Amendment Text: H.Amdt.474 — 112th Congress (2011-2012)

There is one version of the amendment.

Shown Here:
Amendment as Offered (06/16/2011)

This Amendment appears on page H4289 in the following article from the Congressional Record.



[Pages H4283-H4314]
   AGRICULTURE, RURAL DEVELOPMENT, FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, AND 
               RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2012

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to House Resolution 300 and rule 
XVIII, the Chair declares the House in the Committee of the Whole House 
on the state of the Union for the further consideration of the bill, 
H.R. 2112.

                              {time}  0917


                     In the Committee of the Whole

  Accordingly, the House resolved itself into the Committee of the 
Whole House on the state of the Union for the further consideration of 
the bill (H.R. 2112) making appropriations for Agriculture, Rural 
Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies 
programs for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2012, and for other 
purposes, with Mrs. Miller of Michigan in the chair.
  The Clerk read the title of the bill.
  The CHAIR. When the Committee of the Whole rose earlier today, a 
request for a recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman 
from Hawaii (Ms. Hirono) had been postponed, and the bill had been read 
through page 80, line 2.


                 Amendment No. 38 Offered by Mr. Holden

  Mr. HOLDEN. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), insert the 
     following new section:
       Sec. __.  Each amount made available by this Act (other 
     than an amount required to be made available by a provision 
     of law) is hereby reduced by 5.88 percent and may not be used 
     to carry out the limitations contained in paragraphs (1) 
     through (8) of section 728.

  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Pennsylvania is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. HOLDEN. Madam Chair, what my amendment will do is restore the $1 
billion in cuts to mandatory conservation programs in the underlying 
bill. Almost half of the total cuts in this piece of legislation come 
from mandatory conservation programs. That's the largest cut in 
history.
  Madam Chair, specifically in this bill there are $210 million in cuts 
in the Conservation Steward Program; $350 million in cuts in the 
Environmental Quality Incentives Program; $50 million in cuts in 
Farmland Protection Program; 96,000 acres reduced in the Grassland 
Reserve Program; 64,200 acres reduced in the Wetland Reserve Program; 
and $35 million of reductions in Wildlife Habitat Incentives Program.
  Madam Chair, to make this budget-neutral as it is scored by the CBO, 
it is paid for with a 5.88 percent across-the-board cut in 
discretionary spending in the bill, including the $102 million already 
reduced in discretionary conservation programs in the bill.
  Madam Chair, this is shared sacrifice as opposed to not shared 
sacrifice in the overwhelming, significant reduction of $1 billion in 
mandatory discretionary programs.
  Madam Chair, in the farm bill we worked very hard in a bipartisan 
manner to get the investment in conservation that our producers need 
all across the country, and they need it now more than ever as they are 
under significant danger and peril from regulatory agencies, 
particularly the EPA. They need these conservation programs so they can 
stay in compliance and they can do the job that they do so well in 
producing our agriculture all across the country.

                              {time}  0920

  This is a bipartisan bill. I am honored to be the ranking member on 
the Conservation Subcommittee and to be joined by the chairman of the 
subcommittee, the gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Thompson). And I 
urge adoption of the amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. THOMPSON of Pennsylvania. Madam Chair, I move to strike the last 
word.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. THOMPSON of Pennsylvania. Madam Chair, as chairman of the House 
Agriculture Committee's Subcommittee on Conservation, Energy, and 
Forestry, I rise in strong support of this amendment offered by my 
friend from Pennsylvania and ranking member on the subcommittee, Mr. 
Holden.
  This amendment will restore limited mandatory funding for the 
conservation programs as defined under the current farm bill. I believe 
it's important to note that this amendment does not have any additional 
cost. We're still within the frame of the Appropriations Committee's 
allocation for the bill.
  This amendment simply preserves critical conservation programs which 
remain important for many farms, ranches, and agricultural lands across 
the Nation in order to protect environmentally sensitive areas. The 
programs offer voluntary incentives for farmers and ranchers to enroll 
land into conservation areas. In my district, these programs are vital 
for water quality improvement on our local farms and throughout the 
region. And it's the same for many other States. In my area of 
Pennsylvania, this is vital to be able to deal with the mandates levied 
upon us by agencies such as the EPA. The programs are cost-effective 
and provide excellent returns on investment while utilizing local, 
State, and private funding so that everyone involved has skin in the 
game.
  The amendment, again, does not increase the bill's cost by even one 
penny because it's fully offset by reducing the bill's discretionary 
funding by 5.88 percent. I commend the Appropriations subcommittee 
chair for his efforts to produce an overall bill that is fiscally 
responsible and reduces funding in total by 13 percent in comparison to 
previous fiscal years.
  And as the chairman of the subcommittee with jurisdiction over these 
programs, I can say very frankly to my good friend from Georgia, I look 
forward to the next farm bill where the

[[Page H4284]]

authorizing committee can further explore making these programs even 
more efficient and even more cost-effective, more so than they already 
are.
  However, changes to programs, as defined under the current farm bill, 
especially when it comes to the mandatory spending in this amendment, I 
believe should be handled by the Agriculture Committee, not the 
appropriations process. I fully support this amendment and request my 
colleagues to do the same.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. KINGSTON. Madam Chair, I move to strike the last word.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Georgia is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. KINGSTON. Madam Chair, I want to, first of all, thank my good 
friend from Pennsylvania for talking to me about this amendment. 
Earlier this week, I expressed my concerns at that time, which I still 
have with it, and want to make a number of points.
  Number one, we're not 100 percent sure what this scores out in terms 
of budget authority. So there is that question over it. Number two, I 
want to say that while conservation funding is down, farmers still have 
access to $5.8 billion in conservation funding. And that's for private 
landowners. Actually, it's $5.868 billion, to be exact.
  I also want to make sure that my friends know that even though there 
are CHIMPs in this, changes in mandatory programs, that no conservation 
contracts will have to be canceled because of these limitations. The 
Federal Government cannot and does not break farm commodity or 
conservation contracts without significant consequences. We are aware 
of that. So we have made sure that none of the conservation contracts 
would be abrogated.
  And then finally I want to say to my friend the ranking member, just 
to underscore some of the sensitivities that we've been through in the 
last couple of days, that this actually does cut the WIC program, cuts 
the Commodity Supplemental Food Program, and it cuts the Conservation 
Reserve Program and a lot of the other programs which there has been so 
much passion about on this floor in the last couple of days.
  So with that, I do oppose the amendment, and I urge everyone to vote 
``no'' on it.
  Mr. FARR. I move to strike the last word.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from California is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. FARR. Madam Chair, I rise with great concern for this amendment. 
It wants to reduce about 5.8 percent across the board. Our problem is 
that we have dealt a really bad deal. The bill that we brought to the 
floor--and we cut some last night across the board--is $5 billion, or 
23 percent below what the President requested. The President put 
together all of the asks, and as you know, OMB scrubs those things. And 
we're always very critical of the President's requests, sometimes 
because they're so low. Nonetheless, this is 23 percent below what the 
President requested. It's 14 percent below what we enacted last year.
  We in the committee last year, under Rosa DeLauro, when we were in 
the majority, we didn't have the impact on farm programs, particularly 
the environmental programs, that the cuts do this year. It's below the 
2010-enacted level, and it's actually below the 2008-enacted level.
  You know, people use these terms very loosely, ``below a level.'' But 
think of it in your own personal income. Think about what the costs of 
life were for you in 2008 versus now. And I would submit that almost in 
every case, your water bill, your cable bill, your garbage bill, your 
utility bill, certainly the price of gasoline now, is a lot higher than 
it was in 2008. Nonetheless, you've got the same amount of money. So 
it's going to have a draconian impact, this amendment and the 
underlying bill, on the Department of Agriculture and the Food and Drug 
Administration.
  So I'm concerned. I think the gentleman is well intended to protect 
the programs that I care a great deal about. But I think the 5.8 
percent across-the-board cut on top of what we've already cut is just 
too much.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman 
from Pennsylvania (Mr. Holden).
  The question was taken; and the Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. HOLDEN. Madam Chair, I demand a recorded vote.
  The CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further proceedings on 
the amendment offered by the gentleman from Pennsylvania will be 
postponed.


                   Amendment Offered by Mr. Campbell

  Mr. CAMPBELL. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before any short title), insert the 
     following new section:
       The amount otherwise provided by this Act for 
     ``Agricultural Programs, Animal and Plant Health Inspection 
     Service, Salaries and Expenses'' is hereby reduced by 
     $11,000,000.

  The CHAIR. The gentleman from California is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. CAMPBELL. Madam Chair, this amendment really ought to be a no-
brainer. It cuts $11 million from the USDA Wildlife Services' livestock 
protection program. Let me give you four reasons why this should be a 
no-brainer.
  First of all, it saves $11 million. Not the end of the world, but 
it's a start. We all know we have to save a lot of money. We all know 
we have to spend less money, and this is a start for doing it. Now why 
does it do that? Why do we cut $11 million from this? This program is 
taxpayer money used to kill potential predators that supposedly are 
threatening livestock. But this killing of predators is very 
indiscriminate. We're killing all kinds of wildlife out there, both 
predators and nonpredators, both threatening and nonthreatening. Third, 
less than 1 percent of livestock in America is killed by predators 
every year. So we're spending this money for a tiny, tiny portion of 
the livestock that is out there. And fourth--and this is almost the 
biggest reason--why are taxpayers paying this? Why is this a taxpayer 
responsibility? If ranchers want to protect their livestock, why don't 
they do it? Why don't they pay for it?
  Madam Chair, there are so many ways to protect these livestock--with 
pens and with fencing, with lighting, with all kinds of things--without 
indiscriminately killing wildlife and without using taxpayer money to 
do it. Madam Chair, this is $11 million we can save, should save, and 
will save if this amendment is approved.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mrs. LUMMIS. Madam Chairman, I rise in opposition to the amendment.
  The CHAIR. The gentlewoman from Wyoming is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mrs. LUMMIS. Madam Chairman, the gentleman from California would be 
correct, that ranchers and farmers should be able to pay to deal with 
the predator situation. The problem is, they're not allowed to.

                              {time}  0930

  The Federal Government doesn't allow people to kill predators that 
are attacking their livestock. So consequently, here's another 
situation just like we discussed yesterday, where the government puts 
restrictions on ranchers and farmers so they cannot protect their own 
livestock. So the taxpayers--because of their demands that ranchers and 
farmers not protect their own livestock, the Federal Government steps 
in.
  In addition, though, wildlife strikes on airplanes cost U.S. 
commercial aviation $700 million a year. One part of Wildlife Services 
is when USDA works with 822 domestic airports, as well as Department of 
Defense air bases in the U.S. and in Iraq and in Afghanistan. So part 
of this is to assist with efforts to prevent conflict between wildlife 
and commercial aviation flights, some of which can be quite devastating 
and deadly.
  Furthermore, there's been an $18 million loss of sheep and lands to 
predators, or $111 million when you add cattle and calf losses. Absent 
predator management, losses would explode, and that would drive family 
farms and ranchers out of business.
  This is a very balanced program in terms of the approach it takes to 
shared responsibility between airport managers and Wildlife Services, 
ranchers and farmers and Wildlife Services. It requires a tremendous 
cost share or matching program at greater than 40 percent. The Wildlife 
Services Division

[[Page H4285]]

has more than 2,500 cooperative agreements in place across the United 
States.
  Madam Chairman, I yield to the gentleman from Minnesota (Mr. 
Peterson), former chairman of the Ag Committee.
  Mr. PETERSON. The gentlewoman is exactly right. We would be happy to 
control the predators. The problem is they won't let us. And right now 
we're going through a delisting process in Minnesota on wolves. We just 
had a meeting a couple of nights ago, a big meeting up north. And part 
of the problem is, because of the budget situation and the pressure on 
that part of the budget, they don't even have the resources at this 
point, given the existing money, to be able to come in and help us 
control the wolves.
  And they are going through a process where they're turning over the 
management to the local State DNR, and they're not allowing the farmers 
to go out there and control the predators, and they're eating their 
calves and their sheep. And there's even a program in Minnesota where 
they pay them because we can't control it. And we would be happy to, 
you know, we have been trying to get, we're happy they are finally 
being delisted. But the farmers would take care of this. But in this 
agreement it says that we can't do anything for 5 years. We can't hunt 
these wolves for 5 years.
  We also have a problem in Minnesota and other States with cormorants. 
And we entered into an agreement with Mexico that we wouldn't shoot any 
black birds since 1973 under the Migratory Bird Act, and so we can't 
control cormorants. And Wildlife Services is the only way we can deal 
with that. And we've been making some progress on it. But prior to this 
treaty, we controlled these cormorants on these lakes by the local guys 
going out and hunting them.
  So we would be happy, if we get the Federal Government to get out of 
this, to deal with it. We wouldn't need any money from the government. 
This is a problem caused by us, and that's why we need this money. And 
the last thing we need to do is reduce it. So I oppose this amendment.
  Mrs. LUMMIS. Madam Chairman, I now yield to the gentleman from 
Oklahoma (Mr. Lucas), the chairman of the Ag Committee.
  Mr. LUCAS. I thank the gentlelady for yielding.
  I too rise in opposition to this amendment. Let's face it. The 
Wildlife Services plays a critical role in protecting humans from 
dangers caused by wildlife. The Wildlife Services uses biologically 
sound and socially----
  The CHAIR. The time of the gentlewoman from Wyoming has expired.
  Mr. LUCAS. I move to strike the last word.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Oklahoma is recognized.
  Mr. DeFAZIO. Madam Chair, aren't you supposed to alternate sides? 
That was Republican time.
  The CHAIR. The Chair may alternate sides.
  Mr. DeFAZIO. I thought you usually did.
  The CHAIR. The Chair intends to let the gentleman from Oklahoma 
finish his statement.
  The gentleman from Oklahoma is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. LUCAS. Madam Chair, the Wildlife Services' usual biologically 
sound and socially acceptable methods to resolve these issues when 
agriculture and industrial production are harmed by wildlife, or public 
safety is at risk from wildlife.
  If you own a pet, you benefit from the Wildlife Services. They reduce 
rabies in wildlife populations which prevents the spread of that 
terrible disease to domestic animals and humans.
  Every time you get in a car, you benefit from the Wildlife Services. 
They work to reduce automobile collisions with deer, which affect an 
average of 29,000 people each year, cause $1 billion in damages.
  Every time you fly on a plane, you benefit from the Wildlife 
Services. They have people working in all 50 States to prevent 
dangerous aircraft collisions with birds.
  How can we forget Captain Sullenberger's heroic landing on the Hudson 
River after Flight 1549 hit a bird at takeoff? And while we applaud the 
captain's achievement, there is no question that reducing these 
dangerous collisions must be a priority in the future.
  And the largest portion of the Wildlife Services' budget, 43 percent, 
is spent on protecting human health and safety. Often Wildlife Services 
is the first line of defense against health risks involving everything 
from West Nile virus to avian flu, to Lyme disease. They prevent 
disease exposure to humans, livestock and wildlife.
  And what's more, Wildlife Services is one of the few Federal agencies 
that requires private sector matching funds on a 1-1 basis. It's 
unfortunate that there are not more Federal programs as fiscally 
responsible as the Wildlife Services.
  Yet, every year, animal rights groups opposed to the predator control 
conducted by the joint USDA Wildlife Services programs attempt to 
eliminate the funding from this vital program. And every year Congress 
rejects these attempts. That's because the wildlife cause $126 million 
in livestock losses for producers, field crop losses totaling $619 
million, specialty crop losses at $146 million. All told, wildlife 
causes $12.8 billion in damage every year to natural resources, public 
infrastructure, private property and agriculture.
  Without the predatory management done by Wildlife Services, losses 
would explode, driving family farms and ranchers out of business. 
Cutting funding for the Wildlife Services would be both costly and 
dangerous. Doing so also ignores the proven science behind Wildlife 
Services work, as well as their commitment to minimizing wildlife 
mortality.
  This amendment's not scientifically sound, and it's certainly not 
economically minded. I urge my colleagues to oppose it, continue the 
funding for the Wildlife Services' efforts to protect you, your 
property, your pets.
  Mr. DeFAZIO. I move to strike the requisite number of words.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Oregon is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. DeFAZIO. Actually, I have experience with this. When I was a 
county commissioner and we were on some tough times, we said, we're not 
going to continue this program. We dropped our share. Heard all the 
same myths. Oh, my God, the deprivation. We're going to lose all our 
sheep; we're going to lose all our cattle. We're going to have these 
horrible things happen. Know what happened? Nothing. They took care of 
the problem themselves. A coyote comes on your property in proximity to 
your property, you can kill it. That's a myth. You can kill it. Sure 
you can. There's this limited exemption regarding endangered species 
which is apparently a problem in some States, not in ours. They just 
killed some wolves in eastern Oregon because they were concerned that 
they might have the caused predation.
  Now, let's talk about this subsidy. It's unnecessary. It's 
ineffective. And it's a taxpayer subsidy. I mean, are you guys serious 
about cutting the deficit or not? Why give private ranching interests 
subsidies to do something they should do themselves?

                              {time}  0940

  There is no good reason to do that. Now you're going to say, oh, 
we're worried about aircraft. Well, no. We're only cutting in one 
budget, which is $13.7 million, which is the Livestock Protection 
Program.
  Now, of course he said it's incredibly cost effective. It's been 
about $1 billion that's been spent on this program during its duration 
by the Federal Government, $1 billion. And during that time--because 
they're not following biology or any sensibility--the coyote population 
has tripled despite the $1 billion. In Colorado, they fly around in 
planes and shoot coyotes; it costs about 100 bucks a coyote. There are 
more coyotes now than there were when Animal Damage Control started 
these programs.
  They don't understand pack behavior and what causes dispersion. 
They've got coyotes now in parts of the country where they haven't seen 
them for 100 years. It's a really effective program; it's working 
really well. It has nothing to do with geese or any of that. That's 
another part of Wildlife Services. That is not the subsidy to private 
ranching interests to conduct lethal predator control.
  And then they do some other great things. They have these nifty 
little devices, they're called M-44s. It's basically a baited cyanide 
shot shell. Now,

[[Page H4286]]

it has sickened some humans--hasn't killed any yet. Has killed quite a 
number of domestic animals. Sooner or later it's going to kill a kid. 
Some kid is going to be pulling on that little string saying, gee, I 
wonder what this does--BAM, cyanide shot shell. Now, that's really 
discriminate. That's really effective. That's the same program that has 
helped triple the population of coyotes out there over the last 80 
years since these programs have existed.
  So you can come up with all sorts of whoo-ha and say, oh, it has to 
do with Captain Sullenberger. No. It has to do with we can't shoot 
these things ourselves, no. I mean, just face it, if you want to 
subsidize ranching interests, just be honest about it and say we want 
to borrow $11 million in the name of the American taxpayers and give it 
to private ranching interests. That's it, plain and simple, yes or no.
  Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman 
from California (Mr. Campbell).
  The question was taken; and the Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. CAMPBELL. Madam Chair, I demand a recorded vote.
  The CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further proceedings on 
the amendment offered by the gentleman from California will be 
postponed.


                     Amendment Offered by Mr. Flake

  Mr. FLAKE. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before any short title), insert the 
     following new section:

       Sec. __.  None of the funds made available by this Act may 
     be used to provide (or to pay the salaries and expenses of 
     personnel to provide) to upland cotton producers counter-
     cyclical payments for upland cotton under section 1104 of the 
     Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (7 U.S.C. 8714), 
     repayment rates for marketing assistance loans under section 
     1204(b) of such Act (7 U.S.C. 8734(b)) at the prevailing 
     world market price for upland cotton, cotton storage benefits 
     under section 1204(g) of such Act (7 U.S.C. 8734(g)), or loan 
     deficiency payments for upland cotton under section 1205 of 
     such Act (7 U.S.C. 8735).

