall not be 
     available for paper copies of the permanent edition of the 
     Congressional Record for individual Representatives, Resident 
     Commissioners or Delegates authorized under section 906 of 
     title 44, United

[[Page H3674]]

     States Code: Provided further, That this appropriation shall 
     be available for the payment of obligations incurred under 
     the appropriations for similar purposes for preceding fiscal 
     years: Provided further, That notwithstanding the 2-year 
     limitation under section 718 of title 44, United States Code, 
     none of the funds appropriated or made available under this 
     Act or any other Act for printing and binding and related 
     services provided to Congress under chapter 7 of title 44, 
     United States Code, may be expended to print a document, 
     report, or publication after the 27-month period beginning on 
     the date that such document, report, or publication is 
     authorized by Congress to be printed, unless Congress 
     reauthorizes such printing in accordance with section 718 of 
     title 44, United States Code: Provided further, That any 
     unobligated or unexpended balances in this account or 
     accounts for similar purposes for preceding fiscal years may 
     be transferred to the Government Printing Office revolving 
     fund for carrying out the purposes of this heading, subject 
     to the approval of the Committees on Appropriations of the 
     House of Representatives and Senate: Provided further, That 
     notwithstanding sections 901, 902, and 906 of title 44, 
     United States Code, this appropriation may be used to prepare 
     indexes to the Congressional Record on only a monthly and 
     session basis.

                 Office of Superintendent of Documents

                         salaries and expenses

                     (including transfer of funds)

       For expenses of the Office of Superintendent of Documents 
     necessary to provide for the cataloging and indexing of 
     Government publications and their distribution to the public, 
     Members of Congress, other Government agencies, and 
     designated depository and international exchange libraries as 
     authorized by law, $34,728,000: Provided, That amounts of not 
     more than $2,000,000 from current year appropriations are 
     authorized for producing and disseminating Congressional 
     serial sets and other related publications for fiscal years 
     2011 and 2012 to depository and other designated libraries: 
     Provided further, That any unobligated or unexpended balances 
     in this account or accounts for similar purposes for 
     preceding fiscal years may be transferred to the Government 
     Printing Office revolving fund for carrying out the purposes 
     of this heading, subject to the approval of the Committees on 
     Appropriations of the House of Representatives and Senate.

               Government Printing Office Revolving Fund

       For payment to the Government Printing Office Revolving 
     Fund, $4,096,000, to remain available until expended, for 
     information technology development and facilities repair: 
     Provided, That the Government Printing Office is hereby 
     authorized to make such expenditures, within the limits of 
     funds available and in accordance with law, and to make such 
     contracts and commitments without regard to fiscal year 
     limitations as provided by section 9104 of title 31, United 
     States Code, as may be necessary in carrying out the programs 
     and purposes set forth in the budget for the current fiscal 
     year for the Government Printing Office revolving fund: 
     Provided further, That not more than $7,500 may be expended 
     on the certification of the Public Printer in connection with 
     official representation and reception expenses: Provided 
     further, That the revolving fund shall be available for the 
     hire or purchase of not more than 12 passenger motor 
     vehicles: Provided further, That expenditures in connection 
     with travel expenses of the advisory councils to the Public 
     Printer shall be deemed necessary to carry out the provisions 
     of title 44, United States Code: Provided further, That the 
     revolving fund shall be available for temporary or 
     intermittent services under section 3109(b) of title 5, 
     United States Code, but at rates for individuals not more 
     than the daily equivalent of the annual rate of basic pay for 
     level V of the Executive Schedule under section 5316 of such 
     title: Provided further, That activities financed through the 
     revolving fund may provide information in any format: 
     Provided further, That the revolving fund and the funds 
     provided under the headings ``Office of Superintendent of 
     Documents'' and ``Salaries and Expenses'' may not be used for 
     contracted security services at GPO's passport facility in 
     the District of Columbia.

                    GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE

                         Salaries and Expenses

       For necessary expenses of the Government Accountability 
     Office, including not more than $12,500 to be expended on the 
     certification of the Comptroller General of the United States 
     in connection with official representation and reception 
     expenses; temporary or intermittent services under section 
     3109(b) of title 5, United States Code, but at rates for 
     individuals not more than the daily equivalent of the annual 
     rate of basic pay for level IV of the Executive Schedule 
     under section 5315 of such title; hire of one passenger motor 
     vehicle; advance payments in foreign countries in accordance 
     with section 3324 of title 31, United States Code; benefits 
     comparable to those payable under sections 901(5), (6), and 
     (8) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 4081(5), 
     (6), and (8)); and under regulations prescribed by the 
     Comptroller General of the United States, rental of living 
     quarters in foreign countries, $519,802,000: Provided, That, 
     in addition, $24,318,000 of payments received under sections 
     782, 3521, and 9105 of title 31, United States Code, shall be 
     available without fiscal year limitation: Provided further, 
     That this appropriation and appropriations for administrative 
     expenses of any other department or agency which is a member 
     of the National Intergovernmental Audit Forum or a Regional 
     Intergovernmental Audit Forum shall be available to finance 
     an appropriate share of either Forum's costs as determined by 
     the respective Forum, including necessary travel expenses of 
     non-Federal participants: Provided further, That payments 
     hereunder to the Forum may be credited as reimbursements to 
     any appropriation from which costs involved are initially 
     financed.

                        Administrative Provision

           funds available for workers compensation payments

       Sec. 1501. (a) In General.--Available balances of expired 
     Government Accountability Office appropriations shall be 
     available to the Government Accountability Office to make the 
     deposit to the credit of the Employees' Compensation Fund 
     required by section 8147(b) of title 5, United States Code.
       (b) Effective Date.--This section shall apply with respect 
     to appropriations for fiscal year 2013 and each fiscal year 
     thereafter.

                OPEN WORLD LEADERSHIP CENTER TRUST FUND

       For a payment to the Open World Leadership Center Trust 
     Fund for financing activites of the Open World Leadership 
     Center under section 313 of the Legislative Branch 
     Appropriations Act, 2001 (2 U.S.C. 1151), $1,000,000.

                      TITLE II--GENERAL PROVISIONS

                maintenance and care of private vehicles

       Sec. 201.  No part of the funds appropriated in this Act 
     shall be used for the maintenance or care of private 
     vehicles, except for emergency assistance and cleaning as may 
     be provided under regulations relating to parking facilities 
     for the House of Representatives issued by the Committee on 
     House Administration and for the Senate issued by the 
     Committee on Rules and Administration.

                         fiscal year limitation

       Sec. 202.  No part of the funds appropriated in this Act 
     shall remain available for obligation beyond fiscal year 2013 
     unless expressly so provided in this Act.

                 rates of compensation and designation

       Sec. 203.  Whenever in this Act any office or position not 
     specifically established by the Legislative Pay Act of 1929 
     (46 Stat. 32 et seq.) is appropriated for or the rate of 
     compensation or designation of any office or position 
     appropriated for is different from that specifically 
     established by such Act, the rate of compensation and the 
     designation in this Act shall be the permanent law with 
     respect thereto: Provided, That the provisions in this Act 
     for the various items of official expenses of Members, 
     officers, and committees of the Senate and House of 
     Representatives, and clerk hire for Senators and Members of 
     the House of Representatives shall be the permanent law with 
     respect thereto.

                          consulting services

       Sec. 204.  The expenditure of any appropriation under this 
     Act for any consulting service through procurement contract, 
     under section 3109 of title 5, United States Code, shall be 
     limited to those contracts where such expenditures are a 
     matter of public record and available for public inspection, 
     except where otherwise provided under existing law, or under 
     existing Executive order issued under existing law.

                             costs of lbfmc

       Sec. 205.  Amounts available for administrative expenses of 
     any legislative branch entity which participates in the 
     Legislative Branch Financial Managers Council (LBFMC) 
     established by charter on March 26, 1996, shall be available 
     to finance an appropriate share of LBFMC costs as determined 
     by the LBFMC, except that the total LBFMC costs to be shared 
     among all participating legislative branch entities (in such 
     allocations among the entities as the entities may determine) 
     may not exceed $2,000.

                         landscape maintenance

       Sec. 206.  The Architect of the Capitol, in consultation 
     with the District of Columbia, is authorized to maintain and 
     improve the landscape features, excluding streets, in the 
     irregular shaped grassy areas bounded by Washington Avenue, 
     SW on the northeast, Second Street, SW, on the west, Square 
     582 on the south, and the beginning of the I 395 tunnel on 
     the southeast.

                        limitation on transfers

       Sec. 207.  None of the funds made available in this Act may 
     be transferred to any department, agency, or instrumentality 
     of the United States Government, except pursuant to a 
     transfer made by, or transfer authority provided in, this Act 
     or any other appropriation Act.

                      guided tours of the capitol

       Sec. 208. (a) Except as provided in subsection (b), none of 
     the funds made available to the Architect of the Capitol in 
     this Act may be used to eliminate or restrict guided tours of 
     the United States Capitol which are led by employees and 
     interns of offices of Members of Congress and other offices 
     of the House of Representatives and Senate.
       (b) At the direction of the Capitol Police Board, or at the 
     direction of the Architect of the Capitol with the approval 
     of the Capitol Police Board, guided tours of the United 
     States Capitol which are led by employees and interns 
     described in subsection (a) may be suspended temporarily or 
     otherwise subject to restriction for security or related 
     reasons to the same extent as guided tours of

[[Page H3675]]

     the United States Capitol which are led by the Architect of 
     the Capitol.

                   delivery of bills and resolutions

       Sec. 209.  None of the funds made available in this Act may 
     be used to deliver a printed copy of a bill, joint 
     resolution, or resolution to the office of a Member of the 
     House of Representatives (including a Delegate or Resident 
     Commissioner to the Congress) unless the Member requests a 
     copy.

                    delivery of congressional record

       Sec. 210.  None of the funds made available by this Act may 
     be used to deliver a printed copy of any version of the 
     Congressional Record to the office of a Member of the House 
     of Representatives (including a Delegate or Resident 
     Commissioner to the Congress).

            limitation on amount available to lease vehicles

       Sec. 211.  None of the funds made available in this Act may 
     be used by the Chief Administrative Officer of the House of 
     Representatives to make any payments from any Members' 
     Representational Allowance for the leasing of a vehicle, 
     excluding mobile district offices, in an aggregate amount 
     that exceeds $1,000 for the vehicle in any month.


            authorizing commercial activity on union square

       Sec. 212.  (a) Continuation of Types of Activity Previously 
     Authorized.--
       (1) In general.--Notwithstanding any limitations on the use 
     of the United States Capitol Grounds (including section 
     5104(c) of title 40, United States Code), the Chief of the 
     United States Capitol Police (hereafter referred to as the 
     ``Chief'')--
       (A) may issue a permit authorizing a person to engage in 
     commercial activity in Union Square if the activity is 
     similar to the types of commercial activity permitted in 
     Union Square prior to the transfer of jurisdiction and 
     control of Union Square to the Architect of the Capitol under 
     section 1202 of the Legislative Branch Appropriations Act, 
     2012 (Public Law 112 74); and
       (B) under the terms and conditions of such a permit, may 
     require the person to whom the permit is issued to pay a fee 
     to cover any costs incurred by the Architect of the Capitol 
     as a result of the issuance of the permit, if the fees are 
     similar to the fees collected by the Director of the National 
     Park Service for commercial activity permitted in Union 
     Square prior to such transfer of jurisdiction and control.
       (2) Regulations.--The Chief shall carry out this section in 
     accordance with such regulations as the Capitol Police Board 
     may promulgate pursuant to the Board's authority under 
     section 14 of the Act of July 31, 1946 (2 U.S.C. 1969).
       (b) Capitol Trust Account.--
       (1) Establishment.--There is established in the Treasury of 
     the United States an account for the Architect of the Capitol 
     to be known as the ``Capitol Trust Account'', consisting of 
     all fees collected by the Chief under subsection (a)(2).
       (2) Transfer.--Immediately upon receiving any fees 
     collected under subsection (a)(2), the Chief shall transfer 
     the fees to the Capitol Trust Account.
       (3) Use of funds.--Amounts in the Capitol Trust Account 
     shall be available without fiscal year limitation for such 
     maintenance, improvements, and projects with respect to Union 
     Square as the Architect of the Capitol considers appropriate, 
     subject to the approval of the Committees on Appropriations 
     of the House of Representatives and Senate.
       (c) Union Square.--In this section, the term ``Union 
     Square'' means the area for which jurisdiction and control 
     was transferred to the Architect of the Capitol under section 
     1202 of the Legislative Branch Appropriations Act, 2012 
     (Public Law 112 74).
       (d) Effective Date.--This section shall take effect on the 
     date of the enactment of the Legislative Branch 
     Appropriations Act, 2012 (Public Law 112 74).

                       spending reduction account

       Sec. 213.  The amount by which the applicable allocation of 
     new budget authority made by the Committee on Appropriations 
     of the House of Representatives under section 302(b) of the 
     Congressional Budget Act of 1974, excluding Senate items, 
     exceeds the amount of proposed new budget authority is $0.
       This Act may be cited as the ``Legislative Branch 
     Appropriations Act, 2013''.

