Amendment Text: H.Amdt.551 — 112th Congress (2011-2012)

There is one version of the amendment.

Shown Here:
Amendment as Offered (07/07/2011)

This Amendment appears on page H4709 in the following article from the Congressional Record.



[Pages H4689-H4732]
             DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2012

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to House Resolution 320 and rule 
XVIII, the Chair declares the House in the Committee of the Whole House 
on the state of the Union for the further consideration of the bill, 
H.R. 2219.

                              {time}  1233


                     In the Committee of the Whole

  Accordingly, the House resolved itself into the Committee of the 
Whole House on the state of the Union for the further consideration of 
the bill (H.R. 2219) making appropriations for the Department of 
Defense for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2012, and for other 
purposes, with Mr. Westmoreland in the chair.
  The Clerk read the title of the bill.
  The CHAIR. When the Committee of the Whole rose on Wednesday, July 6, 
2011, the bill had been read to page 161, line 12.


                  Amendment No. 13 Offered by Mr. Cole

  Mr. COLE. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), add the 
     following:
       Sec. __.  None of the funds made available by this Act may 
     be used by the Department of Defense to furnish military 
     equipment, military training or advice, or other support for 
     military activities, to any group or individual, not part of 
     a country's armed forces, for the purpose of assisting that 
     group or individual in carrying out military activities in or 
     against Libya.

  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Oklahoma is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. COLE. Mr. Chairman, this amendment is quite simple. It prohibits 
any funds in this bill from being used to conduct military operations 
in Libya, a place where I believe we are engaged in an illegal and 
certainly unauthorized conflict.
  Mr. Chairman, I feel a little bit today like a lawyer with two very 
unpopular clients. One of them is Libya, and the other one is the 
United States Congress. But in this case, each one of them has an 
important point to make.
  With respect to Libya, let me make it clear, I don't believe anybody 
in this Chamber supports Mr. Qadhafi, supports that regime, or wishes 
it well in any way. But Libya did not attack the United States of 
America. Libya did not attack any member of NATO. Libya has not allowed 
al Qaeda to operate with impunity out of its territory. A number of 
years ago, Libya turned over nuclear material to the United States.
  Quite simply, however much we detest Mr. Qadhafi and his regime, we 
have no reason to be at war or conducting military operations in Libya. 
And, frankly, if we allow that situation to continue, I think we have 
to ask ourselves: Are we willing to attack any nation any time that we 
disagree with a regime that we don't like simply because the President 
chooses to do so?
  More troubling than the attack on Libya, in my view, is the 
circumvention of this body, the United States Congress, and its 
warmaking authority under both the Constitution and the War Powers Act. 
Only Congress has the ability to authorize and fund military 
operations.
  The administration consulted with NATO. The administration consulted 
with the United Nations. The administration consulted with the Arab 
League. It never, in any real sense, consulted with the Congress of the 
United States before beginning military operations in Libya.
  Two weeks ago, this House made clear its opposition to the Libyan 
venture by refusing to authorize even the limited use of force. We 
should build on that by removing funding today.
  Some may question whether or not this amendment is germane to this 
particular piece of legislation. Frankly, Mr. Chairman, I worked very 
carefully with the Parliamentarian on the language, and, more 
importantly, it's modeled after the famous Boland amendment of 1983 to 
the Defense approps bill that year that was approved by this body 411-
0.
  Some may argue, like the administration, that we really aren't 
engaged in hostilities in Libya. That simply is laughable. Attorneys at 
both the Department of Defense and the Department of Justice of this 
administration believe that our activity requires congressional 
authorization under the War Powers Act.
  We've flown over a thousand combat sorties over Libyan airspace. 
We've launched 228 Tomahawk missiles. We've launched over a hundred 
Predators. We're refueling and supporting NATO aircraft that are 
engaged in attacking Libya every single day. If that's not war on our 
side of this situation, I can assure you that people on the other side 
consider it war and certainly consider it hostile.
  The reality is we should not be engaged in military action of this 
level unless it's authorized and funded by the Congress of the United 
States.
  In Libya, the President has, quite simply, overreached. However, in 
Congress, we have so far allowed him to do so. We've not authorized 
this activity. There's not a single line in the Defense authorization 
bill or in this bill which actually funds this activity, and we ought 
to explicitly prohibit the President from concluding.
  I think, like many in this body, this is a very important moment for 
the Congress of the United States. Whether or not we claim warmaking 
authority and exercise our power under the Constitution is really the 
issue here. You could be for the Libyan venture and still be able to 
support this legislation, or you could be against it.
  At the end of the day, it's extraordinarily important that we stop 
the erosion of the warmaking authority and responsibility of the 
Congress of the United States, that we end this ill-advised adventure 
in Libya, and that we reassert the rightful place of this institution 
in conducting war and authorizing it and funding it.
  With that, I yield back the balance of my time.