  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Arizona is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. FLAKE. Madam Chair, as I'm certain my colleagues are aware by 
now, in 2002 Brazil filed a complaint with the WTO accusing the U.S. of 
trade-distorting cotton subsidies that were inconsistent with our 
international trade obligations. The WTO sided with Brazil; and after 
years of debate, a WTO arbitration panel authorized Brazil to engage in 
retaliatory trade sanctions against the U.S. for more than $800 
million.
  Instead of effectively reforming our programs, however, the 
administration agreed to pay $147.3 million annually in technical 
assistance to Brazilian cotton farmers every year until the issues of 
trade compliance in our cotton programs are resolved in the next farm 
bill's passage or a mutually agreed upon solution is reached. There is 
little chance that we're going to have reauthorization this year of the 
farm bill. I would suggest that it's probably not likely that we will 
do so next year either.
  So here we are again. We've talked about this before: spending money, 
147 million taxpayer dollars to the Brazilians, so that we can continue 
to subsidize our own cotton farmers. We simply shouldn't do that.
  Now some will say, hey, if we do this, it will spark a trade war, if 
we get rid of this payment to Brazil. In my view, we dealt with that 
effectively in the Appropriations Committee. I offered an amendment 
saying if you want to pay the Brazilians off to not have them retaliate 
for our trade protections, then let's do that out of the money we're 
giving to our own cotton farmers. So take out of direct payments $147 
million and pay that. That amendment was adopted in the Appropriations 
Committee.
  Well, guess what? A point of order was raised here and that amendment 
was stricken, so we couldn't do that. So all this concern--people say 
they're concerned about the taxpayer, well, we protected the taxpayer 
there by saying let's take the money out of the fund that we already 
pay our own farmers and pay off the Brazilians. That was rejected here. 
And so here we are again.
  We have an amendment that will be voted on later, the Kind amendment, 
which will simply strike that payment. I plan to vote for that 
amendment; I hope we do that. But another way of approaching that as 
well is to simply go at our own cotton subsidies to ensure that we're 
not distorting the market by doing this program in the first place.
  Now the Ag Committee will say, that's our expertise, let us deal with 
that; we'll deal with that in a new farm bill. Well, they dealt with 
that in the old farm bill, and many of us stood here and warned and 
said this is trade distorting; the WTO is going to rule against us and 
we're going to end up with retaliatory trade sanctions.
  Well, the Ag Committee went ahead and did it anyway. It didn't fix 
the problem. They will say, well, we tried, we tried. But it's not the 
direct payments that are the problem. It's the countercyclical, it's 
the other programs that we have. And until that is dealt with, we're 
going to have these trade sanctions.
  So when the Ag Committee stands up and says let us deal with that, I 
would remind people we have let them deal with that, and they haven't 
dealt with it. And so we have to go about it in another way.
  I would simply say we cannot continue to subsidize our own ag 
interests this way, in particular this cotton program, when we know 
it's out of step with our international trade obligations.
  So you can go about it in two ways. You can go ahead and say, hey, 
we're going to not pay Brazil this amount, this protection money--or 
whatever you want to call it, this tribute--and then that will force us 
to deal with our own cotton subsidies; or we can deal with the cotton 
subsidies ourselves with this amendment and simply say we aren't going 
to do these trade-distorting cotton subsidies anymore. Then there won't 
be a need to pay Brazil off.
  So that's what this amendment does. I would urge adoption of it.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. CONAWAY. Madam Chair, I move to strike the last word.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Texas is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. CONAWAY. Madam Chair, I'm going to oppose my good friend from 
Arizona's amendment. He tried this in the CR 1 and lost this vote. This 
is a bad way to attack this policy.
  Quite frankly, the Ag Committee did a good-faith effort in addressing 
what we thought were the issues in 2008 with a farm bill by doing away 
with Step Two and other programs. Quite frankly, though, the Brazilians 
won't lay out for us exactly what it is about our policies that they 
don't like. We would be happy for the gentleman to elucidate that for 
us, if he can describe exactly what those policies are. It's not the 
countercyclical payments; it's not the marketing loan payments. It's 
other things that we've been trying to fix, and we will attempt again 
to fix those in 2012.
  This safety net that he attacks with a meat cleaver instead of a 
scalpel is important to production agriculture in this country. As 
we've said over and over these microphones the last 3 days, America has 
always had an ag policy that attempts to put a safety net under 
production agriculture.
  We enjoy the safest, most abundant, cheapest food and fiber supply in 
the world because of the hard work, the sweat equity, and the risk-
taking of the American ag producer. They rely on this safety net that 
is intricate, it's complicated, it's interwoven, and it works.
  We understand in 2012 we will have far fewer resources with which to 
work that safety net. And the Ag Committee is committed to getting that 
done; the chairman is committed to getting that done. We will then 
bring that work product to this floor. The gentleman from Arizona will 
then have the opportunity, if he doesn't think we've fixed the 
Brazilian problem, to present a solution at that time.

                              {time}  0950

  But at this stage, using an appropriations bill to rework the farm 
bill in this manner and ignoring the work of the Ag Committee in my 
view is wrong policy. We should defeat this amendment once again, as we 
did in the CR in February-March. I ask my colleagues to vote against 
the Flake amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.

[[Page H4287]]

  Mr. PETERSON. Madam Chair, I move to strike the last word.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Minnesota is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. PETERSON. I also rise to oppose this amendment. As the gentleman 
from Texas has indicated, we have been trying to resolve this. We made 
significant changes already and there are some ongoing consultations or 
whatever you want to call them with the Brazilians. But he is right: 
They will not lay out what they actually want to resolve this 
situation, and frankly, from what I can see, I don't think there is 
anything that we can do that they will agree to. So we are trying to 
work through this.
  But as I said when we had this discussion yesterday, it is very 
troubling to me that we are in this situation. With the way this WTO 
operates, the Brazilians have the most closed market in the world. You 
try to get any products into Brazil, and it is almost impossible. But 
do we care about that? No. They are spending I don't know how many 
billions of dollars of government money to increase production and 
increase agriculture in Brazil, way more than we are spending, and do 
we complain about that? No.
  Some people say it is because of the agreements that we have entered 
into. Who knows exactly what it is. But the Brazilians are not lily 
white in all of this. They are utilizing some of the flaws in the WTO 
agreement to push this cause, and, frankly, we have let them do it.
  So this needs to get dealt with in the regular order in the farm 
bill. This is not the place to do this on the floor of the House. We 
will deal with it. I think the chairman will back me up on that. We 
would love to have the Brazilians tell us what it is that they will 
agree to so we can resolve this. These discussions are ongoing. 
Hopefully they will be more forthcoming and we can get an answer to 
what it is that will solve this problem. Frankly, from my experience, I 
wouldn't hold my breath. So we will see.
  So I oppose this amendment and I ask my colleagues to oppose it. This 
is the wrong place to do it.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. LUCAS. Madam Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Oklahoma is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. LUCAS. Madam Chairman, I really kind of thought we were working 
on the annual agriculture appropriations bill, with the discretionary 
money, the programs that are handled on a year-to-year basis, but it 
seems we are going to debate the farm bill. I guess if that is the 
case, I should be managing it and let me just do it a year early.
  The short statement is, like my colleagues Mr. Conaway and Mr. 
Peterson, I rise in strong opposition to this amendment. This amendment 
would turn an industry on its head. It would do no good.
  My good friend from Arizona has come to the floor and implied this 
would solve the trade dispute between the United States and Brazil. It 
would do no such thing. Mr. Flake has called this the Brazilian cotton 
problem, but the dispute is much more complicated than just cotton and 
actually involves export programs. This amendment wipes out the safety 
net established in 2008. For what reason? This is the kind of amendment 
you get when you have so-called experts offering amendments in areas 
outside their field of expertise.
  This is a devastating amendment. This would throw the cotton market 
into disarray. We have no assurance, as the ranking member and the 
General Farm Commodities Subcommittee chairman have noted, no assurance 
from the Brazilians that if we eliminated the cotton program, as this 
amendment basically does, that it would make any difference to them.
  As my colleagues have noted, we made huge changes in the 2008 farm 
bill, eliminating step two, changing the GSM program in a way we 
thought would satisfy the Brazilians. This amendment would circumvent 
the legislative process in what can only be described as a haphazard 
way.
  Honestly, I really expected this amendment to be thrown out on a 
point of order because it clearly, clearly would end the 
countercyclical program for cotton, significantly changes how the 
repayment program works, eliminates the loan deficiency payments, and 
eliminates the cotton storage program. Those are major policy changes.
  Again, this appropriation bill is 13 percent down. We are almost back 
to 2006 levels. Anyone who is concerned about what is being spent on 
the production of agriculture in rural America, take note; we are doing 
our part today under Mr. Kingston's bill. And when we get to the farm 
bill, be it next summer in regular order, be it this fall as part of 
some grandiose budget deficit-debt ceiling agreement, we will make 
incredibly tough decisions, because we will have to be a big part of 
addressing the national budgetary issue.
  But let us do it in regular order. Let us do it in the farm bill 
process. Speaker Boehner has said time and time again, a more open 
process. Look at the appropriations process. We are going to do a farm 
bill under this open process. All of my good friends here will get to 
use all of their agricultural expertise in every conceivable way they 
can. But let's do it in regular order, in the proper fashion, in the 
proper way.
  Again, Madam Chairman, I urge my colleagues to reject this amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. FARR. Madam Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from California is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. FARR. I rise with great concerns about this amendment, because I 
don't think it does what the author intends it to do. All it does is 
say none of the funds made available in this act--this act, not other 
acts, not other bills that the chair and ranking member pass in their 
committees--can be used for countercyclical payments to upland cotton 
producers. There is nothing in here about Brazil. This doesn't affect 
Brazil. But this does affect a lot of cotton growers in a lot of 
States, including the State of California, which is one of the leading 
cotton-producing States.
  If this amendment was constructive, I think you would find a lot more 
support for it, but I don't find it being very constructive because it 
only limits it to cuts in this bill and not to what the underlying 
problems are all about, which is covered in many other acts than this 
one.
  Mr. FLAKE. Will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. FARR. I yield to the gentleman from Arizona.
  Mr. FLAKE. I thank the gentleman.
  I recognize the appropriations process isn't the best way to 
legislate, it really isn't, and this is a clumsy way. This only applies 
to this act, and you have to do it in strange ways. I understand that.
  But we are told that we ought to rely on the expertise of the Ag 
Committee. Well, the expertise of the Ag Committee is what got us into 
this problem in the first place. It is what got us into the problem of 
having to pay Brazil in order to continue to subsidize our own farmers. 
That is what we are dealing with here.
  I recognize this is clumsy. I recognize this is uncomfortable. But we 
have got to do this some way, and we can't rely on just waiting until 
the next farm bill is passed. It may not be this year, or likely won't 
be. It won't be next year, or likely won't yet. So we could be doing 
this for years. So I recognize it is clumsy, I apologize for that, but 
we have to do something at some point.
  Mr. FARR. Reclaiming my time, with all due respect, I don't think the 
Agriculture Committee created the Brazilian problem. It was not the 
committee's act that created it. It was what the Brazilians did in 
their ability to become a major agricultural production country. And 
they are going after production in other countries. They have got 
connections with their government much closer between producers and 
government than we have here. They are buying out companies. They are 
going to really try to affect farm prices in the United States. I will 
tell you, the next place they are going to go after is specialty crops.
  So I am not a big fan, as you know. I spoke last night with concerns 
about getting these payment limitations down and to essentially trying 
to find a better program that is not so costly to the taxpayers. But 
you don't do anything beneficial with this money, you just cut it. And 
I am here to do things using money, taxpayers' money, to do the wise 
thing.

[[Page H4288]]

                              {time}  1000

  It doesn't affect the outcome at all. It just penalizes certain 
people that happen to be in the cotton business. And I don't think that 
I want to support an amendment that isn't constructive.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. NEUGEBAUER. I move to strike the last word.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Texas is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. NEUGEBAUER. Thank you, Madam Chairman.
  American farmers and ranchers are citizens, too. I represent West 
Texas District 19 in Texas; 29,000 square miles, 27 counties, made up 
of a lot of farmers and ranchers and farm families and ranch families. 
They're concerned about the deficit as well. They're concerned about 
the growing debt and the legacy that that will leave for our children 
and our grandchildren. They're willing to step up and take their share 
of the burden of being able to get our country headed back on the right 
track again. In fact, that process started in the 2008 farm bill, where 
a lot of these farm programs were reduced. And for the last few years, 
for example, countercyclical payments have been nearly nil in many of 
those commodities because the program was operating the way it was 
designed.
  So I appreciate my colleague's efforts to be a budget hawk and in 
many ways and at many times I have supported a lot of his amendments 
and ideas, but today I come to the floor saying that this is not the 
place to write the farm bill; that we have that process coming up next 
year. Farm families are stepping up in this particular appropriation 
bill. As the chairman so appropriately pointed out, major cuts to 
agricultural programs occur in the bill that we're considering today.
  So I'm going to urge my colleagues, let's write the farm bill when 
it's time to write the farm bill. Let's put together programs that are 
good for production agriculture. I would remind a lot of folks that 
when we look at this farm bill, a lot of people don't understand all of 
the things that are in this. And it's called a farm bill, ag 
appropriation bill. But quite honestly, a majority of this bill is 
about food stamps, it's about nutrition programs, and a very smaller 
percentage of this bill really has anything to do with production 
agriculture. And I think one of the things that we have to be extremely 
careful about here, and that's the reason we need to get this right and 
that's the reason we need to do it in regular order, is today America 
is dependent on 70 percent of its oil in this country. In other words, 
every day we get up, 70 percent of our oil has to be imported in this 
country. And just recently, the United States of America, half of its 
credit is due to foreign countries.
  And so today we are importing oil. Today, we have to import money to 
finance our deficits. And what we want to be extremely careful about is 
that in the future Americans don't have to wake up and determine who's 
going to feed them because we have eliminated the farm industry in this 
country. And so I think that's the reason it's important to do this 
carefully. It's important to do it right. And I look forward as a 
member of the Ag Committee, as we move into 2012, sitting down with my 
colleagues and writing farm policy that will be good for America, be 
good for our budget long term, and that's the appropriate time to do 
that. So I'm going to urge my colleagues to vote against this 
amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. I move to strike the last word.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Oregon is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. I rise in support of the amendment from my good 
friend from Arizona. I appreciate his work over the years as we've 
tried to refocus attention and our resources in areas that are more 
productive for most American farmers and ranchers, for the taxpayer, 
and for the general economy.
  I just heard my good friend talk about his concern about who's going 
to feed America in the future. Well, the issue of having these lavish 
agricultural subsidies that are concentrated three-quarters in the top 
10 producers, and they are not people who are in the main producing 
food, the fruits and vegetables that people care about that would add 
to nutrition. The people that are in my agricultural community in 
Oregon are basically shut out. 87% don't receive it. They are not 
getting support for some of the things that are market neutral in terms 
of marketing, in terms of research that's being slashed, in terms of 
commonsense support for meeting their environmental objectives to 
protect clean water and habitat.
  Being able to start tamping this down is essential. The AGI 
limitation, the one that I had on the floor last night that would limit 
the total amount of payment, these are things that there's never a good 
time to deal with them. I've been through three farm bill cycles. I've 
heard the body express itself in terms of instructions to the conferees 
and watched them disregard it when it came, for example, to limitation 
of payment.
  I would like to turn to my friend from Arizona to yield some time. 
Before I do, I just want to correct one misapprehension that is 
floating around about the amendment that we had on the floor last night 
that limited title 1 payments to $125,000 per entity.
  Now, some people are pretending that this would somehow affect 
disaster payments or crop insurance. No. It is just title 1 payments. 
It's very simple. It's set forth in the bill. Anybody can read it. And 
it's not going to deal, for example, with disaster payments. But on 
this note, I would like to yield to my good friend from Arizona, 
thanking him for his continued partnership and advocacy in this area.
  Mr. FLAKE. I thank the gentleman. I want to thank the gentleman for 
his work in this area for a long time over the years to try to end 
these out-of-step programs that we have in the agricultural field. Let 
me just correct something that was said before. It was said that we're 
in this position because of Brazil, because of the practices that 
they're doing. No. It's because our own agricultural policy--in this 
case, our cotton subsidies--is trade distorting. Nobody can stand up in 
this body or on this floor and make a case otherwise. Nobody can stand 
up with a straight face and say that our cotton program that we have is 
not trade distorting. That's why we're in this problem. That's why 
Brazil was able to take this case to the WTO, and the WTO ruled in 
their favor--because we have trade distorting farm policies. That's 
what we need to fix. That's the intent of this amendment.
  There was an amendment last night by Congressman Kind that will be 
voted on later today. I may not and likely will not call for a rollcall 
on this one so that people can focus on that one. The Kind amendment 
limits payments to Brazil. If we do that, then we can force a change in 
our own policy, and we can force that issue better than perhaps any 
other amendment right now. So that's what I would encourage people to 
vote for, is the Kind amendment, when it comes to a rollcall later. If 
you do not believe that it's proper to be sending money to Brazil to 
address our own trade distorting cotton policy, then vote for the Kind 
amendment later today.
  I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. I appreciate his clarification. I agree 
wholeheartedly with his sentiment. It's insane that instead of changing 
our trade-distorting, unjustified subsidies, that we're instead going 
to subsidize the cotton industry both in the United States and in 
Brazil. It's certainly not the approach that we should be taking at a 
time when we're going to have to do business differently. We talk about 
people getting economic haircuts. What happens today is that 31 
congressional districts get more than half of all the subsidies. They, 
not coincidentally, are districts that are concentrated on the Ag 
Committee and have a different perspective than the majority of the 
people in the House.
  I'm hopeful we can work our will with these amendments.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman 
from Arizona (Mr. Flake).
  The amendment was rejected.


                     Amendment Offered by Mr. Lujan

  Mr. LUJAN. I have an amendment at the desk.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), insert the 
     following:

[[Page H4289]]

       Sec. __. None of the fund made available by this Act may be 
     used by the Under Secretary of Agriculture for Marketing and 
     Regulatory Programs to provide any marketing funds to any 
     entity that advertises, describes, labels, or offers for sale 
     chile peppers (also known as capsicum annum) as New Mexico 
     chile unless such chile peppers were grown in New Mexico.

                              {time}  1010

  Mrs. LUMMIS. Madam Chairman, I reserve a point of order on the 
gentleman's amendment.
  The CHAIR. A point of order is reserved.
  The gentleman from New Mexico is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. LUJAN. Thank you, Madam Chair.
  I rise today to offer an amendment that will protect New Mexico chile 
farmers from unfair marketing practices. Lately we've seen a disturbing 
trend where marketers and retailers falsely use the unique quality and 
brand of New Mexico chile to misleadingly advertise their products. New 
Mexico is a special place where we take pride in our agricultural 
products. In particular, we take pride in our chile. We even spell it 
differently, Madam Chair. We spell it C-H-I-L-E, contrary to the more 
popular spelling C-H-I-L-I most associated with Texas style chili. 
Traveling around New Mexico, I've heard the plight of New Mexico 
farmers. There is concern with the importation of peppers, of chili 
powders from out of State and even from other countries that are 
hurting our producers in New Mexico. It's a concern that they may be 
put out of business, and it's a concern that is attacking the authentic 
New Mexico chile brand.
  This unfair practice has led to decreased revenues for New Mexico 
chile farmers, who work all summer and diligently to raise their crops 
for harvest in the fall months and whose prices are undercut by 
imported products that falsely advertise as New Mexico chile.
  Madam Chair, my amendment is simple and would not impose any costs on 
the Federal Government. My amendment would prevent any funds from this 
bill from being used to advertise, describe, label or offer for sale 
chile peppers as New Mexico chile, unless the chile peppers used are 
grown in New Mexico.
  This amendment is important to the protection of New Mexico's local 
chile producers, and I urge my colleagues to support this amendment and 
protect this unique agricultural product. As we know, Madam Chair, 
anyone who's tried it loves it.
  I yield back the balance of my time.