  The CHAIR. No amendment to the bill shall be in order except those 
printed in House Report 112 518 and except pro forma amendments offered 
at any time by the chair or ranking minority member of the Committee on 
Appropriations or their designees for the purpose of debate.
  Each such amendment may be offered only in the order printed in the 
report, may be offered only by a Member designated in the report, shall 
be considered read, shall be debatable for the time specified in the 
report equally divided and controlled by the proponent and an opponent, 
shall not be subject to amendment, and shall not be subject to a demand 
for division of the question.
  The CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 1, printed in 
House Report 112 518.
  Mr. CRENSHAW. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Florida is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. CRENSHAW. I know there is an amendment that is going to be 
offered by Mr. Gosar from Arizona, and I understand that he is just 
outside the Chamber at this very moment.
  So I thought I would take a minute, while he comes to the floor, to 
just remind everyone of the great job that this subcommittee has done 
in working through all of the issues in order to bring them before the 
House. There are several amendments that are going to be offered here 
today, and we will certainly take those into consideration. From my 
standpoint, some of those amendments are good amendments, and there are 
some that I will oppose.
  As we begin that process, I just want to, once again, thank everyone 
who has spent so much time and energy in bringing this to the House 
floor. In recognizing that this is the branch that funds the House of 
Representatives, which encompass all of the agencies that we look to to 
give us support, we wanted to make sure that they have adequate funds, 
because when they do a good job, it helps us to do a good job.
  Mr. DICKS. Will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. CRENSHAW. I yield to the gentleman from Washington.
  Mr. DICKS. If we have another Member, could we go out of order by 
unanimous consent? Is that a problem?
  Mr. CRENSHAW. In response to your question, I think it is in order, 
Mr. Dicks. I know that I, Mr. Honda, and you as well, Mr. Dicks, could 
strike the last word and make a comment or two if you'd like. Mr. Honda 
might want to say a word.
  Mr. DICKS. Apparently, we would have to go back in the House and ask 
unanimous consent if we wanted to go out of order on this. Maybe it's 
just better to wait for the gentleman from Arizona to get here.
  Since we're here, what is the plan for phase two of the Capitol, of 
the dome restoration? How does the chairman see this?
  Mr. CRENSHAW. That's an excellent question. We ought to take a little 
time.
  Mr. DICKS. I thought it was.
  Mr. CRENSHAW. As you know, phase one is in process, and that's the 
skirt of the dome. You can see some of the work that's being done 
there. The next phase is much more expensive. I think it's a little 
over $100 million. As you know, we have an inauguration that's coming. 
So, during the inauguration, I would hope that we wouldn't have a lot 
of construction going on to impair the view of that beautiful dome. It 
is my desire that, as soon as the inauguration is over, we can find the 
funds, which is a priority of this subcommittee. We might even break 
that up into two or three phases, but certainly that work needs to be 
done.
  As you have often pointed out, when you look up and see that 
magnificent structure, it looks wonderful. But when you get up close, 
there are some problems that we need to deal with. We want to deal with 
those as soon as we can, so I think it's just a matter of priority.
  Mr. DICKS. There is no emergency requirement here? I mean, this work 
is work that can be done over a staged period of time, and there is no 
real serious problem that could have an adverse effect on the Capitol, 
is there?
  Mr. CRENSHAW. No, I don't think there is anything that makes it an 
emergency.
  I think, clearly, like a lot of these projects that ought to be 
funded, the Architect has a long list of projects, and this is 
certainly one of those, so we want to be able to deal with that. It is 
a priority of this subcommittee, and we've talked about that. We want 
to make sure, as soon as we can, that we'll have the money to do that.
  The CHAIR. The time of the gentleman from Florida has expired.
  Mr. DICKS. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the requisite number of 
words.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Washington is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. DICKS. I yield to the gentleman from Oklahoma (Mr. Boren).
  Mr. BOREN. Mr. Chairman, I rise today in support of H. Res. 397, to 
reinstate the House Page Program, which was terminated in August of 
2011.
  This is in the context of the Legislative Branch appropriations. 
Unfortunately, this amendment was not made

[[Page H3676]]

in order, but we're going to work with the committee as we go forward.
  The House Page Program was an institution older than Congress, 
itself. Dating back to the first Continental Congress in 1774, House 
pages supported Congress by delivering messages, answering phones in 
the cloakrooms, and serving on the House floor. Young people who served 
as House pages had the chance to see the inner workings of our 
government from a perspective many people did not. I had the 
opportunity to serve as a page for Senator Robert Byrd in 1988, and it 
is a summer I will never forget. The experience was instrumental in my 
motivation to become a public servant.
  The House Page Program was not only a great opportunity for young 
people to learn about our government, but the enthusiasm of these young 
people also reminded us every day of why we are here.

                              {time}  0940

  In a time when we are trying to come together and find bipartisan 
solutions to our Nation's problems, pages serve as a reminder of our 
future. As we legislate on the House floor, pages served as witnesses 
to lawmaking that will affect their generation. They remind us to 
consider viable long-term solutions to the problems facing America.
  In September of 2011, Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi proposed a new 
intern initiative to replace the House Page program. While this is a 
step in the right direction, I believe it is necessary to restore the 
tradition of young people serving Congress, even before they attend 
college.
  I look forward to working with my colleagues to bring pages back to 
our Halls.
  Mr. DICKS. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.


                  Amendment No. 1 Offered by Mr. Gosar

  The CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 1 printed in 
House Report 112 518.
  Mr. GOSAR. I have an amendment at the table.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 18, line 7, after the dollar amount, insert ``(reduced 
     by $1,235,000)''.
       Page 36, line 10, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(increased by $1,235,000)''.

  The CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 679, the gentleman from 
Arizona (Mr. Gosar) and a Member opposed each will control 5 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Arizona.
  Mr. GOSAR. Mr. Chairman, I rise today and speak of my simple and 
straightforward amendment.
  My amendment would reduce funding at the United States Botanic Garden 
to the levels appropriated in 2009, which equals just over a $1.2 
million cut. That money would then be transferred to the spending 
reduction account so that we can take one more step towards reining in 
Federal spending.
  I will be the first to say I appreciate the Botanic Garden and its 
beauty. I believe it is a great program, and I am personally interested 
in botany. But Members of Congress are often faced with difficult 
choices, especially given our current fiscal crisis. There are programs 
that are constitutionally mandated and other programs that are nice but 
are not constitutionally mandated. This is one program that is nice, 
but it cannot be immune from the fiscal pressures facing our 
government.
  While the Botanic Garden is a wonderful attraction, Congress must 
seek to limit excess spending in the name of getting our fiscal house 
in order. No line item can be overlooked in making these assessments 
and decisions, including our own office budget, as we on the House side 
have demonstrated.
  Mr. Chairman, so many families are tightening their belts during 
these trying economic times. Congress must do the same and make cuts 
where it can.
  I ask each of the Members to vote in favor of the Gosar amendment, 
and I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. CRENSHAW. Mr. Chairman, I rise in opposition to this amendment.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Florida is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. CRENSHAW. Mr. Chairman, I want to urge my colleagues to vote 
against this amendment.
  One of the reasons we have committee structure is so that the members 
of the subcommittee that I chair--and Mr. Honda is the ranking member. 
As I said earlier, we sit down. We listen to the AGG heads and the 
Architect of the Capitol, which is in charge of the budget for the 
Botanic Garden. They make difficult choices. They come to us, and we 
make difficult choices.
  As I've said, we have reduced spending in the Legislative Branch 
Subcommittee for 3 years in a row. We are now at a point where it is 
almost 9 percent less than it was 3 years ago. So if you just decide 
you want to stand up and cut another 10 percent of this budget and then 
say you really like the Botanic Garden, it seems to me that this is a 
function of the Architect of the Capitol.
  It costs $12 million a year to have the Botanic Garden. A million 
people a year come to visit it and enjoy the beauty. If you're just 
going to stand up and say, Let's just cut 10 percent across the board, 
let's just start with the Botanic Garden, I don't know why you don't 
just cut 10 percent from the Capitol Police and 10 percent from some 
other areas. It just seems to be shortsighted.
  We've gone through this process already. The Architect of the Capitol 
has said, I'm not going to ask for additional money to do some of the 
repairs I need to do. There's a need for a new roof and there's a need 
for some other things. They said, We're not going to ask for that 
because we're operating under the philosophy that we all believe here, 
that we ought to do more with less; we ought to try to do the best we 
can. So here we are.
  I would just say that they're doing a good job. They're trying to 
control their costs. If we cut them any further, you really cripple 
them. You'll say to them that they can't have as many staff members, 
they'll have to close the Botanic Garden certain parts of the year. I 
think they've done a good job of managing their money. They have not 
asked for more dollars.
  With that, I would urge Members to defeat this amendment, and I yield 
2 minutes of my time in opposition to the gentleman from California 
(Mr. Honda).
  Mr. HONDA. I thank the gentleman.
  Mr. Chairman, I also rise in opposition to the amendment which seeks 
to cut $1.2 million from the Architect of the Capitol's Botanic Garden.
  The hardest hit agency in this building is the Architect of the 
Capitol, which was cut by $52.5 million, or 11 percent, making it 
impossible to fund the Capitol dome restoration in this bill. However, 
the chairman found a small amount of funding to try to keep up with the 
maintenance of the Botanic Garden. Nevertheless, Members attack because 
they can get a good headline in the papers for cutting a garden.
  To that effect, the author of this amendment put out a press release 
after offering this same amendment last year. In that press release, 
Representative Gosar stated:

       The Botanic Garden has proven its ability to use tax 
     dollars in a cost-effective and efficient way.

  If the Botanic Garden has indeed proven it's ability to use its tax 
dollars in a cost-effective manner, why is the gentleman targeting this 
agency?
  The public should know that after this amendment, we still won't 
finish the dome restoration. We still have to rehabilitate the Cannon 
House Office Building. The gentleman from Arizona wants to make sure 
the Botanic Garden is added to the scrap heap of buildings that we are 
unable to keep in working condition.
  Our constituents sent us here to do real work and look for real 
solutions to the deficit, not to make political points by attacking 
institutions like the Botanic Garden, which was established back in 
1820. As a Member of Congress, we have a responsibility to ensure that 
our Nation's heritage is kept intact for future generations by both 
tackling unnecessary spending, but also by making investments in our 
future.
  With that, Mr. Chairman, I urge defeat of this amendment.
  Mr. CRENSHAW. Mr. Chairman, I yield such time as he may consume to 
the gentleman from Washington (Mr. Dicks).
  Mr. DICKS. I thank the gentleman.
  Just so we have a historical perspective of what we're talking about 
here today, the United States Botanic Garden is rooted in the Nation's 
heritage. During the late 18th century, George Washington, Thomas 
Jefferson, and

[[Page H3677]]

James Madison shared the dream of a national Botanic Garden and were 
instrumental in establishing one on The National Mall in 1820.
  It just seems to me that even though we're in difficult fiscal 
times--and I could make an argument that we should be spending money on 
projects to put people to work, including the dome. But this has a 
historic significance to our country--George Washington, Thomas 
Jefferson, and James Madison.
  To me, we can find $1.23 million to do the repair work that is 
necessary to keep this in good condition for the American people. This 
is a priority. I hope that we will all resoundingly defeat the 
gentleman's amendment.
  Mr. CRENSHAW. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Ms. KAPTUR. Mr. Chair, I rise in strong opposition to this amendment.
  The Botanic Garden is a national treasure.
  The history of the Botanic Garden starts over 200 years ago. 
Originally, the idea for a Botanic Garden came from George Washington 
himself.
  Congress formally established the Garden in 1820 and it is one of the 
oldest botanic gardens in North America.
  The Botanic Garden is dedicated to demonstrating the aesthetic, 
cultural, economic, therapeutic and ecological importance of plants to 
the well-being of humankind.
  More than 750,000 visitors a year experience the Botanic Garden's 
plants displays, innovative exhibits, and special programs.
  The Botanic Garden maintains 13,000 accessions, which equates to 
about 26,000 plants.
  Its noteworthy collections include medicinal plants, rare species, 
orchids, carnivorous plants, cacti, bromeliads, cycads and ferns. Some 
of the plant specimens date back to the Garden's original 1842 founding 
collection.
  There is no better place to gain an understanding of the essential 
relationship of plants to human life than at the Garden. Through living 
displays that feature the biodiversity of plants from around the world, 
the Garden brings to light the many benefits derived from plants 
including oxygen, food, medicine, fiber, fragrance, shelter, and 
inspiration.
  Education is also a critical mission of the Botanic Garden. It 
creates opportunities to inspire our visitors to learn about the 
importance of plants and presents a variety of educational programming 
to visitors, teachers, and students.
  The Botanic Garden partners with the Smithsonian Institution, U.S. 
Department of Agriculture (USDA), the National Wildlife Federation, the 
National Gardening Association and other domestic and international 
botanic gardens on its outreach programs to maximize its educational 
impact.
  Mr. Chairman, this botanic collection is a global treasure.
  Globally, about one in every eight known plant species is threatened 
or nearing extinction. In the United States, the figure rises to about 
three in every ten plant species.
  Humans are inextricably interwined with plants and other life forms, 
locked in a dynamic, co-dependent struggle for survival. It is in our 
own self-interest to pay them more attention.
  Moreover, the Botanic Garden has a backlog of capital renewal and 
deferred maintenance projects of over $14.5 million, which is $2.5 
million more than its total budget in this bill.
  If Mr. Gosar's amendment is accepted, it is likely to cost more 
taxpayer dollars as staff will likely have to be furloughed, the number 
of deferred maintenance projects will increase, and there will be less 
educational opportunities for students.
  While we have serious fiscal challenges in this country, the U.S. 
Botanic Garden is not part of the problem.
  Let's prosecute Wall Street wrong doings and recoup the billions upon 
billions used on bailouts rather than pick on the U.S. Botanic Garden.
  I urge my colleagues to reject this misguided amendment.
  The CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman 
from Arizona (Mr. Gosar).
  The question was taken; and the Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. GOSAR. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further proceedings on 
the amendment offered by the gentleman from Arizona will be postponed.

