Amendment Text: H.Amdt.1326 — 112th Congress (2011-2012)

There is one version of the amendment.

Shown Here:
Amendment as Offered (06/26/2012)

This Amendment appears on page H4051 in the following article from the Congressional Record.



[Pages H4029-H4062]
From the Congressional Record Online through the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]




  TRANSPORTATION, HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT, AND RELATED AGENCIES 
                        APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2013


                             General Leave

  Mr. LATHAM. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that all Members may 
have 5 legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and to 
include extraneous material on H.R. 5972, and that I may include 
tabular material on the same.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentleman from Iowa?
  There was no objection.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to House Resolution 697 and rule 
XVIII, the Chair declares the House in the Committee of the Whole House 
on the state of the Union for the consideration of the bill, H.R. 5972.
  The Chair appoints the gentleman from Washington (Mr. Hastings) to 
preside over the Committee of the Whole.

                              {time}  1921


                     In the Committee of the Whole

  Accordingly, the House resolved itself into the Committee of the 
Whole House on the state of the Union for the consideration of the bill 
(H.R. 5972) making appropriations for the Departments of 
Transportation, and Housing and Urban Development, and related agencies 
for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2013, and for other purposes, 
with Mr. Hastings of Washington in the chair.
  The Clerk read the title of the bill.
  The CHAIR. Pursuant to the rule, the bill is considered read the 
first time.
  The gentleman from Iowa (Mr. Latham) and the gentleman from 
Massachusetts (Mr. Olver) each will control 30 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Iowa.
  Mr. LATHAM. I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Mr. Chairman, I'm pleased to present the fiscal year 2013 
Transportation, Housing and Urban Development appropriations bill to 
the House.
  Before we get to the bill, I'd like to take a moment to congratulate 
my colleague and ranking member of this subcommittee, John Olver, for 
his many years of service. As many of you may know, Mr. Olver is 
retiring at the end of this Congress. I have to say he'll be sorely 
missed by all of us. This is a better bill because of his relentless 
quest for knowledge about its programs. I thank you, John Olver, for 
your service, not just to this institution, but to the Nation. Thank 
you very, very much. You're a great, great partner. You'll be missed.
  The bill before the committee today is a balanced proposal on how to 
allocate $51.6 million among Federal housing and transportation 
programs across the Nation. Continuing our commitment to reduce 
government spending, our allocation is almost $4 billion below fiscal 
year 2012 and almost $2 billion below the President's request. The

[[Page H4030]]

bill also reflects the budget resolution that was passed by the House.
  Mr. Chairman, we had to make some hard choices on funding levels for 
the agencies in this bill. We dedicated ourselves to this task while 
recognizing the serious fiscal constraints that the Nation faces. We 
also kept this bill largely free of authorizations, leaving that 
important work to the Transportation and Infrastructure and Financial 
Services Committees. We also rejected many new unauthorized programs 
that were proposed by the President. For transportation programs, this 
bill focuses on programs most critical to public safety and economic 
growth.
  We fully fund FAA safety programs and provide $1 billion to advance 
the Next Generation of air traffic control. We also fund programs to 
support growth in commercial space and unmanned aerial systems, which 
will play key roles in keeping these U.S. industries on the global 
cutting edge. This bill rejects new fees on air passengers proposed by 
the President that would harm our economy at this time.
  This bill funds highway and transit programs consistent with last 
year's levels but contingent upon reauthorization. Fortunately, Mr. 
Chairman, it appears that there's a positive movement on the 
transportation bill. Again this bill funds highways and transit 
consistent with last year's level but, again, contingent on 
reauthorization.
  The bill cuts the Amtrak operating subsidy by $116 million below last 
year and does not fund the President's request for high-speed rail. 
However, the bill does provide $500 million in authorized funds to fix 
existing infrastructure on public passenger lines. This will 
immediately create jobs, as the CBO has scored it with an almost 80 
percent outlay rate in the first year. We believe this is a better 
alternative to the administration's high-speed rail proposal.
  For housing programs, this bill fully funds renewals of the section 8 
vouchers, serving about 2.2 million families. We also provide $75 
million for 10,000 new VASH vouchers. Those are for the homeless vets. 
We fully fund the budget request in that item. The bill matches the 
President's request for $8.7 billion for Project-Based Rental 
Assistance. The CDBG is funded at a $3.4 billion level, and HOME is 
funded at $1.2 billion.
  I'd like to close by saying we tried to be balanced in our approach 
with this bill, but we did reject broad, new, unauthorized programs 
requested by the President. We also do not include other authorizing 
provisions requested by other Members out of deference to the ongoing 
work of both the T and Financial Services Committees.
  I urge my colleagues to support this bill.
  Mr. Chairman, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. OLVER. I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Mr. Chairman, it is a pleasure to see the Transportation, Housing and 
Urban Development and Related Agencies appropriations bill for fiscal 
year 2013 considered on the House floor this year. And I thank Chairman 
Latham, first, for his kind words, but also for maintaining an 
inclusive committee process as this bill was prepared. He has been a 
good partner for the past 4 years, and I value our relationship.
  I also want to recognize the hard work of the committee staff, 
specifically, on the majority side: Dena Baron, Doug Disrud, Sara 
Peters, Mike Friedberg, Brian Barnard, and Doug Bobbitt. And on the 
minority side: Kate Hallahan, Joe Carlile, and Blair Anderson.
  Chairman Latham and I are lucky to have such dedicated staff who work 
amiably and respectfully together. They have spent many late nights 
putting this bill together, and we would not be here today without 
their hard work.
  Mr. Chairman, the Republican leadership's decision to ignore last 
summer's Budget Control Act agreement has left this bill with an 
inadequate allocation to properly fund our transportation and housing 
investment needs. The resulting artificially low allocation forced 
Chairman Latham to make unnecessary and destructive trade-offs.
  Specifically, I have concerns that the Ryan budget forces us to 
accept the administration's proposal to fund project-based section 8 
contracts for less than a full year. This does not shrink the program 
nor reduce the deficit. It simply pushes the costs down the road and 
increases uncertainty for private business owners.
  I'm also disappointed that this bill does not fund the sustainable 
communities initiative.

                              {time}  1930

  However, within the constraints forced upon him, I recognize that 
Chairman Latham has put forward a respectable bill that contains a 
number of bright spots, including increases for Amtrak, CDBG, the HOME 
program, and housing for the elderly, for which he should be commended. 
I hope that as the process moves forward and we receive a real 
allocation, that these increases will be preserved and that the holes 
can be addressed.
  Unfortunately, I am concerned that the House Republican leadership's 
decision to underfund this bill is not an isolated incident, but is 
symptomatic of an ideology that does not understand the value of 
infrastructure investment.
  This strategy is wrong for America.
  Last year, the leaders of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the AFL-
CIO, not usually bedfellows, agreed that we must have greater 
investment in our Nation's infrastructure in order to create jobs and 
to be competitive in the global economy.
  A modern, well-maintained transportation network is absolutely 
necessary for our economy to grow and the country to prosper.
  The breadth of direct and indirect influence of our transportation 
networks on the economy is staggering. Our auto manufacturing industry, 
its enormous parts supplier base, the national network of gas stations 
and its complex distribution system, and the oil industry all thrive 
because we have an efficient highway system that people need to use.
  The physical construction of roads and railroads requires aggregate 
materials processed locally, steel trusses and rebar made by American 
companies and crews manned by American workers.
  Our transit system supports the domestic manufacturing of buses, 
streetcars, and trains, while providing businesses with cost-effective 
access to labor pools.
  Furthermore, every good produced or consumed in the U.S. must be 
transported via our network of roads, rails, and ports. As a result, 
the efficiency with which our system operates determines whether 
American goods can compete in the global marketplace.
  Yet, report after report indicates that we are falling behind. The 
American Society of Civil Engineers infrastructure report card gave us 
a ``D'' and estimated that more than a $2 trillion investment is 
needed. DOT's most recent ``Conditions and Performance Report'' 
indicates that there is an annual investment gap of $27 billion just to 
maintain our current system of highways and bridges in a state of good 
repair, and a much larger gap to expand the system to meet the needs of 
the growing population.
  The United States has the largest economy in the world, yet the World 
Economic Forum's most recent ranking drops America's infrastructure 
quality to 23rd in the world.
  The reason for our infrastructure decline is simple. We are not 
raising enough revenue to fund our infrastructure needs. In 2000, the 
highway and mass transit accounts raised $35 billion. By 2011, they 
only raised $37 billion. When you factor in inflation, we are raising 
20 percent fewer dollars for our transportation infrastructure than we 
did 10 years ago. This is unsustainable. During the same period, the 
U.S. population grew 10 percent to 309 million people; 65 percent of 
them live in metropolitan areas having populations greater than 500,000 
people.
  Our largest 50 metropolitan areas have more than 1 million in 
population; 13 of them, all cities in the sunbelt such as Dallas, 
Houston, Orlando, Phoenix, and Charlotte, grew more than 25 percent in 
one single decade, the last decade. Such burgeoning communities need a 
massive, timely expansion of both highway and transit facilities in 
order to ensure that rapid population growth doesn't choke their 
economies with congestion.
  In contrast, 22 of those 50 largest areas, all older mature 
metropolitan areas, including Boston, New York, Philadelphia, 
Cleveland, Pittsburgh,

[[Page H4031]]

Chicago and Los Angeles, are growing slower than the national average; 
but their built-out highway, transit, and commute rail systems are 
deteriorating and need a massive, timely program of rehabilitation to 
simply reach a state of good repair.
  Our rural areas face an even worse problem. The number of counties in 
rural America that are losing population is rising rapidly. With that 
comes disinvestment in education, health care, and public 
infrastructure of all shades. Yet virtually the entire rural road 
system must be maintained in a state of good repair or our rural areas 
will become ever greater pockets of poverty.
  If we are to meet these changing population demographics and provide 
a transportation system that functions as a sound foundation and not a 
hindrance on our economy, Congress must find the means and grow the 
political courage to raise revenue.
  The current debate on the surface authorization does not accomplish 
that. In fact, the present gridlock of debate is only effective at 
slowing economic growth and keeping America's unemployment high. That 
cannot be America's goal.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. LATHAM. Mr. Chairman, I am proud to yield 5 minutes to the 
chairman of the full committee, the gentleman from Kentucky (Mr. 
Rogers).
  Mr. ROGERS of Kentucky. Mr. Chairman, I thank the gentleman for 
yielding.
  I rise in support of this bill. This is the sixth bill that we've 
considered on the House floor, which means the House is nearly halfway 
done with its appropriations bills for fiscal year 2013. The 
Appropriations Committee has considered 11 of the 12 annual bills so 
far this year, in record time. I'm proud of our quick and thorough 
progress, and also that we have been able to work in regular order, 
which has been the goal of this committee from the git-go last January.
  The other commitment this committee made at the beginning of the 
Congress was to reduce discretionary spending wherever we can. In the 
past two fiscal years, we've cut spending by more than $95 billion and 
are on our way to continue reductions for a third year in a row.
  I've said it before, Mr. Chairman, but this is a historic 
accomplishment--a record for spending reductions that this Nation has 
not seen since at least World War II.
  The fiscal year 2013 Transportation, Housing and Urban Development 
Appropriations bill continues this downward trajectory, cutting $4 
billion from last year's level, bringing us to the lowest level of 
spending for this bill since 2009.
  The $15.6 billion included in this bill funds Department of 
Transportation agencies like the FAA, the Federal Railroad 
Administration, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, as 
well as critical Housing and Urban Development programs.
  Within the Department of Transportation, the bill targets funds 
towards programs that improve the reliability, efficiency, and safety 
of our Nation's transportation system. This includes reducing 
congestion and delays for air travelers by providing nearly $1 billion 
for the FAA's NextGen program, carefully funding Amtrak to help build 
rail bridges and tunnels, and supporting construction at airports 
across the Nation.
  These smart investments in America's infrastructure will help create 
an environment that supports job creation and spurs economic growth.
  Overall, funding for the Department of Housing and Urban Development 
is cut by $3.8 billion compared with last year, but we took careful 
steps to ensure that this reduction didn't unfairly displace our most 
vulnerable populations, including persons with disabilities and the 
elderly.
  The funding in this section of the bill prioritizes the most 
beneficial and cost-effective programs. We are providing section 8 
vouchers for 2.2 million families--fully funding the President's 
request--and keeping our veterans with roofs over their heads.
  We also increased funding for the Community Development Block Grant 
program. Throughout the bill, the chairman of the subcommittee has made 
policy reforms and conditions that will ensure greater efficiency and 
less waste.

                              {time}  1940

  The safe and responsible shepherding of taxpayer dollars is important 
government-wide, particularly when dealing with our Nation's 
infrastructure and housing.
  We help guarantee that taxpayer dollars aren't slipping through the 
cracks by implementing strict oversight and eliminating wasteful, 
unnecessary programs. To this end, we provided no funding for the 
President's High-Speed Rail program, the unauthorized and expensive 
Choice Neighborhoods program, or the extraneous TIGER grants program, 
among other uneconomical and unnecessary initiatives. Furthermore, the 
bill rejects the administration's attempted accounting tricks that 
would enact new fees on air travelers.
  There are still several moving parts in this section of the bill as 
we await reauthorization for the highway trust fund and its mass 
transit account. The committee stands ready to adjust the bill, as 
needed, if a multiyear authorization should be enacted.
  In closing, I want to take a moment to extend my thanks and 
congratulations to Chairman Latham, Ranking Member Olver, and the 
entire subcommittee for their expert work on this bill. I also want to 
thank the staff for both the majority and the minority; without them, 
the bill would not be here.
  As many of you know, this is Ranking Member Olver's final THUD 
appropriations bill before he retires. His leadership and his 
expertise, his work on this committee, and his contribution to the 
House as a whole are incomparable, and we will certainly miss the 
gentleman a great deal. Congratulations, Mr. Olver, for a great career 
in this body.
  Mr. Chairman, I urge my colleagues to support this bill. It smartly 
focuses on our key infrastructure priorities, supports a more 
responsible and slimmed down housing department, and holds the line on 
discretionary spending to a more sustainable level.
  Mr. OLVER. Mr. Chairman, first I want to thank the chairman of the 
Appropriations Committee for his kind words as well.
  Now I will yield 3 minutes to the gentlelady from Ohio (Ms. Kaptur), 
who is a member of the subcommittee.
  Ms. KAPTUR. I thank Ranking Member Olver, the gentleman from 
Massachusetts, for recognizing me today.
  First, I would like to share my appreciation for all of the work that 
Congressman Olver has dedicated his life to throughout his two-decade-
long career with intelligence, integrity, and honor. More recently, I 
would like to take a moment to recognize the work he has done the past 
4 years as both chair and ranking member of the very productive, 
bipartisan Transportation, Housing and Urban Development Subcommittee. 
His presence, his experience, his moderation, his knowledge, his 
collegiality, and his genius will certainly be missed, and we thank him 
for his phenomenal service to our country.
  With that, I applaud the work that both he and Chairman Latham have 
done with the subcommittee FY 2013 legislation. Unfortunately, their 
sense of necessary bipartisanship does not extend to the leadership of 
this House.
  I must reference the beginning of the appropriations process and the 
leadership's misguided decision to undermine the Budget Control Act of 
2011. The result of our negotiations last summer created a bipartisan 
agreement, with discretionary programs having a spending cap of $1.047 
trillion. However, the Republican leadership reneged on that deal, 
leaving us with $19 billion less for discretionary programs essential 
for the American public and the American economy during this crucial 
moment of economic recovery.
  Despite the fact that they pulled the rug out from under the 
committee, on transportation, Amtrak is actually funded somewhat above 
the fiscal year 2012 level. You know, America has 300 million people 
today, a little bit over that. By 2050 she will have 500 million 
people. We simply need leadership in this country to know that we have 
to meet the needs of a new day. This bill moves us in that direction.
  The legislation also provides renewal of housing contracts for every 
eligible individual and family currently receiving them, though for 
two-thirds of

[[Page H4032]]

them, they will not get the full year renewal. This is not the moment 
to undermine our Nation's housing market further.
  Local community programs like CDBG and HOME are funded at less than 
adequate levels, but we did the best we could with the allocation. An 
important program, the HUD-Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing program, 
is fully funded at $75 million, which will provide housing vouchers for 
over 10,000 veterans, most of them homeless across our country.

  Again, I want to thank Chairman Latham and Ranking Member Olver, as 
well as the full committee Chairman Rogers and Ranking Member Dicks for 
their work. This bill is constrained by budget realities that continue 
to reward Wall Street insiders at the expense of the middle class and 
the poor. I alone can't change that, but this bill demonstrates that 
the Appropriations Committee does its work of maintaining a stable 
Federal Government as fundamental to a stable society in this great 
Nation.
  Mr. LATHAM. Mr. Chairman, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. OLVER. Mr. Chairman, I now yield 3 minutes to the gentlewoman 
from California (Ms. Lee), who is a member of the Appropriations 
Committee.
  Ms. LEE of California. Mr. Chairman, first, let me thank our ranking 
member for yielding. But also, I want to thank yourself and our 
subcommittee chair and the entire staff for their tireless effort to 
bring this appropriations bill to the floor.
  I also want to say to the ranking member, Mr. Olver, that I will miss 
your thoughtfulness. I will miss your real clarity of purpose on all of 
the issues. I will miss your attention to detail and the bipartisan 
spirit that you bring to this Appropriations Committee. I just have to 
say I wish you the best, as you close this chapter of your life and 
begin the next chapter, but I'm going to miss you deeply--as we've 
heard tonight and we will hear until you begin this next chapter. So 
thank you again so much for your service. And most importantly, I just 
want to thank you for your friendship.
  Yes, as a member of the Appropriations Committee, I really understand 
the constraints which we have been working under, but I cannot support 
the inadequate sub-allocation in this bill.
  Mr. Chairman, this bill does not meet the basic responsibilities that 
we have to the American people. It shortchanges key housing and 
transportation initiatives which would rebuild America and put 
construction workers back on the job. And in a time of great need, this 
bill does not include a single dollar for the TIGER grant program.
  Like many communities across the Nation, including in my home 
district, especially in my city of Oakland, California, we continue to 
struggle with high unemployment and crumbling infrastructure. Smart 
investments in infrastructure, such as TIGER grants, create jobs and 
fix our infrastructure.
  Tonight, Congresswoman Maxine Waters will offer an amendment to add 
$500 million in TIGER funding. I'm very proud to cosponsor this 
amendment. I appreciate Congresswoman Waters bringing this forward 
because this is a very important amendment for us to support. So I hope 
all Members will support that $500 million increase in TIGER funding.
  In addition to shortchanging our transportation needs, this bill 
fails to invest in our Nation's critical affordable housing stock. I 
know the chairman and Mr. Olver remember in committee I tried to begin 
the debate on increasing the project-based section 8 voucher program 
because landlords and developers and tenants are going to be 
shortchanged if we don't fix this. Hopefully, that amount will be 
increased in the Senate.
  Now, in the middle of a housing emergency, gutting support for 
affordable housing for our Nation's seniors, the disabled, families and 
children, that's just plain wrong. Republicans supported bailouts to 
Wall Street, but even the smallest programs to help families on Main 
Street like Choice Neighborhoods and Sustainable Communities, those 
initiatives are completely zeroed out.
  This bill fails to fund the National Affordable Housing Trust Fund, 
which Senator Sanders and myself initiated when we both were on the 
Banking Committee many years ago.
  The CHAIR. The time of the gentlewoman has expired.
  Mr. OLVER. I yield an additional minute to the gentlewoman.
  Ms. LEE of California. Thank you very much.
  This bill, as I said a minute ago, this fails to fund the National 
Affordable Housing Trust Fund--very important initiative. Senator 
Sanders and myself, we initially put forth this idea when we were both 
on the Banking Committee. This was an excellent idea, it was an 
excellent bill, it was an excellent program which would build the 
desperately needed housing. It would create thousands of construction 
jobs, which would of course boost the entire economy.

                              {time}  1950

  This bill that we're debating tonight does not fund that, and that is 
really too bad. The American people need Congress to invest in our 
Nation's infrastructure. We cannot build a strong and prosperous Nation 
if our roads and bridges are crumbling beneath our feet. We cannot 
build a strong economy if we leave millions of Americans in poverty at 
the risk of homelessness and struggling to find a good-paying job.
  So I urge Members to oppose this bill. But again, I want to thank the 
chairman and the ranking member for working on the subcommittee bill in 
the spirit of bipartisanship. But I think it just falls short for many 
of us to support.
  Mr. LATHAM. Mr. Chairman, I continue to reserve the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. OLVER. Mr. Chairman, I yield 2 minutes to the gentlewoman from 
Texas (Ms. Jackson Lee).
  Ms. JACKSON LEE of Texas. I thank the ranking member, and I thank the 
chairman of the full committee, of the subcommittee, both chair and 
ranking member.
  I do too want to take a moment to thank the ranking member for his 
long service to this Nation. As he has been a member of the 
Appropriations Committee, we can count his work inside this House. But 
I really think the American people, Mr. Olver, owe you a moment of 
gratitude for the work and commitments that you've shown in making sure 
that those who need help can get help, and I want to pay tribute to you 
this evening.
  I also want to indicate that we understand that we are living in 
difficult times. But I raise concerns about funding, living in the 
fourth largest city in the Nation, where we see enormous congestion, 
and the importance of transit dollars; $900 million, fortunately, came 
to Houston after a long, long wait to build a light-rail system. Those 
dollars need to continue.
  Housing plays a very important role. In the city of Galveston, for 
example, they have been the recipient of $700 million after Hurricane 
Ike to use for the restoration of private housing, infrastructure and, 
of course, public housing. To cut those lines of funding will, in 
essence, impact communities around the Nation that are impacted by 
disaster. Losing the full funding of the TIGER grant--and I support the 
gentlelady from California, Ms. Waters' amendment to restore those 
dollars--they create jobs.
  So it is important, as we look at this bill, that we look at it from 
the perspective of solving the hurt of Americans who've been impacted 
by disaster, of improving mobility, ensuring that we put Americans back 
to work with funding for transportation and the infrastructure. I cite 
Galveston in particular because there is a conflict going on with 
respect to the importance of public and private housing.
  The CHAIR. The time of the gentlewoman has expired.
  Mr. OLVER. I yield the gentlewoman an additional 1 minute.
  Ms. JACKSON LEE of Texas. The situation in Galveston resulted from a 
unique impact of Hurricane Ike. Mr. Chairman, most think that the surge 
would come from the larger body of water, but the surge came from the 
bay and really impacted low-income individuals who didn't have any 
flood insurance or had already paid for their house, it had been in 
their families for years. And through the largesse of the Congress and 
HUD, a $700 million package was presented to restore that area and 
those houses and those families, many of whom I visited in tents.

[[Page H4033]]

  We have a situation where there's a misunderstanding of the value of 
those Federal funds, but we do have those Federal funds; and it is in 
tribute to this Congress, and I want to see funds for public housing, 
for affordable housing continue.
  With that, I would hope that we have an opportunity in the conference 
or have an opportunity to restore the funds that have had to be cut, 
because they create jobs, they provide a lifeline for those impacted by 
disaster, and they create the mobility and infrastructure rebuild that 
America needs.
  Mr. OLVER. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. LATHAM. Mr. Chairman, again, I want to congratulate my good 
friend, Mr. Olver, and second what he said. The staff on both sides 
does an outstanding job for this subcommittee and for the country. It's 
a marvel to watch them work together and to come to this bill.
  So with that, Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The CHAIR. All time for general debate has expired.
  Pursuant to the rule, the bill shall be considered for amendment 
under the 5-minute rule.
  The amendment printed in section 3 of House Resolution 697 is 
adopted. During consideration of the bill for further amendment, the 
Chair may accord priority in recognition to a Member offering an 
amendment who has caused it to be printed in the designated place in 
the Congressional Record. Those amendments will be considered read.
  The Clerk will read.
  The Clerk read as follows:

                               H.R. 5972

       Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of 
     the United States of America in Congress assembled,  That the 
     following sums are appropriated, out of any money in the 
     Treasury not otherwise appropriated, for the Departments of 
     Transportation, and Housing and Urban Development, and 
     related agencies for the fiscal year ending September 30, 
     2013, and for other purposes, namely:

                                TITLE I

                      DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

                        Office of the Secretary

                         salaries and expenses

       For necessary expenses of the Office of the Secretary, 
     $108,277,000, of which not to exceed $2,635,000 shall be 
     available for the immediate Office of the Secretary; not to 
     exceed $992,000 shall be available for the Immediate Office 
     of the Deputy Secretary; not to exceed $19,615,000 shall be 
     available for the Office of the General Counsel; not to 
     exceed $11,248,000 shall be available for the Office of the 
     Under Secretary of Transportation for Policy; not to exceed 
     $12,825,000 shall be available for the Office of the 
     Assistant Secretary for Budget and Programs; not to exceed 
     $2,601,000 shall be available for the Office of the Assistant 
     Secretary for Governmental Affairs; not to exceed $27,095,000 
     shall be available for the Office of the Assistant Secretary 
     for Administration; not to exceed $2,034,000 shall be 
     available for the Office of Public Affairs; not to exceed 
     $1,701,000 shall be available for the Office of the Executive 
     Secretariat; not to exceed $1,539,000 shall be available for 
     the Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization; 
     not to exceed $10,875,000 for the Office of Intelligence, 
     Security, and Emergency Response; and not to exceed 
     $15,117,000 shall be available for the Office of the Chief 
     Information Officer: Provided, That the Secretary of 
     Transportation is authorized to transfer funds appropriated 
     for any office of the Office of the Secretary to any other 
     office of the Office of the Secretary: Provided further, That 
     no appropriation for any office shall be increased or 
     decreased by more than 5 percent by all such transfers: 
     Provided further, That notice of any change in funding 
     greater than 5 percent shall be submitted for approval to the 
     House and Senate Committees on Appropriations: Provided 
     further, That not to exceed $60,000 shall be for allocation 
     within the Department for official reception and 
     representation expenses as the Secretary may determine: 
     Provided further, That notwithstanding any other provision of 
     law, excluding fees authorized in Public Law 107-71, there 
     may be credited to this appropriation up to $2,500,000 in 
     funds received in user fees: Provided further, That none of 
     the funds provided in this Act shall be available for the 
     position of Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs.


             Amendment Offered by Ms. Jackson Lee of Texas

  Ms. JACKSON LEE of Texas. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the 
desk.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       Page 3, line 3, strike ``not to exceed''.
       Page 3, line 11, after ``Secretary'' insert ``(except for 
     the Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business 
     Utilization)''.