                             Point of Order

  Mrs. LUMMIS. Madam Chairman, I make a point of order against the 
amendment. It is violative of clause 2 of rule XXI because it proposes 
changes that require a new determination that is not within the purview 
and scope of the current bill.
  I respectfully ask for a ruling from the Chair.
  The CHAIR. Does any other Member wish to be heard on the point of 
order?
  The gentleman from New Mexico is recognized.
  Mr. LUJAN. Madam Chair, on the point of order, sadly, I think this 
may be ruled out of order, but I would ask that maybe there is an 
opportunity for the committee to work with myself not only as we get to 
the farm bill but also with the Ag Committee as we talk about the 
importance of this important product in New Mexico and its impact 
there, and I would certainly respectfully request from our friends on 
the other side of the aisle that maybe we can get a chance to work with 
one another.
  I would be happy to yield, Madam Chair.
  The CHAIR. The gentlewoman from Wyoming is recognized on the point of 
order.
  Mrs. LUMMIS. Madam Chair, the committee would be very pleased to work 
with the gentleman from New Mexico and myself in particular since my 
daughter is a new resident of your State.
  The CHAIR. The Chair is prepared to rule.
  The Chair finds that this amendment imposes new duties on the 
Secretary, specifically a duty to determine the activities of entities 
receiving certain funds in the bill. The amendment therefore 
constitutes legislation in violation of clause 2 of rule XXI.
  The point of order is sustained, and the amendment is not in order.


                  Amendment Offered by Mrs. Blackburn

  Mrs. BLACKBURN. I have an amendment at the desk.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), insert the 
     following:
       Sec. __.  Each amount made available by this Act (other 
     than an amount required to be made available by a provision 
     of law) is hereby reduced by 5 percent.

  The CHAIR. The gentlewoman from Tennessee is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mrs. BLACKBURN. Thank you, Madam Chairman.
  As you can see, this is a very simple bill. My amendment would 
require every single agency covered in this Ag appropriations bill to 
be accountable to the taxpayers by reducing one nickel out of a dollar 
for what they have been given to spend. It requires all accounts to 
absorb that equally, that 5 percent reduction, and it will keep the 
bureaucracy from picking winners and losers or choosing to fund their 
pet programs. Certainly the amendment will save the taxpayers money, 
but this is also a stand for good government. It's about taking 
responsibility, not torturing the American taxpayer with excuses for 
ineffective and inefficient bureaucracies.
  There are a lot of people that say the Appropriations Committee 
deserves a pat on the back for decreasing discretionary spending by 4.7 
percent below the 2008 levels, and I agree with that. I think they are 
to be commended. Certainly off the President's request, the 13 percent 
reduction that they have made. I'm part of that effort that has pushed 
to return our spending to the pre-stimulus, pre-bailout levels, but 
there is more that must be done. We have to make our government leaner. 
We have to make it more effective. Every day, Americans are tightening 
their belts. They're asking government to do the very same thing. 
Tennesseans keep saying, why is it that government keeps asking us to 
sacrifice for it when government should be sacrificing for us? Every 
Federal program needs to be held accountable, and this is a way to do 
it. Our States have done across-the-board cuts. Our city governments 
have done across-the-board cuts. Even history will show you that twice 
before, our Presidents have pushed for across-the-board cuts: World War 
II, Korean Conflict, there were 28 percent and 30 percent across-the-
board cuts in discretionary spending. The reason they did this, Madam 
Chairman, is because there was a crisis, there was a war, there was a 
need to restructure, to reorder and to address the priorities of the 
day.
  One of my constituents came up to me recently--this is someone who is 
active in the ag community in our State--and she said, ``It is time 
that the bureaucracies get their house in order. It is time that you 
all in Congress stop spending money you don't have on programs we don't 
want.''
  So as we do our due diligence on the spending process, as we act 
responsibly to our constituents and to the taxpayer, it is time for us 
to turn to the bureaucracies, the rank-and-file Federal employees who 
put the pen to the paper on how this money gets spent, and say to them, 
``Find another nickel on a dollar.'' We're doing it for the children, 
we are doing it for our grandchildren, we're doing it to make certain 
that we stop borrowing 40 cents of every dollar that is spent.
  This amendment would reduce the budget authority by $951 million. It 
would reduce the current outlays by $675 million. That would be spread 
equally at a 5 percent rate across every single agency. It can be done, 
and, Madam Chairman, in these times of crisis, it should be done as we 
seek to return this Nation to fiscal stability and to responsibility.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. KINGSTON. Madam Chair, I rise in opposition to the amendment.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Georgia is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. KINGSTON. First of all, I want to thank my good friend from 
Tennessee for offering this amendment and her tireless work to try to 
reduce spending in our country, and I absolutely agree with all the 
statements that she has made.
  I do want to point out, though, that the only budget that has passed 
either body is the Ryan budget. I supported, as I know she did, the RSC 
budget,

[[Page H4290]]

which is actually more conservative, but it did not pass. At least we 
did get a budget passed on the House floor. The Senate was unable to do 
that. Even though the Democrats are the majority party over there, the 
Senate rejected the President's budget 97-0, and apparently now they've 
given up and they're not going to try to pass a budget. The only bill 
that we have an opportunity to move is under the Ryan budget, which is 
what this bill reflects. It is a 13.4--actually it's higher than that 
because we cut it last night a little bit more, or we did some across-
the-boards, but it's about a 13.4 percent cut already.

                              {time}  1020

  Where the big money is--and I know my friend from Tennessee is as 
frustrated about this as I am--is in the mandatory spending. In fact, I 
have a chart over there. We don't have any pages or I'd bring it up 
here on the floor; but 86 percent of this budget is mandatory spending, 
and I use the word ``mandatory'' loosely because it's really on 
automatic spending. That's where the big money is. Unfortunately, we 
can't get to it. This portion that we do have control over used to be 
$23 billion; and right now, under our budget, it's $17.2 billion.
  Let me show my friend this because I think it's very important. The 
blue line is the mandatory spending of the Agriculture budget, and the 
red line is the discretionary spending. The point is that this 
committee has jurisdiction over the red line. We do not on this 
committee have jurisdiction over the blue line. Yet you can see the 
blue line is the one that's going up and that the red line is the one 
that's actually going down.
  So that's one of my frustrations about the entire process and about 
the rules which we're governed by; but I want to make sure that my 
friend knows, under the portion we do control, that we did cut it 13.4 
percent.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. FARR. I move to strike the last word.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from California is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. FARR. I rise in opposition to this amendment.
  It doesn't do any of the things that the author talked about. It's a 
one-sentence bill. This is a legal bill. We are here as lawmakers. It 
says that each amount made available by this act other than the amount 
required to be made available by provision of law, which is the one 
part that Mr. Kingston just talked about, is hereby reduced by 5 
percent.
  That's all it says. There is nothing about accountability. The 
accountability goes on before our committee. That's what we do. We go 
over every item in the USDA's and FDA's budgets and in a public process 
where there is input and give-and-take. We do the scrutiny every year. 
That's what the Appropriations Committee is all about. It makes good 
press releases to get up here and say that, if you cut, squeeze and 
trim, government is going to get a lot better; but then they don't 
practice it in their own offices or in their own lifestyles. They just 
demand that, by just cutting out money, people who give services to 
people can't give those services.
  So this amendment doesn't do anything that the author talks about 
except to whack a budget that was already whacked. It was whacked by 
the allocation given to us. As I pointed out, it's $5 billion less. 
It's almost 23 percent less than what the President requested. It's 14 
percent below what Congress enacted last year. It's 26 percent below 
what we enacted in 2010. It's even below what we enacted in 2008. Last 
night, we cut across the board. We did what this amendment does, in a 
very small proportion; but we used that money beneficially to adjust 
for the WIC program. So just whacking it across the board by 5 percent 
isn't going to cause any good for anybody, and I oppose the amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from Tennessee (Mrs. Blackburn).
  The question was taken; and the Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mrs. BLACKBURN. Madam Chair, I demand a recorded vote.
  The CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further proceedings on 
the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from Tennessee will be 
postponed.


                     Amendment Offered by Mr. Flake

  Mr. FLAKE. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), insert the 
     following:
       Sec. __.  None of the funds made available by this Act may 
     be used for the construction of an ethanol blender pump or an 
     ethanol storage facility.

  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Arizona is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. FLAKE. This is a rather straightforward amendment. I should say, 
before I start, that an identical amendment to this was approved when 
we voted on H.R. 1 earlier this year by a vote of 261-158.
  Mr. KINGSTON. Will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. FLAKE. I yield to the gentleman from Georgia.
  Mr. KINGSTON. I supported this when you offered it on the continuing 
resolution, and I plan to support it today.
  Mr. FLAKE. Okay. Then, reclaiming my time, I will be very brief.
  The ethanol industry, as we all know, receives a trifecta of 
government support. Its use is mandated by law. It is protected by a 
prohibitive import tariff on imported ethanol; and it receives billions 
in subsidies, effectively paying them to follow the law.
  Everyone knows that ethanol subsidies are going to go away. Thirty 
years is enough. I mean, even Al Gore and others who supported them in 
the beginning said, no, that was a mistake, and we're going the other 
direction now. So ethanol supports--or direct subsidies or the import 
tariffs--are going to go.
  The industry is asking, How can we keep these subsidies going? The 
effort now is to pay for infrastructure, so the Secretary of 
Agriculture, Secretary Vilsack, has indicated that he wants the USDA to 
determine how it can potentially use programs to promote the 
distribution and storage--blender pumps--and how to put money into 
infrastructure. As we all know, once you start putting money into 
infrastructure, then you say, well, we've already put some money in, 
and we've got to continue to do it, so those subsidies will continue 
and continue and continue.
  We cannot continue to do this, Madam Chair. We cannot continue to 
fund this, particularly when we are borrowing 40 cents on the dollar. I 
would urge the adoption of the amendment, and I am glad that the 
chairman supports it.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. PETERSON. I move to strike the last word.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Minnesota is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. PETERSON. I rise in opposition to the amendment. We are, once 
again, debating ethanol. There is so much misrepresentation and 
misunderstanding of what's going on.
  The ethanol industry has been one of the best things that has 
happened in rural America. We have created a tremendous amount of jobs 
in small towns that otherwise get bypassed, and they've been very 
successful. The way we've been able to do it up to this point is 
through the blend, by having people blend 10 percent ethanol. The EPA 
is approving going to 15 percent ethanol, but the industry has hit what 
they call a ``blend wall.''
  Now, the blend was basically driven by the fact that the refineries 
and oil companies needed octane. Gasoline is low in octane and high in 
Btus. Ethanol is high in octane and low in Btus. Back in the old days, 
we used lead to raise the octane level. Then when lead was banned, the 
oil companies decided to create MTBE. We warned them against that, but 
they went ahead and built the MTBE plants, which, it turned out, 
poisoned the water in a number of cities in the United States. Then the 
oil companies and refineries went to the ethanol blend, which they 
should have done in the first place. That's working, but we're at a 
limit now.
  If we're going to move ahead, we have to have access to the 
marketplace. The problem that we have is that we don't have the cars 
like Brazil

[[Page H4291]]

has which can burn different levels of ethanol, and we don't have the 
pumps in the gas stations so that people can have access to ethanol. If 
we're going to get rid of the VTAC and the other programs that we have 
in ethanol, we're okay with that as long as the consumers have the 
ability to make the choice at the station. If they want to burn 
ethanol, they've got to have the ability to be able to do that.
  So we need to get the pumps in the station. We need to get the car 
companies to start building vehicles like they do in Brazil, which run 
a 25-30 percent blend. The American companies are building these cars 
in Brazil. Every gas station in Brazil has ethanol as opposed to those 
in the United States. That's one of the reasons they have been so 
successful and why they are now completely independent from any foreign 
sources of fuel for their vehicles.
  What we're trying to do here is eventually eliminate the subsidies 
that people have complained about--the VTAC and other things.

                              {time}  1030

  But in order for us to be able to maintain this industry and maintain 
these jobs in rural America, we have to be able to have the 
infrastructure. We have to have the blended pumps. We have to have the 
cars. The right blend is 25/30 percent. You will get the best 
performance, the best mileage. Brazil has figured this out. They've 
been doing this for a long time. Their blend is 26 percent. We have 
people that have put in amendments that say we can't blend above 10 
percent. We have this foolishness about how it is going to ruin small 
engines and so forth. This argument has been going on since 1975, and 
you know, we've been blending ethanol, we haven't ruined any engines 
yet.
  So we need to defeat this amendment because this goes in the wrong 
direction. If you want a market that's open and lets consumers have a 
choice, the way to do it is to get the infrastructure in place. I ask 
my colleagues to oppose this amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. WELCH. I move to strike the last word.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Vermont is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. WELCH. Madam Chairman, I rise in support of the amendment, and I 
do it with great deference and respect to my leader, the ranking member 
of the Agriculture Committee.
  But here's the issue. One, at what point do we have taxpayers given 
relief from these $6 billion subsidies to an industry? The ethanol 
industry gets 45 cents a gallon. They get the benefit of 54 cents as a 
protective tariff against the import of, among others, Brazilian 
ethanol, and then they get a mandate requiring that they put ethanol in 
their vehicles. Now, as Mr. Flake mentioned, that's a trifecta: 
subsidy, protective tariff, and a mandate. No other industry has that 
level of Federal taxpayer and legislative benefit. We just don't have 
it.
  Second, this is helping parts of rural America. I listened carefully 
to what Mr. Peterson said, but it is causing significant difficulties 
in my State for our dairy farmers who purchase grain. One of the rising 
costs for them is the cost of grain, and one of the factors in that are 
these tariff barriers and mandates that are pushing up their costs. So 
it's making life on the dairy farm pretty tough.
  Now, the final thing is that folks who use small engines like 
chainsaws or weed whackers or lawn mowers or boats where they don't run 
that engine continuously as we do our cars are complaining--and 
mechanics are backing them up--that the ethanol is doing real damage to 
those engines.
  So it's time, I think, for this Congress to step back and give the 
taxpayer some relief. Ethanol, if it's going to sink or swim, it should 
be doing it on its own merits at this point.
  I yield to my friend from Arizona (Mr. Flake).
  Mr. FLAKE. I thank the gentleman and thank him for his articulate 
remarks on this.
  I failed to mention the breadth of support for this amendment in the 
outside community. Let me just read some of these names.
  The CHAIR. The time of the gentleman has expired.
  Mr. KINGSTON. I move to strike the last word.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Georgia is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. KINGSTON. I yield to the gentleman from Arizona (Mr. Flake).
  Mr. FLAKE. I thank the gentleman.
  Suffice it to say, there's a long list of organizations supporting 
this. Everyone on the right from Americans for Limited Government, 
Americans for Prosperity; on the left, Freedom Action, Friends of the 
Earth, Greenpeace; then everyone in the middle, the Grocery 
Manufacturers Association, Milk Producers Council, National Chicken 
Council, National Council of Chain Restaurants, National Meat 
Association, National Turkey Federation, National Wildlife Federation, 
and on and on and on.
  This is a great amendment and I urge its adoption.

       This amendment is supported by the following organizations:
       Action Aid USA; American Frozen Food Institute; American 
     Meat Institute; Americans for Limited Government; Americans 
     for Prosperity; California Dairies, Inc.; Clean Air Task 
     Force; Competitive Enterprise Institute; Environmental 
     Working Group; Friends of the Earth; Freedom Action; 
     Greenpeace USA; Grocery Manufacturers Association; Milk 
     Producers Council; National Chicken Council; National Council 
     of Chain Restaurants; National Meat Association; National 
     Restaurant Association; National Turkey Federation; National 
     Wildlife Federation; Oxfam America; Southeast Milk, Inc.; 
     Taxpayers for Common Sense.

  Mr. KINGSTON. Madam Chair, I yield to the gentlewoman from South 
Dakota (Mrs. Noem).
  Mrs. NOEM. I appreciate the gentleman for yielding.
  Madam Chair, we talk a lot on the House floor recently about 
agriculture and about the fact that agriculture needs a haircut and 
that people are concerned about agriculture getting too many benefits 
provided by the taxpayers. I would certainly say that in the past, in 
the most repast, agriculture has been significantly cut, and under this 
bill here before us today, we also see significant cuts.
  I rise in strong opposition to this amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Arizona because this amendment is an attack on consumer 
choice, on the free market access, and on home grown American energy. 
He's trying to provide technology that would allow consumers to decide 
if they want to use an ethanol blend. We've seen the reports out there 
that have indicated that ethanol has reduced the price of gasoline up 
to 89 cents a gallon, and across this country consumers don't even have 
the option to purchase that right now if they would like to.
  I have a plan that would modernize ethanol policy. It would send over 
a billion dollars to deficit reduction. It would make sure that we have 
infrastructure in place so that consumers can have relief from these 
high gas prices.
  With everything that has been going on in the country today, one of 
the top two issues that I hear about every day in South Dakota and 
across this country is high gas prices. If we can reduce those high gas 
prices for people at home struggling with that today, the best thing we 
can do is give them a flex pump in their community where they can 
access that. Right now they have no choice if they want to use an 
American, domestically grown, renewable energy source which they can 
use to reduce their dependence on foreign sources of oil.
  I'm a strong supporter of an all-of-the-above American energy plan, 
and that's truly what we need. We need to put Americans first. We need 
to stop relying on the Middle East to fuel our vehicles. We can grow 
that product right here in our country. We can provide the taxpayers 
with lower priced gasoline. We can renewably do that over and over and 
over again and give them that choice and that option. We just need to 
give them a pump. We need to give them a pump in their community so 
they have that option, and that's what this country is about is 
flexibility, by giving those people back home options.
  That's why I am not a supporter of this amendment. I think that that 
is certainly a wise place for us to invest in making sure that we rely 
upon ourselves, that we use our own sources and we provide exactly what 
the American people need today.
  The CHAIR. The time of the gentlelady has expired.
  Mr. BISHOP of Georgia. I move to strike the last word.

[[Page H4292]]

  The CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. BISHOP of Georgia. I also rise in opposition to this amendment, 
and I associate myself with the remarks of the gentlelady from South 
Dakota.
  I believe that with the economic challenges that our country has 
felt, much of which is related to the cost of fuel, this is an 
amendment that I think undermines our ability to recover and to create 
jobs.
  In our rural community down in Mitchell County, Georgia, we have an 
ethanol facility there which contributes a tremendous amount to the 
local economy. It hires people and it is, I think, the example of how 
we grow our rural economy. In fact, this amendment would stop that kind 
of job growth. It would not allow this facility to expand and to be 
prosperous, and I just think that it's the wrong way to go.
  When America and the American economy gets sick and gets a cold, the 
rural economy has pneumonia and it's on life support, and we need to 
make sure that--we had some 30, 40, 50, 60 individuals in rural Georgia 
who decided that they wanted to invest their own money in a home grown 
industry for renewable energy, so that we would be in a position to 
contribute to our own energy self-sufficiency and we would be able to 
do it in a way where our local individuals would be able to create jobs 
and to increase the economy there in our local rural community. It has 
worked very well except for the fact that they don't have the 
facilities, don't have the pumps, and we need to make sure that they 
do.
  This amendment I think is pennywise and pound foolish, and I think 
that we need to go ahead and move ahead to help our country become 
energy self-sufficient. How do we do that? By making sure that 
consumers do have access to the blends so that we will not continually 
have to fight with the Middle East for the cost of fuel. Oil prices 
really are battering our economy. Energy costs are battering our 
economy. It's also battering our national security. When you look at 
how many billions of gallons of fuel are spent for our national 
security with our military vehicles, our weapons, we need to have 
alternative energy sources, and I think this amendment undermines that.
  I oppose it and I associate myself with all those who oppose this 
amendment. I think that we need to move forward with energy self-
sufficiency, energy independence for our country.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman 
from Arizona (Mr. Flake).
  The question was taken; and the Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. FLAKE. Madam Chair, I demand a recorded vote.
  The CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further proceedings on 
the amendment offered by the gentleman from Arizona will be postponed.