                              {time}  0950

  Mr. HONDA. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from California is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. HONDA. I yield to my colleague, the gentlewoman from Ohio (Ms. 
Kaptur).
  Ms. KAPTUR. I just want to thank Congressman Honda, the ranking 
member, for yielding me just a brief moment here to oppose this 
amendment and put comments on the record.
  I oppose the Gosar amendment and the cuts to the United States 
Botanic Garden. Unless you've actually walked through the aisles and 
looked at the extraordinary collections, and exhibits, including 
specimens that preserve the genomes of extinct plants; and if you 
haven't really understood why medical science depends on many of the 
medicinal plants that are held there for posterity; and if you haven't 
really appreciated the importance of the botanical sciences to human 
life; and if you haven't understood the work of the Botanic Garden that 
links to hundreds of communities across this country trying to help 
communities raise food, even inside urban borders and food deserts--
then you really can't come to appreciate the importance of the 
fragility of life and how significant this botanical collection is to 
our country. This is a collection and capability that has been 
understood since George Washington's time over decades and indeed 
centuries. Our predecessors appreciated the importance of botanical 
sciences to human life even with science as rudimentary as it was at 
our Nation's founding. The site itself is nestled right adjacent to the 
Capitol, demonstrating the importance to the American people that those 
who came before us understood--the importance of the linkage between 
human life and plant life. Some of the most important scientific 
breakthroughs that we've had in medicine, for example, come from the 
plant kingdom.
  I think that though the gentleman may have a good goal in mind in 
trying to handle our accounts in a more responsible way, this is a very 
irresponsible way to do it. Why? Because if the botanic garden has to 
cut existing contracts, or if they have to lay off workers, or put off 
longer deferred main tenancy, in the end what appears to be a cut may 
actually prove to be a budgetary increase over time in additional 
costs. Truly this cut is rather draconian cuts to the Architect of the 
Capitol.
  I just wanted to say in a prior iteration of his amendment, the 
gentleman actually issued a press release saying the Botanic Garden has 
proven its ability to use tax dollars in a cost-effective and efficient 
way. I don't know how he might have changed his mind on that, but I 
think for the good of the country, for the future of medical science, 
for the linkage of this scientific collection to communities across the 
country, the Botanical Garden has proven its worth.
  I want to thank the gentleman for yielding, and I appreciate the 
opportunity to place my remarks on the record.
  Mr. HONDA. I yield back the balance of my time.


            Amendment No. 2 Offered by Mr. Broun of Georgia

  The CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 2 printed in 
House Report 112 518.
  Mr. BROUN of Georgia. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 22, line 9, after the dollar amount, insert ``(reduced 
     by $878,000)''.
       Page 36, line 10, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(increased by $878,000)''.

  The CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 679, the gentleman from 
Georgia (Mr. Broun) and a Member opposed each will control 5 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Georgia.
  Mr. BROUN of Georgia. Mr. Chairman, this amendment is very simple. It 
would reduce the proposed funding for salaries and expenses of the 
Congressional Research Service, or CRS, back to fiscal year 2012 levels 
this year.
  Mr. Chairman, we have to look at savings at every line of these 
appropriations bills, no matter how big or small they may be. This 
amendment would take almost a million dollars and transfer that money 
to the spending reduction account. Also, keep in mind that I'm not 
asking to cut anything. I'm not making any single cut in funding from 
CRS. I'm only asking that they receive the same amount of

[[Page H3678]]

money that they are getting this very year.
  We are in far worse shape than we were 1 year ago economically. Our 
national debt has hit almost $16 trillion, yet this Congress continues 
to blow through trillions of dollars with a reckless disregard for our 
economic reality.
  Mr. Chairman, I think CRS should have to pitch in and do their part 
by spending no more money next year than they're spending this year. 
It's called tightening the belt. Families have to do it, States have to 
do it, and branches of the Federal Government should also have to do 
it. We have to stop spending money that we do not have. I ask that my 
colleagues support this amendment as a step in the right direction for 
doing just that.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. HONDA. Mr. Chairman, I rise in strong opposition to the 
gentleman's amendment.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from California is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. HONDA. Mr. Chairman, this amendment would cut the funding level 
of the Congressional Research Service by $878,000, returning it to the 
2012 level.
  He said that he's not doing anything to harm it because it's the same 
level as last year, but everybody knows that every year the cost of 
living, the cost of doing services, increases. So a flat, across-the-
board push ahead kind of a budget is really a decrease. It's subtle, 
but it's still a decrease. I just want to let the gentleman know that 
that's the fact.
  The other fact is the CRS is a research arm of the congressional 
Members. It's a research arm that we're able to use to do the kind of 
research that our folks really depend upon and is nonpartisan, is not 
biased in one way or another, and they are very professional in doing 
so. If we're expected to do the right kind of work for our constituency 
and then also for our country on issues, then we should be able to 
expect good work from our CRS.
  In fact, Chairman Crenshaw and his staff should be commended for 
recognizing the funding shortfall that CRS has incurred in recent 
years.
  As other congressional staff can attest, CRS is really essential to 
help Members to be able to perform the duties by this kind of a 
nonpartisan research and policy analysis. I believe this divided 
Congress should take more advantage of this unbiased resource and not 
reduce its capacity. Therefore, I oppose the amendment and urge my 
colleagues do so also.
  I yield back the balance of my time.

               [From the Washington Times, June 6, 2012]

 Congressional Staffers, Public Shortchanged by High Turnover, Low Pay

                            (By Luke Rosiak)

       The most powerful nation on Earth is run largely by 24-
     year-olds.
       High turnover and lack of experience in congressional 
     offices are leaving staffs increasingly without policy and 
     institutional knowledge, a Washington Times analysis of a 
     decade of House and Senate personnel records shows--leaving a 
     vacuum that usually is filled by lobbyists.
       Most Senate staffers have worked in the Capitol for less 
     than three years. For most, it is their first job ever. In 
     House offices, one-third of staffers are in their first year, 
     while only 1 in 3 has worked there for five years or more.
       Among the aides who work on powerful committees where the 
     nation's legislation takes shape, resumes are a little 
     longer: Half have four years of experience.
       When Americans wonder why Congress can't seem to get 
     anything done, this could be a clue. It's also a sharp 
     difference from the average government employee: Unlike many 
     state and federal workers with comfortable salaries, pensions 
     and seemingly endless tenures, those in the halls of power 
     are more likely to be inexperienced and overworked.
       Low pay for high-stress jobs with less-than-stellar 
     prospects for advancement takes a toll on institutional 
     memory and expertise.
       While senators make $174,000, staff assistants and 
     legislative correspondents--by far the most common positions 
     in the Senate--have median pay of $30,000 and $35,000, 
     respectively, significantly less than Senate janitors and a 
     fairly low salary for college graduates in a city as 
     expensive as Washington.
       Historical pay records were transcribed from book form by 
     the website Legistorm.
       The size of committee and members' staffs have remained the 
     same over the past decade, and salaries have often not risen 
     with inflation--or at all.
       The average legislative counsel in the House made $56,000 
     last year, less than in 2007. While pay for parking-lot 
     attendants in the House increased from $26,000 to $49,000 in 
     the past decade, pay for staff assistants, who make up the 
     bulk of the House's workforce, rose from $26,000 to $30,000. 
     That puts them in the bottom fifth of the region's college-
     educated workforce.
       It means that young workers have proximity to enormous 
     power while surviving on a meager budget--dual forces that 
     come together to push congressional staffers through the 
     ``revolving door'' to highly paid K Street lobbyists. In the 
     revolving door, former congressional staff and members use 
     their personal connections and insider knowledge to attempt 
     to pull the levers of power on behalf of a paying client. A 
     former congressional staffer is among the most valuable 
     assets a company desiring legislative change can buy.
       But it also means that staffers are often forced to rely on 
     lobbyists while they still work for Congress, sometimes for 
     the purest of reasons: While lobbyists with decades of 
     experience in energy policy or other arcane areas are common, 
     such depth of experience is nearly nonexistent on Capitol 
     Hill. Though 10 years of experience in a home-state office, 
     which handles constituent services and other less stressful 
     concerns, is not rare, a person with a decade of experience 
     is few and far between in Washington.


                          Without a foundation

       ``Who are congressional staff going to turn to?'' asked 
     Daniel Schuman, a former Congressional Research Service (CRS) 
     lawyer who now studies policy at the nonpartisan Sunlight 
     Foundation. ``The experienced staff aren't there. But 
     lobbyists and think tanks are beating down the door: `Here's 
     the legislation, here are the research materials and I've got 
     the co-sponsors lined up.' ''
       As policy questions more frequently hinge on the nuances of 
     technical matters, members of Congress are operating without 
     the researchers and topical experts on which they have relied 
     to cast informed votes.
       With the shuttering of the Office of Technology Assessment, 
     a 200-member congressional support agency that closed in 1995 
     under House Speaker Newt Gingrich, members who are largely 
     lawyers and rhetorical masters are asked to differentiate 
     between competing proposals that only scientists might be 
     able to evaluate effectively.
       The technology office researched and summarized scientific 
     and technological matters, ranging from acid rain to wireless 
     phones, for members who, with an average age of 64 in the 
     Senate and 58 in the House, are legislating on matters such 
     as the Internet, which most spent much of their lives 
     without. Typical of its work products was a decades-ago 
     warning on the effect of technology on copyright law, a 
     question lawmakers contentiously grappled with this year.
       ``It helped us to . . . better oversee the science and 
     technology programs within the federal establishment,'' said 
     then-Rep. Amo Houghton, New York Republican, who served nine 
     terms before retiring in 2005. The role of CRS, which 
     provides research on topics beyond science and technology, 
     has also been rolled back.
       Brian Darling, a former Senate staffer who is now senior 
     fellow for government studies at the conservative Heritage 
     Foundation, said he strongly supports smaller government, but 
     sometimes symbolic cuts can backfire.
       ``Cutbacks at CRS to me don't make a lot of sense, with 
     their institutional knowledge. They put out a great 
     nonpartisan work product. When crafting the legislative 
     branch appropriation bill, members of Congress are trying to 
     show they want to cut spending, but there can be 
     repercussions,'' he said.
       Though it seems paradoxical, a lack of knowledge and 
     resources by congressional staffers can make for waste, Mr. 
     Schuman said, citing an inability to conduct oversight, 
     agency regulations that are left unchallenged, loopholes 
     slipped into laws that are giveaways for special interests 
     and poorly implemented programs.
       He pointed to the creation of the Department of Homeland 
     Security.
       ``The department is a mess because people didn't understand 
     what would happen when you merge so many different agencies 
     with different cultures,'' he said. ``It is bloated, 
     inefficient and maladroit.''
       A failure by Congress to ``understand the laws it passed'' 
     and ``innovations in the private sector'' also led ultimately 
     to a huge crunch and the massive bailouts with taxpayer 
     money, he said.


                               Up and out

       Consider the class of 2005. Of 186 Senate staff assistants 
     who started that year, 82 percent had left by last year, 13 
     percent were still in the same position and the remaining 5 
     percent have moved up a notch. Of Senate legislative 
     correspondents starting the same year, 83 percent have 
     departed and the rest moved up.
       In the House, of 105 people who started as legislative 
     assistants, four made chief of staff in six years. Seven out 
     of 10 left, and almost all the rest got other promotions.
       As that group has come or gone, multiple other layers of 
     congressional staff have been churned through. Among staffers 
     who moved on from Congress in early 2010, three-quarters of 
     departing staff assistants and legislative correspondents had 
     two years or less under their belts.
       Even policy wonks in the most nonpolitical of positions, 
     ``professional staff'' in the Senate committees where most 
     legislative work gets done, last only five years on average, 
     from the time they got their first job in Congress to the 
     time they found a new employer.