                              {time}  1240

  Mr. DICKS. Mr. Chairman, I rise in opposition to the amendment.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Washington is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. DICKS. Before I begin, I want to say that I have great respect 
for Congressman Cole, who serves on the Defense Appropriations 
Subcommittee. He is one of our most thoughtful members.
  The NATO-led mission to defeat Qadhafi and protect the people of 
Libya was undertaken in concert with a broad coalition of nations, 
including the Arab League, and it followed a resolution adopted in the 
United Nations Security Council authorizing ``all necessary measures.''
  This amendment would end our involvement unilaterally. I believe this 
could materially harm our relationship with NATO, which is also playing 
a major role in this. We will undoubtedly require support in the future 
in our dealings with NATO, and we get support in Afghanistan today.
  I do support a wider debate and greater oversight of the use and the 
costs of U.S. military forces engaged in the Libya operation, both in 
the defense and foreign affairs-related committees as well as here on 
the House floor. We should let the mission with our NATO allies 
continue so we can overthrow Qadhafi and protect the Libyan people.
  I urge all my colleagues to vote ``no'' on this amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. BURTON of Indiana. I move to strike the last word.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. BURTON of Indiana. The Constitution, Mr. Chairman, and the War 
Powers Act clearly say what the parameters are within which the 
President must act or follow: number one, a declaration of war; number 
two, a specific authorization; number three, a national emergency 
created by an attack

[[Page H4690]]

upon the United States, its territories or possessions, or its Armed 
Forces.
  None of these criteria were met by the President. He said he went in 
there because of humanitarian issues. He consulted, as we've said 
before on the floor, with France, England, the United Nations, NATO, 
and the Arab League. He had 2 or 3 weeks to do that, but he didn't have 
time to talk to the Congress of the United States, and he's gone in 
there and spent almost a billion dollars at a time when we just don't 
have the money.
  Now if you're talking about humanitarian problems, in the Sudan, 
2,300 Sudanese have been killed this year alone, and more than 500 
people have died in the last 2 weeks. In Darfur, 450,000 to 480,000 
have been displaced or killed. Just recently, and one of my colleagues 
talked about this a while ago, in the Nuba Mountains in the Sudan, 
they're killing people every single day. Horrible atrocities are taking 
place. Human rights violations. If you're talking about humanitarian 
issues, why wouldn't you go in there as well?
  You look, also, at Syria right now. In Syria, there have been an 
awful lot of people killed. We all see that on television every night. 
There are wars of opportunity. If you go to Liberia, if you go and look 
back at the Khmer Rouge, we didn't get into those wars, and we're not 
getting into these wars right now because it's not in our national 
interest, and it's not a threat to the United States.
  The President has taken us into a conflict. He said it's not a war, 
but it is a war. We've sent about 230 missiles in there at $1.1 million 
per to kill people. We've flown sortie after sortie over there dropping 
bombs on people, and the President says it's not a war. It is a war, 
it's the United States' war, and it's being covered by NATO.
  We shouldn't be going to war unless this body and the other body say 
it's okay. It's in the Constitution. It's in the War Powers Act. We 
should not be there. Nobody likes Muammar Qadhafi. Nobody thinks he 
should be there. But we can't be going into wars of opportunity every 
place, especially at a time when we're fiscally broke. I think it's 
extremely important that legislation like that which the gentleman from 
Oklahoma just offered should be passed, and I hope we will pass it. 
There's a whole host of these amendments that are going to be read 
today and we're going to be voting on, and we need to send a very clear 
signal to the White House that this must never happen again.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Ms. BUERKLE. Mr. Chair, I rise in support of the Cole Amendment to 
H.R. 2219. Mr. Cole's amendment would restrict the use of funds for 
furnishing military equipment, military training or advice, and other 
military activities in Libya.
  The President has failed to properly consult Congress on the 
engagement of hostilities in Libya. The President is also in violation 
of the War Powers Resolution because of the continued military action 
past the 90 days allowed under the War Powers Resolution. The 
Administration's attempt to excuse the continued U.S. military actions 
in Libya by saying that the hostilities do not reach the threshold set 
by the War Powers Resolution is disingenuous.
  The power of the purse plays an important part in the U.S. 
government's system of checks and balances. This amendment today will 
prohibit the President from continuing to conduct military operations 
in Libya until he can justify the actions to the Congress. I strongly 
support the limitation of funding of current military activities with 
respect to Libya. The President should not have a blank check to 
conduct wars without the consultation and authorization of Congress.
  The CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman 
from Oklahoma (Mr. Cole).
  The question was taken; and the Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. DICKS. I demand a recorded vote.
  The CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further proceedings on 
the amendment offered by the gentleman from Oklahoma will be postponed.