                              {time}  1040


                    Amendment Offered by Mr. Gardner

  Mr. GARDNER. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), insert the 
     following new section:
       Sec. __.  The amount otherwise provided by this Act for 
     ``Integrated Activities'' is hereby increased by, and the 
     amount otherwise provided by this Act for ``National 
     Institute of Food and Agriculture-research and education 
     activities'' is hereby reduced (to be derived from amounts 
     for competitive grants (7 U.S.C. 22 450i(b))) by, $4,400,000, 
     respectively.

  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Colorado is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. GARDNER. Madam Chair, this amendment moves funding over to the 
integrated activities account. I am very concerned about our work when 
it comes to animal disease and food safety issues, especially when it 
relates to issues like FMD, chronic waste and disease, mad cow disease, 
other infectious animal diseases, prion-based diseases.
  I want to make sure that we are not imperiling the U.S. livestock 
industry, especially when it comes to our livestock exports. If we were 
to delay even just 3 to 4 days in terms of finding or responding to an 
outbreak of FMD, it could cost our country $135 billion in agriculture 
and possibly destroy our export markets.
  Madam Chair, I would just ask for a ``yes'' vote on the amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman 
from Colorado (Mr. Gardner).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                 Amendment No. 26 Offered by Mr. Flores

  Mr. FLORES. Madam Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), add the 
     following new section:
       Sec. 4__.  None of the funds made available by this Act may 
     be used to enforce section 526 of the Energy Independence and 
     Security Act of 2007 (Public Law 110-140; 42 U.S.C. 17142).

  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Texas is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. FLORES. I rise to offer my amendment, which would address another 
restrictive and misguided Federal regulation.
  Section 526 of the Energy Independence and Security Act prohibits 
Federal agencies from entering into contracts for the procurement of an 
alternative fuel unless its ``lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions'' are 
less than or equal to emissions from an equivalent conventional fuel 
produced from conventional petroleum sources. Simply put, my amendment 
would stop the government from enforcing the ban on the U.S. Department 
of Agriculture and all other Federal agencies funded by the Ag 
appropriations bill.
  The initial purpose of section 526 was to stifle the Defense 
Department's plans to buy and develop coal-based, or coal-to-liquids, 
jet fuels, based on the opinion of environmentalists that coal-based 
jet fuel produces more greenhouse gas emissions than traditional 
petroleum. Earlier this week, I offered my similar amendment to the 
MILCON-VA approps bill, and it passed this House by a voice vote.
  My friend from Texas (Mr. Conaway) also had language added to the 
defense authorization bill to exempt the Defense Department from this 
burdensome regulation. We must ensure that our military becomes energy 
independent and can efficiently rely on domestic and more stable 
sources of fuel. But section 526's ban on fuel choice applies to all 
Federal agencies, not just the Defense Department. This is why I am 
offering this amendment again today.
  While we hope the USDA is not going to be fueling up any jets any 
time soon, the underlying bill does allow for the purchase of more than 
400 new passenger vehicles. The Department of Agriculture's choice on 
fuel to power these vehicles to provide service to our Nation's farmers 
and agricultural producers will be limited without my amendment.
  The USDA should not be burdened with wasting its time studying fuel 
emissions when there's a simple fix, and that's not to restrict their 
fuel choices based on extreme environmental views, policies, and 
regulations like section 526.
  Madam Chairman, section 526 makes our Nation more dependent on Middle 
Eastern oil. And stopping the impact of section 526 would help us 
promote American energy, improve the American economy, and create 
American jobs. I urge my colleagues to support the passage of this 
commonsense amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. FARR. I rise in opposition to the amendment, Madam Chair.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from California is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. FARR. Madam Chair, look, if you like dirty air, you will love 
this amendment. If you like dirty fuel, you will love this amendment.
  What this provision does is it strikes the requirement in law that 
says to the government, which is a big purchaser of fuel, look, don't 
buy dirty fuel. Buy something that is clean. I mean, that's what we're 
trying to do is stimulate clean air, fuel efficiency, alternative 
fuels. This strikes us down. This is going back to the old smokestack, 
fill the air full of dirty air. This goes back to all the traditional 
people that just don't like the fact that there's competition out there 
and that the Federal Government has to purchase that competition. I 
don't understand why in a competitive world, where fuel and efficiency 
and engine development, where we're going to have to lead that or have 
our clock cleaned, this is exactly what creates markets for that.

[[Page H4293]]

  You look at venture capital, you look at all these people that go in 
and put private risk capital out. Then they have got to have a market. 
And fortunately, the government tries to be that market, whether we're 
buying healthy foods for children, whether we're buying food for our 
troops, whether we're trying to encourage alternative fuels, as we have 
under this program where the Navy planes have found a proven 
alternative to traditional aviation fuel that they've tested in 
supersonic speed jets.
  This is a program that tells the American ingenuity, Get out there 
and invent something. Because guess what, if you invent it, we, as a 
purchaser of cleaner and better standards, are going to be your market. 
And this amendment just wipes that all out. It's really back to dirty 
smokestacks, dirty air, and no competition and no ability for America 
to succeed in the future.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. KINGSTON. Madam Chair, I move to strike the last word.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Georgia is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. KINGSTON. For clarification purposes, I yield to my friend from 
Texas (Mr. Flores).
  Mr. FLORES. I thank the gentleman for yielding to me.
  Let me correct some of the comments made by my friend from 
California. First of all, this is a typical example of the way that the 
Federal Government operates, where the left hand does something that's 
entirely different from the right hand. On one hand, the left hand 
says, We want to have alternative fuel sources available for our 
economy. The right hand says, But we can do it for everybody, except 
the agencies of the Federal Government.
  Let me give you an example. Oil sands from Canada. Production of oil 
from oil sands in Canada could completely displace our use of Middle 
Eastern oil. And yet, we're trying to block in this bill the use of oil 
sands from Canada. Virtually all the fuel in the United States has oil 
from some oil sands in Canada blended in as fuel. That would mean all 
that fuel is off limits to the United States Government and, in 
particular with this bill, to the United States Department of 
Agriculture.
  We should reduce our dependence on Middle Eastern oil, not increase 
our dependence on Middle Eastern oil. And my amendment to eliminate the 
impact of section 526 reduces that dependence on Middle Eastern oil. 
Remember also, Madam Chairman, this amendment was passed by a voice 
vote for the MILCON-VA bill.
  Mr. KINGSTON. I yield back the balance of my time.
  The CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman 
from Texas (Mr. Flores).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                     Amendment Offered by Mr. Flake

  Mr. FLAKE. I have an amendment at the desk.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before any short title), insert the 
     following new section:
       Sec. __.  None of the funds appropriated or otherwise made 
     available by this Act may be used to pay the salaries and 
     expenses of personnel of the Department of Agriculture to 
     provide any benefit described in section 1001D(b)(1)(C) of 
     the Food Security Act of 1985 (7 U.S.C. 1308-3a(b)(1)(C)) to 
     a person or legal entity if the average adjusted gross income 
     of the person or legal entity exceeds $250,000.

  Mr. FLAKE (during the reading). I ask unanimous consent that the 
amendment be considered as read.
  The CHAIR. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman from 
Arizona?
  There was no objection.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Arizona is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. FLAKE. Madam Chair, much attention has been paid to making 
significant cuts in Federal spending. The first step in addressing the 
massive public debt that has accumulated, I would submit, is that all 
areas of spending need to be on the table. This includes spending on 
farm subsidies. We've already talked a lot about this today.
  Over the last 15 years, almost three-quarters of farm payments have 
gone to just 10 percent of producers. The bottom 80 percent of 
recipients account for slightly more than a tenth of that money. Under 
current law, recipients are entitled to receive farm subsidies so long 
as their adjusted gross income, or AGI, is less than $500,000 in 
nonfarm AGI and $750,000 in farm AGI.

                              {time}  1050

  Thus, you can have an adjusted gross income of slightly less than 
$1.25 million and still ask taxpayers to foot the bill for your Federal 
agriculture payment. Let me say that again. You can have an adjusted 
gross income of $1.25 million, adjusted gross income, and still go to 
the trough here and ask the taxpayers for farm subsidy payments. I 
would ask anyone, how can they explain why a family earning more than 
$1 million a year needs to receive a check from the government?
  This amendment would lower that income limit to be eligible to 
receive farm payments from $1.25 million to $250,000 in adjusted gross 
income. I think a farmer has done well if they clear $250,000. I think 
it's wonderful if they do that. They should try to take a day off from 
their hard work if they do. But don't come back to the Federal 
Government and say, we need more farm subsidy payments. Let's have some 
sanity in this program here.
  I urge adoption of the amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. BISHOP of Georgia. I move to strike the last word.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. BISHOP of Georgia. I couldn't agree more with the gentleman from 
Arizona when he says that we've got to put everything on the table in 
order to eliminate this deficit and to put us on a path toward 
balancing our budget. We've got a fiscal crisis.
  But at the same time, we need to make smart choices. We need to 
establish priorities. We don't need to cut off our feet or cut off our 
hands. We need to empower ourselves and have the tools that we need. 
And I think that if we're going to have a strong agricultural 
community, if we're going to have American farmers be able to produce 
high quality, safe, economical food for the people of this country and 
for export, and to be able to compete in the global marketplace, we are 
going to have to have reasonable and smart farm support.
  Our authorizing committee has done a great job. And Members of this 
body have done a tremendous job in trying to review over the years what 
we need to do to tighten up and make more efficient our farm support 
programs. And we've got to do that. And of course they do have to be on 
the table. But let's be smart. Let's not take a meat ax to it when we 
need to take a scalpel approach.
  An individual or a legal entity must be actively engaged in farming 
rules that are administered by USDA in order to participate in farm 
programs. To receive the payments when they are available, individuals 
or legal entities determined to be actively engaged in farming must 
prove their average adjusted gross farm and nonfarm income are below 
the levels that are set by the statute. If an individual is determined 
to be eligible, the total benefits for all crops are limited to a 
specific amount as dictated by the statute.
  Now, we can't have a cookie-cutter approach to this. Our farmers in 
the Midwest and other parts of the country other than the Southeast 
have a different need in terms of farm support and farm support 
programs. We have a diversity of crops. We have a multitude of crops in 
our portfolio in the Southeast, from Virginia all the way to Texas. And 
in order to be able to grow those crops effectively, a producer has to 
have versatile equipment. For example, if you grow cotton you've got to 
have a certain kind of equipment for cotton. If you grow corn and 
grain, you've got to have a different piece of equipment for that. 
There are three different kinds of equipment. And peanut growers, 
cotton growers, and grain growers all in the Southeast have to finance 
those various kinds of equipment.
  Now, the 2008 farm law made the most comprehensive and far-reaching 
reforms of eligibility and limitations on farm programs in 20 years. It 
substantially reduced the level of the income test that was established 
in the 2002 farm bill by creating two new tests to determine 
eligibility. Individuals or entities with a 3-year average adjusted 
gross nonfarm income exceeding $500,000 are not eligible for any 
commodity program benefits. Individuals

[[Page H4294]]

with a 3-year average adjusted gross farm income exceeding $750,000 are 
ineligible for direct benefits.
  While this amount may seem generous, the gross income is calculated 
before debt servicing and other expenses are met. Since a new cotton 
harvester can cost upwards of $750,000, and investments in land and 
crop input such as fuel are escalating, you've still got to take into 
account the cost of the irrigation system, the labor cost, the rent on 
the land, the ad valorem taxes, and health insurance for the farmers 
and for their families. So you've really got a lot of expenses that are 
not taken into account when this statutory limitation on income is 
calculated.
  It also, in '08, eliminated the three entity rule and replaced it 
with the direct attribution rule, which provides that each payment is 
attributed to a specific individual. That reduced the payment, since 
prior to 2008, individuals could participate in three entities 
receiving payments.
  Congress thoroughly debated the level of income tax when we developed 
the 2008 farm bill so that the tests for farm income and the tests for 
nonfarm income were appropriate. The tests are administered by USDA, 
and the documents submitted to USDA by program participants are subject 
to rigorous review by USDA and IRS.
  This is a bad, bad thing, and I suggest that we ought to let the 
authorizing committee do this in the farm bill and not do it now.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. LUCAS. Madam Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Oklahoma is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. LUCAS. Madam Chairman, I rise in opposition to this amendment. 
This is clearly an attempt to legislate policy through an appropriation 
bill, contrary to the intent of regular order, and this is not the way 
that we should do business.
  Arbitrarily changing eligibility requirements for farm programs 
outside of the farm bill is irresponsible. It seriously undermines 
farmers' ability to make long-term plans and investments, and it adds a 
dangerous element of uncertainty to the market. The result would be a 
reluctance to make investments in equipment and practices that increase 
productivity.
  The process of developing the 2012 farm bill would begin in the 
Agriculture Committee next week. Our first step will be a comprehensive 
audit of current farm programs to determine which are working, which 
are not, and how to best insure that America's farmers and ranchers 
remain competitive and productive into the 21st century.
  Our farm program audits are just the beginning of what will be a very 
transparent, inclusive, thorough process of developing the 2012 farm 
bill. During that process, we will be careful to consider how best to 
stabilize, how to provide stability and certainty to farmers during 
lean years. Without appropriate risk management tools in place, a few 
bad seasons could put farming operations out of business permanently.
  Proponents of this amendment makes it sound like the Agriculture 
Committee has done nothing on this issue. That couldn't be farther from 
the truth. As my colleague has just alluded, in 2008, the Agriculture 
Committee, under the leadership of my colleague, then-chairman 
Peterson, meticulously debated the appropriate levels for farm program 
eligibility. The results were some of the most aggressive reforms in 
AGI in 2 decades.
  Not only did we tighten eligibility, but in the implementation of 
those rules, USDA allows IRS to verify a farmer's AGI.
  In 2012, we will once again review how to efficiently and effectively 
target farm policy. America's farmers, ranchers and taxpayers deserve 
an open and accountable policymaking process. This amendment not only 
precludes a transparent process, but it silences the voices of 
Americans who would like to contribute to comprehensive discussion of 
farm policy.
  I urge you to oppose this amendment to prevent policy discussions 
from being shortchanged. Allow us to work through regular order in the 
open process that will be used in the coming year.
  Once again, I oppose the amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time, Madam Chairman.
  Mr. PETERSON. I move to strike the last word.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Minnesota is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. PETERSON. I rise in opposition to this amendment.
  As Chairman Lucas just indicated, we spent a lot of time working 
through this. This has a much bigger impact on my friends in the South 
than it does in our part of the world, although it does affect some of 
our folks. But one of the reasons is the way they finance and operate 
in the South, where they have a lot of shared rent. We are pretty much 
cash renting up in our part of the world now.

                              {time}  1100

  But you've got folks that have land that get caught up in this AGI, 
and it causes problems in terms of financing their operations and the 
way that they have structured agriculture in the South.
  When I've been down there in Arkansas and other places--Mississippi, 
Georgia--the people that have been the most opposed to this are the 
bankers. And if you're concerned about having family farmers and 
keeping as many people on the land as possible, this is exactly the 
wrong way to go about it. You're going to upset the whole apple cart in 
doing this.
  Having said that, why do we have an adjusted gross income limit on 
farmers? Why don't we have it on everybody? If this is such a good 
idea, why don't we have anybody that gets any money from the government 
be subject to this AGI? If it's good enough for farmers, then anybody 
that makes $250,000 doesn't get anything from the government, period, 
just like farmers. That's how much sense this makes.
  The other thing that everybody talks about is that 80 percent of the 
people only get 10 percent of the payments. Well, people need to 
understand that we have a definition of ``farmer'' that is flawed and 
we should get rid of. They claim that we have 2 million farmers in this 
country. But do you know what it takes to be a farmer, the definition? 
If you could produce $1,000 of farm income--you don't have to, just if 
you could produce $1,000, you're considered a farmer. The true reality 
is we have 350,000 commercial farmers that produce over 90 percent of 
the food, and obviously they're going to get the payments because 
that's the way the system works.
  We have worked through this on the committee. I didn't agree with 
these AGI limits and payment limits that we put in the bill, but it was 
something we had to work out and we worked it out. This should not be 
dealt with on the floor. Once again, people who have made decisions 
based on the 5-year farm bill--they've made a lot of investments, 
they've put a lot of money into their operations based on how this 
thing is structured--we should not come in and pull the rug out in the 
middle of the deal here. And we should do this in the regular order in 
the farm bill. That's where it needs to be done.
  This is a bad amendment. I urge my colleagues to oppose it.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. CONAWAY. Madam Chair, I move to strike the last word.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Texas is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. CONAWAY. Madam Chair, I want to make a couple of quick points.
  The ranking member, the former chairman of the Ag Committee, made a 
good point, which is the percentages that get bandied about in this 
regard that seem to make the arguments a little more inflammatory are 
based on a skewed definition. You don't live on a farm that makes only 
$1,000 of gross revenue. That's not a farmer who's in the business of 
farming, and that's who these Ag support safety nets should support.
  I would like to make one comment about why the Ag Committee is the 
one that ought to be making these kinds of things. If you will read the 
gentleman's amendment, it says, ``to a person, legal entity, if the 
average adjusted gross income of the person or legal entity is 
$250,000.'' Average of what, Madam Chairman? Average of 1 year? Average 
of 5 years? Average of a lifetime? Average of what? And so a poorly 
crafted amendment--I know the gentleman is working in good faith, he 
has been at this for a long time, I don't have any problem with that, 
but this is an example of a hastily drawn, poorly

[[Page H4295]]

drafted amendment that is unenforceable in effect and it skews up. So 
in addition to all the other things we have said about letting the Ag 
Committee do it, here's a good example of why.
  Madam Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. CRAWFORD. Madam Chair, I move to strike the last word.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Arkansas is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. CRAWFORD. Madam Chair, I also rise today because I strongly 
oppose this amendment.
  As I've listened to the debate, I think some folks are missing some 
fundamental principles of where our Nation's food supply comes from. 
I've seen many Members come to the floor to defend funding our 
nutrition programs--which is obviously a worthy cause--but at the same 
time many of those Members come down here and attempt to pull the rug 
out from under farmers by scrapping programs that provide an important 
safety net to our producers.
  We have to be clear: We can't have a stable food supply for 
recipients of nutrition programs and all Americans unless our commodity 
producers have some stability. Through a deliberate and balanced 
approach, the Ag Committee has brought reform to the AGI means test by 
further targeting program benefits to those individuals that depend on 
farming for their livelihood. By setting the income level at an 
appropriate level, the committee recognized the production costs and 
the economies of scale that are necessary to be competitive in today's 
agriculture. An overly restrictive AGI ceiling disregards the financial 
reality of commercially viable farms.
  Let's be clear about this: A farmer's AGI is not profit. There are 
still a number of expenses that must be covered. In addition to 
personal expenses, farmers must service the debt that, given the cost 
of today's machinery and land, can easily reach into the millions of 
dollars.
  At a time when more and more people have to rely on the productivity 
and stability of American agriculture, now is not the time to pose a 
threat to the very food source on which they rely.
  Madam Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. AUSTIN SCOTT of Georgia. Madam Chair, I move to strike the last 
word.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. AUSTIN SCOTT of Georgia. Madam Chair, I know that $250,000 sounds 
like a lot of money. It will buy you a third of a new John Deere cotton 
picker.
  From our standpoint as a country, agriculture and manufacturing have 
been the foundations of our economy. The things that we need to get our 
economy back on track are access to capital and regulatory certainty. 
And when you make changes that are this drastic on the floor through an 
amendment process instead of going through the committee process where 
it should be done, then you hinder those two things. Farmers lose 
confidence, and their lenders lose confidence in Federal policy, and 
that does away with the stability and predictability that some of these 
issues are designed to provide. The loans necessary to operate the 
business may become harder to come by if we start to make amendments 
like this and allow amendments like this on the floor.
  I simply rise to say this: Agriculture has been strong. It's been one 
of the bright spots in America, and it will continue to be one of the 
bright spots in America because of the work ethic of the people 
involved in the agricultural industry.
  I would ask my colleagues to oppose this amendment and allow us to 
deal with this in the Agriculture Committee in the farm bill that we 
will be starting over the next couple of weeks.
  Madam Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Arizona (Mr. Flake).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. FLAKE. Madam Chair, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Arizona will 
be postponed.