[[Page H3679]]

       ``When people get married or have kids, around 35, you 
     either jump up in pay by $50,000 or you get out of there 
     because you can't make it anymore. Making that money for 10 
     years puts people behind for the rest of their lives in terms 
     of retirement,'' Mr. Schuman said.
       Most college-educated workers in the D.C. area earn $81,000 
     or more, with an average salary of $93,850, according to the 
     U.S. Census Bureau. For college grads under 30, the median 
     salary is $42,000.
       Some 300 staffers who started in 2005 or 2006 are already 
     registered federal lobbyists, a Times review of records 
     indicated. They are preparing detailed policy papers, and in 
     some cases drafting proposed legislation, for their former 
     colleagues, and they have the time and resources to do a more 
     thorough job than those still there--though one that has a 
     slant in favor of their new, more generous employer.
       ``Staff are incredibly vulnerable to this. They're trying 
     to do a very complicated job with limited resources,'' Mr. 
     Schuman said.
       As the federal government has grown dramatically over the 
     decades, the Congress in charge of overseeing it has stayed 
     the same or shrunk. A recent 10 percent reduction to 
     congressional offices' budgets is the latest major reduction.
       ``When times are going bad, lawmakers say we have to cut 
     Congress. But when things are going great, no one says it's 
     time to hire more staff. You get the Congress you pay for,'' 
     Mr. Schuman said.
       Mr. Darling acknowledged that salaries made it nearly 
     impossible for Congress to have many workers with significant 
     experience. But he likened the limitation to ``term limits'' 
     for staff. He decried the deferred compensation system that 
     inspires some Hill staffers to make next to nothing for a few 
     years so they can cash in big as a lobbyist afterward, but 
     praised the idealists who toiled there.
       ``There's a perception that government workers are 
     underworked, and that's far from the case in Congress. In 
     fact, they tend to burn out and leave for higher-paid 
     positions,'' said Mr. Darling. Executive-branch bureaucrats 
     could take a lesson from their grueling workload, he added.
       ``The way Congress runs is the way the federal government 
     should run.''

  Mr. BROUN of Georgia. Well, my good friend from California said this 
is a decrease in spending, but it's not. It's just keeping the spending 
at the current levels for 1 more year. It makes sense.
  We are in hard economic times as a nation. We're broke as a nation. 
We're spending more money than we're bringing in.
  Members on both sides of the aisle certainly use the Congressional 
Research Service, and it's a good service for all of us. But we all 
have to tighten our belts. I hear Members on both sides talk about we 
need to make cuts, we need to balance our budget, we need to start 
dealing with the deficit and debt. I agree, we do.
  This reminds me of some mantra that went on back during our founding 
period with a slightly different twist. Back in those days of founding 
our Nation, they were talking about taxes. The mantra was, Don't tax 
me, don't tax thee, tax that fellow behind the tree. Well, today it's, 
Don't cut me, don't cut thee, cut the fellow behind the tree. But 
there's not a person behind the tree.
  We all need to tighten our belts. This is just a very small, not cut, 
but a stabilization of spending for the CRS. So I encourage my 
colleagues to make one small little, itty-bitty step towards financial 
reality and financial sanity by saying let's just freeze the spending 
level for CRS for 1 year.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman 
from Georgia (Mr. Broun).
  The question was taken; and the Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. HONDA. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further proceedings on 
the amendment offered by the gentleman from Georgia will be postponed.


                  Amendment No. 3 Offered by Mr. Holt

  The CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 3 printed in 
House Report 112 518.
  Mr. HOLT. Mr. Chairman, I have amendment No. 3 at the desk.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 24, line 13, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(reduced by $218,379) (increased by $218,379)''.

  The CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 679, the gentleman from New 
Jersey (Mr. Holt) and a Member opposed each will control 5 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from New Jersey.

                              {time}  1000

  Mr. HOLT. My amendment seeks to address a problem we face here in the 
legislative branch: the congressional supply of pocket-sized copies of 
the U.S. Constitution and Declaration of Independence is exhausted.
  My amendment reduces and then reinserts $218,379 from the budget for 
the Government Printing Office to address this shortage so that they 
can provide these pocket Constitutions and Declarations. It is the 
exact cost of the last printing of the pocket version of the 
Constitution.
  But the money is not the root of the problem. The funding exists to 
print more pocket Constitutions today or tomorrow. What is lacking is 
the authority for the Government Printing Office to do so. The approval 
of this amendment appears to be the best parliamentary approach that we 
have right now to solve this immediate problem.
  Last week, as I prepared to visit a school in New Jersey where we 
would hold a ceremony of oath of citizenship for new citizens, I asked 
my staff to make sure we had pocket Constitutions to distribute to 
them. I always carry one. I find many of my constituents want to as 
well. When I discovered that the supply was exhausted and none have 
been printed for this Congress, I thought we should address that 
problem now. Except for the dozens of copies that might be on a shelf 
in Members' offices or the few that are in a bag in the back of my 
station wagon, Members find that they cannot get these pocket 
Constitutions for love nor money.
  Everyday, like so many of my Republican and Democratic colleagues, I 
point to this Constitution. When I meet with students, I ask them, What 
is the greatest invention of humans? And they, knowing I'm a scientist, 
will sometimes come up with some technological answer. I would argue 
our greatest invention is our constitutional system of government. Our 
brilliant, resilient, self-correcting system of government, dreamed up 
in Philadelphia so many years ago, functions remarkably well over the 
centuries. And this simple, 45-page pocket Constitution that Members 
have been able to share with their constituents for generations allows 
everyone to understand better that brilliant system of government.
  Over my time here in the House, I have eagerly distributed these 
pocket Constitutions to students, new citizens, and many constituents 
who ask for them so that they can have their own. And who better to 
distribute these copies than a Representative working under the 
authority of article I of this ingenious document.
  A self-governing country works only if we citizens believe that it 
does. A self-governing country works only if the citizens provide the 
motive force for it to work. And familiarity with the copies of this 
ingenious, powerful, essential document provide the motivation and the 
mechanism for our government to work.
  Since 2009, when Members of the 111th Congress each received a 
thousand copies of this pocket edition of the U.S. Constitution, 
Members of the House have not received any new pocket Constitutions. 
That means despite the fact that we began this Congress, the 112th, by 
reading the Constitution in this House Chamber, which I was pleased to 
participate in, no Member of the 112th Congress has been provided with 
any additional constitutions. So with no new copies of the pocket 
Constitution since 2009, except these few that I have here, it is long 
past time to fix this simple problem with this simple amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. CRENSHAW. Mr. Chairman, I seek time in opposition, although I'm 
not necessarily opposed.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Florida is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. CRENSHAW. I want to say thank you to the gentleman for bringing 
this to the attention of the House and just from an informational 
standpoint make Members aware that in February this House passed what 
we call the Printing Resolution, which calls for the printing of the 
pocket Constitutions that he's talking about. The other body now has 
that piece of legislation. Like a lot of other pieces of legislation 
that that body finds itself in possession of, nothing has happened.

[[Page H3680]]

  So I think it's appropriate for some of us to encourage the other 
body to take up the Printing Resolution, solve the problem. And, 
actually, I was told just this morning that I think the point of your 
amendment has actually had an impact because the other body, I am told, 
has indicated that they plan to move ahead with the Printing Resolution 
that we sent them earlier this year. So I think all in all, that's been 
positive.
  Mr. HOLT. Will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. CRENSHAW. I yield to the gentleman.
  Mr. HOLT. As I said in my remarks, the problem is not money; the 
problem is authorization. That can be accomplished by this joint 
resolution from the Joint Committee on Printing to the Government 
Printing Office, or it could be resolved through the appropriations, as 
I'm attempting to do now.
  And I should point out, as the gentleman refers to the other body, it 
is out of pride of this body that we say we will do what we should do 
and the Senate will do what they will do and we will try to get 
together to move legislation forward. It is our job here today to do 
what we can do and to educate the public about this ingenious system of 
government that has been so successful for 2 centuries. We should do 
this.
  Mr. CRENSHAW. Reclaiming my time, I yield 2 minutes to Mr. Lungren, 
the chairman of the House Administration Committee.
  Mr. DANIEL E. LUNGREN of California. The gentleman is correct, we did 
pass a resolution over to the other body. It is customary that either 
body determine what their printing needs are, but we do have to 
normally have a resolution for it.
  Under Mr. Harper's direction, with the Joint Committee on Printing, 
we actually reduced our request by 50 percent to save money, but also 
to give adequate printing of what we thought was needed. The other body 
initially decided that they didn't need any more copies. They have now 
reassessed that and at the last minute have indicated to us that they 
see the need for doing that and have promised us that they will act on 
our resolution.
  So this is a hope that maybe this is one thing that they can agree on 
sending out of their body this year and over to us. But in the 
meantime, the gentleman's amendment is appropriate. Let us not lose the 
Constitution over this.
  Mr. CRENSHAW. Mr. Chairman, I yield 2 minutes to the ranking member, 
Mr. Honda.
  Mr. HONDA. Thank you for yielding.
  I won't need the full 2 minutes because I think that the proponent, 
Congressman Holt, has done an excellent job in expressing our sentiment 
about the importance of the pocket Constitution. I appreciate the 
chairman of the authorizing committee, Congressman Lungren, and my 
chairperson for taking the initiative in moving forward on this and 
prodding the other body to make sure that they act on Resolution 90.
  So I would urge all Members to vote ``yes'' on this amendment.
  Mr. CRENSHAW. I yield back the balance of my time.
  The CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman 
from New Jersey (Mr. Holt).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                 Amendment No. 4 Offered by Mr. Scalise

  The CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 4 printed in 
House Report 112 518.
  Mr. SCALISE. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 29, line 21, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(reduced by $1,000,000)''.
       Page 36, line 10, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(increased by $1,000,000)''.

  The CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 679, the gentleman from 
Louisiana (Mr. Scalise) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Louisiana.
  Mr. SCALISE. The amendment that I bring forward zeroes out the Open 
World Leadership Center. This is a subset of the Library of Congress. 
This is an agency that's received millions of dollars over the years--
in fact, $123 million over the past 10 years--to bring foreign 
government leaders from countries like Russia and others to the United 
States, something that might be a good idea but, frankly, when you 
consider the fact that we're running massive deficits, have a mountain 
of debt that keeps building up, we have to cut back programs that we 
just can't afford to do. And clearly, this is one of those programs.
  I do applaud the chairman and the committee for reducing this 
account. Although it's been reduced, there's still a million dollars 
remaining in the account. Ultimately, what we do is completely 
eliminate that funding. The reason that we're doing this, if you go 
back--and we've looked at the Congressional Record over the years, 
going back to 2009--Congress has been very clear to this agency, the 
Open World Leadership Center, that it's time for them to stop receiving 
government money.

                              {time}  1010

  Just look at the comments from April 21 of 2010. At the time, 
Chairman Wasserman Schultz said:

       Our subcommittee's stated goal has been that we would begin 
     to wean you off your reliance on Legislative Branch funding, 
     so it is somewhat difficult for me to understand why you have 
     asked for $2 million more in funding.

  This is an agency, Mr. Chairman, that has shown an unwillingness to 
work with Congress who for years now has said it's time for you to stop 
getting government money. This isn't some new development. This is 
something that Republicans and Democrats have agreed on for years, and 
it's finally time for that government funding to end. And if they want 
to continue doing the work they do, they can still go seek private 
funding, which, by the way, Congress encouraged them to do years ago, 
but they refused to do that because they still had the ability to get 
government money. As long as we leave a million in this account, we 
continue to allow this agency, the Open World Leadership Center, to 
function when we've now, as a policy decision, finally said it's time 
for them to go.
  So with that, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. CRENSHAW. Mr. Chairman, I claim the time in opposition.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Florida is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. CRENSHAW. Everything the gentleman said is true except for the 
fact that what we are doing in this bill is actually shutting down the 
Open World program. When you do that, there are some costs involved in 
the final shutdown, and that's why last year this was funded at $10 
million. To shut down the program, we basically took away $9 million, 
left $1 million there to terminate the existing contracts that we have. 
There's some final compensation that has to be paid. They have to close 
some offices. There are potential unemployment claims.
  And so the point of this bill is to do exactly as the gentleman 
suggests, and that is to shut down this program which probably at one 
time was a very worthwhile program and was, I guess, a program that you 
could afford. But in today's world, this is a program that, under this 
legislative subcommittee, doesn't seem to be the right place to find 
funding. There were attempts in the past to fund it under the State-
Foreign Operations Subcommittee.
  But bottom line, the goal of this committee is to shut down this 
program because we can't afford it anymore. Even if you pass this 
amendment, it still costs a million dollars to shut down the program. 
The Congressional Budget Office scores it as a million dollars.
  So I would say we ought not to pass this amendment. We ought to 
continue the process that has been started to shut down this program, 
and these dollars will be used to do just that.
  With that, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. SCALISE. Mr. Chairman, I continue to reserve.
  Mr. CRENSHAW. Mr. Chairman, I yield 2 minutes to the ranking member, 
the gentleman from California (Mr. Honda).
  Mr. HONDA. Mr. Chairman, the gentleman's amendment attempts to cut $1 
million in the bill for the Open World program, and I want to emphasize 
the word ``attempts.'' I also want to emphasize that it's not my intent 
to support the idea of shutting down the program; it's the issue of the 
process of the gentleman's resolution.