                     Amendment Offered by Mr. Amash

  Mr. AMASH. Mr. Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), insert the 
     following:
       Sec. __.  None of the funds made available by this Act may 
     be used for the use of military force against Libya.

  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Michigan is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. AMASH. Thank you, Mr. Chair.
  First, I would like to thank the distinguished gentleman from Ohio 
(Mr. Kucinich) for his tremendous leadership on this issue. There is a 
growing bipartisan support for this amendment. It's an amendment that 
gives us the opportunity to stop this unconstitutional war in Libya.
  The United States has been at war against Libya for nearly 4 months. 
We have dropped bombs on Libyan buildings. We have flown sorties over 
Libyan airspace. It has been reported that we have even targeted 
Qadhafi himself.
  We are at war. The Constitution vests Congress with the exclusive 
power to declare war, the President has not attempted to obtain 
Congress's authorization for the war, and yet at this moment, as we 
debate on the House floor, the war continues.
  Instead of following the Constitution and seeking authorization, the 
President made strained arguments to justify the continued operation. 
At first, the operation was supposed to be ``limited,'' as though that 
undefined term serves as a constitutional escape clause. My 
constituents certainly would be surprised if Congress established a 
limited religion, or subjected them to limited cruel and unusual 
punishment, or quartered soldiers in their houses, but only for a 
limited time.
  After that ``limited'' argument ran its course, the President turned 
to a U.N. Security Council resolution and an invitation from an 
organization of Arab states to justify our involvement. Those 
organizations were not around at the time the Constitution was written, 
much less are they listed in its text.
  The administration now has retreated from its constitutional 
arguments in public and claims that at least the War Powers Resolution 
does not forbid the strikes because we're not involved in, quote, 
hostilities against Libya. Imagine that the shoe were on the other 
foot, that Libya was bombing us. Would we view the Libyan air force's 
bombing of our infrastructure as a hostile act? Of course we would.
  Last week, a member of the other Chamber called the President's 
arguments, quote, cute. I would use a different term: embarrassing. 
It's embarrassing that the administration attempts to hide behind these 
transparently strained and flimsy arguments, especially when we're 
dealing with such a grave issue.
  But do you know what would be more embarrassing? If this Congress did 
nothing. More embarrassing than the President's contortions of the law 
and disregard for the Constitution would be if Congress, with full 
knowledge that it was occurring, gave him a pass. In the face of an 
attack on the Constitution, in the face of an attack on this 
institution and our powers as a coequal branch, we must stand up and 
say stop. If we don't, we should be the ones who are embarrassed.
  The Amash-Kucinich amendment prohibits funds from being used for 
military force against Libya. To be clear, I believe that Congress 
doesn't need to do anything to stop the President from ordering force 
against Libya; because the President has not received authorization, 
the use of force is already illegal. However, to reinforce our 
constitutional position, our amendment says that beginning at the start 
of the fiscal year, on October 1, the Armed Forces may not drop bombs 
on Libya or otherwise use military force. Unlike the bill we considered 
the week before last, our amendment does not implicitly authorize any 
actions against Libya. It simply says force may not be used because the 
President has not sought nor has he received authorization for force.
  Please vote ``yes'' on the Amash-Kucinich amendment and defend our 
constitutional role in war powers.
  I yield back the balance of my time.