  The CHAIR. The gentlewoman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Ms. JACKSON LEE of Texas. Mr. Chairman, again, as I rise to my feet, 
I do want to acknowledge both the staffs of the chairman of the 
subcommittee and the ranking member of the subcommittee for working 
with my office. And I again want to acknowledge the ranking member, Mr. 
Olver, again for his service to the Nation, but also for the times that 
he has worked with Members over the years and for his commitment, 
again, to the most vulnerable.
  This is a bill that really addresses the needs of Americans in their 
most deepening and expanded need, as I said earlier, mobility, housing, 
so crucial, infrastructure, and the ability to create jobs and to do 
good in our municipalities and rural areas. But it is also an 
opportunity to build capacity, to grow jobs and to build small 
businesses. And I know that firsthand, working consistently throughout 
a number of appropriations bills and authorization bills and as a 
ranking member on the Subcommittee on Transportation Security. In 
addition to our main task is to look to the needs and help build 
capacity in America's small businesses.
  My amendment will ensure the necessary funds that are appropriated 
specifically for the Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business 
Utilization and the Minority Business Resource Center cannot be used by 
the Secretary for any other purpose.
  Small businesses, women-owned businesses, minority-owned businesses 
represent more than the American Dream. They represent the American 
economy. Small businesses account for 95 percent of all employers, 
create half of our gross domestic product, provide three out of four 
new jobs in this country; and allocation reduction directly undermines 
the importance of small businesses, including women-owned businesses 
and minority-owned businesses to the success of our economy.
  Mr. Chairman, many of our utilization, or the utilization of Federal 
funds, going to our local transit agency, for example, in the instance 
of Houston Metro, the structure of receiving the funds is something 
called ``design build.'' Many around the country are using that format, 
which means that the corporation or the retained contractor has 
overriding control over the distribution of those funds in the 
construction of that light rail.
  I celebrate light rail. I celebrate the importance of light rail and 
have done so for the time that I've had the privilege of serving 
Houston and the 18th Congressional District. But in this instance, it's 
important to note that in the course of the design build for Houston 
Metro and HRT, they have dropped their commitment to small minority- 
and women-owned businesses.

                              {time}  2000

  What did I say?
  Dropped the commitment--dropped it poorly, dropped it with a negative 
impact, dropped it impacting women-owned businesses and minority-owned 
businesses. We've got to get back in order to be able to show that the 
utilization of those businesses creates jobs. Small businesses have 
lost an estimated $13.8 billion in business opportunity because they 
cannot fairly compete for Federal contracts because larger companies 
are allowed to bundle contracts. In essence, HRT has self-performed 
instead of sharing those dollars.
  The Department of Transportation created the Office of Small and 
Disadvantaged Business Utilization, OSDBU, as part of the Small 
Business Act because it recognizes the threat big businesses pose to 
small business success. Since the OSDBU's creation, it has been a voice 
for small business and disadvantaged business, ensuring these 
businesses are provided with the maximum ability to participate in the 
agency's contracting selection process for contract and subcontract 
jobs.
  These office divisions are numerous. Each of the offices impacts 
America's entrepreneurs and business ventures in several key ways. For 
instance, the Women's Procurement Assistance Committee provides women-
owned businesses with best practices of business growth and increases 
awareness of opportunities.
  I met on the job, Mr. Chairman, a woman who had taken over the 
business of her husband, who had died of cancer. She had a household to 
lead, and she was trying to do this kind of construction work. At the 
time, she

[[Page H4034]]

had been given by HRT safety work, just holding up a sign. I'm glad 
because of the encouragement, the utilization of this particular 
office, our office pushing, that she now is more advanced in the 
contract that she is securing. But it has to be encouraged.
  This amendment is to ensure that we don't leave out small 
disadvantaged, women-owned and minority-owned businesses. The office's 
short-term lending program is able to give qualifying small businesses 
loans with competitive interest rates for DOT contracts and 
subcontracts.
  In conjunction with the OSDBU, the Minority Business Resource Center 
is responsible for promoting the use of small businesses. My home State 
of Texas was chosen as the headquarters for the OSDBU gulf region. In 
my home city of Houston, Texas, there are more than 60,000 women-owned 
businesses and more than 60,000 African American-owned businesses and 
thousands of other businesses--Asian and Latino.
  I am asking my colleagues to support this amendment because it is an 
amendment that ensures that we put minority-, women-owned and 
disadvantaged small businesses to work under this legislation.
  Mr. Chair, I rise today to offer my amendments to ``the 
Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies 
Appropriations Act for Fiscal Year (FY) 2013.'' My amendments will 
assure the necessary funds that are appropriated specifically for the 
Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization and the Minority 
Business Resource Center cannot be used by the Secretary for another 
purpose, thereby protecting the funds for their intended use.
  Small businesses represent more than the American dream--they 
represent the American economy. Small businesses account for 95 percent 
of all employers, create half of our gross domestic product, and 
provide three out of four new jobs in this country. An allocation 
reduction directly undermines the importance of small businesses 
including women-owned business and minority-owned business to the 
success of our economy.
  Small businesses have lost an estimated $13.8 billion in business 
opportunity because they could not fairly compete for federal contracts 
because larger companies are allowed to bundle contracts.
  The Department of Transportation created the Office of Small and 
Disadvantaged Business Utilization (OSDBU) as part of the Small 
Business Act because it recognizes the threat big businesses pose to 
small business success.
  Since the OSDBU's creation, it has been a voice for small and 
disadvantaged business, ensuring these businesses are provided with the 
maximum ability to participate in the agency's contracting selection 
process for contract and subcontract jobs.
  These office divisions are numerous; each of the offices impacts 
America's entrepreneurs and business ventures in several key ways. For 
instance, its Women's Procurement Assistance Committee (WPAC) provides 
women-owned businesses with best practices for business growth and 
increases awareness of the opportunities these businesses have to 
participate in transportation-related contracts and subcontracts.
  The office's short term lending program is able to give qualifying 
small business loans with competitive interest rates for DOT contracts 
and subcontracts.
  In conjunction with the OSDBU, the Minority Business Resource Center 
is responsible for promoting the use of small businesses in prime and 
subcontracting opportunities in accordance with Federal laws, 
regulations and policy.
  Through its funding, the Center is able to offer several professional 
development services, including: market research, business training, 
counseling, technical assistance, and access to capital for 
transportation related projects.
  My home state of Texas was chosen as the headquarters for the OSDBU 
gulf region program.
  In my home city of Houston, Texas there are more than 60,000 women 
owned businesses, and more than 60,000 African American owned 
businesses.
  The OSDBU supports qualifying businesses who attempt to secure 
contracts and subcontracts with the DOT. In addition, its women 
internship program sponsors 12 schools in the gulf region women's 
internship program.
  Shifting funds for the OSDBU and the Minority Business Resource 
Center will hinder its ability to continue fair hiring practices, which 
will in turn affect small businesses' ability to secure top contracts, 
provide employment opportunities in their community and ultimately 
survive in the business world.
  This will send the message that Congress is more concerned with the 
strength of big business, than assisting the DOT in partnering with 
everyday American business men and women who take pride in their 
companies, and only aspire to positively empower their communities and 
create economic stability in the nation. For these reasons and more I 
urge my colleagues to protect funds for the DOT's budget for the 
Minority Business Resource Center and the OSDBU.
  Moreover, 99 percent of all independent companies and businesses in 
the United States are considered small businesses. They are the engine 
of our economy, creating two-thirds of the new jobs over the last 15 
years. America's 27 million small businesses continue to face a lack of 
credit and tight lending standards, with the number of small businesses 
loans down nearly 5 million since the financial crisis in 2008.
  According to the U.S. Small Business Administration, these small 
businesses account for 52 percent of all U.S. workers. These small 
businesses also provide a continuing source of vitality for the 
American economy. Small businesses in the U.S. produced three-fourths 
of the economy's new jobs between 1990 and 1995, and represent an entry 
point into the economy for new groups. Women, for instance, participate 
heavily in small businesses.
  The number of female-owned businesses climbed by 89 percent, to an 
estimated 8.1 million, between 1987 and 1997, and women-owned sole 
proprietorships were expected to reach 35 percent of all such ventures 
by the year 2000. Small firms also tend to hire a greater number of 
older workers and people who prefer to work part-time.
  A major strength of small businesses is their ability to respond 
quickly to changing economic conditions. They often know their 
customers personally and are especially suited to meet local needs.
  There are tons of stories of start-up companies catching national 
attention and growing into large corporations. Just a few examples of 
these types of start-up businesses making big include the computer 
software company Microsoft; the package delivery service Federal 
Express; sports clothing manufacturer Nike; the computer networking 
firm America OnLine; and ice cream maker Ben & Jerry's.
  We must always ensure that we place a high level of priority on small 
businesses.
  It is equally important that we work towards ensuring that ALL small 
businesses receive the tools and resources necessary for their 
continued growth and development.
  American small businesses are the heart beat of our nation. I believe 
that small businesses represent more than the American dream--they 
represent the American economy.
  Small businesses account for 95 percent of all employers, create half 
of our gross domestic product, and provide three out of four new jobs 
in this country.
  Small business growth means economic growth for the nation. But to 
keep this segment of our economy thriving, entrepreneurs need access to 
loans and programs.
  Through loans, small business owners can expand their businesses, 
hire more workers and provide more goods and services.
  I have worked hard to help small business owners to fully realize 
their potential. That is why I support my amendments which will ensure 
funding directed to entrepreneurial development offices and centers, 
such as the office of the Small Disadvantage Business Utilization and 
the Minority Business Resource Center are remained in tact. These 
initiatives provide counseling in a variety of critical areas, 
including business plan development, finance, and marketing. We must 
consider what impact changes in this appropriations bill will have on 
small businesses.
  There are 5.8 million minority owned businesses in the United States, 
representing a significant aspect of our economy. In 2007, minority 
owned businesses employed nearly 6 million Americans and generated $1 
trillion dollars in economic output.
  Women owned businesses have increased 20% since 2002, and currently 
total close to 8 million. These organizations make up more than half of 
all businesses in health care and social assistance.
  My home city of Houston, Texas is home to more than 6o,000 women 
owned businesses, and more than 60,000 African American owned 
businesses.
  According to a 2009 report published by the Economic Policy 
Institute, ``Starting in 2004, the Small Business Administration (SBA) 
set goals for small business participation in federal contracts. It 
encouraged agencies to award contracts to companies owned by women, 
veterans, and minorities or those located in economically challenged 
areas and gave them benchmarks to work toward. The targets are 
specific: 23% of contracts to small business, 5% to woman-owned small 
businesses, and 3% to disabled veteran-owned and HUBZone small 
businesses.''
  Women and minority owned businesses generate billions of dollars and 
employ millions

[[Page H4035]]

of people. They are certainly qualified to receive these contracts. A 
mandatory DOD outreach program would make women and minority owned 
businesses aware of all of the contract opportunities available to 
them.


           FACTS: Small business are important because they:

  (1) Represent 99.7 percent of all employer firms,
  (2) Employ just over half of all private sector employees,
  (3) Pay 44 percent of total U.S. private payroll,
  (4) Generated 64 percent of net new jobs over the past 15 years,
  (5) Create more than half of the nonfarm private gross domestic 
product (GDP),
  (6) Hire 40 percent of high tech workers (such as scientists, 
engineers, and computer programmers),
  (7) Are 52 percent home-based and 2 percent franchises,
  (8) Made up 97.3 percent of all identified exporters and produced 
30.2 percent of the known export value in FY 2007,
  (9) Produce 13 times more patents per employee than large patenting 
firms and twice as likely as large firm patents to be among the one 
percent most cited.
  Mr. LATHAM. Will the gentlewoman yield?
  Ms. JACKSON LEE of Texas. I yield to the gentleman from Iowa.
  Mr. LATHAM. Mr. Chairman, we will be more than happy to accept the 
amendment.
  Ms. JACKSON LEE of Texas. I thank the gentleman for accepting the 
amendment.
  Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from Texas (Ms. Jackson Lee).
  The amendment was agreed to.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will read.
  The Clerk read as follows:


                      financial management capital

       For necessary expenses for upgrading and enhancing the 
     Department of Transportation's financial systems and re-
     engineering business processes, $10,000,000, to remain 
     available through September 30, 2014.


             Amendment Offered by Mr. Connolly of Virginia

  Mr. CONNOLLY of Virginia. I have an amendment at the desk.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       Page 4, line 6, after the first dollar amount, insert 
     ``(reduced by $5,000,000)''.
       Page 35, line 7, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(increased by $5,000,000)''.

  The CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. CONNOLLY of Virginia. Mr. Chairman, my amendment underscores the 
point that we need to be doing more, not less, to combat the dangerous 
habit of distracted driving on our Nation's roadways.
  Earlier this evening, we voted on a motion to instruct conferees on 
the highway bill to reject the Senate's bipartisan proposal to partner 
with the States on prevention strategies, and the bill before us now 
provides no additional funds to address what Transportation Secretary 
LaHood has identified as an epidemic in this country. Traffic accidents 
caused by distracted driving are on the rise in communities everywhere 
in this country.
  In my home county, our police department in Fairfax County reported a 
48 percent increase in the number of citations issued for distracted 
driving in the last year. A recent study by Virginia Tech 
Transportation Institute points out 80 percent of all crashes and 65 
percent of all near crashes have involved driver distraction. 
Nationally, the Department of Transportation reports that more than 
416,000 people were injured in distracted driving accidents in 2010. 
Tragically, Mr. Chairman, 3,100 of those people were killed.
  According to a recent AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety survey, 94 
percent of respondents recognized the risks of talking, texting, or 
emailing while driving and said such activities are unacceptable. And 
87 percent said they supported laws against reading, typing, or sending 
text messages while driving. Yet more than one-third of those same 
drivers reported they still read or send texts or email while driving. 
In fact, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration estimates 
that more than 100,000 drivers are texting and that more than 600,000 
are using their cell phones at any given time on our Nation's roadways.
  Sending or receiving texts diverts one's attention from the road for 
an average of 4.6 seconds. While that may not seem like a long time, at 
55 miles per hour, it is the equivalent of driving the length of a 
football field without paying attention to the road. A report from the 
University of Utah goes so far as to say that using a cell phone to 
talk or text delays a driver's reaction time just as much as having a 
blood alcohol level of .08, the legal limit.
  I congratulate the 39 States, the District of Columbia, and Guam for 
taking steps to ban text messaging for all drivers, but the force of 
these laws varies. In my home State of Virginia, for example, it is a 
secondary offense, so drivers cannot be pulled over or cited unless 
they're breaking some other law deemed more serious. That's why we need 
to beef up prevention efforts, particularly among younger drivers, Mr. 
Chairman.
  I hosted a teen driving summit when I was chairman of Fairfax County 
a few years ago. Distracted driving is the number one killer of teen 
drivers in America. Alcohol-related accidents among teens has, 
thankfully, dropped. Teenage traffic fatalities have remained virtually 
unchanged, however, as a result of the growth of accidents caused by 
the distraction from texting or talking on the phone. What is shocking 
is that 35 percent of teens who talk or text while they're behind the 
wheel actually do not think they'll get hurt.
  I hear my colleagues talk about their support for traffic safety and 
about efforts to discourage distracted driving, but I don't see any 
tangible actions to address this challenge in each of our communities.
  In his blueprint for ending distracted driving, Secretary LaHood 
endorses efforts to work with the automakers to apply technology being 
marketed to block cells while one is in motion or to improve crash 
warning and driver monitoring systems to prevent accidents caused by 
distracted driving. The Secretary has also proposed partnering with 
States on tougher prevention efforts and public awareness campaigns.
  Mr. Chairman, in today's mobile device-driven society, distracted 
driving is quickly becoming our greatest obstacle to ensuring safety on 
our Nation's roadways, and it will only get worse. I urge my colleagues 
to support this simple amendment. It's a modest transfer of funds from 
an administrative account to increase distracted driving research and 
prevention efforts. This will save lives.
  Recently, there was a tragic accident in Iowa of a young lady who was 
driving while texting, which caused an accident and a fatality. In my 
home county of Fairfax, when I was chairman, I remember having to talk 
to the grieving parents of a young woman who had been texting while 
driving and who wrapped herself around a tree and died a few short 
blocks from her home. Looking in the face of a parent and having to 
explain why that could have been prevented is something I hope none of 
my colleagues ever have to do. I plead with my colleagues on the other 
side to accept this amendment and to save teenage lives.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. LATHAM. I rise in opposition to this amendment.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Iowa is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. LATHAM. Mr. Chairman, it takes $5 million from the DOT's 
Financial Management Capital account and puts it in Operations for 
Vehicle Safety. Let me say that there is no guarantee that DOT will use 
this money as the gentleman has talked about.

                              {time}  2010

  There's no dedication of funds here, obviously.
  First, this would eliminate half of the funds the DOT has to make 
sure its financial systems are current. I don't need to tell anyone 
here how critical it is that DOT's financial systems, which govern the 
accurate disbursement of many billions of dollars each year, need to be 
kept in a good working state.
  Second, this would increase the vehicle safety portion of NHTSA's 
operations. We're already giving this account $12 million more than 
last year, after it was frozen for the last 3 years straight. We simply 
don't need that additional increase.
  Again, with these funds, there's no way to dedicate them to 
distracted driving.
  With that, Mr. Chairman, I would urge a ``no'' vote, and I yield back 
the balance of my time.

[[Page H4036]]

  Mr. OLVER. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Massachusetts is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. OLVER. Mr. Chairman, I find it a little bit difficult here where 
we're taking from one place and putting it into another place. I don't 
dispute what the chairman has said about not being certain that the 
money will be used for the right purpose at that point; however, the 
place where the offset is being made from the Financial Management 
Capital program under DOT, that amount leaves that account with the 
same amount that was in the account in 2012. That should not be a 
particularly onerous change on that score.
  On the other hand, the issue that the gentleman from Virginia has 
raised, the issue of the distracted driving and how important it is, we 
are just losing a lot of young people to distracted driving. There 
seems to be no sense that being on a cell phone or an iPad or some 
other of the common IT programs that are now available, working with 
that doesn't seem to lead to any sense that their driving capacity has 
been impaired.
  In 2010, NHTSA estimated that more than 3,000 people were killed and 
more than 400,000 were injured in distracted driving crashes. Secretary 
LaHood has made the elimination of distracted driving one of his key 
safety priorities and has requested funding in each of the last three 
budgets to do that. It seems to me, with the sense that NHTSA views 
this issue of 3,000 killed, as they say, in 2010, 2 years ago already, 
and more than 400,000 injured and the Secretary's very strong interest 
in the distracted driving issue, that this would be a perfectly 
reasonable thing to do.
  With that, I will support the gentleman from Virginia's amendment, 
and I yield the balance of my time.
  The CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman 
from Virginia (Mr. Connolly).
  The question was taken; and the Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. CONNOLLY of Virginia. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further proceedings on 
the amendment offered by the gentleman from Virginia will be postponed.
  The Clerk will read.
  The Clerk read as follows:

                       cyber security initiatives

       For necessary expenses for cyber security initiatives, 
     including necessary upgrades to wide area network and 
     information technology infrastructure, improvement of network 
     perimeter controls and identity management, testing and 
     assessment of information technology against business, 
     security, and other requirements, implementation of Federal 
     cyber security initiatives and information infrastructure 
     enhancements, implementation of enhanced security controls on 
     network devices, and enhancement of cyber security workforce 
     training tools, $6,000,000, to remain available through 
     September 30, 2014.

                         office of civil rights

       For necessary expenses of the Office of Civil Rights, 
     $9,773,000.


               Amendment Offered by Mr. Broun of Georgia

  Mr. BROUN of Georgia. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       Page 4, line 22, after the dollar amount, insert ``(reduced 
     by $389,000)''.
       Page 150, line 9, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(increased by $389,000)''.

  The CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. BROUN of Georgia. Mr. Chairman, my amendment is very 
straightforward. It would simply reduce the overall funding for the 
Office of Civil Rights within the Department of Transportation by 
$389,000.
  This office is one of 13 in the underlying bill which are slated to 
receive increases for administrative expenses, despite the fiscal 
emergency that we're currently facing. The passage of this amendment 
would simply bring this account back to fiscal year 2012 levels.
  I see my good friend from Texas, Sheila Jackson Lee. She knows we 
have fought together very hard for civil rights and civil liberties 
here in this House, in committee as well as on the floor, and believe 
very strongly that we need to protect our civil liberties and our civil 
rights. But the simple truth is that we're broke as a Nation, and this 
amendment would just simply keep funding at the current level instead 
of raising it. It would just turn it back--what's proposed in the 
underlying bill--to the current level of spending, but not reduce any 
functions of this office. It would not prohibit this office from doing 
any of its work. It would help, in a small way, to put us back into a 
more realistic fiscal state as a Nation because, Mr. Chairman, we just 
have to stop spending money that we don't have.
  It's across the board. Every bureau, every office, every bit of the 
Federal Government needs to not have increases in their costs to the 
taxpayer, not have further borrowing of money that we just don't have. 
We've just got to stop spending money we don't have. This simple 
amendment keeps funding at our current level. That's all it does.
  With that, I urge support of my amendment, and I yield back the 
balance of my time.
  Mr. OLVER. Mr. Chairman, I rise in opposition to the amendment.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Massachusetts is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. OLVER. I yield to the gentlelady from Texas.
  Ms. JACKSON LEE of Texas. I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  My good friend from Georgia knows we've had a lot of opportunities to 
work together on many different issues. It seems as if he is raising an 
issue that would have a sense of agreement, but I have to reluctantly 
and vigorously oppose the gentleman's amendment.
  The Office for Civil Rights in the Department of Transportation 
losing the amount of money that he has suggested will deprive that 
office of viable and important staff and resources for compliance.
  Frankly, this agency governs billions of dollars of Federal dollars. 
In addition, it governs actions that deal with accommodations, the 
utilization of dollars for small, minority, and disadvantaged 
businesses. The civil rights section has been a section that has 
ensured that the Federal dollars in transportation are used in a way 
that is not discriminatory.
  I don't believe, in 2012, we need to be rising to eliminate 
opportunity. We need to expand opportunity. The civil rights section of 
the Department of Transportation has always been a consistent and 
efficient subsection of the agency that has been the guidepost of 
ensuring that our Federal dollars are used appropriately as it relates 
to Native Americans, used appropriately as it relates to Latinos, 
African Americans, Caucasians. It is a civil rights office that 
balances and ensures nondiscrimination, including nondiscrimination 
against the disabled.

                              {time}  2020

  And, frankly, I believe that because of the massiveness of that 
responsibility--particularly as we look at the needs of the disabled in 
transportation resources or transportation utilization--that it is 
crucial that we do not cut to the existing amount of dollars. This is 
not a lot.
  So the impact is greater than what the gentleman believes he will 
have because he suggests that it is a small amount. It is a great 
impact. And I would ask the gentleman to consider this amendment as one 
that has a far-reaching impact and that at this point we do not want to 
make a statement that civil rights and the equal accommodations that 
are necessary and the utilization of Federal dollars is acceptable, 
meaning discrimination is acceptable. Nondiscrimination being, if you 
will, limited by the funding that has been cut through this amendment. 
I would ask that our colleagues oppose the amendment.
  Mr. OLVER. Reclaiming my time at this point, I strongly oppose this 
amendment.
  I think that in this instance, we should understand that the major 
task of the Office of Civil Rights is to ensure that discrimination 
doesn't occur in the implementation of DOT programs.
  The chairman of the subcommittee has already carefully weighed the 
needs of the office and made, I think, a responsible judgment as to the 
correct funding amount. I urge Members to oppose the amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. LATHAM. I move to strike the last word.

[[Page H4037]]

  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Iowa is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. LATHAM. Before yielding to the gentleman, just let me make a 
quick statement here.
  Just so everybody knows, the increase that's in the bill is a simple 
increase for inflation to pay for costs such as the GSA rent and one 
extra compensable workday. Transportation is important to all parts and 
all people in America.
  I just don't think this is the right cut to make in this kind of a 
bill. And I think we should always keep in mind that on our 
allocations, we have written the total appropriation bills to the 1028 
number, rather than 1047. This bill already cuts about $4 billion under 
last year's funding level.
  So with that, I stress my opposition to the amendment, and I would 
gladly yield to the gentleman from Georgia.
  Mr. BROUN of Georgia. I thank the gentleman from Iowa for yielding.
  I believe in ``equal under the law.'' We all ought to be considered 
equal, no matter what color our skin is, no matter who the fathers of 
our own families are, et cetera. I think everybody should be treated 
equally under the law.
  And, certainly, as I stated--I apologize if the gentlelady from Texas 
thought that I was insinuating that she would agree with this 
amendment, because I never had any dreams that she would, frankly.
  But with that, I'm introducing a lot of amendments to this bill to 
reduce administrative expenses and salaries for many, many of the 
different pieces of this underlying bill. And this is just one of many. 
But I'm convinced that I need to withdraw this amendment.
  I ask unanimous consent to withdraw the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the amendment is withdrawn.
  There was no objection.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will read.
  The Clerk read as follows:

           transportation planning, research, and development

       For necessary expenses for conducting transportation 
     planning, research, systems development, development 
     activities, and making grants, to remain available until 
     expended, $8,000,000.


                    Amendment Offered by Ms. Waters

  Ms. WATERS. I have an amendment at the desk.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       Page 5, after line 6, insert the following:

                  national infrastructure investments

       For capital investments in surface transportation 
     infrastructure, $500,000,000, to remain available through 
     September 30, 2014: Provided, That the Secretary of 
     Transportation shall distribute funds provided under this 
     heading as discretionary grants to be awarded to a State, 
     local government, transit agency, or a collaboration among 
     such entities on a competitive basis for projects that will 
     have a significant impact on the Nation, a metropolitan area, 
     or a region: Provided further, That projects eligible for 
     funding provided under this heading shall include, but not be 
     limited to, highway or bridge projects eligible under title 
     23, United States Code; public transportation projects 
     eligible under chapter 53 of title 49, United States Code; 
     passenger and freight rail transportation projects; and port 
     infrastructure investments: Provided further, That the 
     Secretary shall give priority to projects which demonstrate 
     transportation benefits for existing systems or improve 
     interconnectivity between modes: Provided further, That the 
     Secretary may use up to 35 percent of the funds made 
     available under this heading for the purpose of paying the 
     subsidy and administrative costs of projects eligible for 
     Federal credit assistance under chapter 6 of title 23, United 
     States Code, if the Secretary finds that such use of the 
     funds would advance the purposes of this paragraph: Provided 
     further, That in distributing funds provided under this 
     heading, the Secretary shall take such measures so as to 
     ensure an equitable geographic distribution of funds, an 
     appropriate balance in addressing the needs of urban and 
     rural areas, and the investment in a variety of 
     transportation modes: Provided further, That a grant funded 
     under this heading shall be not less than $10,000,000 and not 
     greater than $200,000,000: Provided further, That not more 
     than 25 percent of the funds made available under this 
     heading may be awarded to projects in a single State: 
     Provided further, That the Federal share of the costs for 
     which an expenditure is made under this heading shall be, at 
     the option of the recipient, up to 80 percent: Provided 
     further, That not less than $120,000,000 of the funds 
     provided under this heading shall be for projects located in 
     rural areas: Provided further, That for projects located in 
     rural areas, the minimum grant size shall be $1,000,000 and 
     the Secretary may increase the Federal share of costs above 
     80 percent: Provided further, That projects conducted using 
     funds provided under this heading must comply with the 
     requirements of subchapter IV of chapter 31 of title 40, 
     United States Code: Provided further, That the Secretary 
     shall conduct a new competition to select the grants and 
     credit assistance awarded under this heading: Provided 
     further, That the Secretary may retain up to $20,000,000 of 
     the funds provided under this heading, and may transfer 
     portions of those funds to the Administrators of the Federal 
     Highway Administration, the Federal Transit Administration, 
     the Federal Railroad Administration and the Federal Maritime 
     Administration, to fund the award and oversight of grants and 
     credit assistance made under the National Infrastructure 
     Investments program: Provided further, That the Secretary 
     shall give priority to projects that require a contribution 
     of Federal funds in order to complete an overall financing 
     package.