                   Amendment Offered by Mr. Lipinski

  Mr. LIPINSKI. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), insert the 
     following:
       Sec. __. None of the funds made available by this Act may 
     be used to alter contract no. GS-35F-4076D with respect to 
     the location of data storage.

  Mr. KINGSTON. Madam Chair, I reserve a point of order on the 
gentleman's amendment.
  The CHAIR. A point of order is reserved.
  The gentleman from Illinois is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. LIPINSKI. Madam Chair, I applaud the administration's leadership 
in looking for ways to save money and simplify our Federal IT 
infrastructure by moving data to storage in cloud computing, but the 
critical question is where will this data actually be stored?
  There is no reason for essential government data to be stored in 
offshore facilities, and the USDA has recognized that fact. In cloud 
computing contracts signed by the USDA, Secretary Vilsack and CIO Chris 
Smith have insisted that all data must be stored in the United States. 
This amendment seeks to reinforce and codify USDA contracts' terms 
specifically regarding where the data is stored. That is all that this 
speaks to. It says that this contract, in regards to where the data is 
stored, will be codified with this amendment.
  Now, why is this important? It's critical for security reasons. We 
shouldn't have to worry about another nation seizing the infrastructure 
where our data is stored. It's critical for reliability reasons. We 
don't want another country, either intentionally or accidentally, 
disconnecting us from the servers we need to run our government.

                              {time}  1110

  And it is critical because building, operating, and safeguarding this 
infrastructure here in the United States also means more American jobs.
  So what this amendment seeks to do, as I said, is just look at this 
one part of the contract and say this data must be stored here in the 
United States, that this cannot be changed.
  I ask my colleagues to support this amendment. It is budget neutral. 
It supports the efforts of the USDA and keeps our data secure and 
accessible and supports American jobs.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. KINGSTON. Mr. Chairman, I withdraw my reservation--as I read the 
amendment, it looks like it is in order--and I move to strike the last 
word.
  The Acting CHAIR (Mr. Bishop of Utah). The gentleman from Georgia is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. KINGSTON. I oppose the amendment, and do so out of caution.
  What I want to say to my friend, who knows a lot about this and I 
know is a very careful steward of tax dollars and very deliberative in 
his legislation in general, I am not that familiar with the issue. I am 
not certain why location is that important, and I am very reluctant to 
tie the hands of the USDA in seeking the best contract. I want them to 
do what a business would do and be free from micromanagement by the 
U.S. Congress. If the location is outside of the United States or the 
location is in Illinois or in Georgia or in California, I want them to 
do what is best for the USDA and the best for the taxpayers. As I 
understand this amendment, it would limit that sort of flexibility.
  So I oppose the amendment; but I want to say to the gentleman from 
Illinois, I certainly will continue a dialogue with you on this, 
because I do realize I need to learn more about it. But on that basis, 
I do not want to tie their hands based on location.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. FARR. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from California is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. FARR. I yield to the gentleman from Illinois (Mr. Lipinski).
  Mr. LIPINSKI. I thank the ranking member very much for yielding.
  I thank the chairman for his comments, but I think there has been a 
little bit of confusion, and I just want to clear this up. This speaks 
specifically

[[Page H4296]]

to a contract that the USDA has already entered into, and essentially 
it is just looking at that one piece of that contract that says all 
data must be stored in the United States and codifying that to say that 
that part cannot be changed.
  This is one contract that has already been signed. It is not speaking 
to anything else in the future. But I think that it is important for 
security that I think this is a good move that the USDA made. So I just 
want to speak to that in this amendment specifically, and it is not in 
any way tying the hands of the USDA or any other agency in the future.
  I would hope that the other agencies, USDA and other agencies, follow 
this lead in the future because I think it is good for the United 
States. But it doesn't any further tie the hands of the USDA. I just 
wanted to clear that up.
  Mr. FARR. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Illinois (Mr. Lipinski).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. LIPINSKI. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Illinois 
will be postponed.


                     Amendment Offered by Mr. Flake

  Mr. FLAKE. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), insert the 
     following new section:
       Sec. __.  None of the funds appropriated or otherwise made 
     available by this Act may be used to pay the salaries and 
     expenses of personnel to carry out a market access program 
     under section 203 of the Agricultural Trade Act of 1978 (7 
     U.S.C. 5623).

  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Arizona is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. FLAKE. Mr. Chairman, administered by the USDA's Foreign 
Agricultural Service, the MAP program uses funds from the Commodity 
Credit Corporation to aid the development, expansion and maintenance of 
foreign markets for U.S. agricultural commodities and products. It does 
so by forming partnerships with nonprofit trade organizations and 
cooperatives, nonprofit State regional trade groups, small businesses 
and others to market our products overseas.
  In a perfect world, if there is a lot of money hanging around to do 
something, this might be a good thing to do to help these small 
companies market their products overseas. I would argue that is really 
not the proper role and function of government, but people could argue 
when times are good, let's do that. But we are borrowing 40 cents on 
the dollar. Every dollar that we spend on this kind of thing is 
borrowed. And we are borrowing money to subsidize companies, small and 
large, to market their products overseas.
  A while ago, The New York Times shined some light on this program. 
They spotlighted the ridiculousness of a fashion show in India put on 
with taxpayer money in partnership with the cotton industry's Cotton 
Council International. Here we are subsidizing a fashion show in India 
in partnership with the Cotton Council International.
  The article notes that ``over the last decade, the program has 
provided nearly $2 billion in taxpayer money to agricultural trade 
associations and farmer cooperatives. These promotions are as varied as 
a manual for pet owners in Japan and a class at a Mexican culinary 
school to teach aspiring chefs how to cook rice for Mexican 
customers.'' Come on. We are spending money that we are borrowing for 
this kind of activity.
  You will hear arguments for every dollar we spend in this, it yields 
$20 in returned income or whatever else. You always hear that when you 
hear about government spending that people want to protect. But let me 
say, when we are running debt and deficits like we are today, we 
shouldn't be running programs like this. We ought to save money where 
we can.
  Time magazine also noted here that a lot of the money goes to large 
farmer-owned cooperatives. It will be portrayed it is just helping 
small businesses, that there have been reforms to make sure it doesn't 
go to corporations like McDonald's or whatever else.
  But this article noted that corporations like Sunkist, Welch's and 
Blue Diamond, which grows and sells almonds, combined these three 
companies had over $2 billion in sales in 2009. These aren't small 
companies, yet we are subsidizing them. We are subsidizing the 
promotion of their products overseas. I am glad they are exporting. I 
hope they continue to export. But they don't need to do it with 
taxpayer money.
  I urge adoption of the amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. FARR. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from California is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. FARR. Mr. Chairman, this is the kind of program that I think Mr. 
Flake pointed out that you wonder why we use taxpayer moneys to market 
American agriculture abroad, and you say, well, we don't need to do 
that. As he pointed out, he pointed out a couple of great big companies 
that take advantage of it.
  But guess what? In this legislation we carve out so that the small 
businesses can take advantage of this. And why do we do that? I don't 
know how much you see in the advertising that goes on to buy products 
from other countries, but remember the Juan Valdez coffee ad for 
Colombian coffee, ``Wake up and smell the coffee''? Guess what? That 
was subsidized by the Colombian Government. It was very, very 
effective. Coffee prices actually went down and they lost their ability 
because it cost them about $40 million a year to do that advertising.
  What we have created in the United States is a matching program 
saying, you put up your money first, put up the private sector money, 
and we will match it, and we carve out and protect it.

                              {time}  1120

  And I'm just looking. California has a lot of congressional 
districts. You wouldn't think that districts in San Francisco or Los 
Angeles--we have 53 Members of Congress from California. There's only 
four congressional districts in California that don't take advantage of 
this program. I would imagine those are in the middle of Los Angeles. 
Because there are companies in it--and I can go through all of them. A 
lot of them are very small. In my county alone, we have Soy Vay, for 
example. Soy Vay, the sauce. That's a husband and wife company. They 
take advantage by putting some of their money up and then they get to 
advertise. I don't know what countries they choose to advertise in. 
They can't advertise their product per se. They have to advertise the 
generic of it. So you don't sell Sunkist oranges, you sell: You should 
buy more California oranges.
  It's an easy program to attack, but when you get down to managing in 
a global market and world competition, this stuff makes sense. As long 
as other countries are going to do it to us to stay competitive, we've 
got to do it to them. I think our way of doing it protects the small 
producer, more than anybody else, and allows them to get--we do this in 
tourism promotion all the time. We just passed a bill to advertise 
United States abroad. We have a Tourism Promotion Board to do that. 
We're going to have to be globally competitive. And this is one of the 
programs that allows us to be globally competitive.
  Mr. BISHOP of Georgia. Will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. FARR. I yield to the gentleman from Georgia.
  Mr. BISHOP of Georgia. Thank you very much.
  I couldn't agree with Mr. Farr more. The one thing that I think we 
need to understand that this program enhances is our trade deficit. We 
have been suffering with a global economy over the years. But the one 
aspect of the American economy in terms of our trade deficit that has 
kept us afloat has been agricultural exports. And it's programs like 
the Market Access Program that has allowed us to maintain a trade 
balance with our global competitors.
  So I would think that this is a program that we ought to carefully 
protect. It's a program that works. And it's what has kept our trade 
deficit at

[[Page H4297]]

the level that it is. If we should take this away, we can look to have 
more products from China, fewer of our exports going overseas, and 
fewer of the smaller companies that benefit from this carve-out, being 
able to utilize the Internet marketing and to sell their products 
oversees. So I would think that this is, again, penny-wise, pound-
foolish, and it should be defeated.
  Mr. FARR. I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. LUCAS. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Oklahoma is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. LUCAS. Let me ever so briefly say that I oppose the amendment. 
It, once again, is the process of cutting funding for the Market Access 
Program, in effect legislating farm policy through the appropriations 
process. It is not appropriate under regular order. It should not be 
occurring. We will consider this, along with other programs, in the 
2012 Farm Bill program.
  Let me note, I agree with my colleagues. Over the last 25 years MAP 
has boosted agriculture exports, it has increased American jobs, it has 
added to rural income. I know we have a lot of discussion these days on 
creation of jobs, and rightly so. Exports are one of the most surefire 
ways to increase American jobs. In fact, for every billion dollars in 
exports, approximately 8,400 jobs are created here at home. In 2010, 
agricultural exports alone supported nearly 1 million American jobs.
  Please oppose the amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Arizona (Mr. Flake).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. FLAKE. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Arizona will 
be postponed.
  Ms. SEWELL. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentlewoman from Alabama is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Ms. SEWELL. I would have offered an amendment to actually control the 
cormorants, which are an invasive species that affect the catfish 
farmers. I understand that due to technical reasons, I can't. But I was 
hoping the chairman would allow me to engage in a colloquy regarding 
it.
  The Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services, APHIS as it's known, 
is an agency within the USDA which plays a critical role in helping 
farmers to handle losses as a result of wolves, coyotes, birds, and 
other invasive species. This agency is especially important to our 
catfish farmers because it helps to protect and control the livestock 
from cormorants, which are birds that prey upon catfish.
  In the South, especially in Alabama, the southern catfish production 
has seen phenomenal growth over the last 30 years. The continued growth 
of the catfish industry has really been limited by the growth of these 
cormorants and other invasive species that feed upon the livestock.
  The State of Alabama has roughly 22,000 water acres of fish farms 
where nearly 200 commercial farmers produce 25 different species, most 
of which are catfish. In Alabama, farmers are quite concerned that in 
the committee record it looked as if the control of these invasive 
species would be limited only to the Southeast. I don't think that was 
the original intent of the committee report.
  I really was hoping the chairman would address that issue and just 
clarify, if he would, whether or not the cormorants funding would be 
limited.
  Mr. KINGSTON. Will the gentlewoman yield?
  Ms. SEWELL. I yield to the gentleman from Georgia.
  Mr. KINGSTON. I thank the gentlewoman for yielding, and also to bring 
up the fact that the cormorants are a problem all over the country. And 
certainly, as one from Georgia, I know exactly that you in Alabama are 
having the problems that they have in the Northeast and in Mississippi 
and all the other places. I will absolutely work with the gentlewoman 
from Alabama to make sure that the USDA is addressing your cormorant 
problems. And I will work with the ranking member from California to 
make sure that it does not get forgotten.
  I also appreciate your diligence on the cormorant issue. Realizing 
that the report is a little bit misleading as we have written it, I 
think you have underscored something that we all are behind you on. So 
we will work with you on it.
  Ms. SEWELL. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
  Mr. PETERSON. Will the gentlewoman yield?
  Ms. SEWELL. I yield to the gentleman from Minnesota (Mr. Peterson).
  Mr. PETERSON. I'm sorry, I was out of the Chamber. As I understand 
it, you're trying to get the cormorant animal damage extended to other 
parts of the country.
  Ms. SEWELL. To make sure on the clarification of the language.
  Mr. PETERSON. That is a very important thing. This is getting to be a 
bigger and bigger problem. We've had the problem in the Midwest. They 
have had the problem in the Northeast. But there's a lot of problems I 
know in Alabama and Mississippi and some of those States as well 
because these birds migrate.
  As I said earlier, the reason we got into this problem is because we 
entered into this migratory bird treaty with Mexico and Canada back in 
1973. In Mexico, blackbirds are sacred as part of their culture down 
there. And so there's a prohibition in that treaty against any hunting 
of any blackbirds, whether it be crows or cormorant or whatever it is. 
So that has tied our hands in terms of trying to deal with these 
issues.
  We've been able to make changes on kind of a pilot basis in certain 
areas, but we need to do this all over the country because these birds 
migrate. They go all the way from Canada, down to Mexico, and back and 
forth. They cause a lot of damage to fish farms. In my part of the 
world, it's sport fishing lakes. A cormorant will eat three times its 
weight in fish a day. They do tremendous damage when they get in there.
  So I support the gentlewoman and hope we can extend this program 
around the country.
  Ms. SEWELL. I yield back the balance of my time.

                              {time}  1130

  Mr. KINGSTON. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Georgia is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. KINGSTON. I want to thank the ranking member for working with us 
on this bill. I want to thank all the minority and the majority staff 
for all their fine work. We would not be here today without them. At 
their request and because the hour is late and Members are eager to 
vote on this bill, I will submit the names of all the hardworking 
people who made this thing happen, but I wanted to say thank you on 
behalf of both of us.
  I yield to my friend from California.
  Mr. FARR. Thank you very much, Mr. Chairman.
  I know we've been here almost 25 hours of debate. I appreciate the 
open rule and the fact that we've had a huge debate. I personally would 
like to thank you and all the staff. I wore my Father's Day tie for you 
because I know your children are in town and you've been spending a lot 
of time here on the floor, and I'd like to wish you a happy Father's 
Day.
  Mr. KINGSTON. The same to you. I wore my organic cotton tie on your 
behalf. Thank you very much.
  This legislation would not be possible without the great working 
relationship I enjoy with our ranking member Mr. Farr. Again, we don't 
always agree but we do try to communicate and put together a sound 
product. I also thank all the staffers who have averaged about 50-60 
hours a week since December to make this happen. Matt Smith and Martha 
Foley with the Minority, and Rochelle Dornatt and Troy Phillips with 
Ranking Member Farr's office, our majority staff clerk of many years 
Martin Delgado and his team Tom O'Brien, Betsy Bina, and Andrew Cooper. 
From my personal office, Allie Thigpen, Michael Donnal, Adam Sullivan, 
Chris Crawford, Caroline Black, and Mary Carpenter. You might not see 
them on the House floor, but their fingerprints are all over the bill.


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, proceedings 
will

[[Page H4298]]

now resume on those amendments on which further proceedings were 
postponed, in the following order:
  An amendment by Ms. Pingree of Maine.
  Amendment No. 1 by Ms. Foxx of North Carolina.
  Amendment No. 25 by Mr. Kind of Wisconsin.
  An amendment by Mr. Dingell of Michigan.
  An amendment by Ms. Jackson Lee of Texas.
  Amendment No. 23 by Mr. Gibson of New York.
  Amendment No. 3 by Mr. Blumenauer of Oregon.
  Amendment No. 1 by Mr. King of Iowa.
  Amendment No. 2 by Mr. King of Iowa.
  Amendment No. 22 by Mr. Garrett of New Jersey.
  Amendment No. 29 by Ms. Jackson Lee of Texas.
  An amendment by Mr. Scalise of Louisiana.
  Amendment No. 28 by Ms. Jackson Lee of Texas.
  An amendment by Ms. Hirono of Hawaii.
  Amendment No. 38 by Mr. Holden of Pennsylvania.
  An amendment by Mr. Campbell of California.
  An amendment by Mrs. Blackburn of Tennessee.
  Amendment No. 1 by Mr. Flake of Arizona.
  Amendment No. 2 by Mr. Flake of Arizona.
  An amendment by Mr. Lipinski of Illinois.
  Amendment No. 3 by Mr. Flake of Arizona.
  The Chair will reduce to 2 minutes the time for any electronic vote 
after the first vote in this series.


               Amendment Offered by Ms. Pingree of Maine

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from Maine 
(Ms. Pingree) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Chair will reduce to 2 minutes the time for any 
electronic vote after the first vote in this series.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 170, 
noes 238, not voting 24, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 437]

                               AYES--170

     Ackerman
     Andrews
     Baldwin
     Barrow
     Bass (CA)
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berman
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Boswell
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Castor (FL)
     Chandler
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Clyburn
     Coffman (CO)
     Cohen
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Costello
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Deutch
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Fortenberry
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Gibson
     Gonzalez
     Green, Al
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Hastings (FL)
     Heinrich
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holden
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Israel
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kildee
     Kind
     Kissell
     Kucinich
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Markey
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Michaud
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Nadler
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Reyes
     Richmond
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Serrano
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Shuler
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stark
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Towns
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--238

     Adams
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Amash
     Austria
     Baca
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (NH)
     Benishek
     Berg
     Biggert
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Cleaver
     Coble
     Cole
     Conaway
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Culberson
     Davis (KY)
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dold
     Donnelly (IN)
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallegly
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Heck
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herrera Beutler
     Hinojosa
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kelly
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Landry
     Lankford
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Lewis (CA)
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meehan
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Napolitano
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Palazzo
     Paul
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pence
     Petri
     Pitts
     Platts
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Richardson
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (AR)
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Scalise
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sires
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--24

     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Denham
     Eshoo
     Frank (MA)
     Giffords
     Green, Gene
     Inslee
     Larson (CT)
     McCotter
     Neal
     Olson
     Olver
     Poe (TX)
     Polis
     Rangel
     Rokita
     Rush
     Schweikert
     Slaughter
     Stivers
     Tsongas
     Weiner
     Whitfield

                              {time}  1158

  Messrs. AUSTIN SCOTT of Georgia, WEST, YOUNG of Indiana, HALL, and 
CULBERSON changed their vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  Messrs. JACKSON of Illinois, GUTIERREZ, CUMMINGS, COFFMAN of 
Colorado, Ms. BASS of California, Messrs. WELCH and COSTA changed their 
vote from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated for:
  Mr. GENE GREEN of Texas. Mr. Chair, on rollcall No. 437, I missed the 
vote due to a hearing on Pipeline Safety in Energy & Commerce 
Subcommittee. Had I been present, I would have voted ``aye.''
  Stated against:
  Mr. BILIRAKIS. Mr. Chair, on rollcall No. 437, had I been present, I 
would have voted ``no.''


                  Amendment No. 1 Offered by Ms. Foxx

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from North 
Carolina (Ms. Foxx) on which further proceedings were postponed and on 
which the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.