                              {time}  1250

  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Mr. Chairman, I rise in opposition to the 
amendment.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Mr. Chairman, if this were a debate on policy, 
or a debate on philosophy, or a debate specifically on the War Powers 
Act, the

[[Page H4691]]

position that I would take would be somewhat different than I must take 
today. But as the manager of this bill, what I have to work with is the 
bill before the House and the amendment before the House.
  Now, the amendment is simple. None of the funds made available by 
this act may be used for the use of military force against Libya. What 
I would say to the Chair is that there are no funds in this bill, in 
this act, for Libya. I was curious about that. And as chairman 
preparing to write this bill, in conjunction with Mr. Dicks, the 
ranking member, I wrote to the President on April 1, and I sent each of 
our Members a copy, asking the President specific questions about the 
scope of this activity, the expected cost, et cetera.
  On June 22, the White House finally responded, and said that it will 
not plan to ask for a supplemental appropriations bill. And there is no 
money in this bill for Libya. The administration says that it will not 
ask for a supplemental bill to pay for Libya, that they will use funds 
in the base budget. I wonder from where the administration is going to 
take money out of the base budget. Now, as chairman of the 
subcommittee, this worries me. From where do they plan to take the 
money? That's only part of the argument. There is no money in this act 
for Libya to start with.
  But, secondly, if this amendment should become effective, there are 
many things that we would not be able to do. We would not be able to 
fly or perform search and rescue missions of American forces who may be 
flying aerial activity and have planes go down. Early in the operation, 
we lost an F-15. Two American pilots went into Libya and safely rescued 
the pilot of that F-15. We wouldn't be able to do that under this 
amendment.
  What we are providing today is surveillance, intelligence, and 
reconnaissance. We wouldn't be able to do that under this amendment. We 
wouldn't be able to provide aerial refueling to our coalition partners, 
and they are our partners and we have an agreement with those partners. 
We provide aerial refueling because most of them do not have the 
capacity to refuel their aircraft in the air. Under this amendment, we 
would not be able to provide aerial refueling. We couldn't even provide 
operational planning, sitting down and talking with our coalition 
partners about the plan for Libya.
  So while this amendment would sound good if we were discussing 
philosophy and if we were determining a policy, the policy has already 
been established. And this amendment does not change the policy. It 
affects something in the bill that's not even in the bill. So there are 
no funds in this bill for Libya; and according to the letter from the 
White House, supplemental funds will not be requested. The 
administration will just pay for the operation out of existing funds. 
That remains a good question, and I say that again, I am really curious 
to know what base funds they intend to use to pay for this operation in 
Libya. I don't have the answer today. I am hoping that one day soon I 
may have that answer.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. KUCINICH. I move to strike the last word.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Ohio is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. KUCINICH. I rise in support of the Amash-Kucinich amendment.
  The esteemed chair, my good friend, of the Defense Appropriations 
raises a question: Where are they getting the money? The money is not, 
as he points out, expressly in the bill.
  Well, this legislation, the Amash-Kucinich amendment, isn't to delete 
funds that have already been appropriated. This is to forbid the 
administration, forbid the administration, from using funds that are 