  Ms. WATERS (during the reading). Mr. Chair, I ask unanimous consent 
to dispense with the reading.
  The CHAIR. Is there objection to the request of the gentlewoman from 
California?
  There was no objection.
  Mr. LATHAM. Mr. Chairman, I reserve a point of order on the 
gentlewoman's amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Iowa reserves a point of order.
  The gentlewoman from California is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Ms. WATERS. Mr. Chair, I thank my colleagues Betty McCollum, Barbara 
Lee, Emanuel Cleaver, Karen Bass, Laura Richardson, Bobby Rush, and 
Doris Matsui all for cosponsoring this amendment. Our amendment will 
provide $500 million for the TIGER program, which creates jobs through 
investments in transportation infrastructure.
  The economy is struggling to recover from the recession. The 
unemployment rate has remained above 8 percent nationally for 40 
straight months and is even higher in minority communities and in many 
areas of the country. Meanwhile, the American Society of Civil 
Engineers' ``2009 Report Card for America's Infrastructure'' estimated 
that there is a $549.5 billion shortfall in investments in roads and 
bridges and an additional $190.1 billion shortfall in investments in 
transit.
  TIGER, formally known as Transportation Investment Generating 
Economic Recovery, is a nationwide competitive grant program that 
creates jobs by funding investments in transportation infrastructure by 
States, local governments, and transit agencies. TIGER funds projects 
that will have a significant impact on our Nation's highway and transit 
infrastructure.
  TIGER could finance a wide variety of innovative highway, bridge, and 
transit projects in urban and rural communities all across this 
country, provided there is sufficient funding. One such project is the 
Crenshaw/LAX transit corridor in Los Angeles County, a light-rail 
project that will run through my district. TIGER grants could be used 
to finance stations along this corridor in the communities of Leimert 
Park and Westchester, thereby ensuring that these communities have 
access to light rail.
  According to Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood:

       These are innovative 21st-century projects that will change 
     the U.S. transportation landscape by strengthening the 
     economy and creating jobs, reducing gridlock and providing 
     safe, affordable, and environmentally sustainable 
     transportation choices.

  TIGER received an appropriation of $500 million in fiscal year 2012, 
and the President requested $500 million for the program in funding 
year 2013. Unfortunately, THUD does not include any funding for TIGER. 
Our amendment would create jobs by funding TIGER at the requested level 
without cutting funding for other programs.
  Last week, I introduced H.R. 5976, the TIGER Grants for Job Creation 
Act, which would provide a supplemental emergency appropriation of $1 
billion over the next 2 years for the TIGER program; and 44 of my 
colleagues have already cosponsored this bill.
  So I would ask my colleagues to take a look at what is happening in 
our economy. I think we can all agree this economy needs stimulating. 
And certainly I'm not talking about stimulating just for stimulating's 
sake. I'm talking about stimulating for job creation and for the repair 
of the infrastructure of this country.
  We have too many bridges that have been rated unsafe. We saw what 
happened in Minnesota just a couple of

[[Page H4038]]

years ago when the bridge fell; and I want to tell you, when the 
bridges start to fall and the infrastructure simply disintegrates, 
we're all going to sit around and scratch our heads and say how sorry 
we are. We're going to go to our constituents and tell them, We will 
never let it happen again. We have the opportunity to get in the 
forefront of providing this stimulus to our economy and creating jobs.
  Our constituents want to work. They want jobs. So I would urge my 
colleagues to support the TIGER amendment, invest in our crumbling 
infrastructure, and create good jobs in communities across the United 
States.
  I would yield the balance of my time to the gentlelady from Ohio.

                              {time}  2030

  Ms. KAPTUR. I thank the gentlelady for yielding.
  I rise in support of the Waters TIGER grant amendment. I agree with 
the gentlelady that there's no stronger job creator than investment in 
transportation: Bridges, transit systems, overpasses, passenger rail, 
port development. It makes America more efficient, and it makes us more 
competitive. And there's never been a more critical moment than now to 
do it.
  As kids, we used to sing this song:
  London bridge is falling down, falling down. London bridge is falling 
down. One, two, three, we all fall down.
  Well, we saw what happened in Minnesota when that bridge fell down.
  In Cleveland, the Inner Belt Bridge project did not receive the $125 
million needed to continue to replace the aging I-90 bridge. The 
current bridge is being used well beyond its intended lifespan, and is 
the same design as the bridge that collapsed in Minneapolis in 2007.
  In NW Ohio, there is a smaller project in need of funding. McCord 
Road in Holland, Ohio is the site of Nortfolk Southern's main line and 
Amtrak. Two high school students from Springfield High School were 
involved in a tragic accident there in 2009--one lost their life and 
one was permanently injured, having lost a leg.
  The McCord Road project requested just $10 million. However, it did 
not receive funding with this round of TIGER grants.
  There are thousands more projects like this across the Nation, both 
large and small, but all in great need of investment from the federal 
government.
  I urge my colleagues to support this funding for National 
Infrastructure Investments. Let's build America's homeland forward and 
put America to work in the process.


                             Point of Order

  Mr. LATHAM. Mr. Chairman, I make a point of order against the 
amendment because it proposes to change existing law and constitutes 
legislation in an appropriation bill and therefore it violates clause 2 
of rule XXI.
  The rule states, in pertinent part:
  ``An amendment to a general appropriation bill shall not be in order 
if changing existing law.'' The amendment gives affirmative direction 
in effect and imposes additional duties.
  I ask for a ruling from the Chair.
  The CHAIR. Does any Member wish to be heard on the point of order?
  Ms. WATERS. Mr. Chairman, I rise to speak on the point of order.
  The CHAIR. The gentlewoman from California is recognized.
  Ms. WATERS. In the limited time that we have to speak on these 
important issues, I have tried to point out the high unemployment in 
this country and how we can put Americans to work repairing crumbling 
roads and building transit facilities across our great country. I don't 
see any need to have to expand on this anymore. I think the point is 
perfectly clear that we need to fund this TIGER grant.
  With the economy still struggling to recover from the recession and 
millions of Americans looking for work, we should not be arguing about 
offsets. TIGER has always been funded through the appropriations 
process. TIGER was first created----
  The CHAIR. The gentlewoman will suspend. The gentlewoman must speak 
to the point of order.
  Ms. WATERS. A point of order has been raised because there is no 
offset. And I agree there is no offset. But I make the point that we 
have such a critical need for jobs and investment in our infrastructure 
and this economy that we should not stop this from going forward simply 
because of the offset. We can afford to fund investment in this 
country.
  That's my opposition to the point of order.
  The CHAIR. Does any other Member wish to be heard on the point of 
order?
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from Texas.
  Ms. JACKSON LEE of Texas. First of all, I want to congratulate the 
gentlelady from California for an insightful amendment, and I 
understand the dilemma that the chairman of the subcommittee is in. But 
what I would suggest is that we are in such a crisis as relates to both 
jobs and the needs of urban America, rural America, that the point of 
order should be waived. And it can be waived. We have waived points of 
order on a number of occasions. In this instance, I think we have a 
moment when you have zeroed out for whatever the purposes or reasons 
for zeroing out, and there's not even minimal amounts of money in the 
TIGER funding. None at all.
  Having just left my district on this past Friday, receiving $15 
million in TIGER grants, the first that the city of Houston, the 
fourth-largest city in the Nation, has ever received, but in that 
granting there were urban and rural grantees that were able to create 
jobs.
  The CHAIR. The gentlewoman will suspend. The gentlewoman must confine 
her remarks to the point of order.
  Ms. JACKSON LEE of Texas. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
  And so my argument would be that because of the economic crisis, this 
is warranting a waiver of the point of order so the gentlelady's 
amendment can go forward: $500 million that will be utilized to create 
jobs to rebuild urban and rural America.
  I would ask that the point of order be waived.
  The CHAIR. Does any other Member wish to be heard on the point of 
order?
  Ms. KAPTUR. I rise to speak against the point of order.
  The CHAIR. The gentlewoman from Ohio is recognized.
  Ms. KAPTUR. I wish to say it's amazing what we can find money for and 
what we can't find money for. When Wall Street came in here, in a flash 
in a weekend, $700 billion walked out the door--a thousand times more 
than the gentlelady is asking for. And it would seem to me that with 
this point of order, there's never been a more critical time in our 
country to waive it in order to do the job of America.
  I mentioned the Minneapolis bridge that collapsed. Well, I can tell 
you we have one in Cleveland that's ready to do the same. It's the same 
design.
  What could be more important than investing in this country, creating 
jobs, and meeting these unmet national needs. In western Ohio, we have 
McCord Road, the site of a major Norfolk Southern mainline in Amtrak, 
and young people were killed there at grade. And now they delayed that 
project decades rather than doing the kind of grade crossing that's 
needed.
  Mr. Chairman, you can talk about points of order, but the most 
important point of order is keep the Nation in order. And I think the 
most important way we can do that is to keep this transportation 
funding flowing, making our Nation more competitive, creating jobs, and 
leaving a legacy to the future better than we found it. So I strongly 
support the gentlelady's amendment and object to the point of order and 
ask, along with my colleagues, that it be waived.
  The CHAIR. Does any other Member wish to speak on the point of order? 
If not, the Chair is prepared to rule.
  The Chair finds that this amendment includes language imparting 
direction to the Secretary of Transportation. The amendment therefore 
constitutes legislation in violation of clause 2 of rule XXI. The point 
of order is sustained and the amendment is not in order.
  The Clerk will read.
  The Clerk read as follows:

                          working capital fund

       For necessary expenses for operating costs and capital 
     outlays of the Working Capital Fund, not to exceed 
     $174,128,000 shall be paid from appropriations made available 
     to the Department of Transportation: Provided, That such 
     services shall be provided on a competitive basis to entities 
     within the Department of Transportation: Provided further, 
     That the above limitation on operating expenses shall not 
     apply to non-DOT entities: Provided further, That no funds 
     appropriated in this Act to an agency of the Department shall 
     be transferred to the Working Capital Fund without majority 
     approval of the Working Capital Fund Steering Committee

[[Page H4039]]

     and approval of the Secretary: Provided further, That no 
     assessments may be levied against any program, budget 
     activity, subactivity or project funded by this Act unless 
     notice of such assessments and the basis therefor are 
     presented to the House and Senate Committees on 
     Appropriations and are approved by such Committees.

               minority business resource center program

       For the cost of guaranteed loans, $418,000, as authorized 
     by 49 U.S.C. 332: Provided, That such costs, including the 
     cost of modifying such loans, shall be as defined in section 
     502 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974: Provided 
     further, That these funds are available to subsidize total 
     loan principal, any part of which is to be guaranteed, not to 
     exceed $21,955,000.
       In addition, for administrative expenses to carry out the 
     guaranteed loan program, $867,388.

                       minority business outreach

       For necessary expenses of Minority Business Resource Center 
     outreach activities, $3,234,000, to remain available until 
     September 30, 2014: Provided, That notwithstanding 49 U.S.C. 
     332, these funds may be used for business opportunities 
     related to any mode of transportation.

                        payments to air carriers

                    (airport and airway trust fund)

                     (including transfer of funds)

       In addition to funds made available from any other source 
     to carry out the essential air service program under 49 
     U.S.C. 41731 through 41742, $114,000,000, to be derived from 
     the Airport and Airway Trust Fund, to remain available until 
     expended: Provided, That in determining between or among 
     carriers competing to provide service to a community, the 
     Secretary may consider the relative subsidy requirements of 
     the carriers: Provided further, That no funds made available 
     under section 41742 of title 49, United States Code, and no 
     funds made available in this Act or any other Act in any 
     fiscal year, shall be available to carry out the essential 
     air service program under sections 41731 through 41742 of 
     such title 49 in communities in the 48 contiguous States 
     unless the community received subsidized essential air 
     service or received a 90-day notice of intent to terminate 
     service and the Secretary required the air carrier to 
     continue to provide service to the community at any time 
     between September 30, 2010, and September 30, 2011, 
     inclusive: Provided further, That basic essential air service 
     minimum requirements shall not include the 15-passenger 
     capacity requirement under subsection 41732(b)(3) of title 
     49, United States Code: Provided further, That if the funds 
     under this heading are insufficient to meet the costs of the 
     essential air service program in the current fiscal year, the 
     Secretary shall transfer such sums as may be necessary to 
     carry out the essential air service program from any 
     available amounts appropriated to or directly administered by 
     the Office of the Secretary for such fiscal year.


                  Amendment Offered by Mr. McClintock

  Mr. McCLINTOCK. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       Page 6, line 23, after the dollar amount, insert ``(reduced 
     to $0)''.
       Page 150, line 9, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(increased by $114,000,000)''.

  The CHAIR. The gentleman from California is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. McCLINTOCK. If the House is to live up to the promises the 
Republican majority made to the American people to bring spending under 
control, some tough choices are going to have to be made. This 
amendment, however, is not one of them. This is about the easiest 
choice that the House could possibly make to put an end to the so-
called ``Essential Air Service'' that lavishly subsidizes some of the 
least essential air services in the country.
  This program shells out nearly $200 million a year, including $114 
million of direct taxpayer subsidies, to support empty and near-empty 
flights from selected airports in tiny communities, most of which are 
just a few hours' drive from major airports. A reporter recently 
investigating this waste took one of these flights from Ely, Nevada, 
and was the only passenger on that flight. Our constituents paid $1.8 
million for this air service that carried just 227 passengers during 
the entire year. Ely is a 3\1/2\-hour drive from Salt Lake City 
International Airport.
  Thief River Falls, Minnesota, is considered an Essential Air Service 
airport, despite the fact that it's just a 1 hour and 9 minutes drive 
to Grand Forks International Airport in North Dakota. Hagerstown is 
just 75 miles from Baltimore, but subsidizing their air flights is 
considered an ``essential air service.''
  Now it's true there are a few tiny communities in Alaska--like Kake's 
700 hearty souls--that have no highway connections to hub airports, but 
they've got plenty of alternatives. In the case of Kake, Alaska, they 
enjoy year-round ferry service to Juneau. In addition, Alaska is well 
served by a thriving general aviation market and the ubiquitous bush 
pilot.
  Rural life has both great advantages and great disadvantages, but it 
is not the job of hardworking taxpayers who choose to live elsewhere to 
level out the differences.

                              {time}  2040

  Apologists for this wasteful spending tell us it is an important 
economic driver for these small towns--and I'm sure that's so. Whenever 
you give away money, the folks you're giving it to are always better 
off. But the folks you're taking it away from are always worse off to 
exactly the same extent. Indeed, it is economic drivers like this that 
have driven Greece's economy right off a cliff.
  An airline so reckless with its funds as to manage its affairs in 
such a ludicrous way would quickly bankrupt itself. As we can plainly 
see, the same principle holds true for governments.
  This was a temporary program set up when we deregulated commercial 
aviation during the Carter administration. It was supposed to last a 
few years to give rural communities a chance to adjust. That was 34 
years ago.
  In 2010, in one of the most decisive congressional elections in 
American history, voters entrusted the House to Republicans with a 
crystal clear mandate: Stop wasting our money.
  Last year, the House responded to this mandate by voting to eliminate 
Essential Air Service subsidies in the FAA reauthorization bill. So 
what's the response of the House Appropriations Committee? They do not 
eliminate funding for this wasteful program. They do not reduce funding 
for it. No, they increase funding by 11 percent in a single year to a 
new historic high.
  Mr. Chairman, our Nation is borrowing 40 cents of every dollar that 
it is spending. It has lost its AAA credit rating. Its taxpayers are 
exhausted. Its treasury is empty. Our children are staggering under a 
mountain of debt that will impoverish them for years to come, and yet 
the House Appropriations Committee, in defiance of last year's decision 
by the House to eliminate this program, has just voted a double-digit 
percentage increase for a program that flies near empty planes across 
the country.
  I think we can do better than that. I offer instead this amendment to 
stop fleecing taxpayers for this expensive folly. I believe that House 
Republicans will ultimately prove themselves worthy of the trust the 
American people have given them in this perilous hour in our Nation's 
history. I believe that House Republicans can summon the fortitude to 
save our country from financial wreck and ruin. And I offer this 
amendment to put that day to a modest test.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. OLVER. Mr. Chairman, I rise in opposition to the amendment.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Massachusetts is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. OLVER. Mr. Chairman, I think what we have is a rather classical 
kind of situation. The gentleman from California, I suspect, has no 
Essential Air Service site in his district, but there are 100 
communities, more than 100 communities around the country, some of them 
in very isolated circumstances. I don't know about the situation in the 
case of the one from Baltimore, but it must be somebody who is on the 
east shore and gets Essential Air Service out of Cambridge, Maryland, 
or some other place like that, that is of great significance to them 
and might be of some significance to the person who represents that 
eastern shore of Maryland.
  He uses several times in several ways the example of Alaska. Alaska 
happens to be a territory with huge distances and relatively 
unpopulated, and they don't have any roads in much of Alaska and so the 
only way they can get in and out is by air, or maybe in the wintertime 
by dog sled. So I think it is really presumptuous of the gentleman from 
California to attack all of this program of essential air services 
covering services in a lot of the rural parts of this country.
  I have none in my district. Many of the urban areas obviously do not 
have any in their area. But the Montanas and the much more rural 
States, elsewhere in the mountain States and so

[[Page H4040]]

on, there are numerous of them that use the Essential Air Service, and 
I think that the idea of simply zeroing this one out, in a petulance 
almost, is really quite inappropriate.
  So I strongly oppose the amendment and hope that Members will not 
agree to this amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. LATHAM. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Iowa is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. LATHAM. Mr. Chairman, I rise in opposition to the gentleman's 
amendment.
  The Essential Air Service program ensures that small and rural 
communities have access to the national air transportation system. This 
program plays a key role in the economic development of many rural 
communities by ensuring that air service continues. Does the program 
need reform? Absolutely. That's why last year we capped the program to 
existing communities and have removed the requirement that larger and 
more expensive planes must be used in the program.
  In addition, the authorizers instituted a $1,000 per passenger 
subsidy cap and limited participation in the program to communities 
that have more than 10 enplanements per day.
  This amendment would be devastating to at least 150 rural 
communities. In places like Iowa, it plays an essential role as far as 
the economic development of those communities.
  With that, Mr. Chairman, I urge defeat of the amendment, and I yield 
back the balance of my time.
  The CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman 
from California (Mr. McClintock).
  The question was taken; and the Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. McCLINTOCK. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further proceedings on 
the amendment offered by the gentleman from California will be 
postponed.
  Ms. BASS of California. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The CHAIR. The gentlewoman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Ms. BASS of California. I rise to commend Congresswoman Maxine Waters 
for offering her TIGER grant amendment. The Transportation Investment 
Generating Economic Recovery, or TIGER, grant program invests in 
innovative road, rail, transit, and port projects.
  Projects funded through TIGER strengthen the economy, create jobs, 
reduce traffic, and provide safe, affordable, and environmentally 
sustainable transportation choices. TIGER delivers projects faster and 
saves taxpayer dollars by reducing construction costs.
  In my Los Angeles district, TIGER has provided significant 
opportunity. In fact, TIGER has provided resources for the Crenshaw/LAX 
Transit Corridor project, a light rail line that will connect key 
communities to the Los Angeles International Airport.
  I look forward to continue working with my respected colleague, 
Maxine Waters, to advocate for a comprehensive and community-valued 
Crenshaw/LAX Transit Corridor project that will include a station at 
Vernon Avenue in the historic Leimert Park Village, a neighborhood 
which serves as the central arts and cultural hub of Los Angeles 
County's African American community.
  The TIGER grant program is critical to the success of the Crenshaw/
LAX light rail line, as well as many projects like it throughout the 
country.
  I am sorry that the amendment was ruled out of order. I think that 
that was a mistake on our part.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will read.
  The Clerk read as follows:

  administrative provisions--office of the secretary of transportation

       Sec. 101.  None of the funds made available in this Act to 
     the Department of Transportation may be obligated for the 
     Office of the Secretary of Transportation to approve 
     assessments or reimbursable agreements pertaining to funds 
     appropriated to the modal administrations in this Act, except 
     for activities underway on the date of enactment of this Act, 
     unless such assessments or agreements have completed the 
     normal reprogramming process for Congressional notification.
       Sec. 102.  The Secretary or his designee may engage in 
     activities with States and State legislators to consider 
     proposals related to the reduction of motorcycle fatalities.
       Sec. 103.  Notwithstanding section 3324 of title 31, United 
     States Code, in addition to authority provided by section 327 
     of title 49, United States Code, the Department's Working 
     Capital Fund is hereby authorized to provide payments in 
     advance to vendors that are necessary to carry out the 
     Federal transit pass transportation fringe benefit program 
     under Executive Order 13150 and section 3049 of Public Law 
     109-59: Provided, That the Department shall include adequate 
     safeguards in the contract with the vendors to ensure timely 
     and high-quality performance under the contract.
       Sec. 104.  The Secretary shall post on the Web site of the 
     Department of Transportation a schedule of all meetings of 
     the Credit Council, including the agenda for each meeting, 
     and require the Credit Council to record the decisions and 
     actions of each meeting.

                    Federal Aviation Administration

                               operations

                    (airport and airway trust fund)

       For necessary expenses of the Federal Aviation 
     Administration, not otherwise provided for, including 
     operations and research activities related to commercial 
     space transportation, administrative expenses for research 
     and development, establishment of air navigation facilities, 
     the operation (including leasing) and maintenance of 
     aircraft, subsidizing the cost of aeronautical charts and 
     maps sold to the public, lease or purchase of passenger motor 
     vehicles for replacement only, in addition to amounts made 
     available by Public Law 108-176, $9,718,000,000, of which 
     $4,682,500,000 shall be derived from the Airport and Airway 
     Trust Fund, of which not to exceed $7,513,850,000 shall be 
     available for air traffic organization activities; not to 
     exceed $1,255,000,000 shall be available for aviation safety 
     activities; not to exceed $16,700,000 shall be available for 
     commercial space transportation activities; not to exceed 
     $573,591,000 shall be available for finance and management 
     activities; not to exceed $60,064,000 shall be available for 
     NextGen and operations planning activities; and not to exceed 
     $298,795,000 shall be available for staff offices: Provided, 
     That not to exceed 2 percent of any budget activity, except 
     for aviation safety budget activity, may be transferred to 
     any budget activity under this heading: Provided further, 
     That no transfer may increase or decrease any appropriation 
     by more than 2 percent: Provided further, That any transfer 
     in excess of 2 percent shall be treated as a reprogramming of 
     funds under section 405 of this Act and shall not be 
     available for obligation or expenditure except in compliance 
     with the procedures set forth in that section: Provided 
     further, That not later than March 31 of each fiscal year 
     hereafter, the Administrator of the Federal Aviation 
     Administration shall transmit to Congress an annual update to 
     the report submitted to Congress in December 2004 pursuant to 
     section 221 of Public Law 108-176: Provided further, That the 
     amount herein appropriated shall be reduced by $100,000 for 
     each day after March 31 that such report has not been 
     submitted to the Congress: Provided further, That not later 
     than March 31 of each fiscal year hereafter, the 
     Administrator shall transmit to Congress a companion report 
     that describes a comprehensive strategy for staffing, hiring, 
     and training flight standards and aircraft certification 
     staff in a format similar to the one utilized for the 
     controller staffing plan, including stated attrition 
     estimates and numerical hiring goals by fiscal year: Provided 
     further, That the amount herein appropriated shall be reduced 
     by $100,000 per day for each day after March 31 that such 
     report has not been submitted to Congress: Provided further, 
     That funds may be used to enter into a grant agreement with a 
     nonprofit standard-setting organization to assist in the 
     development of aviation safety standards: Provided further, 
     That none of the funds in this Act shall be available for new 
     applicants for the second career training program: Provided 
     further, That none of the funds in this Act shall be 
     available for the Federal Aviation Administration to finalize 
     or implement any regulation that would promulgate new 
     aviation user fees not specifically authorized by law after 
     the date of the enactment of this Act: Provided further, That 
     there may be credited to this appropriation as offsetting 
     collections funds received from States, counties, 
     municipalities, foreign authorities, other public 
     authorities, and private sources, for expenses incurred in 
     the provision of agency services, including receipts for the 
     maintenance and operation of air navigation facilities, and 
     for issuance, renewal or modification of certificates, 
     including airman, aircraft, and repair station certificates, 
     or for tests related thereto, or for processing major repair 
     or alteration forms: Provided further, That of the funds 
     appropriated under this heading, not less than $10,350,000 
     shall be for the contract tower cost-sharing program: 
     Provided further, That none of the funds in this Act for 
     aeronautical charting and cartography are available for 
     activities conducted by, or coordinated through, the Working 
     Capital Fund.

                              {time}  2050


              Amendment Offered by Mr. Clarke of Michigan

  Mr. CLARKE of Michigan. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the 
desk.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.

[[Page H4041]]

  The Clerk read as follows:

       Page 9, line 18, after the dollar amount, insert ``(reduced 
     by $10,000,000)''.
       Page 9, line 25, after the dollar amount, insert ``(reduced 
     by $5,000,000)''.
       Page 10, line 3, after the dollar amount, insert ``(reduced 
     by $5,000,000)''.
       Page 49, line 9, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(increased by $10,000,000)''.

  Mr. LATHAM. Mr. Chairman, I reserve a point of order.
  The CHAIR. A point of order is reserved.
  The gentleman from Michigan is recognized for 5 minutes on his 
amendment.
  Mr. CLARKE of Michigan. Mr. Chairman, my amendment would add $10 
million to the Federal Transit Administration's formula and bus grants. 
I do this to give our elderly and physically disabled a chance to get 
around their community.
  Many of our disabled and elderly aren't working. They don't have the 
money to afford a car, to afford car insurance, especially in the city 
of Detroit where insurance rates are really prohibitive for many 
people. This allocation of an additional $10 million would provide the 
elderly and our citizens who are physically disabled with the mobility 
that they need to enjoy their lives, and I urge your support.
  Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.