[[Page H4299]]

  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 212, 
noes 201, not voting 19, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 438]

                               AYES--212

     Adams
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Amash
     Austria
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Bartlett
     Benishek
     Berg
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Canseco
     Capito
     Carney
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conaway
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Davis (KY)
     Denham
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dold
     Dreier
     Duncan (SC)
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallegly
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Heck
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kelly
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Landry
     Lankford
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Lewis (CA)
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Palazzo
     Paul
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pence
     Petri
     Platts
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Scalise
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--201

     Ackerman
     Altmire
     Andrews
     Baca
     Baldwin
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (CA)
     Bass (NH)
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berman
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Boswell
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Butterfield
     Cantor
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carson (IN)
     Castor (FL)
     Chandler
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Costello
     Courtney
     Critz
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Dent
     Deutch
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Duffy
     Duncan (TN)
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Fortenberry
     Frank (MA)
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Gerlach
     Gibson
     Gonzalez
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Hastings (FL)
     Heinrich
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holden
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Inslee
     Israel
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kildee
     Kind
     Kissell
     Kucinich
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Markey
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Michaud
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Reyes
     Ribble
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Roe (TN)
     Ross (AR)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schilling
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Shuler
     Sires
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stark
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Towns
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Yarmuth

                             NOT VOTING--19

     Cleaver
     Eshoo
     Giffords
     Larson (CT)
     McCotter
     Neal
     Olson
     Olver
     Pelosi
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Rangel
     Rokita
     Slaughter
     Stivers
     Tsongas
     Walberg
     Weiner
     Whitfield


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute left in this 
vote.

                              {time}  1203

  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                  Amendment No. 25 Offered by Mr. Kind

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Wisconsin 
(Mr. Kind) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which the 
noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 223, 
noes 197, not voting 12, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 439]

                               AYES--223

     Ackerman
     Adams
     Altmire
     Amash
     Andrews
     Baca
     Bachmann
     Baldwin
     Bass (CA)
     Bass (NH)
     Becerra
     Benishek
     Berkley
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (NY)
     Bishop (UT)
     Blumenauer
     Brady (PA)
     Broun (GA)
     Buerkle
     Burton (IN)
     Campbell
     Capps
     Capuano
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Chandler
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cohen
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Dent
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Fitzpatrick
     Flake
     Frank (MA)
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Gowdy
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Gutierrez
     Hall
     Hanabusa
     Harris
     Heinrich
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holt
     Honda
     Hunter
     Inslee
     Israel
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Jordan
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kildee
     Kind
     King (NY)
     Kucinich
     Labrador
     Lamborn
     Landry
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     LaTourette
     Lee (CA)
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Lujan
     Lummis
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Manzullo
     Marino
     Markey
     Matheson
     McClintock
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McKinley
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (CT)
     Murphy (PA)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Nugent
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Paul
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Pence
     Peters
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Platts
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Price (NC)
     Quayle
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rehberg
     Richardson
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Ross (FL)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Royce
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sherman
     Shuster
     Sires
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stark
     Stearns
     Stutzman
     Sutton
     Terry
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Towns
     Turner
     Upton
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walberg
     Walsh (IL)
     Waters
     Watt
     Webster
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (SC)
     Wolf
     Woodall
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Yarmuth
     Yoder
     Young (AK)

                               NOES--197

     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Austria
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Berg
     Berman
     Biggert
     Bishop (GA)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boswell
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Braley (IA)
     Brooks
     Brown (FL)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Cardoza
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Clyburn
     Cole
     Conaway
     Costa
     Costello
     Courtney
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Davis (IL)
     Davis (KY)
     Denham
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dicks
     Dold
     Ellmers
     Emerson

[[Page H4300]]


     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Gallegly
     Gardner
     Gibbs
     Gonzalez
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Granger
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Guthrie
     Hanna
     Harper
     Hartzler
     Hastings (FL)
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Heck
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Hinojosa
     Holden
     Hoyer
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson (OH)
     Jones
     Kelly
     King (IA)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kissell
     Kline
     Lance
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     Levin
     Lewis (CA)
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Long
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Marchant
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCaul
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Mica
     Miller (NC)
     Myrick
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perlmutter
     Peterson
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Polis
     Pompeo
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Reyes
     Ribble
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (AR)
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Sessions
     Sewell
     Shimkus
     Shuler
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Sullivan
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tipton
     Walden
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waxman
     Welch
     West
     Wilson (FL)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--12

     Eshoo
     Giffords
     Larson (CT)
     McCotter
     Neal
     Olver
     Rangel
     Rokita
     Slaughter
     Stivers
     Tsongas
     Weiner


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute left in this 
vote.

                              {time}  1214

  Mr. WITTMAN, Mrs. BONO MACK, and Mr. POE of Texas changed their vote 
from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                    Amendment Offered by Mr. Dingell

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Michigan 
(Mr. Dingell) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 178, 
noes 241, not voting 13, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 440]

                               AYES--178

     Ackerman
     Altmire
     Andrews
     Baca
     Baldwin
     Barrow
     Bass (CA)
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berman
     Biggert
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Boren
     Boswell
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Burgess
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Castor (FL)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Deutch
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Dold
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Frank (MA)
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Gonzalez
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Gutierrez
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Heinrich
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Inslee
     Israel
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kildee
     Kind
     Kissell
     Kucinich
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Markey
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Murphy (PA)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Pingree (ME)
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Shuler
     Sires
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stark
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Towns
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--241

     Adams
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Amash
     Austria
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (NH)
     Benishek
     Berg
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burton (IN)
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Cardoza
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Chandler
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conaway
     Costa
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Davis (KY)
     Denham
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallegly
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Heck
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herrera Beutler
     Holden
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kelly
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Landry
     Lankford
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Lewis (CA)
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mulvaney
     Myrick
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Paul
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pence
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Polis
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (AR)
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Scalise
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--13

     Costello
     Eshoo
     Giffords
     Larson (CT)
     McCotter
     Neal
     Olver
     Rangel
     Rokita
     Slaughter
     Stivers
     Tsongas
     Weiner


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining in 
this vote.

                              {time}  1218

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


             Amendment Offered by Ms. Jackson Lee of Texas

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from Texas 
(Ms. Jackson Lee) on which further proceedings were postponed and on 
which the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 167, 
noes 252, not voting 13, as follows:

[[Page H4301]]

                             [Roll No. 441]

                               AYES--167

     Ackerman
     Andrews
     Baca
     Baldwin
     Bass (CA)
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berman
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Boswell
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Castor (FL)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Cohen
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costello
     Courtney
     Critz
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Deutch
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Fattah
     Filner
     Fitzpatrick
     Frank (MA)
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Gonzalez
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Heinrich
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holden
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Inslee
     Israel
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Kildee
     Kind
     Kissell
     Kucinich
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Markey
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Michaud
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Peters
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Shuler
     Sires
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stark
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Towns
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     West
     Wilson (FL)
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--252

     Adams
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Amash
     Austria
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (NH)
     Benishek
     Berg
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Chandler
     Clyburn
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conaway
     Connolly (VA)
     Costa
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Davis (KY)
     Denham
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dold
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Engel
     Farenthold
     Farr
     Fincher
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallegly
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Heck
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herrera Beutler
     Hinchey
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Keating
     Kelly
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Landry
     Lankford
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Lewis (CA)
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCollum
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meehan
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Moore
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Paul
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pence
     Perlmutter
     Peterson
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Rahall
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (AR)
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Scalise
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Webster
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--13

     Eshoo
     Giffords
     Larson (CT)
     McCotter
     Neal
     Nugent
     Olver
     Rangel
     Rokita
     Slaughter
     Stivers
     Tsongas
     Weiner


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining in 
this vote.

                              {time}  1222

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated against:
  Mr. NUGENT. Mr. Chair, on rollcall No. 441 I was unavoidably 
detained. Had I been present, I would have voted ``no.''


                 Amendment No. 23 Offered by Mr. Gibson

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from New York 
(Mr. Gibson) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 221, 
noes 198, not voting 13, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 442]

                               AYES--221

     Ackerman
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Austria
     Baca
     Bachus
     Baldwin
     Barletta
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (CA)
     Bass (NH)
     Benishek
     Berg
     Berkley
     Berman
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (UT)
     Boren
     Boswell
     Boustany
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Burgess
     Calvert
     Capito
     Capps
     Capuano
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Chandler
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Coble
     Cohen
     Connolly (VA)
     Costello
     Crawford
     Critz
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     DeFazio
     DeLauro
     Denham
     DesJarlais
     Deutch
     Dicks
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Duffy
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Emerson
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Fitzpatrick
     Forbes
     Foxx
     Frank (MA)
     Franks (AZ)
     Fudge
     Gallegly
     Garamendi
     Gardner
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck
     Heinrich
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Hinchey
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holden
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Huelskamp
     Hurt
     Inslee
     Issa
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Jordan
     Keating
     Kind
     King (IA)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kucinich
     Labrador
     Landry
     Langevin
     LaTourette
     Lee (CA)
     Lewis (CA)
     Lewis (GA)
     Loebsack
     Lowey
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan
     Lummis
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Manzullo
     Markey
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller (NC)
     Moran
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Owens
     Pastor (AZ)
     Pelosi
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Polis
     Pompeo
     Price (NC)
     Rahall
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Renacci
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (MI)
     Ross (AR)
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schilling
     Schock
     Schrader
     Scott (SC)
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sessions
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Shuler
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sires
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Southerland
     Speier
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tonko
     Towns
     Van Hollen
     Visclosky
     Walden
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Watt
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--198

     Adams
     Amash
     Andrews
     Bachmann
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Becerra
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (NY)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Blumenauer
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burton (IN)
     Butterfield
     Camp
     Campbell
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Cardoza
     Carter
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conaway
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cravaack
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Davis (KY)
     DeGette
     Dent
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Dold
     Dreier
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers

[[Page H4302]]


     Engel
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Fortenberry
     Frelinghuysen
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Gutierrez
     Hall
     Harper
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Himes
     Holt
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Israel
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Kaptur
     Kelly
     Kildee
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kissell
     Kline
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Lankford
     Larsen (WA)
     Latham
     Latta
     Levin
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Long
     Lucas
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meehan
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Murphy (CT)
     Myrick
     Neugebauer
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Paul
     Paulsen
     Payne
     Pearce
     Pence
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Peterson
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Quigley
     Reichert
     Ribble
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rohrabacher
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (FL)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Schmidt
     Schwartz
     Schweikert
     Sensenbrenner
     Shimkus
     Smith (NJ)
     Stark
     Stearns
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Velazquez
     Walberg
     Walsh (IL)
     Waters
     Waxman
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (SC)
     Wolf
     Woodall
     Yoder

                             NOT VOTING--13

     Eshoo
     Giffords
     Hinojosa
     Larson (CT)
     McCotter
     Neal
     Olver
     Rangel
     Rokita
     Slaughter
     Stivers
     Tsongas
     Weiner


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining on 
this vote.

                              {time}  1227

  Mrs. SCHMIDT changed her vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  Messrs. CLARKE of Michigan and LANDRY changed their vote from ``no'' 
to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated for:
  Mr. HINOJOSA. Mr. Chair, on rollcall No. 442, had I been present, I 
would have voted ``aye.''


               Amendment No. 3 offered by Mr. Blumenauer

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Oregon 
(Mr. Blumenauer) on which further proceedings were postponed and on 
which the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 154, 
noes 262, not voting 16, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 443]

                               AYES--154

     Ackerman
     Amash
     Andrews
     Bachmann
     Baldwin
     Bass (CA)
     Bass (NH)
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berman
     Biggert
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Brady (PA)
     Campbell
     Capps
     Capuano
     Castor (FL)
     Chabot
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clay
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cohen
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Crowley
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Dent
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Dold
     Doyle
     Dreier
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellison
     Fattah
     Filner
     Fitzpatrick
     Flake
     Frank (MA)
     Franks (AZ)
     Garamendi
     Garrett
     Graves (GA)
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Gutierrez
     Hanabusa
     Heinrich
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Inslee
     Israel
     Jackson (IL)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Kildee
     Kind
     King (NY)
     Kucinich
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Markey
     Matheson
     McCarthy (NY)
     McClintock
     McDermott
     McGovern
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Mulvaney
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Paul
     Paulsen
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Peters
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Polis
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Reichert
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schwartz
     Sensenbrenner
     Sherman
     Sires
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stark
     Sutton
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Towns
     Van Hollen
     Walsh (IL)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Waxman
     Wilson (FL)
     Woodall
     Wu
     Yarmuth
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--262

     Adams
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Austria
     Baca
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Benishek
     Berg
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boswell
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Braley (IA)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (FL)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chaffetz
     Chandler
     Clarke (NY)
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cole
     Conaway
     Costa
     Costello
     Courtney
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Cummings
     Davis (KY)
     DeLauro
     Denham
     DesJarlais
     Dicks
     Donnelly (IN)
     Duffy
     Edwards
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Engel
     Farenthold
     Farr
     Fincher
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gallegly
     Gardner
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (FL)
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Heck
     Herger
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holden
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Jenkins
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Keating
     Kelly
     King (IA)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kissell
     Kline
     Labrador
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Lankford
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Lee (CA)
     Lewis (CA)
     Loebsack
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McCollum
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Mica
     Miller (MI)
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, Gary
     Murphy (CT)
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Pastor (AZ)
     Pearce
     Pence
     Perlmutter
     Peterson
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Price (NC)
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Renacci
     Reyes
     Ribble
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (AR)
     Ross (FL)
     Scalise
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sessions
     Sewell
     Shimkus
     Shuler
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walz (MN)
     Watt
     Webster
     Welch
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woolsey
     Yoder
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)

                             NOT VOTING--16

     Diaz-Balart
     Eshoo
     Gibson
     Giffords
     Landry
     Larson (CT)
     McCotter
     Neal
     Olver
     Rangel
     Rokita
     Slaughter
     Stivers
     Sullivan
     Tsongas
     Weiner


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining in 
this vote.

                              {time}  1230

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated against:
  Mr. GIBSON. Mr. Chair, on rollcall No. 443, I would have voted 
``no.''


                 Amendment Offered by Mr. King of Iowa

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on amendment No. 1 offered by the gentleman from Iowa 
(Mr. King) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which the 
ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.

[[Page H4303]]

  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 155, 
noes 262, not voting 15, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 444]

                               AYES--155

     Adams
     Akin
     Bachmann
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Benishek
     Berg
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bono Mack
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Camp
     Campbell
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Carter
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Conaway
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Davis (KY)
     Denham
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Hall
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Huelskamp
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Jenkins
     Jordan
     Kelly
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Lamborn
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     LoBiondo
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mulvaney
     Myrick
     Neugebauer
     Nugent
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paul
     Paulsen
     Pence
     Petri
     Pitts
     Platts
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Reed
     Reichert
     Ribble
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Roskam
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Scalise
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shuster
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Thornberry
     Tipton
     Upton
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Webster
     Westmoreland
     Wolf
     Womack
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)

                               NOES--262

     Ackerman
     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Amash
     Andrews
     Austria
     Baca
     Bachus
     Baldwin
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Bass (CA)
     Bass (NH)
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berman
     Biggert
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonner
     Boren
     Boswell
     Boustany
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Capito
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Chabot
     Chandler
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Cole
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Costello
     Courtney
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Critz
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Dold
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Dreier
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Emerson
     Engel
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Frank (MA)
     Fudge
     Gallegly
     Garamendi
     Gibson
     Gonzalez
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Grijalva
     Guthrie
     Gutierrez
     Hanabusa
     Harper
     Hastings (FL)
     Hayworth
     Heck
     Heinrich
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holden
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Huizenga (MI)
     Inslee
     Israel
     Issa
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kildee
     Kind
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kissell
     Kline
     Kucinich
     Lance
     Landry
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     LaTourette
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis (CA)
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Long
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Marino
     Markey
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Michaud
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Murphy (PA)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Noem
     Nunes
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pearce
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Poe (TX)
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rehberg
     Renacci
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Rogers (AL)
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Ross (AR)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Shuler
     Simpson
     Sires
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stark
     Sutton
     Terry
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Towns
     Turner
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     West
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Woodall
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Yarmuth
     Yoder
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--15

     Eshoo
     Giffords
     Hanna
     Johnson (IL)
     Labrador
     Larson (CT)
     McCotter
     Neal
     Olver
     Rangel
     Rokita
     Slaughter
     Stivers
     Tsongas
     Weiner


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). One minute remains in this vote.

                              {time}  1235

  Mrs. SCHMIDT changed her vote from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                          PERSONAL EXPLANATION

  Mr. JOHNSON of Illinois. Mr. Chair, on rollcall No. 444, I was taken 
from the floor by Agricultural staff to analyze certain issues, and 
inadvertently missed the first King amendment. I have been a strong 
supporter of ranch justice, including in the farm arena. However, the 
process of dealing with claims, and the fiscal impact, necessitate a 
``present'' vote. Had I been present, I would have voted ``present.''


                 Amendment Offered by Mr. King of Iowa

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on amendment No. 2 offered by the gentleman from Iowa 
(Mr. King) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which the 
ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 240, 
noes 176, not voting 16, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 445]

                               AYES--240

     Adams
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Amash
     Austria
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Benishek
     Berg
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conaway
     Costello
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Davis (KY)
     Denham
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Donnelly (IN)
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallegly
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herrera Beutler
     Holden
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kaptur
     Kelly
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Landry
     Langevin
     Lankford
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Lewis (CA)
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meehan
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paul
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pence
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Rahall
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (AR)
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Scalise
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuler
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

[[Page H4304]]



                               NOES--176

     Ackerman
     Altmire
     Andrews
     Baca
     Baldwin
     Barrow
     Bass (CA)
     Bass (NH)
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berman
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Boswell
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Butterfield
     Capito
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Castor (FL)
     Chandler
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Dent
     Deutch
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Dold
     Doyle
     Edwards
     Engel
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Frank (MA)
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Gonzalez
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Hastings (FL)
     Hayworth
     Heinrich
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Inslee
     Israel
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Keating
     Kildee
     Kind
     Kissell
     Kucinich
     Larsen (WA)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Markey
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Michaud
     Miller (NC)
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Pingree (ME)
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Sires
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stark
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Towns
     Upton
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Yarmuth

                             NOT VOTING--16

     Ellison
     Eshoo
     Giffords
     Johnson (IL)
     Larson (CT)
     McCotter
     Meeks
     Miller, George
     Neal
     Olver
     Rangel
     Rokita
     Slaughter
     Stivers
     Tsongas
     Weiner


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). One minute remains in this vote.

                              {time}  1238

  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated against:
  Mr. ELLISON. Mr. Chair, on June 16, 2011, I inadvertently missed 
rollcall No. 445, and would have voted ``no'' on that rollcall vote.


                          personal explanation

  Mr. JOHNSON of Illinois. Mr. Chair, on rollcall No. 445, I was taken 
off the floor by agricultural staff to analyze certain agricultural 
issues, and inadvertently missed the vote. I am a strong pro-life 
Member, but this amendment addresses an issue simply not a part of the 
bill. Had I been present, I would have voted ``present.''


                Amendment No. 22 Offered by Mr. Garrett

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from New Jersey 
(Mr. Garrett) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 231, 
noes 189, not voting 12, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 446]

                               AYES--231

     Adams
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Amash
     Austria
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (NH)
     Benishek
     Berg
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burton (IN)
     Calvert
     Camp
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conaway
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Davis (KY)
     Denham
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dold
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallegly
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Heck
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herrera Beutler
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jordan
     Kelly
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Landry
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     Lewis (CA)
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meehan
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paul
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pence
     Petri
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Scalise
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--189

     Ackerman
     Altmire
     Andrews
     Baca
     Baldwin
     Barrow
     Bass (CA)
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berman
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Boswell
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Burgess
     Butterfield
     Campbell
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Castor (FL)
     Chandler
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Costello
     Courtney
     Critz
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Deutch
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Fortenberry
     Frank (MA)
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Gibson
     Gonzalez
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Heinrich
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holden
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Inslee
     Israel
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kildee
     Kind
     Kissell
     Kucinich
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     LaTourette
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Markey
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Michaud
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Ross (AR)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Shuler
     Sires
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stark
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Towns
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Yarmuth

                             NOT VOTING--12

     Eshoo
     Giffords
     Larson (CT)
     McCotter
     Neal
     Olver
     Rangel
     Rokita
     Slaughter
     Stivers
     Tsongas
     Weiner


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining in 
this vote.