[[Page H3681]]

  Now, according to the Congressional Budget Office, the official 
bookkeeper of Congress, this amendment would net to zero. They believe 
that the organization would need at least $1 million to ramp down the 
organization. That's the CBO's impartial analysis. That means that this 
amendment has no effect. Maybe the gentleman did not know that, or 
maybe he disagrees with the Congressional Budget Office, but the 
Congressional Budget Office is a fine arbiter, and it has concluded 
that this amendment would not save one red cent. Again, this is a 
process of zeroing out, and you need that money.
  But let me emphasize again that it is not my intent to support the 
idea of closing down the program at all; it is just my comment on the 
process.
  Mr. CRENSHAW. Mr. Chairman, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from 
Virginia (Mr. Moran), the former ranking member of the Legislative 
Branch.
  Mr. MORAN. I thank my friend from Florida very much.
  Mr. Chairman, not only do I oppose the amendment, I don't think we 
should be shutting down this program. This was a bipartisan program one 
of whose principal sponsors was Senator Ted Stevens from Alaska. What 
it does is to give voice to leaders within countries who are suffering 
under oppressive forms of government.
  I just met with the Ukrainian delegation. My friend, Mr. Crenshaw, 
may have had an opportunity to meet with them as well. They come 
through the Congress of the United States and the executive branch. 
They learn how our government works. And at a time when we are spending 
two-thirds of a trillion dollars on military security, this is the kind 
of program that can promote smart power by working with leaders in 
other countries. They want freedom of the press. They want democracy. 
They can't stand what communism did to their countries, but they don't 
want the kleptocracy of Russia. They don't want Russian domination. 
They want to be like the United States, and they want to come here and 
learn how to adopt the best principles that empower our democracy.
  It's a good program. It's not much money, and the dividends that it 
yields are far greater than anything it costs us. I certainly agree we 
ought not eliminate the $1 million placeholder, but I wish we would not 
eliminate this program at all because it's a program we ought to be 
proud to fund.
  Mr. SCALISE. Mr. Chairman, I'm prepared to close, and I would first 
like to address some of the issues that were brought up during this 
discussion.
  As it relates to the idea of having exchanges with people from 
foreign countries, that's why we have a State Department. And, in fact, 
the State Department has programs that do just that.
  The Open World Leadership Center is a program run by the Library of 
Congress. If this program were so important to national security and 
relations with foreign countries, then the State Department would pick 
it up, but they haven't chosen to do that because they already do 
programs that are similar. But they probably do it a lot more 
effectively, and it's a lot more coordinated with the State Department 
because it's run out of the State Department.
  So now you have a separate, duplicative program that Congress, both 
Republican and Democrat Members, for 3 years now has been saying, It's 
time for you to go.
  And I go back again to the June 2009 committee hearing. The committee 
recommendation begins a phaseout of Legislative Branch financial 
support for the Open World program. That was the committee 
recommendation in 2009. Republicans weren't running the House back 
then. That was under Democratic leadership.
  And of course in 2010, the chairman at the time, Ms. Wasserman 
Schultz from the opposing party said:

       Our subcommittee's stated goal has been that we would begin 
     to wean you off your reliance on Legislative Branch funding.

  Yet that same year, they asked for $2 million more.
  This is an agency that just doesn't get it, and this represents 
what's wrong with Washington when we're going broke. We are going broke 
right now. Every single day, every dollar spent here in Washington, 42 
cents of that dollar is borrowed money, borrowed from countries like 
China, sending the bill to our kids and our grandkids. And here we've 
got a program that even Congress, Republican and Democrats, said it's 
time for the program to end, and yet they still have a million dollars 
sitting in their budget.
  So what you would have is seven employees. They have a staff of seven 
people. So you've taken $10 million away, and I applaud, again, the 
chairman for doing that. So you've said there will be no more program. 
There will be no more exchange. That's been a decision already made by 
the committee, the subcommittee. But you're leaving seven people to be 
paid to do absolutely nothing with money we don't have.
  Now, how many small businesses across the country that have been 
facing these tough economic times are given a million-dollar check by 
the Federal Government to close down? Unfortunately, so many businesses 
have closed down because times are tough, but they don't get a million 
dollars from the Federal Government to do it, especially with money 
borrowed from China.
  And now I would go to address the CBO issue. We actually asked CBO 
about this amendment. We asked them on Monday. Here's a letter from 
CBO. On Monday they said:

       At this point, we estimate that your amendment would have 
     no score.

  So there is no cost to doing this, but it is a million dollars less 
that we'll be borrowing from China. And at some point they say a 
million dollars here, a million dollars there, pretty soon you're 
talking about real money.
  We need to start making these tough decisions, and, frankly, this one 
isn't that tough. We ought to eliminate this program.
  And I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. CRENSHAW. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman 
from Louisiana (Mr. Scalise).
  The question was taken; and the Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. SCALISE. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further proceedings on 
the amendment offered by the gentleman from Louisiana will be 
postponed.

                              {time}  1020


                  Amendment No. 5 Offered by Mr. Moran

  The CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 5 printed in 
House Report 112 518.
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), insert the 
     following:


          limitation on use of funds for polystyrene products

       Sec. __. None of the funds made available in this Act may 
     be used to obtain polystyrene products for use in food 
     service facilities of the House of Representatives.

  The CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 679, the gentleman from 
Virginia (Mr. Moran) and a Member opposed each will control 5 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Virginia.
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Chairman, this amendment, which I am offering jointly 
with Congress Members Welch and Pingree, would ban polystyrene products 
in our food service facilities here in the House.
  Mr. Chairman, in 2011, the new Republican majority in the House 
instituted the use of polystyrene containers in our food service 
facilities. This amendment would prohibit the use of funds to purchase 
polystyrene products for use in the House cafeteria and eateries.
  Removing polystyrene would show our concern for the health of our 
visitors and our employees, and for the future of our environment. We 
should be using recyclable and biodegradable products and avoiding 
polystyrene foam packaging.
  Over 20 years ago, McDonalds and other for-profit fast-food 
restaurants replaced polystyrene foam with recyclable and paper board 
containers. The House of Representatives is the only place within the 
Capitol Complex to revert back to Styrofoam products. Neither the 
Senate, the Library of Congress, nor the Capitol Visitors Center

[[Page H3682]]

food services use polystyrene food products out of concern for the 
health of their patrons. We should be leading by example, and this 
amendment provides a way through which we can show environmental 
responsibility to the thousands of constituents who visit our offices 
each year. We should be concerned about their health and that of our 
employees.
  Polystyrene is also very difficult to recycle. Most polystyrene 
containers end up taking up inordinately large amounts of space in 
landfills or incinerators. The problems with polystyrene include 
cancerous chemicals used during manufacturing, minimal recycle ability, 
enormous space taken up in landfills, and toxic byproducts released 
during incineration.
  An EPA report on solid waste named the polystyrene manufacturing 
process the fifth-largest creator of hazardous waste. Toxic chemicals 
leak out of these Styrofoam containers into the food and drinks they 
contain and thus endanger human health and reproductive systems. That's 
our employees and our visitors to the House office buildings we're 
endangering. With this amendment, we can reduce environmental hazards 
and landfill waste, and protect the public's health.
  I encourage my colleagues to support what I think should be a no-
brainer amendment, and I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. CRENSHAW. Mr. Chairman, I claim time in opposition to the 
amendment.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Florida is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. CRENSHAW. Mr. Chairman, I just want to say that we don't use any 
appropriated funds to buy polystyrene containers. I just want to make 
that point that we don't use any appropriated money to do that.
  I want to recognize a valued member of the subcommittee, the 
gentleman from California (Mr. Calvert), for 2 minutes.
  Mr. CALVERT. I thank the Chairman.
  My friend's--and he is my friend, Mr. Moran--amendment is certainly 
misguided and costly and a step backwards. Let's talk about the facts.
  The House composting program in the last Congress increased our 
operating costs by half a million dollars a year, all for the luxury of 
using, remember, weak utensils that literally melted in your soup, and 
ineffective cups, soda cups, not including the extra paper insulators 
to keep your hands from burning once you use those ineffective paper 
cups. The cups, by the way, were two to three times more expensive than 
polystyrene foam cups.
  And the environmental benefits. Peer reviewed studies confirm that 
foam food and beverage containers--which are recyclable and, by the 
way, are still used by McDonalds--use significantly less energy and 
water than their supposed eco-friendly alternatives. They use fewer raw 
materials, create less solid waste, and the carbon emission differences 
are nominal.
  If Mr. Moran would like to eliminate polystyrene in the House he 
needs to be right upfront with the American people and let them know 
how much this is going to cost them. In fact, this product costs less 
and is a better product. And I think that's something that we ought to 
do here in the government is find ways of saving money and produce a 
better outcome.
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Chairman, I would say to my good friend from 
California, this amendment doesn't reintroduce the composting program, 
and it doesn't deal with those utensils--which I admit, some of them 
were not the best--but this deals with the polystyrene containers only, 
which is the greater source of concern for the health of our visitors 
and our employees.
  At this time, I'd like to yield 1 minute to our friend and colleague 
from Maine (Ms. Pingree).
  Ms. PINGREE of Maine. I thank my colleague, Mr. Moran, for allowing 
me to speak and join him with this amendment today.
  I rise in support of this amendment, which would prohibit us from 
using taxpayer money to stock the House cafeterias with polystyrene, 
or, as most Americans call it, Styrofoam. Maybe to some this seems like 
a small thing, but stocking our cafeterias with Styrofoam sends a 
terrible message.
  When I was first elected to Congress in 2008, it was such a pleasure 
to see biodegradable materials in the cafeteria: cardboard containers, 
paper cups, even bamboo forks--which maybe didn't always work right, 
but they still were recyclable and biodegradable. We ate out of 
containers that looked a lot like what we now see in most fast food 
restaurants.
  When the Republicans took control, that instantly changed and we are 
back to eating from Styrofoam. When my constituents read about it they 
were, frankly, quite shocked. They couldn't imagine why Congress was 
moving backwards.
  Styrofoam takes hundreds of years to biodegrade and is a suspected 
carcinogen because of the chemical it leaches into food and liquid. I 
urge my colleagues to support our amendment to get rid of Styrofoam in 
the House cafeterias.
  Mr. CRENSHAW. Mr. Chairman, I yield 2 minutes to the distinguished 
chairman of the House Administration Committee, the gentleman from 
California (Mr. Lungren).
  Mr. DANIEL E. LUNGREN of California. I thank the gentleman for 
yielding.
  Last year we had this argument. Last year, it was criticism of the 
fact that I had approved a contract that got rid of the composting and 
instead that started a pilot project, I believe, in the gentleman from 
Virginia's district, where we are taking all of this and we are 
converting it from waste energy in the gentleman's district--one of the 
exemplary programs in the country. We're not putting this into a 
landfill; we are actually converting it. In fact, these products are 
one of the best means of creating energy from waste.
  The second thing is, this is a condemnation of an industry that 
employs about 50,000 Americans around the country that deal with the 
production of this product. I would say they have come to me and said: 
Can you at least defend us with the facts, that the FDA has to approve 
use for sale of these products that come into human contact. If it were 
carcinogenic, it would not be allowed.
  The fact of the matter is, we used common sense. We actually took up 
a recommendation by the Democrats when the Republicans took over. One 
of the recommendations that was made in writing was that we eliminate 
the composting program because it cost too much money, it was 
unsuccessful, and in fact it caused more energy than it was supposed to 
save. We did that. I thought you were going to thank us for following 
your suggestion. We even put it in the gentleman's district--proud 
employees of the gentleman's constituency are reducing this waste to 
energy, and yet the gentleman comes before us and says the program that 
you have in my district, doggone it, we just don't want it. Sometimes 
people around here can't take yes for an answer.
  Mr. MORAN. Well, certainly the gentleman makes a compelling argument 
here in terms of employment. But it is clear that when you talk to 
people who regularly use our cafeterias, that they are concerned about 
the health effects of polystyrene containers. In fact, there's a 
Facebook group that's been created called Stop the Styrofoam Invasion: 
Bring Cardboard Back to the House Cafeteria. Now, I'm sure these 
gentlemen see that effort on Facebook.
  Communities across the country have rallied against polystyrene 
products, and bans have been instituted in cities and counties in 
California, Massachusetts, Illinois, Maine, Washington, Oregon, New 
Jersey, and New York.