                             Point of Order

  Mr. LATHAM. Mr. Chairman, I must insist on my point of order.
  The amendment proposes to amend portions of the bill that have not 
been read. The amendment may not be considered en bloc under clause 
2(f) of rule XXI because the amendment does not propose to transfer 
funds among objects in the bill, as required by clause 2(f).
  I ask for a ruling of the Chair.
  The CHAIR. Does any Member wish to be heard on the point of order?
  The gentleman from Michigan is recognized on the point of order.
  Mr. CLARKE of Michigan. Mr. Chairman, I would request that the bill 
be read, to the extent that the gentleman had an issue about the bill 
not being read.
  The CHAIR. Does the gentleman ask unanimous consent to reach ahead in 
the reading to allow the en bloc amendment?
  Mr. CLARKE of Michigan. I do, Mr. Chairman.
  The CHAIR. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman from 
Michigan?
  Mr. LATHAM. I object.
  The CHAIR. Objection is heard.
  Does any Member wish to be heard on the point of order? If not, the 
Chair is prepared to rule.
  To be considered en bloc pursuant to clause 2(f) of rule XXI, an 
amendment must propose only to transfer appropriations among objects in 
the bill. Because the amendment offered by the gentleman from Michigan 
proposes also another kind of change in the bill, namely, increasing a 
limitation on obligations from the Highway Trust Fund, it may not avail 
itself of clause 2(f) to address portions of the bill not yet read. 
Therefore, the amendment is not in order and the point of order is 
sustained.
  Ms. RICHARDSON. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The CHAIR. The gentlewoman from California is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Ms. RICHARDSON. Mr. Chairman, I rise today in support of the Waters-
McCollum-Lee-Cleaver-Bass-Richardson-Rush-Matsui amendment which, 
unfortunately, was not found in order. I would hope that the Members 
here, the leadership, would reconsider that decision.
  I'm strongly in support of seeking to restore the $500 million for an 
additional year of the widely popular and highly successful, might I 
say, TIGER grant program.
  As a member of the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure and 
as a Representative of one of the most transportation-intensive 
infrastructure districts in the country, I know how important it is to 
maintain an efficient transportation infrastructure that will help our 
country remain competitive globally, throughout this country and in the 
world.
  The TIGER program enables DOT to use a rigorous process to select 
projects with exceptional benefits to explore ways to deliver projects 
faster and to save on construction costs. It also enables us to make 
investments in our Nation's infrastructure and to make communities more 
livable and sustainable.
  The 2012 TIGER IV program received 703 grant applications, requesting 
a total of $10.2 billion from all 50 States, including the U.S. 
territories and the District of Columbia. The first three TIGER 
programs received nearly 2,250 applications, requesting more than $95 
billion.
  Now, some might say certainly we must have our financial house in 
order and we have to really look at how we spend the dollars that are 
available. But I would argue before the committee today that TIGER 
grants was actually a program that was used, it was well monitored. The 
programs were brought forward, and they were done at a benefit not only 
for the funding initially of those programs, but for the jobs that they 
provided as well.
  Clearly, there is a need for additional investment in our country's 
infrastructure. We have reports in my area, for example, in California 
of many of the roads and the highways where we receive a D grade due to 
the lack of the quality of infrastructure in our community.
  Of the 47 projects that were funded in the most recent round of TIGER 
grants, nearly 16 percent went specifically to port infrastructure, 
according to the American Association of Port Authorities, which 
calculated $69.7 million would be directed to the ports.
  Funding these projects is crucial to the U.S. port facilities. It 
supports 13.3 million jobs and accounts for $3.15 trillion in business 
activity that by having better roads and infrastructure we can 
continue, and the TIGER grants help us to do that.
  In addition to restoring the full $500 million for the TIGER program, 
I believe that the conference report that comes before this body should 
contain the Senate's MAP-21 National Freight program and the Projects 
of National and Regional Significance program.
  Since coming to Congress, I have advocated for a National Freight 
program and policy, and that's why I introduced H.R. 1122, the Freight 
FOCUS Act. The Freight FOCUS Act establishes the Office of Freight 
Planning and Development within the Department of Transportation to 
coordinate a national freight policy. By creating a national freight 
advisory committee, private and public sector entities would have 
direct input into funding priorities and planning.
  The National Freight program would provide over $2 billion a year to 
upgrade our Nation's goods movement system. That equates to $336 
million to the State of California, alone, over 2 years for freight 
infrastructure upgrades. These funds are critical to areas like mine, a 
district where over 40 percent of our entire Nation's cargo goes 
through the Port of Los Angeles and Long Beach and, ultimately, through 
my district.
  In addition to MAP-21, which would authorize $1 billion for the 
Projects of National and Regional Significance, according to the 
Bloomberg Government report, the cost of congestion to the trucking 
industry totalled $23 billion in 2010, almost a quarter of the cost of 
congestion to the entire economy.
  Investing in key intermodal links, such as the Gerald Desmond Bridge, 
which was a project that was funded through the Projects of National 
Significance, these links and the jobs that are associated to them are 
vital to us moving goods throughout this country.
  Without programs like TIGER and PNRS, critical infrastructure like 
the Gerald Desmond Bridge--that has a diaper underneath it catching 
concrete, which Chairman Mica visited and saw himself--these types of 
bridges would continue to crumble and put a vital link to our Nation's 
largest seaports to consumers at risk.
  I would like to encourage my colleagues to accept, even though it's 
been initially found out of order, to reconsider that effort, and hope, 
as we go forward, there will be a greater precedence, as the committee 
report comes out, for the National Freight program and the Projects of 
Regional Significance. I look forward to the decision and support in 
the future.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. CLARKE of Michigan. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.

[[Page H4042]]

  Mr. CLARKE of Michigan. Mr. Chairman, I do understand the procedural 
limitations raised by the gentleman from Iowa on my amendment. My goal 
here was to provide those citizens with physical disabilities some way 
to get around their community because, many times, even if they can 
afford to buy a vehicle or auto insurance, they may not be able to 
drive that vehicle.
  I look forward to working with the subcommittee chair, the gentleman 
from Iowa, on other ways that we could better serve our citizens who 
are elderly and who have physical disabilities.
  Mr. LATHAM. If the gentleman would yield, I would just say that I 
would hope the authorizers come back with a robust number for you, and 
that we'll be happy to try to work with the gentleman.
  Mr. CLARKE of Michigan. Thank you very much. I yield back the balance 
of my time.

                              {time}  2100

  The Acting CHAIR (Mrs. Roby). The Clerk will read.
  The Clerk read as follows:

                        facilities and equipment

                    (airport and airway trust fund)

       For necessary expenses, not otherwise provided for, for 
     acquisition, establishment, technical support services, 
     improvement by contract or purchase, and hire of national 
     airspace systems and experimental facilities and equipment, 
     as authorized under part A of subtitle VII of title 49, 
     United States Code, including initial acquisition of 
     necessary sites by lease or grant; engineering and service 
     testing, including construction of test facilities and 
     acquisition of necessary sites by lease or grant; 
     construction and furnishing of quarters and related 
     accommodations for officers and employees of the Federal 
     Aviation Administration stationed at remote localities where 
     such accommodations are not available; and the purchase, 
     lease, or transfer of aircraft from funds available under 
     this heading, including aircraft for aviation regulation and 
     certification; to be derived from the Airport and Airway 
     Trust Fund, $2,749,596,000 of which $480,000,000 shall remain 
     available until September 30, 2013, and of which 
     $2,269,596,000 shall remain available until September 30, 
     2015: Provided, That there may be credited to this 
     appropriation funds received from States, counties, 
     municipalities, other public authorities, and private 
     sources, for expenses incurred in the establishment, 
     improvement, and modernization of national airspace systems: 
     Provided further, That upon initial submission to the 
     Congress of the fiscal year 2014 President's budget, the 
     Secretary of Transportation shall transmit to the Congress a 
     comprehensive capital investment plan for the Federal 
     Aviation Administration which includes funding for each 
     budget line item for fiscal years 2014 through 2018, with 
     total funding for each year of the plan constrained to the 
     funding targets for those years as estimated and approved by 
     the Office of Management and Budget.

                 research, engineering, and development

                    (including rescission of funds)

                    (airport and airway trust fund)

       For necessary expenses, not otherwise provided for, for 
     research, engineering, and development, as authorized under 
     part A of subtitle VII of title 49, United States Code, 
     including construction of experimental facilities and 
     acquisition of necessary sites by lease or grant, 
     $175,000,000, to be derived from the Airport and Airway Trust 
     Fund and to remain available until September 30, 2015: 
     Provided, That there may be credited to this appropriation as 
     offsetting collections, funds received from States, counties, 
     municipalities, other public authorities, and private 
     sources, which shall be available for expenses incurred for 
     research, engineering, and development: Provided further, 
     That, of the unobligated balances from prior year 
     appropriations available under this heading, $26,183,998 are 
     rescinded.

                       grants-in-aid for airports

                (liquidation of contract authorization)

                      (limitation on obligations)

                    (airport and airway trust fund)

       For liquidation of obligations incurred for grants-in-aid 
     for airport planning and development, and noise compatibility 
     planning and programs as authorized under subchapter I of 
     chapter 471 and subchapter I of chapter 475 of title 49, 
     United States Code, and under other law authorizing such 
     obligations; for procurement, installation, and commissioning 
     of runway incursion prevention devices and systems at 
     airports of such title; for grants authorized under section 
     41743 of title 49, United States Code; and for inspection 
     activities and administration of airport safety programs, 
     including those related to airport operating certificates 
     under section 44706 of title 49, United States Code, 
     $3,400,000,000 to be derived from the Airport and Airway 
     Trust Fund and to remain available until expended: Provided, 
     That none of the funds under this heading shall be available 
     for the planning or execution of programs the obligations for 
     which are in excess of $3,350,000,000 in fiscal year 2013, 
     notwithstanding section 47117(g) of title 49, United States 
     Code: Provided further, That none of the funds under this 
     heading shall be available for the replacement of baggage 
     conveyor systems, reconfiguration of terminal baggage areas, 
     or other airport improvements that are necessary to install 
     bulk explosive detection systems: Provided further, That 
     notwithstanding section 47109(a) of title 49, United States 
     Code, the Government's share of allowable project costs under 
     paragraph (2) for subgrants or paragraph (3) of that section 
     shall be 95 percent for a project that the Administrator 
     determines is a successive phase of a multi-phased 
     construction project for which the project sponsor received a 
     grant in Fiscal Year 2011 for the construction project: 
     Provided further, That notwithstanding any other provision of 
     law, of funds limited under this heading, not more than 
     $105,000,000 shall be obligated for administration, not less 
     than $15,000,000 shall be available for the airport 
     cooperative research program, and not less than $29,300,000 
     shall be available for Airport Technology Research.

       administrative provisions--federal aviation administration

       Sec. 110.  None of the funds in this Act may be used to 
     compensate in excess of 600 technical staff-years under the 
     federally funded research and development center contract 
     between the Federal Aviation Administration and the Center 
     for Advanced Aviation Systems Development during fiscal year 
     2013.
       Sec. 111.  None of the funds in this Act shall be used to 
     pursue or adopt guidelines or regulations requiring airport 
     sponsors to provide to the Federal Aviation Administration 
     without cost building construction, maintenance, utilities 
     and expenses, or space in airport sponsor-owned buildings for 
     services relating to air traffic control, air navigation, or 
     weather reporting: Provided, That the prohibition of funds in 
     this section does not apply to negotiations between the 
     agency and airport sponsors to achieve agreement on ``below-
     market'' rates for these items or to grant assurances that 
     require airport sponsors to provide land without cost to the 
     FAA for air traffic control facilities.
       Sec. 112.  The Administrator of the Federal Aviation 
     Administration may reimburse amounts made available to 
     satisfy 49 U.S.C. 41742(a)(1) from fees credited under 49 
     U.S.C. 45303: Provided, That during fiscal year 2013, any 
     amount remaining in such account at the close of that fiscal 
     year may be made available to satisfy section 41742(a)(1) for 
     the subsequent fiscal year.
       Sec. 113.  Amounts collected under section 40113(e) of 
     title 49, United States Code, shall be credited to the 
     appropriation current at the time of collection, to be merged 
     with and available for the same purposes of such 
     appropriation.
       Sec. 114.  None of the funds limited by this Act for grants 
     under the Airport Improvement Program shall be made available 
     to the sponsor of a commercial service airport if such 
     sponsor fails to agree to a request from the Secretary of 
     Transportation for cost-free space in a non -revenue 
     producing, public use area of the airport terminal or other 
     airport facilities for the purpose of carrying out a public 
     service air passenger rights and consumer outreach campaign.
       Sec. 115.  None of the funds in this Act shall be available 
     for paying premium pay under subsection 5546(a) of title 5, 
     United States Code, to any Federal Aviation Administration 
     employee unless such employee actually performed work during 
     the time corresponding to such premium pay.
       Sec. 116.  None of the funds in this Act may be obligated 
     or expended for an employee of the Federal Aviation 
     Administration to purchase a store gift card or gift 
     certificate through use of a Government-issued credit card.
       Sec. 117.  The Secretary shall apportion to the sponsor of 
     an airport that received scheduled or unscheduled air service 
     from a large certified air carrier (as defined in part 241 of 
     title 14 Code of Federal Regulations, or such other 
     regulations as may be issued by the Secretary under the 
     authority of section 41709) an amount equal to the minimum 
     apportionment specified in 49 U.S.C. 47114(c), if the 
     Secretary determines that airport had more than 10,000 
     passenger boardings in the preceding calendar year, based on 
     data submitted to the Secretary under part 241 of title 14, 
     Code of Federal Regulations.
       Sec. 118.  None of the funds in this Act may be obligated 
     or expended for retention bonuses for an employee of the 
     Federal Aviation Administration without the prior written 
     approval of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Administration 
     of the Department of Transportation.
       Sec. 119.  Subparagraph (D) of section 47124(b)(3) of title 
     49, United States Code, is amended by striking ``benefit.'' 
     and inserting ``benefit, with the maximum allowable local 
     cost share capped at ``20 percent.''.
       Sec. 119A.  Notwithstanding any other provision of law, 
     none of the funds made available under this Act or any prior 
     Act may be used to implement or to continue to implement any 
     limitation on the ability of any owner or operator of a 
     private aircraft to obtain, upon a request to the 
     Administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration, a 
     blocking of that owner's or operator's aircraft registration 
     number from any display of the Federal Aviation 
     Administration's Aircraft Situational Display to Industry 
     data that is made available to the public, except data made 
     available to a Government agency, for the noncommercial 
     flights of that owner or operator.

[[Page H4043]]

       Sec. 119B.  None of the funds appropriated or limited by 
     this Act may be used to change weight restrictions or prior 
     permission rules at Teterboro airport in Teterboro, New 
     Jersey.

                     Federal Highway Administration

                 limitation on administrative expenses

                     (including transfer of funds)

       Contingent upon reauthorization, not to exceed 
     $392,855,251, together with advances and reimbursements 
     received by the Federal Highway Administration, shall be paid 
     in accordance with law from appropriations made available by 
     this Act to the Federal Highway Administration for necessary 
     expenses for administration and operation. In addition, not 
     to exceed $3,220,000 shall be paid from appropriations made 
     available by this Act and transferred to the Appalachian 
     Regional Commission in accordance with section 104 of title 
     23, United States Code.

                          federal-aid highways

                      (limitation on obligations)

                          (highway trust fund)

       Contingent upon reauthorization, none of the funds in this 
     Act shall be available for the implementation or execution of 
     programs, the obligations for which are in excess of 
     $39,143,582,670 for Federal-aid highways and highway safety 
     construction programs for fiscal year 2013: Provided, That 
     within the $39,143,582,670 obligation limitation on Federal-
     aid highways and highway safety construction programs, not 
     more than $429,800,000 shall be available for the 
     implementation or execution of programs for transportation 
     research (chapter 5 of title 23, United States Code; sections 
     111, 5505, and 5506 of title 49, United States Code; and 
     title 5 of Public Law 109-59) for fiscal year 2013: Provided 
     further, That this limitation on transportation research 
     programs shall not apply to any authority previously made 
     available for obligation: Provided further, That the 
     Secretary may, as authorized by section 605(b) of title 23, 
     United States Code, collect and spend fees, to cover the 
     costs of services of expert firms, including counsel, in the 
     field of municipal and project finance to assist in the 
     underwriting and servicing of Federal credit instruments and 
     all or a portion of the costs to the Federal Government of 
     servicing such credit instruments: Provided further, That 
     such fees are available until expended to pay for such costs: 
     Provided further, That such amounts are in addition to 
     administrative expenses that are also available for such 
     purpose, and are not subject to any obligation limitation or 
     the limitation on administrative expenses under section 608 
     of title 23, United States Code.

                (liquidation of contract authorization)

                          (highway trust fund)

       Contingent upon reauthorization, for carrying out the 
     provisions of title 23, United States Code, that are 
     attributable to Federal-aid highways, not otherwise provided, 
     including reimbursement for sums expended pursuant to the 
     provisions of 23 U.S.C. 308, $39,882,583,000 or so much 
     thereof as may be available in and derived from the Highway 
     Trust Fund (other than the Mass Transit Account), to remain 
     available until expended.

       administrative provisions--federal highway administration

       Sec. 120.  Contingent upon reauthorization, the following 
     authorities shall apply for fiscal year 2013:
        (a) The Secretary of Transportation shall--
       (1) not distribute from the obligation limitation for 
     Federal-aid highways amounts authorized for administrative 
     expenses and programs by section 104(a) of title 23, United 
     States Code; programs funded from the administrative takedown 
     authorized by section 104(a)(1) of title 23, United States 
     Code (as in effect on the date before the date of enactment 
     of the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation 
     Equity Act: A Legacy for Users); the highway use tax evasion 
     program; and the Bureau of Transportation Statistics;
       (2) not distribute an amount from the obligation limitation 
     for Federal-aid highways that is equal to the unobligated 
     balance of amounts made available from the Highway Trust Fund 
     (other than the Mass Transit Account) for Federal-aid 
     highways and highway safety programs for previous fiscal 
     years the funds for which are allocated by the Secretary;
       (3) determine the ratio that--
       (A) the obligation limitation for Federal-aid highways, 
     less the aggregate of amounts not distributed under 
     paragraphs (1) and (2), bears to
       (B) the total of the sums authorized to be appropriated for 
     Federal-aid highways and highway safety construction programs 
     (other than sums authorized to be appropriated for provisions 
     of law described in paragraphs (1) through ( 9 ) of 
     subsection (b) and sums authorized to be appropriated for 
     section 105 of title 23, United States Code, equal to the 
     amount referred to in subsection (b)(10) for such fiscal 
     year), less the aggregate of the amounts not distributed 
     under paragraphs (1) and (2) of this subsection;
       (4)(A) distribute the obligation limitation for Federal-aid 
     highways, less the aggregate amounts not distributed under 
     paragraphs (1) and (2), for sections 1301, 1302, and 1934 of 
     the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation 
     Equity Act: A Legacy for Users; section 117 and section 
     144(g) of title 23, United States Code; and section 14501 of 
     title 40, United States Code, so that the amount of 
     obligation authority available for each of such sections is 
     equal to the amount determined by multiplying the ratio 
     determined under paragraph (3) by the sums authorized to be 
     appropriated for that section for the fiscal year; and
       (B) distribute $2,000,000,000 for section 105 of title 23, 
     United States Code;
       (5) distribute the obligation limitation provided for 
     Federal-aid highways, less the aggregate amounts not 
     distributed under paragraphs (1) and (2) and amounts 
     distributed under paragraph (4), for each of the programs 
     that are allocated by the Secretary under the Safe, 
     Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A 
     Legacy for Users and title 23, United States Code, (other 
     than to programs to which paragraphs (1) and (4) apply), by 
     multiplying the ratio determined under paragraph (3) by the 
     amounts authorized to be appropriated for each such program 
     for such fiscal year; and
       (6) distribute the obligation limitation provided for 
     Federal-aid highways, less the aggregate amounts not 
     distributed under paragraphs (1) and (2) and amounts 
     distributed under paragraphs (4) and (5), for Federal-aid 
     highways and highway safety construction programs (other than 
     the amounts apportioned for the equity bonus program, but 
     only to the extent that the amounts apportioned for the 
     equity bonus program for the fiscal year are greater than 
     $2,639,000,000, and the Appalachian development highway 
     system program) that are apportioned by the Secretary under 
     the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation 
     Equity Act: A Legacy for Users and title 23, United States 
     Code, in the ratio that--
       (A) amounts authorized to be appropriated for such programs 
     that are apportioned to each State for such fiscal year, bear 
     to
       (B) the total of the amounts authorized to be appropriated 
     for such programs that are apportioned to all States for such 
     fiscal year.
       (b) Exceptions From Obligation Limitation.--The obligation 
     limitation for Federal-aid highways shall not apply to 
     obligations:
       (1) under section 125 of title 23, United States Code;
       (2) under section 147 of the Surface Transportation 
     Assistance Act of 1978;
       (3) under section 9 of the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1981;
       (4) under subsections (b) and (j) of section 131 of the 
     Surface Transportation Assistance Act of 1982;
       (5) under subsections (b) and (c) of section 149 of the 
     Surface Transportation and Uniform Relocation Assistance Act 
     of 1987;
       (6) under sections 1103 through 1108 of the Intermodal 
     Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991;
       (7) under section 157 of title 23, United States Code, as 
     in effect on the day before the date of the enactment of the 
     Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century;
       (8) under section 105 of title 23, United States Code, as 
     in effect for fiscal years 1998 through 2004, but only in an 
     amount equal to $639,000,000 for each of those fiscal years;
       (9) for Federal-aid highway programs for which obligation 
     authority was made available under the Transportation Equity 
     Act for the 21st Century or subsequent public laws for 
     multiple years or to remain available until used, but only to 
     the extent that the obligation authority has not lapsed or 
     been used;
       (10) under section 105 of title 23, United States Code, but 
     only in an amount equal to $639,000,000 for each of fiscal 
     years 2005 through 2013; and
       (11) under section 1603 of the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, 
     Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users, to 
     the extent that funds obligated in accordance with that 
     section were not subject to a limitation on obligations at 
     the time at which the funds were initially made available for 
     obligation.
       (c) Redistribution of Unused Obligation Authority.--
     Notwithstanding subsection (a), the Secretary shall, after 
     August 1 of such fiscal year, revise a distribution of the 
     obligation limitation made available under subsection (a) if 
     the amount distributed cannot be obligated during that fiscal 
     year, and redistribute sufficient amounts to those States 
     able to obligate amounts in addition to those previously 
     distributed during that fiscal year, giving priority to those 
     States having large unobligated balances of funds apportioned 
     under sections 104 and 144 of title 23, United States Code.
       (d) Applicability of Obligation Limitations to 
     Transportation Research Programs.--The obligation limitation 
     shall apply to transportation research programs carried out 
     under chapter 5 of title 23, United States Code, and title V 
     (research title) of the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, 
     Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users, 
     except that obligation authority made available for such 
     programs under such limitation shall remain available for a 
     period of 3 fiscal years and shall be in addition to the 
     amount of any limitation imposed on obligations for Federal-
     aid highway and highway safety construction programs for 
     future fiscal years.
       (e) Redistribution of Certain Authorized Funds.--
       (1) In general.--Not later than 30 days after the date of 
     the distribution of obligation limitation under subsection 
     (a), the Secretary shall distribute to the States any funds 
     that--
       (A) are authorized to be appropriated for such fiscal year 
     for Federal-aid highways programs; and
       (B) the Secretary determines will not be allocated to the 
     States, and will not be available for obligation, in such 
     fiscal year due to

[[Page H4044]]

     the imposition of any obligation limitation for such fiscal 
     year.
       (2) Ratio.--Funds shall be distributed under paragraph (1) 
     in the same ratio as the distribution of obligation authority 
     under subsection (a)(6).
       (3) Availability.--Funds distributed under paragraph (1) 
     shall be available for any purposes described in section 
     133(b) of title 23, United States Code.
       (f) Special Limitation Characteristics.--Obligation 
     limitation distributed for a fiscal year under subsection 
     (a)(4) for the provision specified in subsection (a)(4) 
     shall--
       (1) remain available until used for obligation of funds for 
     that provision; and
       (2) be in addition to the amount of any limitation imposed 
     on obligations for Federal-aid highway and highway safety 
     construction programs for future fiscal years.
       (g) Limitation on Statutory Construction.--Nothing in this 
     section shall be construed to limit the distribution of 
     obligation authority under subsection (a)(4)(A) for each of 
     the individual projects numbered greater than 3676 listed in 
     the table contained in section 1702 of the Safe, Accountable, 
     Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for 
     Users.
       Sec. 121.  Notwithstanding 31 U.S.C. 3302, funds received 
     by the Bureau of Transportation Statistics from the sale of 
     data products, for necessary expenses incurred pursuant to 49 
     U.S.C. 111 may be credited to the Federal-aid Highways 
     account for the purpose of reimbursing the Bureau for such 
     expenses: Provided, That such funds shall be subject to the 
     obligation limitation for Federal-aid Highways and highway 
     safety construction programs.
       Sec. 122.  Not less than 15 days prior to waiving, under 
     his statutory authority, any Buy America requirement for 
     Federal-aid highway projects, the Secretary of Transportation 
     shall make an informal public notice and comment opportunity 
     on the intent to issue such waiver and the reasons therefor: 
     Provided, That the Secretary shall provide an annual report 
     to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations on any 
     waivers granted under the Buy America requirements.
       Sec. 123. (a) In General.--Except as provided in subsection 
     (b), none of the funds made available, limited, or otherwise 
     affected by this Act shall be used to approve or otherwise 
     authorize the imposition of any toll on any segment of 
     highway located on the Federal-aid system in the State of 
     Texas that--
       (1) as of the date of enactment of this Act, is not tolled;
       (2) is constructed with Federal assistance provided under 
     title 23, United States Code; and
       (3) is in actual operation as of the date of enactment of 
     this Act.
       (b) Exceptions.--
       (1) Number of toll lanes.--Subsection (a) shall not apply 
     to any segment of highway on the Federal-aid system described 
     in that subsection that, as of the date on which a toll is 
     imposed on the segment, will have the same number of nontoll 
     lanes as were in existence prior to that date.
       (2) High-occupancy vehicle lanes.--A high-occupancy vehicle 
     lane that is converted to a toll lane shall not be subject to 
     this section, and shall not be considered to be a nontoll 
     lane for purposes of determining whether a highway will have 
     fewer nontoll lanes than prior to the date of imposition of 
     the toll, if--
       (A) high-occupancy vehicles occupied by the number of 
     passengers specified by the entity operating the toll lane 
     may use the toll lane without paying a toll, unless otherwise 
     specified by the appropriate county, town, municipal or other 
     local government entity, or public toll road or transit 
     authority; or
       (B) each high-occupancy vehicle lane that was converted to 
     a toll lane was constructed as a temporary lane to be 
     replaced by a toll lane under a plan approved by the 
     appropriate county, town, municipal or other local government 
     entity, or public toll road or transit authority.

              Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

              motor carrier safety operations and programs

                (liquidation of contract authorization)

                      (limitation on obligations)

                          (highway trust fund)

       Contingent upon reauthorization, for payment of obligations 
     incurred in the implementation, execution and administration 
     of motor carrier safety operations and programs pursuant to 
     section 31104(i) of title 49, United States Code, and 
     sections 4127 and 4134 of Public Law 109-59, $244,144,000, to 
     be derived from the Highway Trust Fund (other than the Mass 
     Transit Account), together with advances and reimbursements 
     received by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration: 
     Provided, That none of the funds derived from the Highway 
     Trust Fund in this Act shall be available for the 
     implementation, execution or administration of programs, the 
     obligations for which are in excess of $244,144,000, for 
     ``Motor Carrier Safety Operations and Programs'' of which 
     $8,543,000, to remain available for obligation until 
     September 30, 2015, is for the research and technology 
     program and $1,000,000 shall be available for commercial 
     motor vehicle operator's grants to carry out section 4134 of 
     Public Law 109-59: Provided further, That notwithstanding any 
     other provision of law, none of the funds under this heading 
     for outreach and education shall be available for transfer: 
     Provided further, That the Federal Motor Carrier Safety 
     Administration shall transmit to Congress a report on March 
     29, 2013 on the agency's ability to meet its requirement to 
     conduct compliance reviews on mandatory carriers.

                      motor carrier safety grants

                (liquidation of contract authorization)

                      (limitation on obligations)

                          (highway trust fund)

       Contingent upon reauthorization, for payment of obligations 
     incurred in carrying out sections 31102, 31104(a), 31106, 
     31107, 31109, 31309, 31313 of title 49, United States Code, 
     and sections 4126 and 4128 of Public Law 109-59, 
     $307,000,000, to be derived from the Highway Trust Fund 
     (other than the Mass Transit Account) and to remain available 
     until expended: Provided, That none of the funds in this Act 
     shall be available for the implementation or execution of 
     programs, the obligations for which are in excess of 
     $307,000,000, for ``Motor Carrier Safety Grants''; of which 
     $212,000,000 shall be available for the motor carrier safety 
     assistance program to carry out sections 31102 and 31104(a) 
     of title 49, United States Code; $30,000,000 shall be 
     available for the commercial driver's license improvements 
     program to carry out section 31313 of title 49, United States 
     Code; $32,000,000 shall be available for the border 
     enforcement grants program to carry out section 31107 of 
     title 49, United States Code; $5,000,000 shall be available 
     for the performance and registration information system 
     management program to carry out sections 31106(b) and 31109 
     of title 49, United States Code; $25,000,000 shall be 
     available for the commercial vehicle information systems and 
     networks deployment program to carry out section 4126 of 
     Public Law 109-59; and $3,000,000 shall be available for the 
     safety data improvement program to carry out section 4128 of 
     Public Law 109-59: Provided further, That of the funds made 
     available for the motor carrier safety assistance program, 
     $29,000,000 shall be available for audits of new entrant 
     motor carriers.

 administrative provision--federal motor carrier safety administration

       Sec. 130.  Funds appropriated or limited in this Act shall 
     be subject to the terms and conditions stipulated in section 
     350 of Public Law 107-87 and section 6901 of Public Law 110-
     28.