                              {time}  1242

  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


          Amendment No. 29 Offered by Ms. Jackson Lee of Texas

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from Texas 
(Ms. Jackson Lee) on which further proceedings were postponed and on 
which the noes prevailed by voice vote.

[[Page H4305]]

  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 181, 
noes 237, not voting 14, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 447]

                               AYES--181

     Ackerman
     Altmire
     Andrews
     Baca
     Baldwin
     Barrow
     Bass (CA)
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berman
     Biggert
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Boren
     Boswell
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Castor (FL)
     Chandler
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costello
     Courtney
     Critz
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Deutch
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Dold
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Frank (MA)
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Gonzalez
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Heinrich
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holden
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Inslee
     Israel
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kildee
     Kind
     Kissell
     Kucinich
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Markey
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Michaud
     Miller (NC)
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Peters
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Rohrabacher
     Ross (AR)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Shuler
     Sires
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stark
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Towns
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--237

     Adams
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Amash
     Austria
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (NH)
     Benishek
     Berg
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Cardoza
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conaway
     Costa
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Davis (KY)
     Denham
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallegly
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Heck
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herrera Beutler
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kelly
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Landry
     Lankford
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Lewis (CA)
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Paul
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pence
     Perlmutter
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Ryan (WI)
     Scalise
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--14

     Eshoo
     Giffords
     Larson (CT)
     McCotter
     Miller, George
     Neal
     Nunnelee
     Olver
     Rangel
     Rokita
     Slaughter
     Stivers
     Tsongas
     Weiner


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining in 
this vote.

                              {time}  1245

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                    Amendment Offered by Mr. Scalise

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Louisiana 
(Mr. Scalise) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 238, 
noes 179, not voting 15, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 448]

                               AYES--238

     Adams
     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Amash
     Austria
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Benishek
     Berg
     Biggert
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boswell
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conaway
     Costello
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Culberson
     Davis (KY)
     Denham
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dold
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallegly
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herrera Beutler
     Holden
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Jenkins
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kelly
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Landry
     Lankford
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Lewis (CA)
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meehan
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paul
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pence
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Rahall
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (AR)
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Scalise
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--179

     Ackerman
     Andrews
     Baca
     Baldwin
     Barrow
     Bass (CA)

[[Page H4306]]


     Bass (NH)
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berman
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Castor (FL)
     Chandler
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Deutch
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Frank (MA)
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Gonzalez
     Green, Al
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Hastings (FL)
     Hayworth
     Heinrich
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Inslee
     Israel
     Issa
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kildee
     Kind
     Kissell
     Kucinich
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Markey
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Michaud
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Pingree (ME)
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Reichert
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Shuler
     Sires
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stark
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Towns
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Yarmuth

                             NOT VOTING--15

     Akin
     Bilbray
     Eshoo
     Giffords
     Larson (CT)
     McCotter
     Neal
     Nugent
     Olver
     Rangel
     Rokita
     Slaughter
     Stivers
     Tsongas
     Weiner


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining in 
this vote.

                              {time}  1248

  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated for:
  Mr. AKIN. Mr. Chair, on rollcall No. 448, had I been present, I would 
have voted ``aye.''
  Mr. NUGENT. Mr. Chair, on rollcall No. 448, had I been present, I 
would have voted ``aye.''


          Amendment No. 28 Offered by Ms. Jackson Lee of Texas

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from Texas 
(Ms. Jackson Lee) on which further proceedings were postponed and on 
which the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 182, 
noes 235, not voting 15, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 449]

                               AYES--182

     Ackerman
     Andrews
     Baca
     Baldwin
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Bass (CA)
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berman
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Boren
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Castor (FL)
     Chandler
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costello
     Courtney
     Critz
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Deutch
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Forbes
     Frank (MA)
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Gonzalez
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Heinrich
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holden
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Inslee
     Israel
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Kildee
     Kind
     Kissell
     Kucinich
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Marchant
     Markey
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Michaud
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Napolitano
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paul
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Peters
     Pingree (ME)
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Rohrabacher
     Ross (AR)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Shuler
     Sires
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stark
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Towns
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--235

     Adams
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Amash
     Austria
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (NH)
     Benishek
     Berg
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boswell
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Cardoza
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conaway
     Costa
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Davis (KY)
     Denham
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dold
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallegly
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Heck
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herrera Beutler
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Keating
     Kelly
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Landry
     Lankford
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Lewis (CA)
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marino
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meehan
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pence
     Perlmutter
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Scalise
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--15

     Eshoo
     Giffords
     Labrador
     Larson (CT)
     McCotter
     Nadler
     Neal
     Olver
     Rangel
     Rokita
     Slaughter
     Stivers
     Tsongas
     Weiner
     Wilson (SC)


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1251

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                    Amendment Offered by Ms. Hirono

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from Hawaii 
(Ms. Hirono) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.

[[Page H4307]]

  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 288, 
noes 132, not voting 12, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 450]

                               AYES--288

     Ackerman
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Andrews
     Baca
     Bachus
     Baldwin
     Barletta
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (CA)
     Bass (NH)
     Becerra
     Berg
     Berkley
     Berman
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Blumenauer
     Boren
     Boswell
     Boustany
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brooks
     Brown (FL)
     Buchanan
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Capito
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Chaffetz
     Chandler
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Costello
     Courtney
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Critz
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Deutch
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Dold
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Duncan (TN)
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Frank (MA)
     Fudge
     Gallegly
     Garamendi
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Gutierrez
     Hall
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck
     Heinrich
     Herger
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holden
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Hultgren
     Israel
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly
     Kildee
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kissell
     Kline
     Kucinich
     Labrador
     Lance
     Landry
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Marchant
     Marino
     Markey
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (CT)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Noem
     Nunes
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paul
     Paulsen
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Platts
     Polis
     Pompeo
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rehberg
     Renacci
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Rogers (MI)
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Ross (AR)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schilling
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Shuler
     Shuster
     Sires
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stark
     Sutton
     Terry
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Towns
     Turner
     Upton
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walden
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Wittman
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)

                               NOES--132

     Adams
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Amash
     Austria
     Bachmann
     Barrow
     Benishek
     Biggert
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Brady (TX)
     Broun (GA)
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Campbell
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Carter
     Chabot
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conaway
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Davis (KY)
     Denham
     Diaz-Balart
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Engel
     Farenthold
     Flake
     Fleming
     Flores
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gardner
     Gibbs
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Guinta
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Hensarling
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Inslee
     Issa
     Johnson, Sam
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Lamborn
     Lankford
     Latta
     Lewis (CA)
     Long
     Lucas
     Lummis
     Mack
     Manzullo
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McMorris Rodgers
     Miller, Gary
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Neugebauer
     Nugent
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Pearce
     Pence
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Reed
     Reichert
     Ribble
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rohrabacher
     Rooney
     Roskam
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Sessions
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Thornberry
     Tipton
     Walberg
     Walsh (IL)
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Wilson (SC)
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--12

     Eshoo
     Giffords
     Larson (CT)
     McCotter
     Neal
     Olver
     Rangel
     Rokita
     Slaughter
     Stivers
     Tsongas
     Weiner


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1256

  Mr. CHAFFETZ and Ms. ROS-LEHTINEN changed their vote from ``no'' to 
``aye.''
  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                 Amendment No. 38 Offered by Mr. Holden

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from 
Pennsylvania (Mr. Holden) on which further proceedings were postponed 
and on which the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 84, 
noes 335, not voting 13, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 451]

                                AYES--84

     Altmire
     Barletta
     Bartlett
     Berkley
     Bishop (GA)
     Boren
     Brady (PA)
     Brown (FL)
     Cardoza
     Carney
     Chandler
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Costa
     Costello
     Courtney
     Critz
     Davis (IL)
     DeFazio
     Doyle
     Filner
     Fitzpatrick
     Foxx
     Gerlach
     Goodlatte
     Griffith (VA)
     Hall
     Harper
     Himes
     Holden
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hurt
     Johnson (IL)
     Kelly
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kissell
     Kucinich
     Labrador
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Manzullo
     Marino
     Matheson
     McCarthy (NY)
     Meehan
     Mica
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Murphy (PA)
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Paul
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Platts
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rush
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Shuler
     Shuster
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (WA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Visclosky
     Walsh (IL)
     Walz (MN)
     Welch
     West
     Wittman

                               NOES--335

     Ackerman
     Adams
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Amash
     Andrews
     Austria
     Baca
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Baldwin
     Barrow
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (CA)
     Bass (NH)
     Becerra
     Benishek
     Berg
     Berman
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (NY)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Blumenauer
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boswell
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Braley (IA)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Capps
     Capuano
     Carnahan
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Cohen
     Cole
     Conaway
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (KY)
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Denham
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Dold
     Donnelly (IN)
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Engel
     Farenthold
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fincher
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Frank (MA)
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gallegly
     Garamendi
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Gutierrez
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (FL)
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Heck
     Heinrich
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Huelskamp
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Inslee
     Israel
     Issa
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kildee
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kline
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Landry
     Langevin
     Lankford
     Larsen (WA)
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis (CA)
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey

[[Page H4308]]


     Lujan
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Lynch
     Mack
     Maloney
     Markey
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, Gary
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Mulvaney
     Myrick
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paulsen
     Payne
     Pearce
     Pelosi
     Pence
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Polis
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Price (NC)
     Quayle
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (AR)
     Ross (FL)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Serrano
     Sessions
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Sires
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Speier
     Stark
     Stearns
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Sutton
     Terry
     Thompson (CA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Tipton
     Tonko
     Towns
     Turner
     Upton
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Walberg
     Walden
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Webster
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Yarmuth
     Yoder
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--13

     Eshoo
     Giffords
     Larson (CT)
     Marchant
     McCotter
     Neal
     Olver
     Rangel
     Rokita
     Slaughter
     Stivers
     Tsongas
     Weiner


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1300

  Ms. WILSON of Florida changed her vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated against:
  Mr. WEST. Mr. Chair, on rollcall No. 451, had I been present, I would 
have voted ``no.''


                   Amendment Offered by Mr. Campbell

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from California 
(Mr. Campbell) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 132, 
noes 287, not voting 13, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 452]

                               AYES--132

     Ackerman
     Baldwin
     Bass (CA)
     Becerra
     Berman
     Blackburn
     Brady (PA)
     Brooks
     Campbell
     Capps
     Capuano
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Castor (FL)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Coffman (CO)
     Cohen
     Connolly (VA)
     Cooper
     Crowley
     Davis (CA)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Deutch
     Dicks
     Doggett
     Dold
     Doyle
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellison
     Engel
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Fitzpatrick
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Gallegly
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Hanabusa
     Hayworth
     Heinrich
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hirono
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Inslee
     Israel
     Jackson (IL)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (IL)
     Jones
     Keating
     Kucinich
     Langevin
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lipinski
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Mack
     Maloney
     Markey
     McCarthy (NY)
     McClintock
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McHenry
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paul
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Reichert
     Reyes
     Rohrabacher
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schwartz
     Schweikert
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sherman
     Sires
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stark
     Sutton
     Tonko
     Towns
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Waxman
     Welch
     Whitfield
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Yarmuth
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--287

     Adams
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Amash
     Andrews
     Austria
     Baca
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (NH)
     Benishek
     Berg
     Berkley
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blumenauer
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boswell
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Braley (IA)
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (FL)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Cardoza
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Chandler
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coble
     Cole
     Conaway
     Conyers
     Costa
     Costello
     Courtney
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Cummings
     Davis (IL)
     Davis (KY)
     Denham
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Donnelly (IN)
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Edwards
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Frank (MA)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Gardner
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Gutierrez
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (FL)
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herrera Beutler
     Hinojosa
     Hochul
     Holden
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Jordan
     Kaptur
     Kelly
     Kildee
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kissell
     Kline
     Labrador
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Landry
     Lankford
     Larsen (WA)
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Lewis (CA)
     Lewis (GA)
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Lynch
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meeks
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, Gary
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pence
     Peterson
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Rahall
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (AR)
     Ross (FL)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Scalise
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schrader
     Scott (SC)
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Sessions
     Sewell
     Shimkus
     Shuler
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Visclosky
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Wilson (FL)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)

                             NOT VOTING--13

     Eshoo
     Giffords
     Larson (CT)
     McCotter
     Neal
     Olver
     Rangel
     Rokita
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Slaughter
     Stivers
     Tsongas
     Weiner


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1306

  Ms. ZOE LOFGREN of California, Messrs. COFFMAN of Colorado and CLARKE 
of Michigan, Ms. SPEIER, and Mr. BERMAN changed their vote from ``no'' 
to ``aye.''
  Messrs. FRANK of Massachusetts, FLAKE, SAM JOHNSON of Texas, ROTHMAN 
of New Jersey, and AMASH changed their vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                  Amendment Offered by Mrs. Blackburn

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from 
Tennessee (Mrs. Blackburn) on which further proceedings were postponed 
and on which the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.

[[Page H4309]]

  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 109, 
noes 310, not voting 13, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 453]

                               AYES--109

     Amash
     Bachmann
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Biggert
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bono Mack
     Brady (TX)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Campbell
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cooper
     Davis (KY)
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Garrett
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gowdy
     Graves (GA)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Hall
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jordan
     King (NY)
     Kline
     Labrador
     Lamborn
     Landry
     Latta
     Long
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     McCarthy (CA)
     McClintock
     McHenry
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Nugent
     Nunnelee
     Paul
     Paulsen
     Pence
     Petri
     Pitts
     Pompeo
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rigell
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Tiberi
     Upton
     Walberg
     Walsh (IL)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--310

     Ackerman
     Adams
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Andrews
     Austria
     Baca
     Bachus
     Baldwin
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Bass (CA)
     Bass (NH)
     Becerra
     Benishek
     Berg
     Berkley
     Berman
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonner
     Boren
     Boswell
     Boustany
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brooks
     Brown (FL)
     Bucshon
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Chandler
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Cole
     Conaway
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Costa
     Costello
     Courtney
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Denham
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Dold
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Engel
     Farenthold
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Frank (MA)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gallegly
     Garamendi
     Gardner
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gonzalez
     Gosar
     Granger
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Grijalva
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Gutierrez
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (FL)
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Heck
     Heinrich
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holden
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Inslee
     Israel
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly
     Kildee
     Kind
     King (IA)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kissell
     Kucinich
     Lance
     Langevin
     Lankford
     Larsen (WA)
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis (CA)
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Marino
     Markey
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCaul
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Michaud
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nunes
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pearce
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Polis
     Posey
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (AR)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Shuler
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sires
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stark
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tierney
     Tipton
     Tonko
     Towns
     Turner
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walden
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Webster
     Welch
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)

                             NOT VOTING--13

     Eshoo
     Giffords
     Larson (CT)
     McCotter
     Neal
     Olver
     Rangel
     Rokita
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Slaughter
     Stivers
     Tsongas
     Weiner


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1309

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                     Amendment Offered by Mr. Flake

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on amendment No. 1 offered by the gentleman from Arizona 
(Mr. Flake) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 283, 
noes 128, not voting 21, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 454]

                               AYES--283

     Adams
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Amash
     Andrews
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (CA)
     Bass (NH)
     Becerra
     Benishek
     Berkley
     Berman
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Blumenauer
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boustany
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Capps
     Capuano
     Carney
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Chandler
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cohen
     Cole
     Conaway
     Connolly (VA)
     Cooper
     Courtney
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (KY)
     DeLauro
     Denham
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Deutch
     Doggett
     Dold
     Doyle
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Farr
     Fitzpatrick
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Foxx
     Frank (MA)
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gallegly
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hayworth
     Heinrich
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Honda
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Johnson, Sam
     Jordan
     Kelly
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kline
     Kucinich
     Labrador
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Landry
     Lankford
     Larsen (WA)
     LaTourette
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Long
     Lujan
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Lynch
     Mack
     Maloney
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Miller, George
     Moran
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (CT)
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Nadler
     Neugebauer
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paul
     Paulsen
     Payne
     Pearce
     Pence
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Polis
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Richardson
     Rigell
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rooney
     Roskam
     Ross (FL)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Schiff
     Schmidt
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Sherman
     Shuler
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sires
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Southerland
     Speier
     Stearns
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tipton
     Tonko
     Upton
     Van Hollen
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Webster
     Welch
     West
     Westmoreland
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

[[Page H4310]]



                               NOES--128

     Ackerman
     Austria
     Baca
     Baldwin
     Barrow
     Berg
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Boswell
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Burton (IN)
     Butterfield
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carson (IN)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Conyers
     Costa
     Costello
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Cummings
     Davis (IL)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Diaz-Balart
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Donnelly (IN)
     Emerson
     Engel
     Filner
     Fincher
     Fortenberry
     Gardner
     Gonzalez
     Graves (MO)
     Hanabusa
     Hartzler
     Hastings (FL)
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck
     Holden
     Holt
     Hoyer
     Huelskamp
     Hultgren
     Inslee
     Israel
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Kaptur
     Kildee
     Kind
     King (IA)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kissell
     Langevin
     Latham
     Latta
     Lewis (CA)
     Loebsack
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Manzullo
     Markey
     McCarthy (NY)
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Miller (NC)
     Moore
     Napolitano
     Noem
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pelosi
     Peterson
     Price (NC)
     Reyes
     Richmond
     Rivera
     Roby
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Ross (AR)
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Schakowsky
     Schilling
     Schock
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell
     Shimkus
     Smith (NE)
     Terry
     Thompson (MS)
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Towns
     Turner
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth
     Yoder

                             NOT VOTING--21

     Clarke (MI)
     Eshoo
     Fattah
     Garamendi
     Giffords
     Gosar
     Green, Al
     Gutierrez
     Keating
     Larson (CT)
     McCotter
     Neal
     Olver
     Rangel
     Rokita
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Slaughter
     Stark
     Stivers
     Tsongas
     Weiner


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining in 
this vote.

                              {time}  1312

  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated for:
  Mr. GOSAR. Mr. Chair, on rollcall No. 454, I would have voted ``aye'' 
but was in an interview and missed the vote.