appropriated in this act.
  Now, there is no way that Congress could or would intervene to stop a 
search and rescue mission. And that's not relevant unless you're 
talking about that this Congress is finally going to search this 
defense budget, figure out where the President is getting the money, 
and rescue the American taxpayers from a wasteful war and rescue the 
Constitution from an illegal war. That is what makes it a search and 
rescue mission. But no search and rescue is prohibited by the Amash-
Kucinich amendment.
  I want to say that I am proud to have worked with Mr. Amash to come 
together with this bipartisan agreement. And the support for it is 
growing. We have Mr. Paul, Ms. Woolsey, Mr. Jones, Mr. Conyers, Mr. 
Burton, Ms. Barbara Lee, Mr. Poe, Mr. Stark, Mr. McClintock, Mr. 
Nadler, Mr. Nugent, Mr. Johnson, Mr. Honda. The support is growing. And 
Members can call either Mr. Amash's office or my office right now if 
they want to cosponsor.
  This is our moment in Congress; this is our moment to reclaim the 
Constitution of the United States, which the Founders envisioned that 
under article I, section 8, we have the power to determine whether or 
not this Nation goes to war, not some rebel group in Benghazi. Because 
when you reduce it to its ultimate, a group of Benghazi rebels made the 
decision to go to war against its own government, and before you know 
it NATO joins in, we're pulled into it. The administration went to 
everyone except getting the approval of the United States Congress.
  This is our moment to reclaim the Constitution. Will we rise to the 
occasion? This isn't only about this Congress right now. History will 
judge us whether or not we understood the imperative of article I, 
section 8. This is about the Constitution. Certainly it's about a 
billion dollars that would be spent by September unless we intervene, 
at a time of rising debt, at a time of tremendous pressure on the 
budget, at a time when local governments in our communities are cutting 
public services because they don't have the money. This administration 
determines they're going to take us into war, and they didn't even give 
so much as give this Congress an opportunity to have this debate before 
the decision was made. That was wrong.
  I appreciate that we have been able to set aside any partisan 
disagreements that are part of the nature of this forum to understand 
that we have a higher calling here. And that higher calling is to 
defend this Constitution of the United States, which describes what our 
duties are when we come here. We take the oath to defend the 
Constitution. That's what we shall do today.
  We shall rescue this Congress from the ignominy of having the rights 
that the people expect us to exercise on their behalf just trampled by 
an administration that doesn't think that we have any co-equal role in 
the government at all. This is our moment to stand up, Democrats and 
Republicans alike.
  I am proud to work with Mr. Amash in crafting this bipartisan 
Kucinich-Amash amendment.
  This is our moment, Members. Let's not lose this opportunity to stand 
up and speak out on behalf of the United States Constitution, on behalf 
of the separation of powers, on behalf of the co-equality of our House 
of Representatives and the Congress of the United States. Let's show 
the Founders, and the spirit of the Founders is always with us in this 
place, let's demonstrate that we remember where we came from when this 
Constitution was set forth. Let's demonstrate that we have reached our 
moment where we stand up.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. McCLINTOCK. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from California is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. McCLINTOCK. Mr. Chairman, for more than 3 months, our Nation has 
been amidst a quiet constitutional crisis that carries immense 
implications. My friend, the gentleman from Florida, is sadly mistaken 
to dismiss this as a meaningless philosophical discussion. This strikes 
at the very heart of our constitutional form of government.