  Mr. LATHAM (during the reading). Madam Chairman, I ask unanimous 
consent that the remainder of the bill through page 34, line 23, be 
considered as read, printed in the Record, and open to amendment at any 
point.
  The Acting CHAIR. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman 
from Iowa?
  There was no objection.
  The Acting CHAIR. Are there any amendments to that portion of the 
bill?
  If not, the Clerk will read.
  The Clerk read as follows:

             National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

                        operations and research

       For expenses necessary to discharge the functions of the 
     Secretary, with respect to traffic and highway safety under 
     subtitle C of title X of Public Law 109-59 and chapter 301 
     and part C of subtitle VI of title 49, United States Code, 
     $152,000,000, of which $20,000,000 shall remain available 
     through September 30, 2014.

                        operations and research

                (liquidation of contract authorization)

                      (limitation on obligations)

                          (highway trust fund)

       Contingent upon reauthorization, for payment of obligations 
     incurred in carrying out the provisions of 23 U.S.C. 403, and 
     chapter 303 of title 49, United States Code, $122,360,000, to 
     be derived from the Highway Trust Fund (other than the Mass 
     Transit Account) and to remain available until expended: 
     Provided, That none of the funds in this Act shall be 
     available for the planning or execution of programs the total 
     obligations for which, in fiscal year 2013, are in excess of 
     $122,360,000, of which $118,244,000 shall be for programs 
     authorized under 23 U.S.C. 403, and of which $4,166,000 shall 
     be for the National Driver Register authorized under chapter 
     303 of title 49, United States Code: Provided further, That 
     within the $122,360,000 obligation limitation for operations 
     and research, $20,000,000 shall remain available until 
     September 30, 2014 and shall be in addition to the amount of 
     any limitation imposed on obligations for future years: 
     Provided further, That $10,000,000 of the total obligation 
     limitation for operations and research in fiscal year 2013 
     shall be applied toward unobligated balances of contract 
     authority provided in prior Acts for carrying out the 
     provisions of 23 U.S.C. 403, and chapter 303 of title 49, 
     United States Code.


                Amendment Offered by Mr. Braley of Iowa

  Mr. BRALEY of Iowa. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       Page 35, line 16, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(reduced by $10,000,000) (increased by $10,000,000)''.
       Page 35, line 21, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(reduced by $10,000,000) (increased by $10,000,000)''.

[[Page H4045]]

       Page 35, line 22, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(reduced by $10,000,000) (increased by $10,000,000)''.

  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. BRALEY of Iowa. Madam Chair, I want to make a specific point of 
emphasizing that I'm offering this amendment in honor of one of the 
gentleman from Iowa's constituents, a young, 7-year-old girl named 
Kadyn Halverson who, on May 10 of 2011, was struck and killed by a 
pickup truck while exiting a school bus.
  And this particular section of the bill deals with the report 
language that talks about, among other things, the ability to talk 
about safety and pupil transportation relating to the National Highway 
Transportation Safety Administration. So to understand the purpose 
behind this amendment, it's important to know how this tragedy 
happened.
  This young girl was crossing the street to board her school bus. The 
bus had its red lights flashing. The stop arm was activated, and a 
pickup truck traveling at 60 miles an hour struck and killed her. The 
driver tested positive for marijuana and later pleaded guilty to 
vehicular homicide and has been sentenced to 15 years in prison.
  Now, this is one isolated incident in my home State, but statistics 
show that 13 million violations occur in this country every year of 
vehicles passing stopped school buses. It's obvious we have a serious 
problem, and my amendment would use this funding for the purpose of 
working with States to create tougher sanctions and tougher enforcement 
to reduce this alarming problem of people violating the law and passing 
stopped school buses.
  The intent of my amendment is to require the National Highway Traffic 
Safety Administration, otherwise known as NHTSA, to prioritize at least 
$10 million for school bus safety work and, specifically, to work with 
State and local law enforcement to improve enforcement of State law 
concerning illegally passing stopped school buses.
  My amendment would ensure that we are enforcing the laws on the books 
pertaining to stopping those school buses. It's a part of an ongoing 
effort to provide safety to kids who are going to school and returning 
every day; 13 million violations a year is way too many. We have an 
obligation to work with States. My amendment would do that by directing 
NHTSA to use this opportunity to help those States become more 
effective in preventing these tragedies.
  It wasn't the only one that has become of significance in my State in 
the past year; 11-year-old Justin Bradfield of Janesville, Iowa, was 
tragically killed in 2011 after being struck by a school bus. That's 
why earlier this year I introduced Kadyn's Act in the House. The bill 
would encourage States to toughen their penalties for those found 
guilty of passing a stopped school bus.
  I am honored to have the subcommittee chairman as a cosponsor of that 
legislation. I hope that my colleagues will support this amendment, and 
I urge them to work to pass both these bills to make it safer for our 
kids to get to school and back.
  With that, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. LATHAM. Madam Chair, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Iowa is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. LATHAM. I appreciate the intent of the amendment of the gentleman 
from Iowa. The gentleman introduced legislation that would require 
States to enact harsher penalties for reckless drivers who pass stopped 
school buses, and this amendment complements that legislation and, I 
think, sends a very, very important message.
  The legislation named in memory of the little girl the gentleman 
spoke about from Iowa who was killed so tragically, this is extremely 
important, I think, to raise the profile. I would hope that the 
authorizing committee in conference on the highway bill would take this 
into consideration and act on this very provision.
  As a cosponsor of the act, I commend the gentleman's effort and would 
accept the amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Iowa (Mr. Braley).
  The amendment was agreed to.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will read.
  The Clerk read as follows:

                     highway traffic safety grants

                (liquidation of contract authorization)

                      (limitation on obligations)

                          (highway trust fund)

       Contingent upon reauthorization, for payment of obligations 
     incurred in carrying out the provisions of 23 U.S.C. 402, 
     405, 406, 408, and 410 and sections 2001(a)(11), 2009, 2010, 
     and 2011 of Public Law 109-59, to remain available until 
     expended, $501,828,000 to be derived from the Highway Trust 
     Fund (other than the Mass Transit Account): Provided, That 
     none of the funds in this Act shall be available for the 
     planning or execution of programs the total obligations for 
     which, in fiscal year 2013, are in excess of $501,828,000 for 
     programs authorized under 23 U.S.C. 402, 405, 406, 408, and 
     410 and sections 2001(a)(11), 2009, 2010, and 2011 of Public 
     Law 109-59, of which $235,000,000 shall be for ``Highway 
     Safety Programs'' under 23 U.S.C. 402; $25,000,000 shall be 
     for ``Occupant Protection Incentive Grants'' under 23 U.S.C. 
     405; $34,500,000 shall be for ``State Traffic Safety 
     Information System Improvements'' under 23 U.S.C. 408; 
     $139,000,000 shall be for ``Alcohol-Impaired Driving 
     Countermeasures Incentive Grant Program'' under 23 U.S.C. 
     410; $25,328,000 shall be for ``Administrative Expenses'' 
     under section 2001(a)(11) of Public Law 109-59; $29,000,000 
     shall be for ``High Visibility Enforcement Program'' under 
     section 2009 of Public Law 109-59; $7,000,000 shall be for 
     ``Motorcyclist Safety'' under section 2010 of Public Law 109-
     59; and $7,000,000 shall be for ``Child Safety and Child 
     Booster Seat Safety Incentive Grants'' under section 2011 of 
     Public Law 109-59: Provided further, That none of these funds 
     shall be used for construction, rehabilitation, or remodeling 
     costs, or for office furnishings and fixtures for State, 
     local or private buildings or structures: Provided further, 
     That not to exceed $500,000 of the funds made available for 
     section 410 ``Alcohol-Impaired Driving Countermeasures 
     Grants'' shall be available for technical assistance to the 
     States: Provided further, That not to exceed $750,000 of the 
     funds made available for the ``High Visibility Enforcement 
     Program'' shall be available for the evaluation required 
     under section 2009(f) of Public Law 109-59.

      administrative provisions--national highway traffic safety 
                             administration

       Sec. 140.  Contingent upon reauthorization, notwithstanding 
     section 402(g) of title 23, United States Code, an additional 
     $130,000 shall be made available to the National Highway 
     Traffic Safety Administration, out of the amount limited for 
     section 402 of title 23, United States Code, to pay for 
     travel and related expenses for State management reviews and 
     to pay for core competency development training and related 
     expenses for highway safety staff.
       Sec. 141.  The limitations on obligations for the programs 
     of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration set in 
     this Act shall not apply to obligations for which obligation 
     authority was made available in previous public laws for 
     multiple years but only to the extent that the obligation 
     authority has not lapsed or been used.
       Sec. 142.  None of the funds in this Act shall be used to 
     implement section 404 of title 23, United States Code.

                    Federal Railroad Administration

                         safety and operations

       For necessary expenses of the Federal Railroad 
     Administration, not otherwise provided for, $184,000,000, of 
     which $20,360,000 shall remain available until expended.


               Amendment Offered by Mr. Broun of Georgia

  Mr. BROUN of Georgia. Madam Chairman, I have an amendment at the 
desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       Page 39, line 4, after the dollar amount, insert ``(reduced 
     by $5,404,000)''.
       Page 150, line 9, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(increased by $5,404,000)''.

  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. BROUN of Georgia. Madam Chair, my amendment would simply reduce 
funding for administrative expenses within the Federal Railroad 
Administration by $5,404,000.
  This office is one of 13 in the underlying bill which is slated to 
receive increases for administrative expenses, despite the fiscal 
emergency that we're facing as a Nation. This, like many of the 
amendments that I'm bringing, would just reduce funding back to current 
levels, back to the FY12 levels.
  We have many sections of this bill that are slated to be increased. 
But as we face an economic emergency as a Nation, as we're spending 
money that we don't have--40 cents of every dollar we're spending is 
being borrowed--we just have to stop the outrageous spending that's 
going on here in Washington.
  This amendment would simply bring the administrative expenses for the 
Federal Railroad Administration back to current levels. It would not 
reduce the functions of the administration. It

[[Page H4046]]

would just keep funding at the current levels.
  It makes sense to just stop increasing, so I urge support of my 
amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. LATHAM. I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Iowa is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. LATHAM. Madam Chair, I must oppose the gentleman's amendment. 
This would not allow the Federal Railroad Administration to hire 
additional safety inspectors and fully implement the risk reduction 
program.

                              {time}  2110

  These investments have a proven record in reducing the number of 
crashes on our Nation's railways.
  While we appreciate the gentleman's concern over the debt, this is an 
arbitrary way to budget, and it negates months of work on this 
committee to try and determine the proper funding levels for these 
different functions. The bill already cuts $4 billion from 2012, which 
is a very fiscally responsible level, so I would urge a ``no'' vote on 
the amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Georgia (Mr. Broun).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. BROUN of Georgia. Madam Chair, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Georgia will 
be postponed.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will read.
  The Clerk read as follows:

                   railroad research and development

       For necessary expenses for railroad research and 
     development, $35,500,000, to remain available until expended.

       railroad rehabilitation and improvement financing program

       The Secretary of Transportation is authorized to issue 
     direct loans and loan guarantees pursuant to sections 502 
     through 504 of the Railroad Revitalization and Regulatory 
     Reform Act of 1976 (Public Law 94-210), as amended, such 
     authority to exist as long as any such direct loan or loan 
     guarantee is outstanding: Provided, That, pursuant to section 
     502 of such Act, as amended, no new direct loans or loan 
     guarantee commitments shall be made using Federal funds for 
     the credit risk premium during fiscal year 2013.

operating subsidy grants to the national railroad passenger corporation

       To enable the Secretary of Transportation to make quarterly 
     grants to the National Railroad Passenger Corporation for the 
     operation of intercity passenger rail, as authorized by 
     section 101 of the Passenger Rail Investment and Improvement 
     Act of 2008 (division B of Public Law 110-432), $350,000,000, 
     to remain available until expended: Provided, That the 
     amounts available under this paragraph shall be available for 
     the Secretary to approve funding to cover operating losses 
     for the Corporation only after receiving and reviewing a 
     grant request for each specific train route: Provided 
     further, That each such grant request shall be accompanied by 
     a detailed financial analysis, revenue projection, and 
     capital expenditure projection justifying the Federal support 
     to the Secretary's satisfaction: Provided further, That not 
     later than 60 days after enactment of this Act, the 
     Corporation shall transmit, in electronic format, to the 
     Secretary, the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations, 
     the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure and 
     the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation 
     the annual budget and business plan and the 5-Year Financial 
     Plan for fiscal year 2013 required under section 204 of the 
     Passenger Rail Investment and Improvement Act of 2008: 
     Provided further, That the budget, business plan, and the 5-
     Year Financial Plan shall also include a separate accounting 
     of ridership, revenues, and capital and operating expenses 
     for the Northeast Corridor; commuter service; long-distance 
     Amtrak service; State-supported service; each intercity train 
     route, including Autotrain; and commercial activities 
     including contract operations: Provided further, That the 
     budget, business plan and the 5-Year Financial Plan shall 
     include a description of work to be funded, along with cost 
     estimates and an estimated timetable for completion of the 
     projects covered by these plans: Provided further, That the 
     budget, business plan and the 5-Year Financial Plan shall 
     include annual information on the maintenance, refurbishment, 
     replacement, and expansion for all Amtrak rolling stock 
     consistent with the comprehensive fleet plan: Provided 
     further, That the Corporation shall provide semiannual 
     reports in electronic format regarding the pending business 
     plan, which shall describe the work completed to date, any 
     changes to the business plan, and the reasons for such 
     changes, and shall identify all sole-source contract awards 
     which shall be accompanied by a justification as to why said 
     contract was awarded on a sole-source basis, as well as 
     progress against the milestones and target dates of the 2012 
     performance improvement plan: Provided further, That the 
     Corporation's budget, business plan, 5-Year Financial Plan, 
     semiannual reports, and all subsequent supplemental plans 
     shall be displayed on the Corporation's Web site within a 
     reasonable timeframe following their submission to the 
     appropriate entities: Provided further, That these plans 
     shall be accompanied by a comprehensive fleet plan for all 
     Amtrak rolling stock which shall address the Corporation's 
     detailed plans and timeframes for the maintenance, 
     refurbishment, replacement, and expansion of the Amtrak 
     fleet: Provided further, That said fleet plan shall establish 
     year-specific goals and milestones and discuss potential, 
     current, and preferred financing options for all such 
     activities: Provided further, That none of the funds under 
     this heading may be obligated or expended until the 
     Corporation agrees to continue abiding by the provisions of 
     paragraphs 1, 2, 5, 9, and 11 of the summary of conditions 
     for the direct loan agreement of June 28, 2002, in the same 
     manner as in effect on the date of enactment of this Act: 
     Provided further, That none of the funds provided in this Act 
     may be used to support any route on which Amtrak offers a 
     discounted fare of more than 50 percent off the normal peak 
     fare: Provided further, That the preceding proviso does not 
     apply to routes where the operating loss as a result of the 
     discount is covered by a State and the State participates in 
     the setting of fares: Provided further, That the Corporation 
     shall submit to the House and Senate Committees on 
     Appropriations a budget request for fiscal year 2014 in 
     similar format and substance to those submitted by executive 
     agencies of the Federal Government.

  capital and debt service grants to the national railroad passenger 
                              corporation

       To enable the Secretary of Transportation to make grants to 
     the National Railroad Passenger Corporation for capital 
     investments as authorized by section 101(c) and 219(b) of the 
     Passenger Rail Investment and Improvement Act of 2008 
     (division B of Public Law 110-432), $1,452,000,000, to remain 
     available until expended, of which not to exceed $271,000,000 
     shall be for debt service obligations as authorized by 
     section 102 of such Act: Provided, That of the amounts made 
     available under this heading, not less than $50,000,000 shall 
     be made available to bring Amtrak served facilities and 
     stations into compliance with the Americans with Disabilities 
     Act: Provided further, That after an initial distribution of 
     up to $200,000,000, which shall be used by the Corporation as 
     a working capital account, all remaining funds shall be 
     provided to the Corporation only on a reimbursable basis: 
     Provided further, That of the amounts made available under 
     this heading, not less than $500,000,000 shall be made 
     available to fund high priority state-of-good-repair 
     intercity infrastructure projects on infrastructure owned by 
     the Corporation or States for the benefit of existing 
     intercity passenger rail services: Provided further, That of 
     the amount provided under the preceding proviso, $80,000,000 
     may be used to subsidize operating losses of the Corporation 
     only after receiving and reviewing a grant request justifying 
     the Federal support to the Secretary's satisfaction; Provided 
     further, That such projects shall only include capital 
     projects within the meaning of Section 24401(2)(A) of Title 
     49, United States Code: Provided further, That the Secretary 
     shall approve funding for these projects only after receiving 
     and reviewing a grant request for each project developed by 
     Amtrak in conjunction with any state partners: Provided 
     further, That the Federal share payable of the costs for such 
     a project shall not exceed 80 percent: Provided further, That 
     at least 30 days prior to the obligation of funds for such a 
     project, the Secretary shall provide to the House and Senate 
     Committees on Appropriations written notification of the 
     approval of the project: Provided further, That the Secretary 
     may retain up to one-half of 1 percent of the funds provided 
     under this heading to fund the costs of project management 
     oversight of capital projects funded by grants provided under 
     this heading, as authorized by subsection 101(d) of division 
     B of Public Law 110-432: Provided further, That the Secretary 
     shall approve funding for capital expenditures, including 
     advance purchase orders of materials, for the Corporation 
     only after receiving and reviewing a grant request for each 
     specific capital project justifying the Federal support to 
     the Secretary's satisfaction: Provided further, Except as 
     otherwise provided herein, none of the funds under this 
     heading may be used to subsidize operating losses of the 
     Corporation: Provided further, That except as otherwise 
     provided herein, none of the funds under this heading may be 
     used for capital projects not approved by the Secretary of 
     Transportation or on the Corporation's fiscal year 2013 
     business plan: Provided further, That in addition to the 
     project management oversight funds authorized under section 
     101(d) of division B of Public Law 110-432, the Secretary may 
     retain up to an additional $3,000,000 of the funds provided 
     under this heading to fund expenses associated with 
     implementing section 212 of division B of Public Law 110-432, 
     including the amendments made by section 212 to section 24905 
     of title 49, United States Code.

                    next generation high-speed rail

                              (rescission)

       Of the funds made available for Next Generation High Speed 
     Rail, as authorized by

[[Page H4047]]

     sections 1103 and 7201 of Public Law 105-178, $1,973,000 are 
     hereby permanently rescinded: Provided, That no amounts may 
     be cancelled from amounts that were designated by the 
     Congress as an emergency requirement pursuant to the 
     Concurrent Resolution on the Budget or the Balanced Budget 
     and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985, as amended.

                 northeast corridor improvement program

                              (rescission)

       Of the funds made available for the Northeast Corridor 
     Improvement Program, as authorized by Public Law 94-210, 
     $4,419,000 are hereby permanently rescinded: Provided, That 
     no amounts may be cancelled from amounts that were designated 
     by the Congress as an emergency requirement pursuant to the 
     Concurrent Resolution on the Budget or the Balanced Budget 
     and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985, as amended.

       administrative provisions--federal railroad administration

       Sec. 150.  Hereafter, notwithstanding any other provision 
     of law, funds provided in this Act for the National Railroad 
     Passenger Corporation shall immediately cease to be available 
     to said Corporation in the event that the Corporation 
     contracts to have services provided at or from any location 
     outside the United States. For purposes of this section, the 
     word ``services'' shall mean any service that was, as of July 
     1, 2006, performed by a full-time or part-time Amtrak 
     employee whose base of employment is located within the 
     United States.
       Sec. 151.  The Secretary of Transportation may receive and 
     expend cash, or receive and utilize spare parts and similar 
     items, from non-United States Government sources to repair 
     damages to or replace United States Government owned 
     automated track inspection cars and equipment as a result of 
     third-party liability for such damages, and any amounts 
     collected under this section shall be credited directly to 
     the Safety and Operations account of the Federal Railroad 
     Administration, and shall remain available until expended for 
     the repair, operation and maintenance of automated track 
     inspection cars and equipment in connection with the 
     automated track inspection program.
       Sec. 152.  Notwithstanding any other provisions of law, 
     rule or regulation, the Secretary of Transportation is 
     authorized to allow the issuer of any preferred stock 
     heretofore sold to the Department to redeem or repurchase 
     such stock upon the payment to the Department of an amount 
     determined by the Secretary.
       Sec. 153.  None of the funds provided to the National 
     Railroad Passenger Corporation may be used to fund any 
     overtime costs in excess of $35,000 for any individual 
     employee: Provided, That the president of Amtrak may waive 
     the cap set in the previous proviso for specific employees 
     when the president of Amtrak determines such a cap poses a 
     risk to the safety and operational efficiency of the system: 
     Provided further, That Amtrak shall notify House and Senate 
     Committees on Appropriations within 30 days of waiving such 
     cap and delineate the reasons for such waiver.
       Sec. 154.  The unobligated balance of funds provided under 
     sections 1101(a)(18) and 1307 of Public Law 109-59 shall be 
     used for the elimination of hazards at railway-highway 
     crossings described in section 104(d)(2) of title 23, United 
     States Code, to remain available until expended.

                     Federal Transit Administration

                        administrative expenses

       For necessary administrative expenses of the Federal 
     Transit Administration's programs authorized by chapter 53 of 
     title 49, United States Code, $100,000,000: Provided, That 
     none of the funds provided or limited in this Act may be used 
     to create a permanent office of transit security under this 
     heading: Provided further, That upon submission to the 
     Congress of the fiscal year 2014 President's budget, the 
     Secretary of Transportation shall transmit to Congress the 
     annual report on New Starts, including proposed allocations 
     of funds for fiscal year 2014.

  Mr. LIPINSKI. Madam Chair, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Illinois is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. LIPINSKI. I rise to engage in a colloquy with my good friend from 
Iowa, the distinguished chairman, Mr. Latham.
  First, I would like to acknowledge the difficult and challenging job 
the chairman has had in crafting this bill. I would also like to 
acknowledge all of the work of Ranking Member Olver, not just this year 
but in years past here in Congress, and especially as head of this 
committee.
  In 2008, Congress passed a mandate requiring commuter and freight 
railroads to implement Positive Train Control by 2015. While PTC 
provides a very significant safety improvement, it is also very costly. 
The Federal Railroad Administration has estimated that the total cost 
for PTC will be $13.2 billion industrywide.
  In recognizing the cost when we were working on the bill in order to 
implement the mandate, I was able to add language authorizing the Rail 
Safety Technology Grant program at $50 million per year. Since the 
program was authorized, however, Congress has only appropriated $50 
million for 1 year.
  This mandate is especially hard on commuter railroads. In the Chicago 
region, Metra serves approximately 300,000 commuters every weekday. 
Metra estimates that PTC will cost $200 million, an amount the agency 
will struggle to afford. There are many other commuter railroads in 
this country facing similar situations and needing some help in 
implementing this safety technology.
  Yet, in recognizing the difficult choices the chairman has had to 
make on this bill, I will not offer an amendment. I would ask, as this 
bill moves forward to conference and in future appropriations bills, 
that we work together to find some level of Federal support to help 
defray the costs for our Nation's railroads in order to implement PTC.
  With that, I yield to Chairman Latham.
  Mr. LATHAM. I thank the gentleman for his hard work in this area and 
for his efforts on the Transportation Committee.
  Commuter railroads are an extremely important mode of transportation 
and are critical to many of our regional economies. I would be more 
than happy to work with the gentleman on ways to address the PTC 
funding issues as we go to conference and in the future.
  Mr. LIPINSKI. In reclaiming my time, I thank the gentleman, and I 
look forward to working with him on this funding issue.
  I yield back the balance of my time.


               Amendment Offered by Mr. Broun of Georgia

  Mr. BROUN of Georgia. I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       Page 48, line 16, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(reduced by $1,287,000)''.
       Page 150, line 9, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(increased by $1,287,000)''.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. BROUN of Georgia. My amendment would reduce funding for the 
administrative expenses within the Federal Transit Administration by 
$1,287,000.
  This office is one of 13 in the underlying bill which is slated to 
receive increases for administrative expenses despite the dire fiscal 
environment we have in our Nation, but we've got to stop the outrageous 
spending that government has been doing.
  The passage of my amendment would simply bring the funding level for 
these administrative expenses that are within the Federal Transit 
Administration back to the level of this year. It would just reduce the 
increase back to current levels.
  I urge the support of my amendment, and I yield back the balance of 
my time.
  Mr. OLVER. Madam Chairman, I rise in opposition to this amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Massachusetts is recognized for 
5 minutes.
  Mr. OLVER. From what I understand of this amendment, the gentleman 
from Georgia is now removing a little over $1 million, $1,300,000 or 
thereabouts, from the $100 million that is assigned by Mr. Latham's 
bill for the administrative expenses of the FTA.
  As I pointed out in my opening statement, 65 percent of all of our 
population in this country--and it's going up every census--is now 
living in metropolitan areas with populations of greater than a half a 
million people. The remarkable thing about this is that, among the 50 
largest metropolitan areas, there is a 25 percent increase every decade 
in their populations.
  Georgia has one of those major population areas--the whole Atlanta 
area--which is also growing by more than 25 percent every decade, but 
the gentleman is trying to constrain the dollars of the FTA, which is 
the agency that provides the development of transit services for all of 
these major metropolitan areas around the country.
  I think that this is an exceedingly modest increase that has been 
proposed. Virtually everybody has metropolitan areas that are in need 
of this enormous increase in investments for transit services, for 
public transportation services, whether they be by commuter rail or by 
light rail--any one of those programs.

[[Page H4048]]

                              {time}  2120

  I just think that this is an exceedingly short-sighted amendment to 
be trying to impose upon the FTA, which has increased its total 
services to the urban parts of the country. Year after year, the number 
of grants that are being given out, the amount of the administration of 
those grants goes up, and it must continue to go up if we're going to 
continue to have growth in population, which we expect is going to 
continue at roughly 10 percent per decade, as it has in the last 
decade.
  I strongly oppose this amendment and urge a ``no'' vote on the 
amendment. I think that it is clearly a counterproductive thing to be 
doing, no matter what our economic times may look like at the present 
time.
  We have to get back to a growth program in this country. We have to 
get back to building more infrastructure and to administrate through 
the FTA the programs by which those infrastructure improvements get 
made in all of the metropolitan areas that are growing around the 
country.
  With that, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. LATHAM. Madam Chair, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Iowa is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. LATHAM. Madam Chairwoman, I rise to oppose the gentleman's 
amendment.
  This is a minor 1.3 percent increase over the prior year with all of 
the increase going to uncontrollable costs, such as additional 
compensable workday, rent and IT maintenance costs. Further, we've 
already rejected $66 million of funds for new activities requested in 
the President's budget.
  This is also one mode where we shouldn't cut funds. The FTA staffing 
has increased only 19.7 percent over the last 20 years, yet FTA funding 
has increased by 129 percent, and the number of grants that FTA 
administers and oversees has increased 118 percent. I'm not sure 
cutting S funding is the right thing to do in an agency that oversees 
this much of the Federal funds. We're talking about 0.0005 percent, the 
full-time equivalent for every thousand dollars that the grants are 
doled out.
  I thank the gentleman for his interest in reducing spending. I would 
say we've already cut $66 million, and I will oppose any effort to 
reduce FDA's oversightability.
  Again, I would ask for a ``no'' vote, and I yield back the balance of 
my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Georgia (Mr. Broun).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. BROUN of Georgia. Madam Chair, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Georgia will 
be postponed.
  The Clerk will read.
  The Clerk read as follows:

                         formula and bus grants

                      (limitation on obligations)

                          (highway trust fund)

       Contingent upon enactment of surface transportation 
     authorization legislation, funds available in fiscal year 
     2013 for the implementation or execution of transit formula 
     and bus grant programs authorized under title 49, United 
     States Code, as amended by such authorization, shall not 
     exceed total obligations of $8,360,565,000 from the Mass 
     Transit Account of the Highway Trust Fund.