                     Amendment Offered by Mr. Flake

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on amendment No. 2 offered by the gentleman from Arizona 
(Mr. Flake) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 186, 
noes 228, not voting 18, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 455]

                               AYES--186

     Ackerman
     Adams
     Amash
     Andrews
     Bachmann
     Baldwin
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (CA)
     Bass (NH)
     Benishek
     Berkley
     Berman
     Biggert
     Bishop (NY)
     Blackburn
     Blumenauer
     Boswell
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Campbell
     Capps
     Capuano
     Castor (FL)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cohen
     Connolly (VA)
     Cooper
     Courtney
     Cravaack
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Dent
     Deutch
     Doggett
     Dold
     Doyle
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Fattah
     Filner
     Fitzpatrick
     Flake
     Fleming
     Foxx
     Frank (MA)
     Franks (AZ)
     Garrett
     Gibson
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez
     Gowdy
     Graves (GA)
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Grimm
     Heck
     Heinrich
     Hensarling
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Hunter
     Inslee
     Israel
     Issa
     Johnson (GA)
     Jordan
     Kaptur
     Kind
     King (NY)
     Kucinich
     Labrador
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Long
     Lynch
     Mack
     Maloney
     Markey
     Matheson
     McCarthy (NY)
     McClintock
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McHenry
     McKinley
     Meeks
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Miller, Gary
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (CT)
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Nadler
     Nugent
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Paul
     Paulsen
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Peters
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Pitts
     Platts
     Polis
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Price (NC)
     Quayle
     Quigley
     Reichert
     Richardson
     Roe (TN)
     Rohrabacher
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Ross (FL)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott (VA)
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Sherman
     Sires
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stark
     Stearns
     Sutton
     Tonko
     Van Hollen
     Visclosky
     Walsh (IL)
     Waxman
     Welch
     West
     Wilson (SC)
     Wolf
     Woodall
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--228

     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Austria
     Baca
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Becerra
     Berg
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Brown (FL)
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chandler
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clyburn
     Cole
     Conaway
     Conyers
     Costa
     Costello
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Davis (IL)
     Davis (KY)
     Denham
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Donnelly (IN)
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Engel
     Farenthold
     Farr
     Fincher
     Fleischmann
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gallegly
     Gardner
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Granger
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Al
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (FL)
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Herger
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holden
     Holt
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hurt
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Jenkins
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Keating
     Kelly
     Kildee
     King (IA)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kissell
     Kline
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Landry
     Lankford
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Lewis (CA)
     Lewis (GA)
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McCollum
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Miller (MI)
     Miller (NC)
     Napolitano
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pastor (AZ)
     Pearce
     Pence
     Perlmutter
     Peterson
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Rahall
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Renacci
     Reyes
     Ribble
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rooney
     Roskam
     Ross (AR)
     Rush
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Scalise
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell
     Shimkus
     Shuler
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Tipton
     Towns
     Turner
     Upton
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Webster
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Yarmuth
     Yoder

                             NOT VOTING--18

     Eshoo
     Garamendi
     Giffords
     Gutierrez
     Larson (CT)
     McCotter
     Neal
     Olver
     Rangel
     Rokita
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Slaughter
     Stivers
     Tsongas
     Velazquez
     Waters
     Watt
     Weiner


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining in 
this vote.

                              {time}  1315

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated against:
  Mr. AL GREEN of Texas. Madam Chair, today I was unavoidably detained 
and missed the vote on: Flake Amendment No. 2 to H.R. 2112. Prohibits 
the use of funds to be used for the construction of any ethanol blender 
pump or any ethanol storage facility. Had I been present, I would have 
voted ``no'' on this bill.


                   Amendment Offered by Mr. Lipinski

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Illinois 
(Mr. Lipinski) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.

[[Page H4311]]

  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 162, 
noes 254, not voting 16, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 456]

                               AYES--162

     Ackerman
     Aderholt
     Altmire
     Baca
     Baldwin
     Bartlett
     Bass (NH)
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berman
     Bilbray
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blackburn
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Burgess
     Capito
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Chandler
     Chu
     Coble
     Conaway
     Cooper
     Costello
     Courtney
     Cravaack
     Critz
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (IL)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Dent
     Deutch
     Dicks
     Doggett
     Dold
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Duffy
     Duncan (TN)
     Engel
     Filner
     Fitzpatrick
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Frank (MA)
     Franks (AZ)
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibson
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Granger
     Graves (MO)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Hanna
     Heck
     Heinrich
     Higgins
     Hinojosa
     Hochul
     Holden
     Holt
     Honda
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Israel
     Jackson (IL)
     Johnson (IL)
     Jones
     Kaptur
     Keating
     King (NY)
     Kissell
     Langevin
     LaTourette
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Manzullo
     Markey
     Matheson
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McGovern
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     Meehan
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (NC)
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Nugent
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Paul
     Peters
     Pitts
     Platts
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Reichert
     Reyes
     Rigell
     Rohrabacher
     Rooney
     Rothman (NJ)
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schilling
     Scott (SC)
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Shuler
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sires
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Stark
     Sullivan
     Sutton
     Terry
     Tiberi
     Tonko
     Turner
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Wu
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--254

     Adams
     Akin
     Alexander
     Amash
     Andrews
     Austria
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (CA)
     Benishek
     Berg
     Biggert
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blumenauer
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boswell
     Boustany
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burton (IN)
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capps
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coffman (CO)
     Cohen
     Cole
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Costa
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Crowley
     Culberson
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (KY)
     Denham
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Dreier
     Duncan (SC)
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Farenthold
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fincher
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gallegly
     Gardner
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gonzalez
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Graves (GA)
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanabusa
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (FL)
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herrera Beutler
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hirono
     Hoyer
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Inslee
     Issa
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Jordan
     Kelly
     Kildee
     Kind
     King (IA)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Kucinich
     Labrador
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Landry
     Lankford
     Larsen (WA)
     Latham
     Latta
     Lee (CA)
     Lewis (CA)
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Maloney
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Miller, George
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (CT)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paulsen
     Payne
     Pearce
     Pelosi
     Pence
     Perlmutter
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Poe (TX)
     Polis
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Price (NC)
     Quayle
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (AR)
     Ross (FL)
     Roybal-Allard
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Scalise
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Schweikert
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Sessions
     Sewell
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Speier
     Stearns
     Stutzman
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tierney
     Tipton
     Towns
     Upton
     Van Hollen
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Wilson (SC)
     Womack
     Woodall
     Woolsey
     Yoder
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--16

     Brady (TX)
     Eshoo
     Garamendi
     Giffords
     Gutierrez
     Larson (CT)
     McCotter
     Neal
     Olver
     Rangel
     Rokita
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Slaughter
     Stivers
     Tsongas
     Weiner


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining in 
this vote.

                              {time}  1318

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                     Amendment Offered by Mr. Flake

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on amendment No. 3 offered by the gentleman from Arizona 
(Mr. Flake) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 101, 
noes 314, not voting 17, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 457]

                               AYES--101

     Amash
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Bass (NH)
     Benishek
     Berkley
     Black
     Blackburn
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Campbell
     Cantor
     Carney
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Cicilline
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cohen
     Connolly (VA)
     Cooper
     Culberson
     Davis (CA)
     DeFazio
     Doggett
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Fitzpatrick
     Flake
     Fleming
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Gowdy
     Graves (GA)
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Hall
     Hanabusa
     Hayworth
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Hunter
     Jordan
     Lamborn
     Lankford
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Mack
     Matheson
     McClintock
     McCollum
     McHenry
     Meehan
     Miller (FL)
     Miller, Gary
     Moran
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Nugent
     Pascrell
     Paul
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pence
     Peters
     Polis
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Quigley
     Rohrabacher
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Smith (NJ)
     Southerland
     Speier
     Stearns
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Tiberi
     Tonko
     Van Hollen
     Walberg
     Walsh (IL)
     West
     Wilson (FL)
     Wilson (SC)
     Woodall
     Young (AK)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--314

     Ackerman
     Adams
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Andrews
     Austria
     Baca
     Baldwin
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (CA)
     Becerra
     Berg
     Berman
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Bishop (UT)
     Blumenauer
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boswell
     Boustany
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Canseco
     Capito
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Chandler
     Chu
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cole
     Conaway
     Conyers
     Costa
     Costello
     Courtney
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (IL)
     Davis (KY)
     DeLauro
     Denham
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Dold
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Engel
     Farenthold
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Fincher
     Fleischmann
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Frank (MA)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gallegly
     Gardner
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gonzalez
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Granger
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Guthrie
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (FL)
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck
     Heinrich
     Herger
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holden
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hurt
     Israel
     Issa
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly
     Kildee
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kissell
     Kline
     Kucinich
     Labrador
     Lance
     Landry
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis (CA)
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lucas

[[Page H4312]]


     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     Markey
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCaul
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller (MI)
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Murphy (CT)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pallone
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (NC)
     Rahall
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Reyes
     Ribble
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (AR)
     Ross (FL)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Shuler
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sires
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Stark
     Sutton
     Terry
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tierney
     Tipton
     Towns
     Turner
     Upton
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walden
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Webster
     Welch
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Yarmuth
     Yoder
     Young (FL)

                             NOT VOTING--17

     DeGette
     Eshoo
     Garamendi
     Giffords
     Gutierrez
     Inslee
     Larson (CT)
     McCotter
     Neal
     Olver
     Rangel
     Rokita
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Slaughter
     Stivers
     Tsongas
     Weiner
  Ms. BASS of California changed her vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''

                              {time}  1321

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will read.
  The Clerk read as follows:

        This Act may be cited as the ``Agriculture, Rural 
     Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related 
     Agencies Appropriations Act, 2012''.

  Mr. KINGSTON. Mr. Chairman, I move that the Committee do now rise and 
report the bill back to the House with sundry amendments, with the 
recommendation that the amendments be agreed to and that the bill, as 
amended, do pass.
  The motion was agreed to.
  Accordingly, the Committee rose; and the Speaker pro tempore (Mr. 
Terry) having assumed the chair, Mr. Bishop of Utah, Acting Chair of 
the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union, reported 
that that Committee, having had under consideration the bill (H.R. 
2112) making appropriations for Agriculture, Rural Development, Food 
and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies programs for the fiscal 
year ending September 30, 2012, and for other purposes, reported the 
bill back to the House with sundry amendments adopted in the Committee 
of the Whole, with the recommendation that the amendments be agreed to 
and that the bill, as amended, do pass.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Under House Resolution 300, the previous 
question is ordered.
  Is a separate vote demanded on any amendment reported from the 
Committee of the Whole? If not, the Chair will put them en gros.
  The amendments were agreed to.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the engrossment and third 
reading of the bill.
  The bill was ordered to be engrossed and read a third time, and was 
read the third time.


                           Motion to Recommit

  Ms. HOCHUL. Mr. Speaker, I have a motion to recommit at the desk.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is the gentlewoman opposed to the bill?
  Ms. HOCHUL. I am opposed to the bill in its current form.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The Clerk will report the motion to 
recommit:

       Ms. Hochul moves to recommit the bill H.R. 2112 to the 
     Committee on Appropriations with instructions to report the 
     same back to the House forthwith with the following 
     amendment:
       Page 55, after line 23, insert the following:
       In addition, for carrying out section 4a of the Commodity 
     Exchange Act (7 U.S.C. 6a), including establishing limits to 
     diminish, eliminate, or prevent excessive speculation, and as 
     authorized by section 12(d) of such Act (7 U.S.C. 16(d)), 
     $11,800,000.
       Page 6, line 11, after the dollar amount, insert ``(reduced 
     by $4,000,000)''.
       Page 27, line 11, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(reduced by $3,800,000)''.
       Page 30, line 10, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(reduced by $4,000,000)''.

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentlewoman from New York is recognized 
for 5 minutes in support of her motion.
  Ms. HOCHUL. Mr. Speaker, I am here today as someone who very recently 
stood before the voters, and I can tell you that the constituents I 
represent are fed up with our inability to control the soaring price of 
gas in this country. In the diners, in the small businesses, and 
certainly at the gas stations, you can feel the incredible anger and 
helplessness of our consumers. And that is why I feel compelled to 
stand here today to offer this final amendment to restore critical 
funding to the Commodity Futures Trading Commission.
  The CFTC is like the sheriffs in town who protect us from the Wild 
West of oil speculators. Now if Republicans had their way, they would 
send these sheriffs packing, let the speculators drive up our gas 
prices and run wild, just shooting around town. But those who support 
my final amendment to the bill see it differently. We like law and 
order. We like it when people play by the rules. And we like having 
sheriffs around to make sure someone is keeping an eye on these 
speculators on behalf of our consumers.
  The Agriculture appropriations bill under debate right now would hurt 
every single person we represent. And among the many problems with this 
bill is the fact that it cedes regulation of the oil market back to Big 
Oil, and it pits consumers against speculators.
  Today oil is trading at about $100 a barrel. In my district, my 
constituents are paying over $4 a gallon just to fill up, and that's 
for regular. The price of diesel is really, really hurting my farmers, 
who pay a quarter more for every gallon.
  You know, the worst part is that none of this is new for western New 
York. A few years ago, my region had the highest gas prices in 
America--not high prices, the highest. Even today, the village of 
Arcade, a tiny village in a farming community in Wyoming County, is 
listed as having among the highest gas prices in the Nation. How can 
that possibly be explained? What is so disturbing is that our area was 
just starting to climb out of recession when the price of gas 
skyrocketed, sending our recovery efforts backwards.
  For all the Members who are concerned about the deficit, I hope you 
will support this amendment. The high cost of oil is not only 
bankrupting American families and businesses but is also bankrupting 
our country.
  I know that the folks back home in my district are fed up with the 
deficit; they're fed up with the poor economy; and they are fed up with 
high gas prices. And they want to know what we're going to do to solve 
these problems. I'll tell you, the answer does not lie in firing the 
regulators who watch and control the speculators who now make up over 
70 percent of the market. And that's exactly what this bill does.
  Recently, several traders and firms were charged by the CFTC with 
price manipulation, trying to hoard crude oil and score a quick $50 
million. And I ask, how does gutting this agency, which protects our 
consumers from speculators, end up reducing the price of gas? The 
answer is, it doesn't.
  Even the CEO of Exxon-Mobil blames speculators for the high prices, 
saying that just last month, oil should be trading around $60 to $70 a 
barrel if it was governed by supply and demand. Can you imagine, $60 a 
barrel? Also recently, the world's largest commodity trader, Goldman 
Sachs, told their clients that the speculators had artificially driven 
up the price of oil by as much as $27 a barrel.
  The bottom line is, how do we justify slashing the budget for the 
only agency that can crack down on excessive speculation? I will tell 
you, it's not by firing all the sheriffs just when Jesse James is 
coming to town. I don't know about anyone else, but when I return home 
this weekend, I sure would not want to have to explain my support for a 
bill that would, in effect, make it easier for Big Oil companies and 
speculators to take advantage of our consumers, our drivers.
  The choice is simple. Does this Congress stand with the consumers, 
our families, our small businesses, and our

[[Page H4313]]

farmers? Or does it stand with the speculators? I know where my 
constituents expect me to stand.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. KINGSTON. Mr. Speaker, I rise in opposition to the motion to 
recommit.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman from Georgia is recognized for 
5 minutes.
  Mr. KINGSTON. Mr. Speaker, I want to start off by saying, if this was 
a serious amendment, if this was a serious proposal--we have had 25 
hours of debate--it would have been out on the House floor, and we 
could have taken a look at it. But let me say this: Very importantly, 
there is absolutely nothing in this bill that prohibits the CFTC from 
looking at oil speculation as it respects the supply or the cost of 
oil.

                              {time}  1330

  This amendment is not needed because of that alone. But let me also 
quote the Democrat Commissioner on the CFTC, Michael Dunn, a Democrat 
member of the CFTC. There has been a suggestion by some that once we 
set position limits, that's speculative limits, on physical 
derivatives, that the price we pay will inevitably drop. I believe this 
is a fallacy.
  To date, the CFTC staff has been unable to find any reliable economic 
analysis to support the contention that excessive speculation is 
affecting the markets we regulate, or that position limits will prevent 
excessive speculation. The price volatility exists in our markets 
because of global supply and demand for physical commodities.
  Now, why are the Democrats trying to get us bogged down in that the 
price of oil is going up because of speculation? Well, I can tell you. 
Go back to January 2009, and ask your constituents if they remember 
paying a 1.83 per gallon. And in that same month, who became President 
of the United States but President Obama, the Democrat.
  The change you were asking for, the change we were promised was that 
gas went from $1.83 per gallon to now $3.80, a 90 percent increase. And 
the Democrats want us to believe it's because of speculators. You know 
why it's gone up? Because of more regulation, less permitting, more 
delays and more lawsuits.
  Think about this. The President recently went down to Brazil and he 
told them, hey, we understand you're going to drill offshore. We 
encourage you to do so. We want to lend you the money, and we want to 
become your best customers.
  Well, ladies and gentlemen, I've got news for the President. I've got 
news for the Democrats. American technology and American engineers do 
not need to hold second place to Brazil or any other country in the 
world. We are America.
  We need to have an all-of-the-above energy policy. We do need to look 
at solar. We do need to look at ethanol. We do need to look at wind. We 
need to also look at nuclear and fossil fuels, and we need to do it 
here in the United States of America.
  We are Americans. And if you want to bring down the price of gas at 
the pump, then let's increase our own domestic supply and quit playing 
games of blaming it on Wall Street.
  I recommend a ``no'' vote on the motion to reconsider.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Without objection, the previous question is 
ordered on the motion to recommit.
  There was no objection.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the motion to recommit.
  The question was taken; and the Speaker pro tempore announced that 
the noes appeared to have it.


                             Recorded Vote

  Ms. HOCHUL. Mr. Speaker, I demand a recorded vote.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to clause 8 and clause 9 of rule 
XX, this 15-minute vote on the motion to recommit will be followed by 
5-minute votes on passage of H.R. 2112; and approval of the Journal, if 
ordered.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 185, 
noes 233, not voting 14, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 458]

                               AYES--185

     Ackerman
     Altmire
     Andrews
     Baca
     Baldwin
     Barrow
     Bass (CA)
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berman
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Boren
     Boswell
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Castor (FL)
     Chandler
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Costello
     Courtney
     Critz
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Deutch
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Frank (MA)
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Gonzalez
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Heinrich
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holden
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Inslee
     Israel
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kildee
     Kind
     Kissell
     Kucinich
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Markey
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Michaud
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Ross (AR)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Shuler
     Sires
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stark
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Towns
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--233

     Adams
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Amash
     Austria
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (NH)
     Benishek
     Berg
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conaway
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Davis (KY)
     Denham
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dold
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallegly
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Heck
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herrera Beutler
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jordan
     Kelly
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Landry
     Lankford
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Lewis (CA)
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meehan
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paul
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pence
     Petri
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Scalise
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Webster
     West
     Whitfield
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--14

     Eshoo
     Giffords
     Larson (CT)
     McCotter
     Neal
     Olver
     Rangel
     Rokita
     Slaughter
     Stivers
     Tsongas
     Weiner
     Westmoreland
     Yoder

[[Page H4314]]




                Announcement by the Speaker Pro Tempore

  The SPEAKER pro tempore (during the vote). There are 2 minutes 
remaining in this vote.

                              {time}  1352

  So the motion to recommit was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the passage of the bill.
  Under clause 10 of rule XX, the yeas and nays are ordered.
  This will be a 5-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--yeas 217, 
nays 203, not voting 12, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 459]

                               YEAS--217

     Adams
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Austria
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Bartlett
     Bass (NH)
     Benishek
     Berg
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burton (IN)
     Calvert
     Camp
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conaway
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Davis (KY)
     Denham
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dold
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Farenthold
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallegly
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Heck
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herrera Beutler
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jordan
     Kelly
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Landry
     Lankford
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Lewis (CA)
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meehan
     Mica
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Neugebauer
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pence
     Petri
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Scalise
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                               NAYS--203

     Ackerman
     Altmire
     Amash
     Andrews
     Baca
     Bachmann
     Baldwin
     Barrow
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (CA)
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berman
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Boren
     Boswell
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (FL)
     Burgess
     Butterfield
     Campbell
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Castor (FL)
     Chandler
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Costello
     Courtney
     Critz
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Deutch
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Duncan (TN)
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Fincher
     Flake
     Frank (MA)
     Franks (AZ)
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Gonzalez
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Heinrich
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holden
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Inslee
     Israel
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kildee
     Kind
     King (IA)
     Kissell
     Kucinich
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Markey
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McClintock
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Noem
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paul
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Rohrabacher
     Ross (AR)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Schweikert
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Shuler
     Sires
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stark
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Towns
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Yarmuth

                             NOT VOTING--12

     Eshoo
     Giffords
     Larson (CT)
     McCotter
     Neal
     Olver
     Rangel
     Rokita
     Slaughter
     Stivers
     Tsongas
     Weiner


                Announcement by the Speaker Pro Tempore

  The SPEAKER pro tempore (during the vote). There is 1 minute 
remaining in this vote.

                              {time}  1401

  Mr. GUTIERREZ changed his vote from ``yea'' to ``nay.''
  Mr. GARY G. MILLER of California changed his vote from ``nay'' to 
``yea.''
  So the bill was passed.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

                          ____________________