                              {time}  1030

  Now, these are not statewide bans in all of these States. Many of 
them, they're cities and counties. But this is not something that is 
unique to the people supporting this amendment. Across the country, 
people are realizing that it is not healthy to use polystyrene as a 
material. It does take up too much land space in many places in the 
country, and we really ought to support this amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. CRENSHAW. I yield back the balance of my time.
  The CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman 
from Virginia (Mr. Moran).
  The question was taken; and the Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.

[[Page H3683]]

  Mr. DANIEL E. LUNGREN of California. Mr. Chairman, I demand a 
recorded vote.
  The CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further proceedings on 
the amendment offered by the gentleman from Virginia will be postponed.


                 Amendment No. 6 Offered by Mr. Harper

  The CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 6 printed in 
House Report 112 518.
  Mr. HARPER. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), insert the 
     following:
       Sec. __.  None of the funds made available by this Act may 
     be used to provide an aggregate number of more than 50 
     printed copies of any edition of the United States Code to 
     all offices of the House of Representatives.

  The CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 679, the gentleman from 
Mississippi (Mr. Harper) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Mississippi.
  Mr. HARPER. Mr. Chairman, this amendment would limit the printing of 
paper copies of the U.S. Code for the United States House of 
Representatives to 50 copies.
  As chairman of the Joint Committee on Printing, I have been working 
to cut wasteful printing, and the U.S. Code is a prime example of what 
needs to be cut. Every 6 years, the United States Code is reprinted to 
incorporate new statutory changes.
  Currently, the 2012 edition of the U.S. Code is slated to be printed 
by GPO in fiscal year 2013. However, the printing and production of the 
Code takes anywhere from 14 to 16 months, guaranteeing that the Code is 
outdated before it even is in print.
  Mr. Chairman, my amendment would reduce the House's allotment from 
213 to 50 copies. This reduction will ensure the long-term preservation 
of hard copies in the House, while freeing up over $369,000 for FY2013, 
money that would be better spent modernizing and improving access to 
legislative information, including the Code.
  The printed copies of the U.S. Code in the House are used less each 
day because of increasingly available, more up-to-date electronic 
alternatives. This amendment is a simple overdue reduction in 
unnecessary printing.
  I want to thank Chairman Lungren, as well as the appropriators, for 
their support of these efforts; and I encourage my colleagues to 
support this amendment.
  Mr. CRENSHAW. Will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. HARPER. I yield to the gentleman from Florida.
  Mr. CRENSHAW. Thank you for yielding. I just want to thank you for 
bringing this to our attention. I think it's well-intentioned. I think 
it's a good idea.
  I'm just curious as to how you decided to have 50 copies instead of 
213.
  Mr. HARPER. Well, there's certainly an assessment of the number of 
copies and the need and each agency that controls those and gets those. 
And we believe that on the distribution of those copies, as you look at 
it, that those agencies that get them, which include 43 copies to House 
Leg Counsel, 48 copies to House Law Revision Counsel, 13 copies to the 
House Committee on Appropriations, the House Legislative Resource 
Center receives four copies, House Parliamentarian receives three, and 
then the list goes on from there as to how we have those.
  I certainly do believe that the House Committee on Appropriations, 
for example, is not going to need 13 full copies for those. Those are 
things that, even going back to law school days, you learn how to share 
the available copies.
  Mr. CRENSHAW. Will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. HARPER. I will certainly yield to the gentleman.
  Mr. CRENSHAW. How many copies will the Appropriations Committee get 
under your amendment?
  Mr. HARPER. Well, under the amendment we do not determine how many 
copies each will get. If we do a pro rata reduction in the numbers that 
go to each one, I think we could come to an agreement as to what those 
numbers will be.
  Mr. CRENSHAW. If the gentleman will further yield, I just want to say 
I think that's a very good amendment.
  Mr. HARPER. Thank you, sir.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman 
from Mississippi (Mr. Harper).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                  Amendment No. 7 Offered by Mr. Flake

  The CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 7 printed in 
House Report 112 518.
  Mr. FLAKE. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), insert the 
     following:
       Sec. __.  None of the funds made available by this Act for 
     Members' Representational Allowances, the salaries and 
     expenses of House Leadership Offices, or the salaries and 
     expenses of Committee Employees may be used to purchase paid 
     advertisements on any Internet site other than an official 
     site of the Member, leadership office, or committee involved.

  The CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 679, the gentleman from 
Arizona (Mr. Flake) and a Member opposed each will control 5 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Arizona.
  Mr. FLAKE. This amendment would simply prohibit Members, Committees, 
and leadership offices from using taxpayer-funded MRAs to purchase 
online advertisements. These ads are little more than a tool to boost 
name identification. They blur the lines between official duties and 
campaign activities. I believe, and I think most of us would concede, 
it's an inappropriate use of taxpayer money.
  I know that some will stand up and say we've got to advertise town 
halls and whatever else that we're doing.
  Let me tell you, all the online advertising that is being paid for by 
the taxpayers from Members' offices right now, town halls and those 
other notices represent a tiny fraction of that. Most of it are things 
like this, ads reading: Congressman X is fighting the madness. Click on 
this, and then it sends them to their official page, just boosting 
their name ID.
  Representative X is working to lower gas prices by increasing 
American energy production. Find out more and like my page today.
  Another one: Congressman X is committed to creating jobs, driving 
down spending, and shrinking the size of the Federal Government. That's 
pure electioneering or campaigning. The taxpayers have no reason to 
fund that kind of purchase in online advertising.
  We already see the abuse that takes place with regard to franking. 
When you receive in the mail a four-color glossy that you can't even 
tell the difference between that these days and a campaign mailer, 
unless you look and see the very, very fine print that is there on the 
bottom of the mailer: paid for at taxpayer expense.
  Enter the Internet world and the potential for abuse is that much 
greater when Members can target ads. Say if I wanted to run for 
Governor next, I could say that I want an ad to pop up or my name to 
pop up when somebody types in a Google search for Arizona Governor. I 
would submit to you that kind of thing is happening right now, and 
we've got to stop it before it brings a dark cloud over this body.
  We all know what happened with earmarks in years past. It got so 
rampant and the corruption set in that we had to get rid of it 
completely. Let's stop this before it really balloons. There is abuse 
going on right now, but let's stop it before it gets big.
  I urge adoption of the amendment and reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. CRENSHAW. Mr. Chairman, I rise to claim time in opposition.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Florida is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. CRENSHAW. Mr. Chairman, Members of the House, if the gentleman 
has a problem with communicating with constituents, then I think he 
ought to take his gripes to the Franking Commission.
  I think everyone knows in this House that Members have an office 
account, and the philosophy is that you have an office account, you run 
your office. You are held accountable for how you spend those dollars. 
Some dollars are spent for salaries, for equipment, for rent, and for 
communications.
  When the communications are paid for with taxpayers' dollars, they 
are

[[Page H3684]]

subject to review by what's called the Franking Commission. That is a 
bipartisan commission, made up of Democrats, made up of Republicans. 
And before any kind of communication is put forward--whether it's a 
newsletter, maybe it is a postcard--before anything goes out, there are 
very strict guidelines that the Franking Commission uses to decide what 
goes in to those communication pieces.
  Under the rules, Members are allowed to use their MRA, their office 
account, that's funded by taxpayers dollars. They can, if they want to 
announce they're going to have a town hall meeting, they can send out a 
postcard, they can send out a letter. They can actually buy advertising 
in a newspaper, as long as it meets the requirements of the Franking 
Commission. And they are very strict about how big your name can be and 
how many pictures you can have.

                              {time}  1040

  You can also buy time, buy advertising on the radio. If you want to 
say, ``I'm going to have a meeting, and we're going to decide whether 
or not to appoint people to the military academies,'' you can do that. 
You can also use the Internet for that. Quite frankly, in today's 
world, that's how most people get their information. I'm not a tech 
guy, but I understand that social media is how a lot of young people 
and old people, as well, communicate.
  If you want to communicate through the Internet, then you should have 
the same rules and regulations that apply to the print. You have to go 
to the Franking Commission, and they approve it. Again, Democrats and 
Republicans, they're making sure that these are official notices. They 
can direct you to your own Web site. Most Members have Web sites, and 
they can announce things on there.
  So it seems strange to me to single out this new social media, which 
is where the world seems to be going. That's how people get their 
information. It's a lot cheaper to communicate on the Internet than it 
is to mail a letter or to mail a post card. It seems to me this is just 
an effort to micromanage how the Members use their MRAs, and you single 
out the one area in which the world seems to be going. So it's like a 
step backwards to say that you can communicate, that you can buy 
advertising on the radio, that you can buy an ad in a newspaper as long 
as you comply with these franking rules but that you can't do it with 
the Internet. It just seems like a strange way to go. Once again, all 
of this is subject to review by the Franking Commission, made up of 
Democrats and Republicans, in order to make sure that all of that is 
appropriate.
  With that, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. FLAKE. In response, the gentleman mentioned people want to 
announce town halls and whatnot. That is a tiny, tiny fraction of what 
occurs in the money being spent, taxpayer money, through franking on 
the Internet. It's things like this, and I'll just read a few.
  This is from a Member:

       ``Like'' my Facebook page to find out what I'm doing to 
     create jobs, to reduce spending, and to put our economy back 
     on track.

  How is that necessary for the taxpayer to fund? Come on. Let's get 
real here.
  Another one:

       I want to know, do you support a balanced budget amendment 
     to the United States Constitution?

  I don't really want to know that. Members just want to get traffic, 
name IDs to their Web pages.
  Now, I'm not a Luddite here. I have my own Web page. I have a 
Facebook account. I do all of that, but I do it where it's 
appropriate--with campaign funds, not with official funds to campaign.
  The gentleman mentioned that we ought to just kind of trust the 
Member--there is a Franking Commission--and let everybody do it. I 
should mention that, in 1997, when this bill came to the floor, Members 
thought there was some abuse going on with the franking of mail, so a 
requirement was put in to add the ``printed at taxpayer expense.'' That 
was done by amendment on this bill on this floor in 1997. Also, there 
was abuse with franking too close to an election. So, with an amendment 
in this bill on this floor in 1997, there was put in a requirement that 
there is a 90-day blackout period in which you can't do it.
  So there is a recognition that sometimes you go too far here. I can 
tell you that Members are going too far. I would invite anyone to go 
down to the Franking Commission and take a look at what's going on, to 
take a look at what Members are sending.
  We're going to be voting on this quickly. So I would submit, if 
you're coming to the floor or watching this debate, you don't want to 
be on the other side of this issue, because we will be here, sooner or 
later, banning this practice. I hope it's sooner rather than later.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. CRENSHAW. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the gentleman 
from California, the chairman of the House Administration Committee, 
Mr. Lungren.
  Mr. DANIEL E. LUNGREN of California. I would just like to advise all 
Members that we have full-time employees working under the direction of 
Members of the Franking Commission and the House administration every 
single day who review the products of the offices of Members.
  There is a limitation on the number of references you can make to 
yourself. There is a limitation on the number of pictures you can have. 
There is a limitation on how large the pictures can be. There is a 
limitation on some of the language that there can be. We try not to 
censor, but we try to make a distinction between that which is 
partisanly political and that which is a communication to our 
membership.
  If someone is trying to suggest that we ought not to be allowed to 
ask our constituents ``What is your position on a balanced budget 
amendment?'' I'd like to say that you have that right. If you don't 
want to ask that question, you don't have to ask that question, but 
that's for Members to be able to do that.
  Frankly, I think the idea that somehow we ought to limit our 
communications to the old-fashioned snail mail is just wrong. What 
we've attempted to do is to use the principles that have been 
established by the Franking Commission over the years to the new 
technology. That is simply what we have done. It is no more or no less. 
If people want to complain about particular messages that have come 
out, we can look at that. In fact, we turn down many, many suggested 
pieces to be sent out by Members of Congress. We have tried to adjust 
to the new communications, and the gentleman's amendment would not 
allow us to use a new means of communication.
  Mr. FLAKE. May I inquire as to the time remaining?
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Arizona has 30 seconds remaining.
  Mr. FLAKE. In closing, I would just say we have a Franking 
Commission. They are making determinations like this, and we're still 
getting this stuff. We're still getting people saying, Congressman X--
fighting the madness. ``Like'' my Facebook page now.
  I would suggest that the bipartisanship of this Franking Commission 
is part of the problem. Both parties say, They're doing it, so we'll do 
it, too, and we'll both turn the other way.
  That's why we get into problems with this. I'm just saying, please, 
get ahead of the curve here, and get ahead of where the taxpayers are 
going to be on this issue. I urge the support of the amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman 
from Arizona (Mr. Flake).
  The question was taken; and the Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. CRENSHAW. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further proceedings on 
the amendment offered by the gentleman from Arizona will be postponed.