                  (liquidation of contract authority)

                          (highway trust fund)

       Contingent upon enactment of surface transportation 
     authorization legislation, $9,400,000,000, to remain 
     available until expended and to be derived from the Mass 
     Transit Account of the Highway Trust Fund, for payment of 
     obligations incurred in carrying out mass transit programs 
     authorized under title 49, United States Code, as amended by 
     such authorization.

                research and university research centers

       For necessary expenses to carry out 49 U.S.C. 5306, 5312-
     5315, 5322, and 5506, $44,000,000, to remain available until 
     expended: Provided, That $6,500,000 is available to carry out 
     the transit cooperative research program under section 5313 
     of title 49, United States Code, $3,000,000 is available for 
     the National Transit Institute under section 5315 of title 
     49, United States Code, and $4,000,000 is available for the 
     university transportation centers program under section 5506 
     of title 49, United States Code: Provided further, That 
     $20,000,000 is available to carry out innovative research and 
     demonstrations of national significance under section 5312 of 
     title 49, United States Code.

                       capital investment grants

       For necessary expenses to carry out section 5309 of title 
     49, United States Code, $1,816,993,000, to remain available 
     until expended, of which $127,566,794 shall be available to 
     carry out section 5309(e) of such title.

      grants to the washington metropolitan area transit authority

       For grants to the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit 
     Authority as authorized under section 601 of division B of 
     Public Law 110-432, $150,000,000, to remain available until 
     expended: Provided, That the Secretary shall approve grants 
     for capital and preventive maintenance expenditures for the 
     Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority only after 
     receiving and reviewing a request for each specific project: 
     Provided further, That prior to approving such grants, the 
     Secretary shall determine that the Washington Metropolitan 
     Area Transit Authority has placed the highest priority on 
     those investments that will improve the safety of the system: 
     Provided further, That the Secretary, in order to ensure 
     safety throughout the rail system, may waive the requirements 
     of section 601(e)(1) of title VI of Public Law 110-432 (112 
     Stat. 4968) for fiscal year 2013.


                    Amendment Offered by Mr. Garrett

  Mr. GARRETT. I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:
       Page 50, line 18, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(reduced to $0)''.
       Page 150, line 9, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(increased by $150,000,000)''.

  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from New Jersey is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. GARRETT. It is the desire of this House and Members of this side 
of the aisle that we put an end to earmarks, and yet some might say 
that in this bill there contains $150 million solely for the benefit of 
one particular project, the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit 
Authority, or WMATA.
  This is just one-tenth of the $1.5 billion that Congress intends to 
spend on the D.C. metro system over a 10-year period. This may not be 
considered your average earmark. The Heritage Foundation has dubbed 
this--according to Heritage--``the largest earmark in American 
history.''
  Why? Well, the amendment before us is simple. It would eliminate the 
subsidy to WMATA that has been received since 2008. At a time of record 
budget deficits and debt, the American people cannot afford to provide 
a special subsidy, especially when it takes into consideration the fact 
that the D.C. metro area already receives funds from several different 
Federal transit programs. And given the performance of this agency, I 
really find it amazing. I find it astounding that this year the 
American people should be expected to give them another $150 million of 
their hard-earned money.
  In addition to the daily service interruptions, the lax management, 
and the generally poor performance that we're all familiar with, Metro 
has a significant record of wasteful spending. In 2005, The Washington 
Post reported that Metro spent $382 million to rebuild cars only to 
have them break down more often than those that weren't overhauled. The 
Post also pointed out that when senior agency attorneys wanted two new 
window offices, they spent $270,000 just to accommodate them. Why not? 
It's just taxpayer dollars from across the rest of this country.
  Earlier this year, it was reported that the Office of the Inspector 
General uncovered several personnel and unwarranted expenses on Metro's 
credit card, such as $2,000 worth of gift cards, three camcorders 
valued at $700, and even $180 just for headphones alone.
  Madam Chair, we cannot afford to keep pouring our money into an 
Agency that clearly hasn't done its job of cleaning its own house.
  Finally, it is curious to note that the $150 million this bill 
provides for is $15 million more than the President requested in his 
budget. Do we really want to be out-spending the President of the 
United States in this area?
  Finally, hardworking taxpayers should not be forced to subsidize a 
transportation system that has basically failed over the years to get 
its own fiscal house in order. We owe it to the American people to do 
better than that.
  With that, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. OLVER. Madam Chair, I rise in opposition to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Massachusetts is recognized for 
5 minutes.

[[Page H4049]]

                              {time}  2130

  Mr. OLVER. Madam Chairwoman, the amendment that is offered here in 
this instance is really quite a curious one, it seems to me.
  The gentleman offering the amendment is from New Jersey, the largest 
overall metropolitan system, with its commuter rails, with its 
expansions needed, always repairing, always upgrading, always expanding 
the systems that serve the whole New York metropolitan area. It serves 
northern New Jersey, which partly serves people in his district.
  Now, the amendment that is being proposed is an amendment that 
affects WMATA, the Washington/Virginia/Maryland metropolitan area, 
which is our sixth largest metro area, with somewhat over 5 million 
people. I don't know exactly--although my staff here is trying to 
figure it out--how many riders there are on WMATA each year.
  The expenditure under consideration of $150 million a year was fully 
authorized by the PRIIA Act in 2008, signed by President Bush at that 
time. And this is about the third or fourth year of the $150 million 
guarantee, the commitment in the authorizing bill to do the $150 
million per year in the whole system, no specific place, not in a 
specific congressional district, though there are several congressional 
districts in which WMATA functions. And it's matched dollar for dollar. 
It's 50 percent matching moneys. Maryland, Virginia, and D.C. have to 
match the $150 million along the way.
  We do have, occasionally, safety problems. We have had some crashes 
here in Washington and some people who have been injured or killed in 
those crashes.
  And I find it really quite curious that the gentleman from New Jersey 
would be trying to take away the money that is fully authorized----
  Mr. GARRETT. Will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. OLVER. I would be happy to yield to the gentleman from New 
Jersey.
  Mr. GARRETT. I find it odd that I am in the position here of actually 
defending the President of the United States and defending what his 
recommendations are in this area, but I will gladly do so.
  The President suggested that, with all of those factors that you have 
just played out taken into consideration, it was his opinion that we 
should not be spending this full amount of money. It was President 
Obama's suggestion that we actually curtail the money.
  Mr. OLVER. Yes.
  Reclaiming my time, it has been the position of our subcommittee 
looking at, realizing that the authorization in the PRIIA Act and the 
commitments that had been made to this metropolitan area, which many of 
us and many of our staff use for transportation. We have had serious 
safety problems, and a serious need has been shown through those safety 
problems for an upgrading of the equipment and systems that we use in 
this area.
  So I think it is certainly my position, and I think it is the 
chairman of the subcommittee's position, that this is a choice well 
made, critically made, with critical thought to why this was being done 
for the safety of the people using the WMATA public transportation 
system all over Maryland, D.C., and northern Virginia.
  Mr. GARRETT. If the gentleman will yield, then the question is: Are 
you suggesting that the President does not care for the safety of this 
administration? Are you suggesting that the President----
  Mr. OLVER. I'm not suggesting any such thing.
  I am suggesting that this is a legislative position, that this should 
be done, that it has been agreed to be done.
  I now have the number of riders. We had 217 million riders in the 
WMATA system in 2011. That's a huge number of riders, and they deserve 
some consideration for the safety of the WMATA system.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. WOLF. I rise in opposition to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Virginia is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. WOLF. This language came about as a result of our former 
colleague from Virginia, Tom Davis.
  There are many ideas behind it. I didn't know the amendment was 
coming up. I think that is part of the problem around here with the 
prefiling. It would be nice to let Members know what is coming up so 
they know. But I did see it, so I ran over.
  One, the number of Federal employees. This serves the Pentagon. It 
serves most of the Federal agencies in the government. But if you 
looked at the Metro today, most of the people riding it today were 
tourists from New Jersey and from Texas and from other places like that 
around.
  When you look at Metro with regard to the inauguration and many of 
the other events, that was the whole concept, that the administration, 
both Republican and Democrat--and this was a Republican amendment 
offered by Congressman Tom Davis to have this funding over a period of, 
I think, if my memory serves me, over a period of 10 years.
  So I rise in strong opposition to the Garrett amendment and ask that 
Congress maintain the integrity of what Congressman Davis and many 
other Congresses have done in the past.
  Mr. GARRETT. Will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. WOLF. I yield to the gentleman from New Jersey.
  Mr. GARRETT. I understand all the points that you raise as far as who 
is using the system, New Jersey people and New York people. But I can 
make that exact same argument about the New York/New Jersey 
metropolitan area and our transit area as well, and we don't have a 
$150 million extra earmark in for our area.
  Already, the D.C. metro area is getting $1.5 billion from Congress, 
from the U.S. taxpayers from Colorado to Oklahoma to Tennessee for this 
system, and now they're getting $150 million more. But all the tourists 
that come up from all over the United States to visit my metropolitan 
area in New York/New Jersey, we're not getting an extra $150 million, 
and we have the same exact concerns as far as safety and maintenance 
and the rest.
  So the constituents in my area are saying, Why is it that only the 
constituents down here get this extra earmark and we don't see the same 
thing for other metropolitan areas?

  I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  Mr. WOLF. I thank the gentleman.
  This is the Nation's Capital. We are the Nation's Capital. People 
from all over the world come here.
  And I want to be sure--things are thrown around on this floor many 
times that are not accurate. A large proportion of the New York system 
was paid for with Federal taxpayer money.
  This was the agreement that was made by the Government Operations 
Committee, I think, in conjunction with Congressman Davis, Congressman 
Hoyer, and others a number of years ago. Congressman Davis is no longer 
here, but that was the whole sentiment with regard behind it.
  So I urge Members to vote ``no'' on the Garrett amendment and yield 
back the balance of my time.
  Mr. OLVER. Madam Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Massachusetts is recognized for 
5 minutes.
  Mr. OLVER. Madam Chairwoman, I understand that since I claimed the 
time in opposition, I retain, then, the right to strike the last word, 
so I have struck the last word. Thank you very much.
  Just to continue this one, New York, at the present time, is 
benefiting from enormous additional investments in two major projects. 
One reaches out into Long Island, the so-called East Side Access 
project, which you wouldn't know or care, perhaps, much about because 
it reaches to all the population out on Long Island--to the east, to 
that direction for you, to the east--and the Second Avenue Subway.

                              {time}  2140

  So that New York system has those two very large programs. Each one 
of them is about $2 billion. That's $2 billion going on concurrently 
with what this 10-year program is for the maintenance of the system 
here in Washington, when we have had clear evidence of safety 
difficulties and equipment difficulties that had not been taken into 
account. We were not putting enough investment into the maintenance of 
the Washington system.
  And to add to the gentleman from Virginia's comment about this, our

[[Page H4050]]

constituents from every district all over the country come to 
Washington and deserve to have a really good public transportation 
system in Washington. So it is in all of our interests to make certain 
that that system is up to snuff on safety and the equipment is in good 
repair. So I have no apology whatsoever for supporting this one, and 
would strongly urge that we defeat this amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. CULBERSON. I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Texas is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. CULBERSON. Madam Chairman, I want to be sure to point out to the 
House that the account is authorized. Under the Passenger Rail 
Improvement Act, in order for the metropolitan D.C. area to receive the 
funds, Virginia, Maryland, and the District of Columbia have to match 
the money, which certainly helps. And I also note that the committee 
has included language, which is very important, that the Federal 
Government cannot provide more than 60 percent for the first time. 
That's important that the local communities do their fair share.
  All of the money in the Passenger Rail Improvement Act for the D.C. 
area has to be used for safety and capital improvements only. They can 
use the money only to buy new cars and equipment to improve the safety 
of the system. And as my good friend from New Jersey has pointed out, 
if there's clearly evidence, apparently, of misuse of the funds, the 
inspector general can certainly investigate that and even bring 
criminal charges against those responsible for using the funds for a 
purpose other than that authorized by the Passenger Rail Improvement 
Act.
  I think it's also important to point out that the bill, overall, cuts 
New Starts funding by $419 million and cuts the request for 
administrative funding for the FTA by $66 million.
  These bills that Chairman Rogers has presided over that all of us on 
Appropriations have worked so hard on, for the first time we've got a 
whole series of bills reducing spending year after year. There's much, 
much more to do. And while I'm certainly in philosophical agreement 
with the gentleman's amendment, because of the careful balance the bill 
strikes in funding an authorized program, it can only be used for a 
limited purpose that must be matched, and the committee would like to 
ask for a ``no'' vote on the gentleman's amendment.
  Mr. GARRETT. Will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. CULBERSON. I am happy to yield to my good friend from New Jersey.
  Mr. GARRETT. I will just make three quick points. One is, again, it 
is really odd that here I stand with you next to the microphone and 
that I am actually defending the more conservative position and 
actually defending the position of the President of the United States, 
who says we should be spending less money.
  Secondly, in a time when we all said, Let's eliminate earmarks, here 
we have, as Heritage says, the largest earmark in American history. 
Because this is not simply an issue of saying that this program has a 
safety need and no one else does. If it wasn't a grant application 
process where New York, New Jersey, or any other system around the 
country could have applied and say, Our safety needs are X times high 
or less than Washington, D.C., maybe there wouldn't be a concern. But 
that's not the case here.
  All the other metropolitan transit systems in the country aren't 
being weighed as far as what their safety needs or what their 
maintenance needs are. It just simply made a decision here that 
Washington, D.C., and the congressional districts that it contains 
around it somehow or another merit greater service than do the other 
ones in Chicago or New York or New Jersey, what have you. I think 
that's where the difficulty lies.
  Mr. CULBERSON. If I could reclaim my time, the gentleman and I worked 
together arm-in-arm on so many good conservative causes, and in this 
one area we do have a slight disagreement. I would point out that the 
statute requires that the metropolitan Washington transit entity has to 
submit a grant application. Under the law, they can't just 
automatically access these funds. They have to submit a grant 
application that complies with all the Federal Transit Administration's 
requirements. They have to demonstrate that the money will be used for 
the narrow purposes authorized by the act for safety and capital 
improvements, and they must comply with all of the other requirements 
that every other transit entity in the Nation complies with.
  For all those reasons, to keep the careful balance the committee has 
struck, the overall reduction in funding, the committee would ask for a 
``no'' vote on this amendment, and I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from New Jersey (Mr. Garrett).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. GARRETT. Madam Chair, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from New Jersey 
will be postponed.
  The Clerk will read.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       administrative provisions--federal transit administration

                    (including rescission of funds)

       Sec. 160.  The limitations on obligations for the programs 
     of the Federal Transit Administration shall not apply to any 
     authority under 49 U.S.C. 5338, previously made available for 
     obligation, or to any other authority previously made 
     available for obligation.
       Sec. 161.  Notwithstanding any other provision of law, 
     funds appropriated or limited by this Act under the Federal 
     Transit Administration's discretionary program appropriations 
     headings for projects specified in this Act or identified in 
     reports accompanying this Act not obligated by September 30, 
     2015, and other recoveries, shall be directed to projects 
     eligible to use the funds for the purposes for which they 
     were originally provided.
       Sec. 162.  Notwithstanding any other provision of law, any 
     funds appropriated before October 1, 2012, under any section 
     of chapter 53 of title 49, United States Code, that remain 
     available for expenditure, may be transferred to and 
     administered under the most recent appropriation heading for 
     any such section.
       Sec. 163.  Notwithstanding any other provision of law, 
     unobligated funds made available for new fixed guideway 
     system projects under the heading ``Federal Transit 
     Administration, Capital Investment Grants'' in any 
     appropriations Act prior to this Act may be used during this 
     fiscal year to satisfy expenses incurred for such projects.
       Sec. 164.  Notwithstanding any other provision of law, 
     unobligated funds or recoveries under section 5309 of title 
     49, United States Code, that are available to the Secretary 
     of Transportation for reallocation shall be directed to 
     projects eligible to use the funds for the purposes for which 
     they were originally provided.
       Sec. 165.  In addition to the amounts made available under 
     section 5327(c)(1) of title 49, United States Code, the 
     Secretary may use, for program management activities 
     described in section 5327(c)(2), 1.5 percent of the amount 
     made available to carry out section 5316 of title 49, United 
     States Code: Provided, That funds made available for program 
     management oversight shall be used to oversee the compliance 
     of a recipient or subrecipient of Federal transit assistance 
     consistent with activities identified under section 
     5327(c)(2) and for purposes of enforcement.
       Sec. 166.  Notwithstanding any other provision of law, none 
     of the funds made available in this Act shall be available to 
     carry out 49 U.S.C. 5309(m)(6)(B) and (C).
       Sec. 167.  Notwithstanding any other provision of law, none 
     of the funds made available in this Act shall be used to 
     enter into a full funding grant agreement for a project with 
     a New Starts share greater than 60 percent.
       Sec. 168.  The Secretary shall conduct a formal 
     adjudication in accordance with section 554 of title 5, 
     United States Code, requiring any transit agency that during 
     fiscal year 2008 was both initially granted a 60-day period 
     to come into compliance with part 604, and then granted an 
     exception from such part in this fiscal year to present 
     evidence why it cannot come into compliance with such part: 
     Provided, That any determination arising from the 
     adjudication shall be sent to the House and Senate Committees 
     on Appropriations for consideration: Provided further, That 
     this section shall be obviated if there is an arrangement 
     between such transit agency and charter bus providers that 
     the Secretary considers appropriate in accordance with 
     section 5323(d) of title 49, United States Code.
       Sec. 169.  For purposes of applying the project 
     justification and local financial commitment criteria of 49 
     U.S.C. 5309(d) to a New Starts project, the Secretary may 
     consider the costs and ridership of any connected project in 
     an instance in which private parties are making significant 
     financial contributions to the construction of the connected 
     project; additionally, the Secretary may consider the 
     significant financial contributions of private parties to the 
     connected

[[Page H4051]]

     project in calculating the non-Federal share of net capital 
     project costs for the New Starts project.
       Sec. 169A.  Of the funds made available for the Formula 
     Grants program, as authorized by Public Law 97-424, as 
     amended, $70,867,394 are hereby permanently rescinded: 
     Provided, That of the funds made available for the Formula 
     Grants program, as authorized by Public Law 91-43, as 
     amended, $699,307 are hereby permanently rescinded: Provided 
     further, That of the funds made available for the Formula 
     Grants program as authorized by Public Law 95-599, as 
     amended, $928,838 are hereby permanently rescinded: Provided 
     further, That of the funds made available for the University 
     Transportation Research program, as authorized by Public Law 
     91-453, as amended, and by Public Law 102-240, as amended, 
     $292,554 are hereby permanently rescinded: Provided further, 
     That of the funds made available for the Job Access and 
     Reverse Commute program, as authorized by Public Law 105-178, 
     as amended, $14,661,719 are hereby permanently rescinded: 
     Provided further, That of the funds made available for the 
     Capital Investment Grants program, as authorized by Public 
     Law 105-178, as amended, $11,429,055 are hereby permanently 
     rescinded: Provided further, That of the funds made available 
     for the Research, Training, and Human Resources program, as 
     authorized by Public Law 95-599, as amended, $247,579 are 
     hereby permanently rescinded: Provided further, That of the 
     funds made available for the Interstate Transfer Grants 
     program, as authorized by 23 U.S.C. 103(e)(4), $2,661,568 are 
     hereby permanently rescinded: Provided further, That of the 
     funds made available for the Washington Metropolitan Area 
     Transit Authority, as authorized by section 14 of Public Law 
     96-184, as amended, and by Public Law 101-551, as amended, 
     $523,000 are hereby permanently rescinded: Provided further, 
     That of the funds made available for the Urban Discretionary 
     Grants program, as authorized by Public Law 88-365, as 
     amended, $578,353 are hereby permanently rescinded: Provided 
     further, That no amounts may be rescinded from amounts that 
     were designated by the Congress as an emergency requirement 
     pursuant to a concurrent resolution on the budget or the 
     Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985, as 
     amended.
       Sec. 169B.  None of the funds in this Act may be available 
     to advance a new fixed guideway capital project to final 
     design or a full funding grant agreement as defined by 49 
     U.S.C. 5309 for the Metropolitan Transit Authority of Harris 
     County, Texas if the proposed capital project is constructed 
     on or planned to be constructed on Richmond Avenue west of 
     Montrose Boulevard or on Post Oak Boulevard north of Richmond 
     Avenue in Houston, Texas.
       Sec. 169C.  Notwithstanding any other provision of law, 
     fuel for vehicle operations, including the cost of utilities 
     used for the propulsion of electrically driven vehicles, 
     shall be treated as an associated capital maintenance item 
     for purposes of grants made under section 5307 of title 49, 
     United States Code, in fiscal year 2013. Amounts made under 
     this heading shall be limited to $100,000,000.


                             Point of Order

  Mr. DUNCAN of Tennessee. Madam Chairwoman, I rise to raise a point of 
order against section 169C.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman will state his point of order.
  Mr. DUNCAN of Tennessee. Madam Chairwoman, I raise a point of order 
against section 169C on page 56, lines 10 through 16. This section 
violates clause 2(b) of rule XXI. It changes existing law and therefore 
constitutes legislating on an appropriation bill in violation of House 
rules.
  I would also note that the issue of when transit agencies can use 
Federal transit funds for operating expenses is part of conference 
negotiations on the highway bill, which hopefully will be resolved by 
the end of this week. The conference report will include a better, more 
targeted policy on this issue.
  I request a ruling in favor of this point of order.
  The Acting CHAIR. Does any other Member wish to be heard on the point 
of order? If not, the Chair will rule.
  The Chair finds that this section explicitly supersedes existing law. 
The section therefore constitutes legislation in violation of clause 2 
of rule XXI. The point of order is sustained and the section is 
stricken from the bill.
  The Clerk will read.
  The Clerk read as follows:

             Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation

       The Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation is hereby 
     authorized to make such expenditures, within the limits of 
     funds and borrowing authority available to the Corporation, 
     and in accord with law, and to make such contracts and 
     commitments without regard to fiscal year limitations as 
     provided by section 104 of the Government Corporation Control 
     Act, as amended, as may be necessary in carrying out the 
     programs set forth in the Corporation's budget for the 
     current fiscal year.

                       operations and maintenance

                    (harbor maintenance trust fund)

       For necessary expenses for operations, maintenance, and 
     capital asset renewal of those portions of the St. Lawrence 
     Seaway owned, operated, and maintained by the Saint Lawrence 
     Seaway Development Corporation, $33,000,000, to be derived 
     from the Harbor Maintenance Trust Fund, pursuant to Public 
     Law 99-662.

                        Maritime Administration

                       maritime security program

       For necessary expenses to maintain and preserve a U.S.-flag 
     merchant fleet to serve the national security needs of the 
     United States, $184,000,000, to remain available until 
     expended.

                        operations and training

       For necessary expenses of operations and training 
     activities authorized by law, $145,753,000, of which 
     $11,500,000 shall remain available until expended for 
     maintenance and repair of training ships at State Maritime 
     Academies, and of which $2,400,000 shall remain available 
     through September 30, 2014 for Student Incentive Program 
     payments at State Maritime Academies, and of which not less 
     than $14,000,000 shall remain available until expended for 
     capital improvements at the United States Merchant Marine 
     Academy: Provided, That amounts apportioned for the United 
     States Merchant Marine Academy shall be available only upon 
     allotments made personally by the Secretary of Transportation 
     or the Assistant Secretary for Budget and Programs: Provided 
     further, That the Superintendent, Deputy Superintendent and 
     the Director of the Office of Resource Management of the 
     United State Merchant Marine Academy may not be allotment 
     holders for the United States Merchant Marine Academy, and 
     the Administrator of the Maritime Administration shall hold 
     all allotments made by the Secretary of Transportation or the 
     Assistant Secretary for Budget and Programs under the 
     previous proviso: Provided further, That 50 percent of the 
     funding made available for the United States Merchant Marine 
     Academy under this heading shall be available only after the 
     Secretary, in consultation with the Superintendent and the 
     Maritime Administrator, completes a plan detailing by program 
     or activity how such funding will be expended at the Academy, 
     and this plan is submitted to the House and Senate Committees 
     on Appropriations.

                             ship disposal

       For necessary expenses related to the disposal of obsolete 
     vessels in the National Defense Reserve Fleet of the Maritime 
     Administration, $4,000,000, to remain available until 
     expended.

          maritime guaranteed loan (title xi) program account

                     (including transfer of funds)

       For the necessary administrative expenses of the maritime 
     guaranteed loan program, $3,750,000 shall be paid to the 
     appropriation for ``Operations and Training'', Maritime 
     Administration.

                              {time}  2150


               Amendment Offered by Mr. Broun of Georgia

  Mr. BROUN of Georgia. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       Page 59, line 7, after the dollar amount, insert ``(reduced 
     by $10,000)''.
       Page 150, line 9, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(increased by $10,000)''.

  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. BROUN of Georgia. Madam Chair, my amendment would reduce funding 
for the administrative expenses for the Maritime Guaranteed Loan 
program by $10,000. That's all. It doesn't sound like much, but it 
freezes spending at the current levels.
  I believe very firmly that we ought to cut spending in this House. 
We've cut our MRAs, our own operating accounts for our own 
administrative expenses by 11 percent. What this amendment does, it 
freezes at the current fiscal year '12 levels. It is a minor amount of 
money to most folks, but still, $10,000 is a lot of money to this old 
Georgia boy.
  So I urge adoption of my amendment, and I yield back the balance of 
my time.
  Mr. LATHAM. Madam Chair, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Iowa is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. LATHAM. I would just accept the amendment, and I yield back the 
balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Georgia (Mr. Broun).
  The amendment was agreed to.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will read.
  The Clerk read as follows:

[[Page H4052]]

           administrative provisions--maritime administration

       Sec. 170.  Notwithstanding any other provision of this Act, 
     the Maritime Administration is authorized to furnish 
     utilities and services and make necessary repairs in 
     connection with any lease, contract, or occupancy involving 
     Government property under control of the Maritime 
     Administration: Provided, That payments received therefor 
     shall be credited to the appropriation charged with the cost 
     thereof and shall be available until expended: Provided 
     further, That rental payments under any such lease, contract, 
     or occupancy for items other than such utilities, services, 
     or repairs shall be covered into the Treasury as 
     miscellaneous receipts.
       Sec. 171.  None of the funds available or appropriated in 
     this Act shall be used by the United States Department of 
     Transportation or the United States Maritime Administration 
     to negotiate or otherwise execute, enter into, facilitate or 
     perform fee-for-service contracts for vessel disposal, 
     scrapping or recycling, unless there is no qualified domestic 
     ship recycler that will pay any sum of money to purchase and 
     scrap or recycle a vessel owned, operated or managed by the 
     Maritime Administration or that is part of the National 
     Defense Reserve Fleet. Such sales offers must be consistent 
     with the solicitation and provide that the work will be 
     performed in a timely manner at a facility qualified within 
     the meaning of section 3502 of Public Law 106-398. Nothing 
     contained herein shall affect the Maritime Administration's 
     authority to award contracts at least cost to the Federal 
     Government and consistent with the requirements of 16 U.S.C. 
     5405(c), section 3502, or otherwise authorized under the 
     Federal Acquisition Regulation.

         Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration

                          operational expenses

                         (pipeline safety fund)

                     (including transfer of funds)

       For necessary operational expenses of the Pipeline and 
     Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, $23,030,000, of 
     which $639,000 shall be derived from the Pipeline Safety 
     Fund: Provided, That $1,500,000 shall be transferred to 
     ``Pipeline Safety'' in order to fund ``Pipeline Safety 
     Information Grants to Communities'' as authorized under 
     section 60130 of title 49, United States Code.


               Amendment Offered by Mr. Broun of Georgia

  Mr. BROUN of Georgia. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       Page 60, line 25, after the first dollar amount, insert 
     ``(reduced by $1,670,000)''.
       Page 150, line 9, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(increased by $1,670,000)''.

  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. BROUN of Georgia. Madam Chair, this, like many amendments I'm 
offering tonight, would freeze spending at the FY12 levels. We've just 
got to stop spending money we don't have, Madam Chairman.
  I recommend adoption of my amendment, and I yield back the balance of 
my time.
  Mr. OLVER. Madam Chair, I rise in opposition to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Massachusetts is recognized for 
5 minutes.
  Mr. OLVER. What we are talking about here is pipeline safety 
inspectors. The increase in pipeline safety inspectors, and the agency 
is Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, that 
organization has, over the last few years, had an ever-increasing 
responsibility.
  Just about 18 months ago, we had a Pacific Gas and Electric pipeline 
that ruptured in San Bruno, California. The ensuing fire and explosion 
leveled some 35 homes and killed eight people. The National 
Transportation Safety Board's investigation found that Pacific Gas and 
Electric's poor quality control and integrity management systems 
contributed to the cause of the pipeline rupture. It is a prime example 
of why we need strong enforcement and oversight of the Nation's ever-
expanding, really already vast, but ever-expanding pipeline system.
  Now, section 31 of the Pipeline Safety Reauthorization bill enacted 
on January 3 of this year authorized 10 additional pipeline inspection 
and enforcement personnel if the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials 
Safety Administration had filled all 135 of its existing positions by a 
certain deadline.
  We need to be doing more rather than less on pipeline safety, and so 
I oppose this amendment very strongly.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. LATHAM. Madam Chair, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Iowa is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. LATHAM. I rise in strong opposition to this amendment.
  This program was authorized just last year. The funds that are being 
cut here are for safety inspectors, and we've had explosions in Iowa.
  The gentleman referred to very tragic pipeline explosions elsewhere 
around the country. We have seen a number of these explosion incidents. 
We simply cannot compromise safety in this regard. It's a small 
increase and consistent with the authorization that was just passed by 
this Congress.
  I can tell you from personal experience, in a little town of 
Alexander, about 5 miles outside of town, it's been several years ago, 
but a pipeline exploded, and basically we had to evacuate about a 15-
mile area, and it was a huge issue. Fortunately, no one was killed in 
that explosion.
  But I'll just say that this is a very important function and that we 
need to have these inspectors. We need to have a focus on pipeline 
safety. And so again, I would recommend a ``no'' vote on this 
amendment, and I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Georgia (Mr. Broun).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. BROUN of Georgia. I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Georgia will 
be postponed.
  The Clerk will read.
  The Clerk read as follows:

                       hazardous materials safety

       For expenses necessary to discharge the hazardous materials 
     safety functions of the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials 
     Safety Administration, $42,546,000, of which $1,725,000 shall 
     remain available until September 30, 2015: Provided, That up 
     to $800,000 in fees collected under 49 U.S.C. 5108(g) shall 
     be deposited in the general fund of the Treasury as 
     offsetting receipts: Provided further, That there may be 
     credited to this appropriation, to be available until 
     expended, funds received from States, counties, 
     municipalities, other public authorities, and private sources 
     for expenses incurred for training, for reports publication 
     and dissemination, and for travel expenses incurred in 
     performance of hazardous materials exemptions and approval 
     functions.

                            pipeline safety

                         (pipeline safety fund)

                    (oil spill liability trust fund)

                  (pipeline safety design review fund)

       For expenses necessary to conduct the functions of the 
     pipeline safety program, for grants-in-aid to carry out a 
     pipeline safety program, as authorized by 49 U.S.C. 60107, 
     and to discharge the pipeline program responsibilities of the 
     Oil Pollution Act of 1990, $111,252,000, of which $18,573,000 
     shall be derived from the Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund and 
     shall remain available until September 30, 2015; and of which 
     $90,679,000 shall be derived from the Pipeline Safety Fund, 
     of which $48,191,000 shall remain available until September 
     30, 2015; and of which $2,000,000, to remain available until 
     expended, shall be derived as provided in this Act from the 
     Pipeline Safety Design Review Fund, as authorized in 49 
     U.S.C. 60117(n): Provided, That not less than $1,058,000 of 
     the funds provided under this heading shall be for the one-
     call State grant program.

                     emergency preparedness grants

                     (emergency preparedness fund)

       For necessary expenses to carry out 49 U.S.C. 5128(b), 
     $188,000, to be derived from the Emergency Preparedness Fund, 
     to remain available until September 30, 2014: Provided, That 
     not more than $28,318,000 shall be made available for 
     obligation in fiscal year 2013 from amounts made available by 
     49 U.S.C. 5116(i) and 5128(b)-(c): Provided further, That 
     none of the funds made available by 49 U.S.C. 5116(i), 
     5128(b), or 5128(c) shall be made available for obligation by 
     individuals other than the Secretary of Transportation, or 
     his designee.

           Research and Innovative Technology Administration

                        research and development

       For necessary expenses of the Research and Innovative 
     Technology Administration, $13,500,000: Provided, That there 
     may be credited to this appropriation, to be available until 
     expended, funds received from States, counties, 
     municipalities, other public authorities, and private sources 
     for expenses incurred for training.

                      Office of Inspector General

                         salaries and expenses

       For necessary expenses of the Office of the Inspector 
     General to carry out the provisions of the Inspector General 
     Act of 1978, as amended, $84,499,000: Provided, That the 
     Inspector General shall have all necessary authority, in 
     carrying out the duties specified in the Inspector General 
     Act, as amended (5

[[Page H4053]]

     U.S.C. App. 3), to investigate allegations of fraud, 
     including false statements to the government (18 U.S.C. 
     1001), by any person or entity that is subject to regulation 
     by the Department: Provided further, That the funds made 
     available under this heading may be used to investigate, 
     pursuant to section 41712 of title 49, United States Code: 
     (1) unfair or deceptive practices and unfair methods of 
     competition by domestic and foreign air carriers and ticket 
     agents; and (2) the compliance of domestic and foreign air 
     carriers with respect to item (1) of this proviso: Provided 
     further, That no funding through expenditure transfers shall 
     be made between either the Federal Highway Administration, 
     the Federal Aviation Administration, the Federal Transit 
     Administration, or the National Transportation Safety Board, 
     and the Office of Inspector General: Provided further, That: 
     (1) the Inspector General shall have the authority to audit 
     and investigate the Metropolitan Washington Airports 
     Authority (MWAA); (2) in carrying out these audits and 
     investigations the Inspector General shall have all the 
     authorities described under section 6 of the Inspector 
     General Act (5 U.S.C. App.); (3) MWAA Board Members, 
     employees, contractors, and subcontractors shall cooperate 
     and comply with requests from the Inspector General, 
     including providing testimony and other information; (4) The 
     Inspector General shall be permitted to observe closed 
     executive sessions of the MWAA Board of Directors; (5) MWAA 
     shall pay the expenses of the Inspector General, including 
     staff salaries and benefits and associated operating costs, 
     which shall be credited to this appropriation and remain 
     available until expended; and (6) if MWAA fails to make funds 
     available to the Inspector General within 30 days after a 
     request for such funds is received, then the Inspector 
     General shall notify the Secretary of Transportation who 
     shall not approve a grant for MWAA under section 47107(b) of 
     title 49, United States Code, until such funding is made 
     available for the Inspector General.

                      Surface Transportation Board

                         salaries and expenses

       For necessary expenses of the Surface Transportation Board, 
     including services authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109, $31,250,000: 
     Provided, That notwithstanding any other provision of law, 
     not to exceed $1,250,000 from fees established by the 
     Chairman of the Surface Transportation Board shall be 
     credited to this appropriation as offsetting collections and 
     used for necessary and authorized expenses under this 
     heading: Provided further, That the sum herein appropriated 
     from the general fund shall be reduced on a dollar-for-dollar 
     basis as such offsetting collections are received during 
     fiscal year 2013, to result in a final appropriation from the 
     general fund estimated at no more than $30,000,000.


               Amendment Offered by Mr. Broun of Georgia

  Mr. BROUN of Georgia. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       Page 65, line 11, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(reduced by $1,940,000)''.
       Page 150, line 9, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(increased by $1,940,000)''.

  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. BROUN of Georgia. Madam Chair, my amendment will reduce funding 
for salaries and expenses for the Surface Transportation Board by 
$1,940,000. This office is one of 13 in the underlying bill which would 
receive increases for administrative expenses in this underlying bill. 
Passage of my amendment would simply bring funding levels back to 
current levels, fiscal year 2012.
  Madam Chair, we are spending money we don't have. We have reduced our 
own operating expenses as Members of the House by 11 percent, over 11 
percent, and this amendment would just freeze--would prevent any 
increase in the salaries and expenses for the Surface Transportation 
Board--to this year's level.

                              {time}  2200

  We've got to be fiscally responsible, Madam Chairman, as a Nation. 
We've got to stop the outrageous spending that's going on here in 
Washington. And this doesn't even stop it; this just freezes it at the 
current levels.
  This, hopefully, is going to put a little spotlight on the fact that 
we need to stop spending money we don't have, stop borrowing 40 cents 
on every dollar the Federal Government spends. My amendment would just 
freeze spending at the current levels.
  I urge support of my amendment, and I yield back the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. LATHAM. I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Iowa is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. LATHAM. Madam Chairwoman, I accept the amendment, and I yield 
back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Georgia (Mr. Broun).
  The amendment was agreed to.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will read.
  The Clerk read as follows:

            General Provisions--Department of Transportation

       Sec. 180.  During the current fiscal year, applicable 
     appropriations to the Department of Transportation shall be 
     available for maintenance and operation of aircraft; hire of 
     passenger motor vehicles and aircraft; purchase of liability 
     insurance for motor vehicles operating in foreign countries 
     on official department business; and uniforms or allowances 
     therefor, as authorized by law (5 U.S.C. 5901-5902).
       Sec. 181.  Appropriations contained in this Act for the 
     Department of Transportation shall be available for services 
     as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109, but at rates for individuals 
     not to exceed the per diem rate equivalent to the rate for an 
     Executive Level IV.
       Sec. 182.  None of the funds in this Act shall be available 
     for salaries and expenses of more than 110 political and 
     Presidential appointees in the Department of Transportation: 
     Provided, That none of the personnel covered by this 
     provision may be assigned on temporary detail outside the 
     Department of Transportation.
       Sec. 183. (a) No recipient of funds made available in this 
     Act shall disseminate personal information (as defined in 18 
     U.S.C. 2725(3)) obtained by a State department of motor 
     vehicles in connection with a motor vehicle record as defined 
     in 18 U.S.C. 2725(1), except as provided in 18 U.S.C. 2721 
     for a use permitted under 18 U.S.C. 2721.
       (b) Notwithstanding subsection (a), the Secretary shall not 
     withhold funds provided in this Act for any grantee if a 
     State is in noncompliance with this provision.
       Sec. 184.  Funds received by the Federal Highway 
     Administration, Federal Transit Administration, and Federal 
     Railroad Administration from States, counties, 
     municipalities, other public authorities, and private sources 
     for expenses incurred for training may be credited 
     respectively to the Federal Highway Administration's 
     ``Federal-Aid Highways'' account, the Federal Transit 
     Administration's ``Research and University Research Centers'' 
     account, and to the Federal Railroad Administration's 
     ``Safety and Operations'' account, except for State rail 
     safety inspectors participating in training pursuant to 49 
     U.S.C. 20105.
       Sec. 185.  None of the funds in this Act to the Department 
     of Transportation may be used to make a grant unless the 
     Secretary of Transportation notifies the House and Senate 
     Committees on Appropriations not less than 3 full business 
     days before any project competitively selected to receive a 
     discretionary grant award, any discretionary grant award, 
     letter of intent, or full funding grant agreement totaling 
     $1,000,000 or more is announced by the department or its 
     modal administrations from:
       (1) any discretionary grant program of the Federal Highway 
     Administration including the emergency relief program;
       (2) the airport improvement program of the Federal Aviation 
     Administration;
       (3) any program of the Federal Railroad Administration;
       (4) any program of the Federal Transit Administration other 
     than the formula grants and fixed guideway modernization 
     programs; or
       (5) any funding provided under the headings ``National 
     Infrastructure Investments'' in this Act: Provided, That the 
     Secretary gives concurrent notification to the House and 
     Senate Committees on Appropriations for any ``quick release'' 
     of funds from the emergency relief program: Provided further, 
     That no notification shall involve funds that are not 
     available for obligation.
       Sec. 186.  Rebates, refunds, incentive payments, minor fees 
     and other funds received by the Department of Transportation 
     from travel management centers, charge card programs, the 
     subleasing of building space, and miscellaneous sources are 
     to be credited to appropriations of the Department of 
     Transportation and allocated to elements of the Department of 
     Transportation using fair and equitable criteria and such 
     funds shall be available until expended.
       Sec. 187.  Amounts made available in this or any other Act 
     that the Secretary determines represent improper payments by 
     the Department of Transportation to a third-party contractor 
     under a financial assistance award, which are recovered 
     pursuant to law, shall be available--
       (1) to reimburse the actual expenses incurred by the 
     Department of Transportation in recovering improper payments; 
     and
       (2) to pay contractors for services provided in recovering 
     improper payments or contractor support in the implementation 
     of the Improper Payments Information Act of 2002: Provided, 
     That amounts in excess of that required for paragraphs (1) 
     and (2)--
       (A) shall be credited to and merged with the appropriation 
     from which the improper payments were made, and shall be 
     available for the purposes and period for which such 
     appropriations are available; or
       (B) if no such appropriation remains available, shall be 
     deposited in the Treasury as miscellaneous receipts: Provided 
     further, That prior to the transfer of any such recovery to 
     an appropriations account, the Secretary shall notify to the 
     House and Senate Committees on Appropriations of the

[[Page H4054]]

     amount and reasons for such transfer: Provided further, That 
     for purposes of this section, the term ``improper payments'', 
     has the same meaning as that provided in section 2(d)(2) of 
     Public Law 107-300.
       Sec. 188.  Notwithstanding any other provision of law, if 
     any funds provided in or limited by this Act are subject to a 
     reprogramming action that requires notice to be provided to 
     the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations, said 
     reprogramming action shall be approved or denied solely by 
     the Committees on Appropriations: Provided, That the 
     Secretary may provide notice to other congressional 
     committees of the action of the Committees on Appropriations 
     on such reprogramming but not sooner than 30 days following 
     the date on which the reprogramming action has been approved 
     or denied by the House and Senate Committees on 
     Appropriations.
       Sec. 189.  None of the funds appropriated or otherwise made 
     available under this Act may be used by the Surface 
     Transportation Board of the Department of Transportation to 
     charge or collect any filing fee for rate complaints filed 
     with the Board in an amount in excess of the amount 
     authorized for district court civil suit filing fees under 
     section 1914 of title 28, United States Code.
       Sec. 190.  Funds appropriated in this Act to the modal 
     administrations may be obligated for the Office of the 
     Secretary for the costs related to assessments or 
     reimbursable agreements only when such amounts are for the 
     costs of goods and services that are purchased to provide a 
     direct benefit to the applicable modal administration or 
     administrations.
       This title may be cited as the ``Department of 
     Transportation Appropriations Act, 2013''.

                                TITLE II

              DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT

                     Management and Administration

               administration, operations, and management

       For necessary salaries and expenses for administration, 
     management and operations of the Department of Housing and 
     Urban Development, $518,068,000, of which not to exceed 
     $3,572,000 shall be available for the immediate Office of the 
     Secretary; not to exceed $1,206,000 shall be for the Office 
     of the Deputy Secretary and the Chief Operating Officer; not 
     to exceed $1,711,000 shall be available for the Office of 
     Hearings and Appeals; not to exceed $705,000 shall be 
     available for the Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business 
     Utilization; not to exceed $47,627,000 shall be available for 
     the Office of the Chief Financial Officer; not to exceed 
     $95,102,000 shall be available for the Office of the General 
     Counsel; not to exceed $2,400,000 shall be available to the 
     Office of Congressional and Intergovernmental Relations; not 
     to exceed $3,502,000 shall be available for the Office of 
     Public Affairs; not to exceed $247,535,000 shall be available 
     for the Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer; not to 
     exceed $47,500,000 shall be available for the Office of Field 
     Policy and Management; not to exceed $16,563,000 shall be 
     available for the Office of the Chief Procurement Officer; 
     not to exceed $3,127,000 shall be available for the Office of 
     Departmental Equal Employment Opportunity; not to exceed 
     $1,404,000 shall be available for the Center for Faith-Based 
     and Community Initiatives; not to exceed $2,360,000 shall be 
     available for the Office of Sustainable Housing and 
     Communities; not to exceed $4,884,000 shall be available for 
     the Office of Strategic Planning and Management; and not to 
     exceed $38,870,000 shall be available for the Office of the 
     Chief Information Officer: Provided, That funds provided 
     under this heading may be used for necessary administrative 
     and non-administrative expenses of the Department of Housing 
     and Urban Development, not otherwise provided for, including 
     purchase of uniforms, or allowances therefore, as authorized 
     by 5 U.S.C. 5901-5902; hire of passenger motor vehicles; 
     services as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109: Provided further, 
     That notwithstanding any other provision of law, funds 
     appropriated under this heading may be used for advertising 
     and promotional activities that support the housing mission 
     area: Provided further, That the Secretary shall transmit to 
     the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations a detailed 
     budget justification for each office within the Department, 
     including an organizational chart for each operating area 
     within the Department: Provided further, That the budget 
     justification shall include funding levels for the past 3 
     fiscal years for all offices: Provided further, that the 
     budget submitted by the Department must also include a 
     detailed justification for the incremental funding increases, 
     decreases and FTE fluctuations being requested by program, 
     activity, or program element: Provided further, That the 
     Secretary shall provide the Committees on Appropriations 
     quarterly written notification regarding the status of 
     pending congressional reports: Provided further, That the 
     Secretary shall provide all signed reports required by 
     Congress electronically: Provided further, That not to exceed 
     $25,000 of the amount made available under this paragraph for 
     the immediate Office of the Secretary shall be available for 
     official reception and representation expenses as the 
     Secretary may determine.


                    Amendment Offered by Mrs. Capps

  Mrs. CAPPS. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       Page 71, line 19, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(reduced by $10,000,000)''.
       Page 72, line 3, after the dollar amount, insert ``(reduced 
     by $2,000,000)''.
       Page 72, line 8, after the dollar amount, insert ``(reduced 
     by $5,000,000)''
       Page 72, line 20, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(reduced by $3,000,000)''
       Page 102, line 2, after the first dollar amount, insert 
     ``(increased by $10,000,000)''.

  The Acting CHAIR. The gentlewoman from California is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mrs. CAPPS. Madam Chair, this is a straightforward amendment to 
increase funding for the HUD Housing Counseling Assistance Program.
  As we all know, the foreclosure crisis continues to ravage our 
families in many parts of the country. This is a problem in my home 
State of California, but also in many other States. Nevada, Florida, 
Ohio, Illinois, and Georgia all have foreclosure rates well above the 
national average.
  There are many efforts aimed at solving this crisis, but local 
housing counseling agencies have proven to be among the most effective 
tools we have to help struggling families stay in their homes during 
these tough times. These local nonprofits are filled with dedicated 
staff who work tirelessly to help homeowners make informed decisions 
and stay in their homes. They provide a wide range of free counseling 
services, including post-purchase counseling, renter counseling, 
reverse mortgage counseling for senior homeowners, and counseling for 
homeless individuals and families seeking shelter. And they depend on 
Federal funding from HUD's Housing Counseling Assistance Program to 
provide these services.
  Every dollar allocated to these local organizations helps to ensure 
that all homeowners in financial distress may have a trusted third-
party resource to turn to free of charge. Recognizing the value and 
effectiveness of housing counselors, Congress more than doubled funding 
for this critical program from 2007 to 2010 to help combat the rapidly 
expanding foreclosure crisis, and that money was money well spent.
  Local counseling agencies used the funding to create jobs by hiring 
additional counselors and expanding their services to meet the rapidly 
growing demand created by the recession. Sadly, however, funding for 
Housing Counseling Assistance was abruptly eliminated in FY 2011. This 
was a devastating blow to these local organizations, resulting in 
layoffs and, more important, elimination of a valuable and much needed 
service to homeowners who are in trouble. Thankfully, we were able to 
restore some of this funding last year, and I thank the chairman and 
the Appropriations Committee for maintaining last year's funding level 
in the bill before us.
  But, frankly, this is not enough. The foreclosure crisis is far from 
over, and the need for this funding has never been greater.
  Just last month, one in every 639 houses nationwide received a 
foreclosure notice. That's why my amendment would increase funding for 
HUD Housing Counseling Assistance by $10 million, matching the 
President's request of $55 million.
  The amendment is fully paid for with a $10 million reduction in the 
administration's operations and management account. This additional 
funding will make a tremendous difference in the lives of middle class 
Americans in my district and across this country who are desperately 
trying to stay afloat.
  In my district on the central coast of California, where the 
foreclosure rate remains well above the national average, every little 
bit makes such a difference. I know my local housing counselors, like 
SurePath Financial, like People's Self-Help Housing and Cabrillo 
Economic Development, they're going to be able to help many more of my 
constituents with this extra funding.
  I know some States have been harder hit than others by the 
foreclosure crisis, but the benefits of counseling extend to all 
homeowners, not just those facing foreclosure. In a recently released 
study, HUD examined both families seeking to purchase their first homes 
and those struggling to prevent foreclosure. In the pre-purchase 
counseling study, HUD found that of those participants that became 
homeowners, all but one of them remained current on their mortgage 
payments after 18

[[Page H4055]]

months. This study shows that housing counseling is not only helping 
address the current foreclosure crisis, it's also helping prevent 
future crises by helping homeowners find mortgages that they can afford 
and fully understand.
  When homeowners understand their mortgage and properly plan, they're 
much more likely to make their payments on time and avoid foreclosure 
in the future. The Housing Counseling Assistance Program helps to make 
that happen.
  This program has broad national support from respected nonprofits 
like Catholic Charities, National Council on Aging, and the National 
Council of La Raza, and for-profit industry groups like the Mortgage 
Bankers Association. And it should have broad bipartisan support here 
in the House as well.
  I'm willing to bet that most of my colleagues in this House have 
referred constituents in need of help to their local housing counseling 
agencies. I know I certainly have. I have no reservations about 
referring my constituents to local HUD-certified housing counselors 
because I know they will receive excellent advice and guidance. But as 
the foreclosure crisis has dragged on, demand for help has far exceeded 
the resources available. My amendment will not immediately solve this 
enormous program, but it will certainly help.
  This shouldn't be a partisan issue. I know we must make tough choices 
to balance our budget, but we must also make smart choices. Voting for 
my amendment is a smart choice. It's also the right choice for 
Americans who are still struggling to stay afloat. So I urge my 
colleagues to support our local housing counselors and vote ``yes'' on 
my amendment.
  Madam Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. LATHAM. Madam Chairwoman, I rise in opposition to the 
gentlelady's amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Iowa is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. LATHAM. Madam Chairwoman, again, I oppose the gentlelady's 
amendment.
  This bill provides $45 million for housing counseling--the same as 
last year and $45 million more than in fiscal year 2011.
  HUD just reorganized into the new Office of Housing Counseling. I 
would say that before we give additional resources to HUD's Housing 
Counseling, we need to make sure HUD has the capability to effectively 
implement this program. I think they ought to be able to walk before 
they run here.
  Housing Counseling agencies are still complaining of the painstaking 
bureaucracy involved in applying and receiving these funds. On the 
other hand, people could get housing counseling from many government 
sources, including NeighborWorks.

                              {time}  2210

  NeighborWorks gets funding out the door quickly, has extensive 
metrics ensuring the proper use of the funds. We increased 
NeighborWorks by $10 million over last year.
  We need HUD to do this thing right. So until they can prove to us 
they could, taking funding from HUD's salaries and expenses would not 
be an effective use of government resources.
  Again, Madam Chair, I would urge a ``no'' vote.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. OLVER. Madam Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Massachusetts is recognized for 
5 minutes.
  Mr. OLVER. I am inclined to support the amendment that the 
gentlewoman from California has proposed, recognizing that the request 
on the part of the administration was for $55 million, and that it's an 
interesting juxtaposition, because the HUD counseling programming, the 
request is for $55 million. The request for the National Reinvestment 
Corporation, that's NeighborWorks, which does also counseling, that 
request was for $213 million, for a total of $268 million.
  The other body, in the legislation that they put forward, with a much 
larger allocation than we had in our budget because of the position on 
what the discretionary expenditure limits would be on the House side, 
the other body gave 55, the President's request, but also gave 215 for 
the National Reinvestment Corporation's account, which put them on the 
other body's side account, to $2 million above.
  In the wisdom of the chairman, on the House side, in our bill, we 
have $10 million less for the HUD Department's program, but $10 million 
more for the National Reinvestment Corporation's program. To my view, 
it doesn't make much difference there, but I will support the 
gentlewoman from California for her passion on this one.
  I think it is certainly very clear that if the economy recovers, more 
Americans are going to be buying homes and that it is crucial that we 
have programs in place in both of those locuses that ensure that 
homeowners and new homeowners and people who are prospective homeowners 
do not repeat the same mistakes that led us into the financial crisis 
in the first place.
  So I think it's a small difference, but I'm going to support the 
gentlewoman's amendment; and I hope the amendment will be adopted.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from California (Mrs. Capps).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mrs. CAPPS. Madam Chair, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from California 
will be postponed.


                     Amendment Offered by Mr. Gosar

  Mr. GOSAR. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       Page 71, line 19, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(reduced by $24,437,268)''.
       Page 71, line 20, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(reduced by $168,491)''.
       Page 71, line 21, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(reduced by $56,887)''.
       Page 71, line 23, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(reduced by $80,708)''.
       Page 71, line 25, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(reduced by $33,255)''.
       Page 72, line 2, after the dollar amount, insert ``(reduced 
     by $2,246,566)''.
       Page 72, line 3, after the dollar amount, insert ``(reduced 
     by $4,485,961)''.
       Page 72, line 5, after the dollar amount, insert ``(reduced 
     by $113,208)''.
       Page 72, line 7, after the dollar amount, insert ``(reduced 
     by $165,189)''.
       Page 72, line 8, after the dollar amount, insert ``(reduced 
     by $11,676,226)''.
       Page 72, line 10, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(reduced by $2,240,575)''.
       Page 72, line 11, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(reduced by $781,277)''.
       Page 72, line 13, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(reduced by $147,501)''.
       Page 72, line 15, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(reduced by $66,227)''.
       Page 72, line 17, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(reduced by $111,321)''.
       Page 72, line 18, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(reduced by $230,378)''.
       Page 72, line 20, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(reduced by $1,833,498)''.
       Page 150, line 9, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(increased by $24,437,268)''.