                       Announcement by the Chair

  The CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, proceedings will now 
resume on those amendments printed in House Report 112 518 on which 
further proceedings were postponed, in the following order:
  Amendment No. 1 by Mr. Gosar of Arizona.
  Amendment No. 2 by Mr. Broun of Georgia.
  Amendment No. 4 by Mr. Scalise of Louisiana.
  Amendment No. 5 by Mr. Moran of Virginia.

[[Page H3685]]

  Amendment No. 7 by Mr. Flake of Arizona.
  The Chair will reduce to 2 minutes the minimum time for any 
electronic vote after the first vote in this series.


                  Amendment No. 1 Offered by Mr. Gosar

  The CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a recorded vote 
on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Arizona (Mr. Gosar) on 
which further proceedings were postponed and on which the noes 
prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 213, 
noes 193, not voting 25, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 371]

                               AYES--213

     Adams
     Amash
     Amodei
     Austria
     Bachmann
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Benishek
     Berg
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bishop (NY)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Braley (IA)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Camp
     Campbell
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Carney
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Chandler
     Coffman (CO)
     Conaway
     Connolly (VA)
     Cooper
     Costa
     Cravaack
     Critz
     Davis (KY)
     DeFazio
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Donnelly (IN)
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Gallegly
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herrera Beutler
     Himes
     Hochul
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Israel
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Keating
     Kelly
     Kind
     King (IA)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kissell
     Kline
     Lamborn
     Landry
     Lankford
     Latta
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Long
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCotter
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Mica
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pence
     Petri
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Polis
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Scalise
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schrader
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shuster
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thornberry
     Tipton
     Turner (NY)
     Turner (OH)
     Upton
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--193

     Ackerman
     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Baca
     Bachus
     Bass (NH)
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berman
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Bonner
     Boswell
     Brady (PA)
     Brown (FL)
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Capito
     Capps
     Capuano
     Carnahan
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Castor (FL)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Cole
     Conyers
     Costello
     Courtney
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Dold
     Doyle
     Dreier
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Emerson
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fortenberry
     Frank (MA)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Gerlach
     Gonzalez
     Granger
     Green, Al
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Harper
     Hastings (FL)
     Hayworth
     Heinrich
     Higgins
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Kildee
     King (NY)
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Lujan
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Markey
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Michaud
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Olver
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Roskam
     Ross (AR)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schock
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Sires
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stark
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woolsey
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)

                             NOT VOTING--25

     Akin
     Andrews
     Baldwin
     Bass (CA)
     Bilirakis
     Cardoza
     Coble
     Denham
     Filner
     Gohmert
     Green, Gene
     Hirono
     Holden
     Kucinich
     Labrador
     Lewis (CA)
     Mack
     Meehan
     Miller (FL)
     Neal
     Paul
     Platts
     Shuler
     Slaughter
     Towns

                              {time}  1112

  Ms. RICHARDSON, Mrs. CAPPS, and Messrs. DOLD and DREIER changed their 
vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  Mr. ISRAEL changed his vote from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated for:
  Mr. MILLER of Florida. Mr. Chair, due to attending Corrections 
Professionals National Memorial Service, I missed the following 
rollcall vote: No. 371 on June 8, 2012. If present, I would have voted: 
rollcall vote No. 371--Gosar (R AZ) Amendment, ``aye.''
  Stated against:
  Mr. FILNER. Mr. Chair, on rollcall 371, I was away from the Capitol 
due to prior commitments to my constituents. Had I been present, I 
would have voted ``no.''
  Mr. ANDREWS. Mr. Chair, on rollcall No. 371, had I been present, I 
would have voted ``no.''


            Amendment No. 2 Offered by Mr. Broun of Georgia

  The CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a recorded vote 
on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Georgia (Mr. Broun) on 
which further proceedings were postponed and on which the ayes 
prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 214, 
noes 189, not voting 28, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 372]

                               AYES--214

     Adams
     Alexander
     Amash
     Austria
     Bachmann
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (NH)
     Benishek
     Berg
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bono Mack
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Calvert
     Campbell
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conaway
     Costa
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Davis (KY)
     Denham
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dold
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallegly
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Heck
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herrera Beutler
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hurt
     Israel
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kelly
     King (IA)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kissell
     Kline
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Landry
     Latham
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCotter
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson

[[Page H3686]]


     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pence
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Ribble
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Roskam
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Scalise
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner (NY)
     Turner (OH)
     Upton
     Walberg
     Walsh (IL)
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (SC)
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--189

     Ackerman
     Aderholt
     Altmire
     Amodei
     Baca
     Bachus
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berman
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Bonner
     Boren
     Boswell
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Butterfield
     Camp
     Capps
     Capuano
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Castor (FL)
     Chandler
     Chu
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cohen
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costello
     Courtney
     Critz
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Farr
     Fattah
     Forbes
     Frank (MA)
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Gerlach
     Gonzalez
     Green, Al
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Heinrich
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hochul
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Hunter
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kildee
     Kind
     King (NY)
     Langevin
     Lankford
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Lujan
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Markey
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Michaud
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Olver
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Pearce
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Pingree (ME)
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Renacci
     Reyes
     Richmond
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Ross (AR)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sires
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stark
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walden
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Wittman
     Woolsey
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)

                             NOT VOTING--28

     Akin
     Andrews
     Baldwin
     Bass (CA)
     Bilirakis
     Cardoza
     Cicilline
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coble
     Deutch
     Filner
     Gohmert
     Green, Gene
     Hirono
     Holden
     Kucinich
     Labrador
     Lewis (CA)
     Mack
     Meehan
     Neal
     Paul
     Platts
     Richardson
     Shuler
     Slaughter
     Towns

                              {time}  1117

  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated for:
  Ms. ROS-LEHTINEN. Mr. Chairman, on rollcall No. 372, I inadvertently 
voted ``no''. I meant to vote ``aye.'' Had I been present, I would have 
voted ``aye.''
  Stated against:
  Mr. FILNER. Mr. Chair, on rollcall 372, I was away from the Capitol 
due to prior commitments to my constituents. Had I been present, I 
would have voted ``no.''


                 Amendment No. 4 Offered by Mr. Scalise

  The CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a recorded vote 
on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Louisiana (Mr. Scalise) 
on which further proceedings were postponed and on which the noes 
prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 204, 
noes 203, not voting 24, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 373]

                               AYES--204

     Adams
     Alexander
     Amodei
     Austria
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (NH)
     Benishek
     Bilbray
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boswell
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Camp
     Campbell
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coffman (CO)
     Conaway
     Costa
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Culberson
     DeFazio
     Denham
     DesJarlais
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Gallegly
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Goodlatte
     Gowdy
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herrera Beutler
     Hochul
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kelly
     Kind
     King (IA)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kissell
     Kline
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Landry
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Long
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCotter
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pence
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Quayle
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Scalise
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Upton
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--203

     Ackerman
     Aderholt
     Altmire
     Amash
     Andrews
     Baca
     Becerra
     Berg
     Berkley
     Berman
     Biggert
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Boren
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Capito
     Capps
     Capuano
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Castor (FL)
     Chandler
     Chu
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Cole
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costello
     Courtney
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (KY)
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Dent
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Dold
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Dreier
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Emerson
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Farenthold
     Farr
     Fattah
     Frank (MA)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Gerlach
     Gibson
     Gonzalez
     Gosar
     Granger
     Green, Al
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Harper
     Hastings (FL)
     Hayworth
     Heck
     Heinrich
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Israel
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kildee
     King (NY)
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     LaTourette
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Lujan
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Markey
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McKeon
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Michaud
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Olver
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Pingree (ME)
     Polis
     Price (GA)
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Rogers (KY)
     Ross (AR)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Sires
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stark
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Turner (NY)
     Turner (OH)
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz (MN)
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woolsey
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)

                             NOT VOTING--24

     Akin
     Baldwin
     Bass (CA)
     Bilirakis
     Cardoza
     Cicilline
     Coble
     Davis (IL)
     Filner

[[Page H3687]]


     Gohmert
     Green, Gene
     Hirono
     Holden
     Kucinich
     Labrador
     Lewis (CA)
     Mack
     Meehan
     Neal
     Paul
     Platts
     Shuler
     Slaughter
     Towns

                              {time}  1121

  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated against:
  Mr. FILNER. Mr. Chair, on rollcall 373, I was away from the Capitol 
due to prior commitments to my constituents. Had I been present, I 
would have voted ``no.''


                  Amendment No. 5 Offered by Mr. Moran

  The CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a recorded vote 
on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Virginia (Mr. Moran) on 
which further proceedings were postponed and on which the ayes 
prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 178, 
noes 229, not voting 24, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 374]

                               AYES--178

     Ackerman
     Altmire
     Baca
     Bass (NH)
     Becerra
     Benishek
     Berkley
     Berman
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Boswell
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Castor (FL)
     Chandler
     Chu
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costello
     Courtney
     Critz
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Deutch
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Farr
     Fattah
     Frank (MA)
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Gonzalez
     Green, Al
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Hayworth
     Heinrich
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hochul
     Holden
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Israel
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kildee
     Kind
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Markey
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     Meeks
     Michaud
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Olver
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Pingree (ME)
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reichert
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Sires
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stark
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Woolsey
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)

                               NOES--229

     Adams
     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amash
     Amodei
     Andrews
     Austria
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Berg
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conaway
     Costa
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Davis (KY)
     Denham
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dold
     Donnelly (IN)
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herrera Beutler
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jordan
     Kelly
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kissell
     Kline
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Landry
     Lankford
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCotter
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pence
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (AR)
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Scalise
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner (NY)
     Turner (OH)
     Upton
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--24

     Akin
     Baldwin
     Bass (CA)
     Bilirakis
     Cardoza
     Cicilline
     Coble
     Filner
     Gallegly
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Green, Gene
     Hirono
     Kucinich
     Labrador
     Lewis (CA)
     Mack
     Meehan
     Neal
     Paul
     Platts
     Shuler
     Slaughter
     Towns

                              {time}  1125

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated for:
  Mr. FILNER. Mr. Chair, on rollcall 374, I was away from the Capitol 
due to prior commitments to my constituents. Had I been present, I 
would have voted ``aye.''
  Stated against:
  Mr. GINGREY of Georgia. Mr. Speaker, on rollcall No. 374 on agreeing 
to the Moran Amendment to H.R. 5882, the Fiscal Year 2013 Legislation 
Branch Appropriations Act, I am not recorded because I was unavoidably 
detained. Had I been present, I would have voted ``no.''


                  Amendment No. 7 Offered by Mr. Flake

  The CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a recorded vote 
on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Arizona (Mr. Flake) on 
which further proceedings were postponed and on which the ayes 
prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 148, 
noes 261, not voting 22, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 375]

                               AYES--148

     Ackerman
     Adams
     Altmire
     Austria
     Bachus
     Bartlett
     Bass (NH)
     Benishek
     Berkley
     Bishop (NY)
     Bishop (UT)
     Blackburn
     Boswell
     Brady (TX)
     Braley (IA)
     Buchanan
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Campbell
     Carney
     Castor (FL)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Chandler
     Coffman (CO)
     Cooper
     Cravaack
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Dent
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Donnelly (IN)
     Duncan (TN)
     Emerson
     Eshoo
     Flake
     Frank (MA)
     Franks (AZ)
     Gallegly
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gowdy
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Higgins
     Hochul
     Israel
     Jenkins
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson (OH)
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kaptur
     Kildee
     Kind
     King (IA)
     Kissell
     Kline
     Lamborn
     Latham
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Long
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Marchant
     Markey
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Miller, Gary
     Miller, George
     Mulvaney
     Myrick
     Noem
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Pence
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Peterson
     Petri
     Polis
     Posey
     Quayle
     Quigley
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Ribble
     Roe (TN)
     Rohrabacher
     Rooney
     Ross (AR)
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Ruppersberger
     Ryan (WI)
     Scalise
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schrader
     Schweikert
     Scott (VA)
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Southerland
     Speier
     Stearns
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Sutton
     Terry
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (PA)

[[Page H3688]]


     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner (NY)
     Upton
     Van Hollen
     Walsh (IL)
     Walz (MN)
     Wilson (SC)
     Womack
     Young (FL)

                               NOES--261

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amash
     Amodei
     Andrews
     Baca
     Bachmann
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Barton (TX)
     Becerra
     Berg
     Berman
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bishop (GA)
     Black
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boustany
     Brady (PA)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (FL)
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Capps
     Capuano
     Carnahan
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chu
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Cole
     Conaway
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Costa
     Costello
     Courtney
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     Davis (KY)
     DeLauro
     Denham
     DesJarlais
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dicks
     Dold
     Doyle
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Ellmers
     Engel
     Farenthold
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Gerlach
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gonzalez
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Green, Al
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harper
     Hastings (FL)
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Heck
     Heinrich
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herrera Beutler
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Holden
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Keating
     Kelly
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Lance
     Landry
     Langevin
     Lankford
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Lujan
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Manzullo
     Marino
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCotter
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meeks
     Miller (MI)
     Miller (NC)
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Murphy (PA)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neugebauer
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Olver
     Pallone
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pelosi
     Pingree (ME)
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Price (GA)
     Price (NC)
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reed
     Renacci
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rokita
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Runyan
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schock
     Schwartz
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sires
     Smith (NE)
     Stark
     Stivers
     Thompson (MS)
     Thornberry
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Turner (OH)
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walberg
     Walden
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Webster
     Welch
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Woodall
     Woolsey
     Yarmuth
     Yoder
     Young (AK)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--22

     Akin
     Baldwin
     Bass (CA)
     Bilirakis
     Cardoza
     Cicilline
     Coble
     Filner
     Gohmert
     Green, Gene
     Hirono
     Kucinich
     Labrador
     Lewis (CA)
     Mack
     Meehan
     Neal
     Paul
     Platts
     Shuler
     Slaughter
     Towns

                              {time}  1129

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated against:
  Mr. FILNER. Mr. Chair, on rollcall 375, I was away from the Capitol 
due to prior commitments to my constituents. Had I been present, I 
would have voted ``no.''