  Mr. GOSAR (during the reading). Madam Chair, I ask unanimous consent 
that the reading of the amendment be dispensed with.
  The Acting CHAIR. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman 
from Arizona?
  There was no objection.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Arizona is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. GOSAR. Madam Chair, I rise today in support of my amendment to 
H.R. 5972, the Transportation, Housing and Urban Development and 
Related Agencies Appropriations Act for the Fiscal Year of 2013.
  The purposes of my amendment are straightforward and simple. First, 
the amendment aims to hold one particular Federal agency accountable 
for its terrible mismanagement of resources, the Department of Housing 
and Urban Development, or HUD.
  Second, the amendment saves over $24 million in taxpayer dollars 
during these trying economic times. I was perturbed to read that 
Appropriations Committee Report numbered 112-541 as it related to HUD's 
administrative operations and management. I will read an excerpt from 
page 71 here:

       While the Committee appreciates the expanded Congressional 
     Budget Justifications the Department submitted, the committee 
     is appalled with the quality of the information the 
     Department and administration provide throughout the year to 
     explain and to justify their budget requests. HUD does not 
     have adequate knowledge of the number of people

[[Page H4056]]

     it takes to implement a program. Further, the information HUD 
     provides is often wrong, contains mathematical errors, and 
     calls into question HUD's entire Congressional Budget 
     Justification and the Department's competence in managing its 
     resources.

  On the following page, the report goes on to show that HUD cannot 
account for much of its data regarding salary and benefit levels for 
its employees. HUD also violated the Anti-Deficiency Act multiple times 
in FY 2011, in which the Department hired more people than it had 
resources to pay.
  Let me say that I do appreciate the committee's awareness of the 
situation and its desire to lower funding levels in this bill, as 
compared to last year's levels. But I believe that HUD's 
administrative, operations and management resources can and should be 
reduced to FY 2008 levels. This is a reasonable level of funding that 
allowed them to do their job during very troubling economic times. 
Unfortunately, we still live in such times; and that fact, combined 
with their negligence, means that they must operate with less. Business 
incompetence isn't an answer and cannot be rewarded within any budget.
  For these reasons, I ask each Member of the House to support my 
amendment to the underlying bill. This is a win-win for the American 
taxpayer. You can cast a vote to hold government accountable and reduce 
the deficit, and you have the ability. Join me in supporting this 
commonsense amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. LATHAM. Madam Chair, I rise in opposition to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Iowa is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. LATHAM. I'm very pleased that you've read our comments about HUD 
and the management problems that they've had down there. Obviously, 
they've got a long way to go. They are making some real strides and 
improvement. We worked closely with the Secretary to try and have some 
management involved finally.
  But this amendment arbitrarily cuts S budgets to the 2008 levels. 
Just so everybody knows, we have already reduced funding by over $14 
million from last year in this account. We've met the budget resolution 
levels and cut overall in the bill almost $4 billion from last year's 
appropriated levels.
  While, again, we really appreciate the concern over the debt, this is 
really an arbitrary way to budget, unfortunately, and negates the 
months of work the committee has done in determining proper levels as 
far as funding.
  But, again, I would love to have you read, again, the committee's 
comments because it has been an extraordinary problem at the 
Department. Again, they are making progress, not fast enough for any of 
us, and we have already, in the bill, cut $14 million from last year.
  So with that, Madam Chair, I would urge a ``no'' vote.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Arizona (Mr. Gosar).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. GOSAR. Madam Chair, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Arizona will 
be postponed.


                 Amendment No. 1 Offered by Mr. Nadler

  Mr. NADLER. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 71, line 19, after the dollar amount insert ``(reduced 
     by $2,000,000)''.
       Page 72, line 20, after the dollar amount insert ``(reduced 
     by $2,000,000)''
       Page 88, line 23, after the dollar amount insert 
     ``(increased by $2,000,000)''.

  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from New York is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. NADLER. Madam Chair, before I get to the substance of the 
amendment, I cannot allow the occasion to pass because it may be my 
last comment on the floor on this bill, and the occasion is that this 
is the last time this bill will be shepherded by the gentleman from 
Massachusetts (Mr. Olver), who's the ranking member and former chairman 
of the subcommittee, and who's done a wonderful job and has been a help 
to all of us and a help on amendments like this. And I just wanted to 
say that I regret that he will not be shepherding next year's bill and 
in the future.
  Mr. LATHAM. Will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. NADLER. I yield to the gentleman.

                              {time}  2220

  Mr. LATHAM. Due to the hour of the evening, we will accept the 
amendment. We don't need a lot of discussion. We want to get on with 
the series of votes, so we will gladly accept the amendment.
  Mr. NADLER. Let me describe it in one sentence.
  This amendment increases the HOPWA, which is the Housing 
Opportunities for Persons with AIDS, by $2 million. It offsets it with 
a harmless offset.
  I appreciate the cooperation, and I yield back the balance of my 
time.
  Madam Chair, HOPWA is a national safety net for people battling HIV/
AIDS, providing housing support through competitive and formula grants 
to all fifty states, the District of Colombia, Puerto Rico and the 
Virgin Islands since 1992. At any given time, one-third to one-half of 
all Americans with HIV/AIDS are either homeless or in imminent danger 
of losing their homes. Research shows that stable housing leads to 
better health outcomes for those living with HIV. Inadequate or 
unstable housing is not only a barrier to effective treatment, but also 
puts people with HIV/AIDS at risk of premature death from exposure to 
other diseases, poor nutrition, stress, and lack of medical care. 
Housing interventions are critical in our continued fight against HIV/
AIDS, and even modest investments in stable housing programs saves 
federal and state tax dollars.
  It is because of the important and unique role HOPWA plays in 
battling AIDS that the program enjoys broad bipartisan support, and 
it's why I'm offering an amendment today that would restore $2 million 
to the program.
  Unfortunately, this year's Transportation-HUD appropriations bill 
would fund the HOP WA program at $330 million--yet another cut to this 
successful program, this time in the amount of $2 million, and the 
third cut it's received in three years.
  While the loss of another $2 million for HOPWA this year may seem 
small by federal budgeting standards, it is far from inconsequential. 
By restoring just $1 million to the HOPWA program, we can help provide 
stable, affordable housing for approximately 171 households grappling 
with HIV/AIDS. If you support my amendment, which would restore $2 
million to the program and would maintain flat funding from FY12 to 
FY13, more than 340 households will have the guarantee of secure 
housing for another year.
  Let me repeat that: my amendment only seeks to maintain FY12 funding 
levels. $332 million is far from what's needed to help every household 
eligible for the program, but for those 350 households it means 
everything.
  To protect these households in need while adhering to House rules, my 
amendment is budget neutral reducing funding for the Chief Information 
Officer by $2 million. I support the work of the Chief Information 
Officer and believe that our constituents should know about, and can 
gain access to, the panoply of HUD-sponsors programs designed to help 
them and their families. But even after my amendment, the Chief 
Information Officer would still have almost $37 million to do its work. 
At a time when all families are struggling, those living with HIV/AIDS 
are particularly at risk. Nothing can be more important than keeping 
people in their homes and helping those struggling with disease to have 
a fighting chance. For me, the choice is simple, and I urge my 
colleagues to join me in supporting my amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from New York (Mr. Nadler).
  The amendment was agreed to.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will read.
  The Clerk read as follows:

                  Program Office Salaries and Expenses

                       public and indian housing

       For necessary salaries and expenses of the Office of Public 
     and Indian Housing, $206,500,000.


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, proceedings 
will now resume on those amendments on which further proceedings were 
postponed, in the following order:
  An amendment by Mr. Connolly of Virginia.
  An amendment by Mr. McClintock of California.
  An amendment by Mr. Garrett of New Jersey.
  An amendment by Mrs. Capps of California.

[[Page H4057]]

  An amendment by Mr. Gosar of Arizona.
  First amendment by Mr. Broun of Georgia.
  Second amendment by Mr. Broun of Georgia.
  Fourth amendment by Mr. Broun of Georgia.
  The Chair will reduce to 2 minutes the minimum time for any 
electronic vote after the first vote in this series.


             Amendment Offered by Mr. Connolly of Virginia

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Virginia 
(Mr. Connolly) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 175, 
noes 222, not voting 35, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 416]

                               AYES--175

     Altmire
     Andrews
     Baca
     Baldwin
     Barber
     Barrow
     Bass (CA)
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berman
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Boswell
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Castor (FL)
     Chandler
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly (VA)
     Cooper
     Costa
     Costello
     Courtney
     Cuellar
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Dent
     Deutch
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Dold
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Duncan (TN)
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Eshoo
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Fitzpatrick
     Frank (MA)
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Gerlach
     Gibson
     Gonzalez
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Heinrich
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Israel
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kildee
     Kind
     Kissell
     Kucinich
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Michaud
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Olver
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Pingree (ME)
     Platts
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Ross (AR)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Shuler
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stark
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Van Hollen
     Visclosky
     Walz (MN)
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--222

     Adams
     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amash
     Amodei
     Austria
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (NH)
     Benishek
     Berg
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conaway
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Culberson
     Davis (KY)
     Denham
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallegly
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Heck
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jordan
     Kelly
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     Lance
     Landry
     Lankford
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCotter
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meehan
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paul
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pence
     Petri
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Scalise
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner (OH)
     Upton
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--35

     Ackerman
     Akin
     Bilirakis
     Clarke (NY)
     Conyers
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Engel
     Flores
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gutierrez
     Holden
     Jackson (IL)
     Johnson (IL)
     Lamborn
     Lewis (CA)
     Lewis (GA)
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Markey
     McCarthy (NY)
     Meeks
     Myrick
     Pelosi
     Peterson
     Rangel
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Stivers
     Sullivan
     Towns
     Tsongas
     Turner (NY)
     Velazquez
     Wasserman Schultz
     Woolsey
     Young (AK)

                              {time}  2246

  Messrs. HUIZENGA of Michigan, BILBRAY, and ROSS of Florida changed 
their vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  Ms. HERRERA BEUTLER and Mr. PLATTS changed their vote from ``no'' to 
``aye.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                  Amendment Offered by Mr. McClintock

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from California 
(Mr. McClintock) on which further proceedings were postponed and on 
which the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 164, 
noes 238, not voting 30, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 417]

                               AYES--164

     Adams
     Amash
     Austria
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barrow
     Barton (TX)
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burton (IN)
     Camp
     Campbell
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Conaway
     Connolly (VA)
     Culberson
     Davis (KY)
     Denham
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Doggett
     Dold
     Dreier
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Fincher
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Foxx
     Frank (MA)
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gowdy
     Graves (GA)
     Green, Gene
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Hanna
     Harris
     Hastings (WA)
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Himes
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     Lance
     Landry
     Lankford
     Latta
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCotter
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     Meehan
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Paul
     Paulsen
     Pence
     Petri
     Poe (TX)
     Polis
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rigell
     Roe (TN)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Roskam
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Rush
     Ryan (WI)
     Scalise
     Schmidt
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Turner (OH)
     Upton
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (IN)

[[Page H4058]]



                               NOES--238

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Amodei
     Andrews
     Baca
     Baldwin
     Barletta
     Bartlett
     Bass (CA)
     Bass (NH)
     Becerra
     Benishek
     Berg
     Berkley
     Berman
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boswell
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brooks
     Brown (FL)
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Capito
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Castor (FL)
     Chandler
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Cole
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Costello
     Courtney
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Cuellar
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Duffy
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Eshoo
     Farenthold
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Fitzpatrick
     Fortenberry
     Fudge
     Gallegly
     Garamendi
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gonzalez
     Gosar
     Granger
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Al
     Griffin (AR)
     Grijalva
     Guthrie
     Hahn
     Hall
     Hanabusa
     Harper
     Hartzler
     Hastings (FL)
     Hayworth
     Heck
     Heinrich
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Huelskamp
     Israel
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly
     Kildee
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kissell
     Kucinich
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan
     Lummis
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Marino
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Michaud
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Noem
     Olver
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Pearce
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Pingree (ME)
     Pitts
     Platts
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rehberg
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Rivera
     Roby
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Ross (AR)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schilling
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Shuler
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stark
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Tierney
     Tipton
     Tonko
     Van Hollen
     Visclosky
     Walz (MN)
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Wolf
     Womack
     Yarmuth
     Young (FL)

                             NOT VOTING--30

     Ackerman
     Akin
     Burgess
     Clarke (NY)
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Engel
     Gutierrez
     Holden
     Jackson (IL)
     Johnson (IL)
     Lamborn
     Lewis (CA)
     Lewis (GA)
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Markey
     Meeks
     Myrick
     Peterson
     Rangel
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Stivers
     Sullivan
     Towns
     Tsongas
     Turner (NY)
     Velazquez
     Wasserman Schultz
     Woolsey
     Young (AK)


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  2251

  MR. CONNOLLY of Virginia changed his vote from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                    Amendment Offered by Mr. Garrett

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from New Jersey 
(Mr. Garrett) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 160, 
noes 243, not voting 29, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 418]

                               AYES--160

     Adams
     Alexander
     Amash
     Bachmann
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Barton (TX)
     Benishek
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Camp
     Campbell
     Canseco
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Conaway
     Costa
     Cravaack
     Denham
     DesJarlais
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Emerson
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kelly
     King (IA)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     Lance
     Landry
     Lankford
     Latta
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McClintock
     McCotter
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paul
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pence
     Petri
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Roskam
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Scalise
     Schmidt
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Tiberi
     Upton
     Walberg
     Walsh (IL)
     West
     Westmoreland
     Wilson (SC)
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--243

     Aderholt
     Altmire
     Amodei
     Andrews
     Austria
     Baca
     Bachus
     Baldwin
     Barber
     Bartlett
     Bass (CA)
     Bass (NH)
     Becerra
     Berg
     Berkley
     Berman
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Boren
     Boswell
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Cantor
     Capito
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Castor (FL)
     Chandler
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Cole
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costello
     Courtney
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     Davis (KY)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Dent
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Dold
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Dreier
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Ellmers
     Eshoo
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Fitzpatrick
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Frank (MA)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gallegly
     Garamendi
     Gerlach
     Gibson
     Gonzalez
     Granger
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harper
     Hastings (FL)
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Heck
     Heinrich
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Israel
     Issa
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kildee
     Kind
     King (NY)
     Kissell
     Kucinich
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCaul
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McKeon
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Michaud
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, Gary
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Olver
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Pingree (ME)
     Pitts
     Platts
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Ross (AR)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schilling
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Shuler
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stark
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tierney
     Tipton
     Tonko
     Turner (OH)
     Van Hollen
     Visclosky
     Walden
     Walz (MN)
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Webster
     Welch
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Yarmuth
     Young (FL)

                             NOT VOTING--29

     Ackerman
     Akin
     Clarke (NY)
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Engel
     Gutierrez
     Holden
     Jackson (IL)
     Johnson (IL)
     Lamborn
     Lewis (CA)
     Lewis (GA)
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Markey
     Meeks
     Myrick
     Peterson
     Rangel
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Stivers
     Sullivan
     Towns
     Tsongas
     Turner (NY)
     Velazquez
     Wasserman Schultz
     Woolsey
     Young (AK)


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  2255

  So the amendment was rejected.

[[Page H4059]]

  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                    Amendment Offered by Mrs. Capps

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from 
California (Mrs. Capps) on which further proceedings were postponed and 
on which the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 184, 
noes 218, not voting 30, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 419]

                               AYES--184

     Andrews
     Baca
     Bachmann
     Baldwin
     Barber
     Barrow
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (CA)
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berman
     Biggert
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Boren
     Boswell
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Castor (FL)
     Chandler
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cohen
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Costello
     Courtney
     Critz
     Cuellar
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Dent
     Deutch
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Eshoo
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Fitzpatrick
     Frank (MA)
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Gerlach
     Gibson
     Gonzalez
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck
     Heinrich
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Israel
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kildee
     Kind
     Kissell
     Kucinich
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Michaud
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Olver
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Pingree (ME)
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Rooney
     Ross (AR)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Shuler
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stark
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Turner (OH)
     Van Hollen
     Visclosky
     Walz (MN)
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--218

     Adams
     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Amash
     Amodei
     Austria
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Bartlett
     Bass (NH)
     Benishek
     Berg
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Cole
     Conaway
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Davis (KY)
     Denham
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dold
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallegly
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herrera Beutler
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jordan
     Kelly
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     Lance
     Landry
     Lankford
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCotter
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meehan
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paul
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pence
     Petri
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Scalise
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Upton
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--30

     Ackerman
     Akin
     Clarke (NY)
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Engel
     Gutierrez
     Holden
     Jackson (IL)
     Johnson (IL)
     Lamborn
     Lewis (CA)
     Lewis (GA)
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Markey
     Meeks
     Myrick
     Peterson
     Rangel
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Stearns
     Stivers
     Sullivan
     Towns
     Tsongas
     Turner (NY)
     Velazquez
     Wasserman Schultz
     Woolsey
     Young (AK)


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  2259

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated against:
  Mr. STEARNS. Madam Chair, on rollcall No. 419, I was unavoidably 
detained. Had I been present, I would have voted ``no.''


                     Amendment Offered by Mr. Gosar

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Arizona 
(Mr. Gosar) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 179, 
noes 224, not voting 29, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 420]

                               AYES--179

     Adams
     Alexander
     Amash
     Austria
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Benishek
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Camp
     Campbell
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Cardoza
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Conaway
     Costa
     Culberson
     Denham
     DesJarlais
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Gallegly
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herrera Beutler
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kelly
     King (IA)
     Kingston
     Kline
     Labrador
     Lance
     Landry
     Lankford
     Latta
     Long
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCotter
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McMorris Rodgers
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paul
     Paulsen
     Pence
     Petri
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Roskam
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Scalise
     Schmidt
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stutzman
     Thornberry
     Tipton
     Upton
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

[[Page H4060]]



                               NOES--224

     Aderholt
     Altmire
     Amodei
     Andrews
     Baca
     Baldwin
     Barber
     Barletta
     Bass (CA)
     Bass (NH)
     Becerra
     Berg
     Berkley
     Berman
     Biggert
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Bishop (UT)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Boren
     Boswell
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Capito
     Capps
     Capuano
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Castor (FL)
     Chandler
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Cole
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costello
     Courtney
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Cuellar
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     Davis (KY)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Dent
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Dold
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Eshoo
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Fitzpatrick
     Frank (MA)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Gerlach
     Gibson
     Gonzalez
     Granger
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hahn
     Hall
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Heck
     Heinrich
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Israel
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kildee
     Kind
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kissell
     Kucinich
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Michaud
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Noem
     Olver
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Pearce
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Pingree (ME)
     Platts
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Rivera
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Ross (AR)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schilling
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Shuler
     Simpson
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stark
     Sutton
     Terry
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Turner (OH)
     Van Hollen
     Visclosky
     Walz (MN)
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Wolf
     Womack
     Yarmuth

                             NOT VOTING--29

     Ackerman
     Akin
     Clarke (NY)
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Engel
     Gutierrez
     Holden
     Jackson (IL)
     Johnson (IL)
     Lamborn
     Lewis (CA)
     Lewis (GA)
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Markey
     Meeks
     Myrick
     Peterson
     Rangel
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Stivers
     Sullivan
     Towns
     Tsongas
     Turner (NY)
     Velazquez
     Wasserman Schultz
     Woolsey
     Young (AK)


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  2303

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


               Amendment Offered by Mr. Broun of Georgia

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the first amendment offered by the gentleman from 
Georgia (Mr. Broun) on which further proceedings were postponed and on 
which the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 173, 
noes 230, not voting 29, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 421]

                               AYES--173

     Adams
     Alexander
     Amash
     Bachmann
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (NH)
     Benishek
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bono Mack
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Camp
     Campbell
     Canseco
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Conaway
     Cravaack
     Culberson
     Denham
     DesJarlais
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hanna
     Hartzler
     Heck
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herrera Beutler
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     King (IA)
     Kingston
     Kline
     Labrador
     Lance
     Landry
     Lankford
     Latta
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matheson
     McClintock
     McCotter
     McHenry
     McMorris Rodgers
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paul
     Paulsen
     Pence
     Petri
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rigell
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Roskam
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Rush
     Ryan (WI)
     Scalise
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stutzman
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Upton
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--230

     Aderholt
     Altmire
     Amodei
     Andrews
     Austria
     Baca
     Bachus
     Baldwin
     Barber
     Barletta
     Bass (CA)
     Becerra
     Berg
     Berkley
     Berman
     Biggert
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Bonner
     Boren
     Boswell
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Cantor
     Capito
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Castor (FL)
     Chandler
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Cole
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Costello
     Courtney
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Cuellar
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     Davis (KY)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Dent
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Dold
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Eshoo
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Fitzpatrick
     Frank (MA)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gallegly
     Garamendi
     Gerlach
     Gibson
     Gonzalez
     Granger
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Hahn
     Hall
     Hanabusa
     Harper
     Harris
     Hastings (FL)
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Heinrich
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Israel
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly
     Kildee
     Kind
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kissell
     Kucinich
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Lujan
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCaul
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Michaud
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Olver
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Pearce
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Pingree (ME)
     Platts
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Rivera
     Roby
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Ross (AR)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Shuler
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stark
     Sutton
     Terry
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Turner (OH)
     Van Hollen
     Visclosky
     Walz (MN)
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Wolf
     Womack
     Yarmuth

                             NOT VOTING--29

     Ackerman
     Akin
     Clarke (NY)
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Engel
     Gutierrez
     Holden
     Jackson (IL)
     Johnson (IL)
     Lamborn
     Lewis (CA)
     Lewis (GA)
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Markey
     Meeks
     Myrick
     Peterson
     Rangel
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Stivers
     Sullivan
     Towns
     Tsongas
     Turner (NY)
     Velazquez
     Wasserman Schultz
     Woolsey
     Young (AK)


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  2307

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


               Amendment Offered by Mr. Broun of Georgia

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded

[[Page H4061]]

vote on the second amendment offered by the gentleman from Georgia (Mr. 
Broun) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which the 
noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 188, 
noes 215, not voting 29, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 422]

                               AYES--188

     Adams
     Alexander
     Amash
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (NH)
     Benishek
     Berg
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Camp
     Campbell
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Conaway
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Culberson
     Denham
     DesJarlais
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Heck
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herrera Beutler
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     King (IA)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     Lance
     Landry
     Lankford
     Latta
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McClintock
     McCotter
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McMorris Rodgers
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paul
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pence
     Petri
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Polis
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rigell
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Roskam
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Scalise
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thornberry
     Tipton
     Upton
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--215

     Aderholt
     Altmire
     Amodei
     Andrews
     Austria
     Baca
     Baldwin
     Barber
     Barletta
     Bass (CA)
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berman
     Biggert
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Boren
     Boswell
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Capito
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Castor (FL)
     Chandler
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Cole
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Costello
     Courtney
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Cuellar
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     Davis (KY)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Dent
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Dold
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Eshoo
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Fitzpatrick
     Frank (MA)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gallegly
     Garamendi
     Gerlach
     Gibson
     Gonzalez
     Granger
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Heinrich
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Israel
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly
     Kildee
     Kind
     King (NY)
     Kissell
     Kucinich
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCaul
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Olver
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Pingree (ME)
     Platts
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Rivera
     Roby
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Ross (AR)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Shuler
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stark
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Turner (OH)
     Van Hollen
     Visclosky
     Walz (MN)
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Wolf
     Womack
     Yarmuth

                             NOT VOTING--29

     Ackerman
     Akin
     Clarke (NY)
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Engel
     Gutierrez
     Holden
     Jackson (IL)
     Johnson (IL)
     Lamborn
     Lewis (CA)
     Lewis (GA)
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Markey
     Meeks
     Myrick
     Peterson
     Rangel
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Stivers
     Sullivan
     Towns
     Tsongas
     Turner (NY)
     Velazquez
     Wasserman Schultz
     Woolsey
     Young (AK)


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  2310

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


               Amendment Offered by Mr. Broun of Georgia

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the fourth amendment offered by the gentleman from 
Georgia (Mr. Broun) on which further proceedings were postponed and on 
which the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 138, 
noes 265, not voting 29, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 423]

                               AYES--138

     Adams
     Amash
     Bachmann
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (NH)
     Benishek
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bono Mack
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burton (IN)
     Campbell
     Canseco
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Conaway
     Crawford
     Culberson
     DesJarlais
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Hall
     Hanna
     Hartzler
     Heck
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herrera Beutler
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     King (IA)
     Kingston
     Kline
     Labrador
     Lance
     Landry
     Lankford
     Latta
     Long
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     McClintock
     McCotter
     McHenry
     McMorris Rodgers
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Mulvaney
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Palazzo
     Paul
     Paulsen
     Pence
     Petri
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rigell
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Roskam
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Scalise
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stutzman
     Thornberry
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Westmoreland
     Wilson (SC)
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--265

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Amodei
     Andrews
     Austria
     Baca
     Bachus
     Baldwin
     Barber
     Barletta
     Bass (CA)
     Becerra
     Berg
     Berkley
     Berman
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Bonner
     Boren
     Boswell
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Buchanan
     Burgess
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Cantor
     Capito
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Chandler
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coffman (CO)
     Cohen
     Cole
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Costello
     Courtney
     Cravaack
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Cuellar
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     Davis (KY)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Denham
     Dent
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Dold
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle

[[Page H4062]]


     Dreier
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Eshoo
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Fitzpatrick
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Frank (MA)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gallegly
     Garamendi
     Gardner
     Gerlach
     Gibson
     Gonzalez
     Granger
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Harper
     Harris
     Hastings (FL)
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Heinrich
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Israel
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly
     Kildee
     Kind
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kissell
     Kucinich
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Lujan
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Marino
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCaul
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, Gary
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Murphy (PA)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Olson
     Olver
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Pearce
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Pingree (ME)
     Pitts
     Platts
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Rivera
     Roby
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Ross (AR)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Shuler
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stark
     Sutton
     Terry
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Tipton
     Tonko
     Turner (OH)
     Upton
     Van Hollen
     Visclosky
     Walz (MN)
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Webster
     Welch
     West
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Yarmuth
     Young (FL)

                             NOT VOTING--29

     Ackerman
     Akin
     Clarke (NY)
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Engel
     Gutierrez
     Holden
     Jackson (IL)
     Johnson (IL)
     Lamborn
     Lewis (CA)
     Lewis (GA)
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Markey
     Meeks
     Myrick
     Peterson
     Rangel
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Stivers
     Sullivan
     Towns
     Tsongas
     Turner (NY)
     Velazquez
     Wasserman Schultz
     Woolsey
     Young (AK)


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  2315

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Mr. LATHAM. Madam Chairman, I move that the Committee do now rise.
  The motion was agreed to.
  Accordingly, the Committee rose; and the Speaker pro tempore (Mr. 
West) having assumed the chair, Mrs. Roby, Acting Chair of the 
Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union, reported that 
that Committee, having had under consideration the bill (H.R. 5972) 
making appropriations for the Departments of Transportation, and 
Housing and Urban Development, and related agencies for the fiscal year 
ending September 30, 2013, and for other purposes, had come to no 
resolution thereon.

                          ____________________