                          Personal Explanation

  Mr. AKIN. Mr. Chair, on rollcall Nos. 371, 372, 373, 374 and 375 I 
was delayed and unable to vote. Had I been present I would have voted 
``aye'' on rollcall No. 371, ``aye'' on rollcall No. 372, ``aye'' on 
rollcall No. 373, ``no'' on rollcall No. 374, and ``aye'' on rollcall 
No. 375.

                              {time}  1130

  The CHAIR. Under the rule, the Committee rises.
  Accordingly, the Committee rose; and the Speaker pro tempore (Mrs. 
Biggert) having assumed the chair, Mr. Bass of New Hampshire, Chair of 
the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union, reported 
that that Committee, having had under consideration the bill (H.R. 
5882) making appropriations for the Legislative Branch for the fiscal 
year ending September 30, 2013, and for other purposes, and, pursuant 
to House Resolution 667, he reported the bill back to the House with 
sundry amendments adopted in the Committee of the Whole.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Under the rule, the previous question is 
ordered.
  Is a separate vote demanded on any amendment reported from the 
Committee of the Whole? If not, the Chair will put them en gros.
  The amendments were agreed to.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the engrossment and third 
reading of the bill.
  The bill was ordered to be engrossed and read a third time, and was 
read the third time.


                           Motion to Recommit

  Ms. PINGREE of Maine. Madam Speaker, I have a motion to recommit at 
the desk.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is the gentlewoman opposed to the bill?
  Ms. PINGREE of Maine. I am opposed.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The Clerk will report the motion to 
recommit.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       Ms. Pingree of Maine moves to recommit the bill H.R. 5882 
     to the Committee on Appropriations with instructions to 
     report the same back to the House forthwith with the 
     following amendment:
       Page 3, line 11, after the dollar amount, insert ``(reduced 
     by $3,099,244)''.
       Page 4, line 9, after the dollar amount, insert ``(reduced 
     by $3,099,244)''.

  Ms. PINGREE of Maine (during the reading). I ask unanimous consent to 
dispense with the reading.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentlewoman from Maine?
  There was no objection.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentlewoman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Ms. PINGREE of Maine. Madam Speaker, every day my colleagues on the 
other side of the aisle talk about cutting spending. In fact, a fair 
number of them came here after getting elected by promising to slash 
wasteful spending and be good stewards of the taxpayer dollars. And 
they have voted for some pretty big spending cuts.
  They cut spending on food stamps, making it harder for struggling 
families to put a meal on the table. They cut spending on unemployment 
benefits, making it harder for the millions of Americans who are 
looking for work to make ends meet. They cut spending on Pell Grants, 
making it harder for working families to put their kids through 
college.
  But the problem is these cuts my colleagues have passed put the 
entire burden on working families and seniors who are already 
struggling to get by and none of it on big oil companies or wealthy 
money managers. The problem is the burden of spending cuts is not now 
being shared equally or distributed fairly.
  Today, Madam Speaker, I am offering my colleagues a chance to share 
that burden by cutting our own spending on fancy taxpayer-funded 
mailings that our constituents don't always want us to send. The 
amendment I'm offering represents a 10 percent cut in our franking 
budget. This would mean giving up expensive, glossy, self-promoting 
mailings and getting back to straight talk to our constituents. Don't 
get me wrong: Part of our job is communicating with our constituents 
and letting them know about the work we are doing here in Washington 
and in our home districts.
  In my office, we've designated simple, straightforward mailings in-
house to communicate directly with our constituents. We've designed 
them in-house. We've been able to cut the costs of this communication 
dramatically but still effectively communicate. In fact, we've recently 
sent an update to veterans explaining the programs available to them, 
and two or three constituents have received their lifetime veterans 
benefits because of that update.
  Asking working families to sacrifice and bear the burden of spending 
cuts while protecting big banks, Big Oil, and congressional perks is 
one of the reasons our approval rating is at an all-time low.
  Madam Speaker, we all agree we need to get budget deficits under 
control, but asking seniors, young people, and working families to feel 
the pain while passing tax cuts for the rich, protecting tax breaks for 
Big Oil, and spending millions of dollars on glossy, self-promoting 
mailers is unfair, and Americans know it.

[[Page H3689]]

  If we want the American public to think we can be responsible and 
serious about cutting wasteful spending, we will pass this amendment 
today and take a big chunk out of our franking budget.
  Let me be clear: this is the final amendment to the bill. It will not 
kill the bill or send it back to committee. If adopted, the bill will 
immediately proceed to final passage as amended. And if adopted, the 
American people might have a little more faith that the people they 
send to Congress are really serious about cutting wasteful spending, 
and not just protecting the perks that they think will get them 
reelected.
  I urge you to vote ``yes'' on my final amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. CRENSHAW. Madam Speaker, I rise in opposition to the motion.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman from Florida is recognized for 
5 minutes.
  Mr. CRENSHAW. Madam Speaker, I want to urge my colleagues to vote 
``no'' on this motion to recommit and vote for this very good bill.
  Now, I'm not surprised that the Democrats don't like this bill. This 
funding bill spends less money than last year, and last year's bill 
spent less than the year before. So for 3 straight years we've reduced 
spending in the legislative branch. We've reduced spending on 
ourselves. So don't tell us we haven't shared in the pain. We are doing 
in this bill what we ask every agency or State government to do. We are 
doing in this bill what every American family does. We are setting 
priorities. We are tightening our belt. We are reining in spending. We 
are doing more with less. No wonder they don't like it.
  So I say let's pass this bill, reject this motion to recommit, and 
cast a vote for fiscal responsibility by voting ``yes.''
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Without objection, the previous question is 
ordered on the motion to recommit.
  There was no objection.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the motion to recommit.
  The question was taken; and the Speaker pro tempore announced that 
the noes appeared to have it.


                             Recorded Vote

  Ms. PINGREE of Maine. Madam Speaker, I demand a recorded vote.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to clause 8 and clause 9 of rule 
XX, this 15-minute vote on the motion to recommit will be followed by 
5-minute votes on passage of the bill and the motion to instruct 
conferees on H.R. 4348.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 101, 
noes 309, not voting 21, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 376]

                               AYES--101

     Ackerman
     Altmire
     Andrews
     Baca
     Bass (CA)
     Berkley
     Berman
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Boswell
     Brady (PA)
     Capps
     Carney
     Castor (FL)
     Chandler
     Clarke (MI)
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Costello
     Critz
     Cuellar
     Davis (CA)
     DeFazio
     Deutch
     Doggett
     Donnelly (IN)
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Farr
     Fattah
     Garamendi
     Gonzalez
     Green, Al
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Higgins
     Hinojosa
     Hochul
     Holden
     Israel
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kildee
     Kind
     Kissell
     Langevin
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Markey
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Michaud
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Murphy (CT)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Polis
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Sherman
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stark
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Walz (MN)
     Waxman
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--309

     Adams
     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amash
     Amodei
     Austria
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (NH)
     Becerra
     Benishek
     Berg
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Braley (IA)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (FL)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Capuano
     Carnahan
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Chu
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conaway
     Connolly (VA)
     Courtney
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Crowley
     Culberson
     Cummings
     Davis (IL)
     Davis (KY)
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Denham
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Dold
     Doyle
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Frank (MA)
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gallegly
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Goodlatte
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Gutierrez
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Heck
     Heinrich
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herrera Beutler
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jordan
     Kelly
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Landry
     Lankford
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCotter
     McDermott
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meeks
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Moore
     Moran
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Olver
     Palazzo
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pence
     Petri
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Price (NC)
     Quayle
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Reyes
     Ribble
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (AR)
     Ross (FL)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Schakowsky
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sessions
     Sewell
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sires
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner (NY)
     Turner (OH)
     Upton
     Visclosky
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Webster
     Welch
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Woolsey
     Yoder
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--21

     Akin
     Baldwin
     Bilirakis
     Cardoza
     Cicilline
     Coble
     Filner
     Gohmert
     Gosar
     Green, Gene
     Hirono
     Kucinich
     Labrador
     Lewis (CA)
     Mack
     Meehan
     Neal
     Paul
     Shuler
     Slaughter
     Towns


                Announcement by the Speaker Pro Tempore

  The SPEAKER pro tempore (during the vote). There are 2 minutes 
remaining.

                              {time}  1153

  Messrs. DINGELL and LEVIN changed their vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  Ms. WILSON of Florida and Mr. HINOJOSA changed their vote from ``no'' 
to ``aye.''
  So the motion to recommit was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated for:
  Mr. FILNER. Madam Speaker, on rollcall 376, I was away from the 
Capitol due to prior commitments to my constituents. Had I been 
present, I would have voted ``aye.''
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the passage of the bill.
  Under clause 10 of rule XX, the yeas and nays are ordered. Members 
will record their vote by electronic device.
  This is a 5-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--yeas 307, 
nays 102, not voting 22, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 377]

                               YEAS--307

     Ackerman
     Adams
     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Amodei
     Andrews
     Austria
     Baca
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barletta

[[Page H3690]]


     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (CA)
     Bass (NH)
     Benishek
     Berg
     Berkley
     Berman
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonamici
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boswell
     Boustany
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Braley (IA)
     Brooks
     Brown (FL)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burton (IN)
     Calvert
     Camp
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Capps
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Clyburn
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conaway
     Connolly (VA)
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Crowley
     Culberson
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (KY)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Denham
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Dold
     Donnelly (IN)
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Eshoo
     Farenthold
     Fattah
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallegly
     Garamendi
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Goodlatte
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Green, Al
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hahn
     Hall
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (FL)
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Heinrich
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hochul
     Hoyer
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jordan
     Kaptur
     Kelly
     Kildee
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kissell
     Kline
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Landry
     Lankford
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Maloney
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCollum
     McCotter
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pelosi
     Pence
     Perlmutter
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Quayle
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Richardson
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (AR)
     Ross (FL)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Ryan (WI)
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schrader
     Scott (SC)
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sessions
     Sewell
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sires
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Southerland
     Speier
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Turner (NY)
     Turner (OH)
     Upton
     Van Hollen
     Visclosky
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waxman
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                               NAYS--102

     Amash
     Becerra
     Blumenauer
     Broun (GA)
     Burgess
     Butterfield
     Campbell
     Capuano
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Chandler
     Chu
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Cohen
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costello
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (IL)
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duncan (TN)
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Farr
     Flake
     Frank (MA)
     Franks (AZ)
     Fudge
     Gonzalez
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Heck
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Holden
     Holt
     Honda
     Israel
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Keating
     Kind
     Langevin
     Lee (CA)
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lummis
     Lynch
     Markey
     Matheson
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Mulvaney
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Olver
     Owens
     Peters
     Pingree (ME)
     Polis
     Price (GA)
     Price (NC)
     Reichert
     Reyes
     Richmond
     Roybal-Allard
     Royce
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schilling
     Schwartz
     Schweikert
     Sherman
     Stark
     Stearns
     Sutton
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Velazquez
     Waters
     Watt
     Welch
     Wittman
     Woolsey
     Yarmuth

                             NOT VOTING--22

     Akin
     Baldwin
     Bilirakis
     Cardoza
     Cicilline
     Coble
     Filner
     Gohmert
     Gosar
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Gene
     Hirono
     Kucinich
     Labrador
     Lewis (CA)
     Mack
     Meehan
     Neal
     Paul
     Shuler
     Slaughter
     Towns


                Announcement by the Speaker Pro Tempore

  The SPEAKER pro tempore (during the vote). There are 2 minutes 
remaining.

                              {time}  1200

  So the bill was passed.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.
  Stated for:
  Mr. GOSAR. Mr. Speaker, on rollcall vote No. 377, I was unable to 
make it to the floor in time for the vote due to a previously scheduled 
meeting with constituents. Had I been present, I would have voted 
``yea.''
  Stated against:
  Mr. FILNER. Madam Speaker, on rollcall 377, I was away from the 
Capitol due to prior commitments to my constituents. Had I been 
present, I would have voted ``no.''

                          ____________________