                              {time}  1300

  On March 19, completely without congressional authorization, the 
President ordered an unprovoked attack against another country. In so 
doing, he crossed a very bright constitutional line placed there 
specifically to prevent so momentous and fatal a question as war being 
made by a single individual.
  The American Founders were explicit on this point. For centuries, 
European monarchs had plunged their nations into bloody and 
debilitating wars on whim, and the Founders wanted to protect the 
American Republic from that fate.
  James Madison explained why in this passage in a letter to Hamilton. 
He

[[Page H4692]]

said: ``In no part of the Constitution is more wisdom to be found than 
in the clause which confines the question of war or peace to the 
legislature, and not to the executive department. The trust and the 
temptation would be too great for any one man. War is, in fact, the 
true nurse of executive aggrandizement. In war a physical force is to 
be created and it is the executive will which is to direct it. In war, 
the public treasures are to be unlocked, and it is the executive hand 
which is to dispense them. In war, the honors and the emoluments of 
office are to be multiplied, and it is the executive patronage under 
which they are to be enjoyed. Those who are to conduct a war cannot, in 
the nature of things, be proper or safe judges whether a war ought to 
be commenced, continued, or concluded.''
  The President has tried to justify this act in a variety of ways: 
that bombing another country is not really an act of war, that there 
wasn't time to consult Congress--though more than enough to consult the 
United Nations Security Council--or that it was a humanitarian act.
  Mr. Chairman, never was there a greater provocation or clearer moral 
justification for war than the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. And 
never was there a more activist President than Franklin Roosevelt.
  Yet within 24 hours of that attack, President Roosevelt appeared 
before a joint session of Congress in this very Hall. He clearly 
recognized that as Commander in Chief his authority only extended to 
ordering that ``all measures be taken for our defense.'' He recognized 
that under the Constitution, anything more, even in this most historic 
attack, required an act of Congress, which he sought and obtained.
  The unprovoked attack on Libya was not authorized by this Congress, 
and it is accordingly unconstitutional and illegal. Indeed, 2 weeks 
ago, the House considered a resolution authorizing a war with Libya, 
and it rejected that measure by a nearly 3-1 margin. It then considered 
a second measure to authorize acts of war against Libya just short of 
actual combat, including refueling tankers on their way to targets. The 
identification and selection of targets, operational support, 
operational planning, it rejected that measure as well.
  The precedent being established right now by the President's 
deliberate defiance of the Constitution and the clear will of Congress 
has profound implications for our Nation's future. If this act is 
allowed to stand unchallenged, it means that the checks and balances 
painstakingly built into the Constitution on the supreme question of 
war and peace have been rendered meaningless.
  Weeks ago, the House voted to deny authorization for the use of funds 
for the war on Libya effective October 1. This amendment simply follows 
through on that decision in the actual appropriations act.
  Frankly, we need to do much more than this. Clearly, one of the 
conditions for increasing the debt limit must be to ensure that no 
funds, either borrowed or raised, should be used to continue to support 
this illegal act.
  And we need to remember that a war once started cannot always be 
turned off by an appropriations act. Once we have attacked another 
country without provocation, we have created an aggrieved belligerent 
that now has cause to pursue that war regardless of what the Congress 
later decides.
  That's why this precedent is so dangerous. That's why the President's 
actions are so devastating to our very form of government, and that's 
why we need to speak clearly and unequivocally through measures like 
that offered by the gentlemen from Michigan and Ohio today.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Ms. WOOLSEY. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The CHAIR. The gentlewoman from California is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Ms. WOOLSEY. Mr. Chairman, I rise in support of the Amash-Kucinich 
amendment, and I am proud to be a cosponsor and at the same time call 
on other Members to join us on the floor right now for this important 
debate.
  Mr. Chairman, I have been struck in recent days by the profound lack 
of seriousness in Washington when it comes to confronting this illegal 
war we are fighting in Libya. Last week at a news conference, the 
President dismissed congressional concerns about war powers authority 
and his Libya policy and, he said ``all kinds of noise about process.''
  At the same time, the U.S. Senate essentially punted on the issue 
earlier this week, pulling the plug on an important debate that the 
country needs because a few Republican Senators complained that they 
canceled recess only to deal with the debt ceiling, and they were not 
going to discuss Libya.
  But perhaps it was right here in the House that we have seen the most 
incoherence on Libya. Right before we adjourned almost 2 weeks ago, 
this body voted against authorizing the use of force in Libya; and then 
less than 2 hours later, the House voted to continue funding the war we 
had just refused to authorize.
  Mr. Chairman, Congress has the ``power of the purse,'' and we must be 
prepared to use it. We must use this opportunity to send a powerful 
message. A vote of no confidence in this Libya policy will prove that 
we do not and will not write another check for a war that Americans 
don't want and a war that we did not authorize.
  Hostilities with Libya--and, let's be frank, these are hostilities--
have now been going on for more than 100 days with the cost climbing 
toward a billion dollars, and that doesn't even include the moral costs 
and the cost of civilian lives. The people's money is too important and 
too precious, especially during this time of fiscal austerity.
  No one believes that cutting off Libya alone is enough to make 
meaningful progress on deficit reduction; but I think it's outrageous 
that we are talking about cuts in Social Security benefits, and those 
cuts are on the table while we are discussing the debt ceiling 
negotiations while we continue to throw money at not one, not two, but 
three wars.
  A Brown University study concludes that when it's all said and done 
Iraq and Afghanistan will suck the Treasury dry to the tune of at least 
$3.7 trillion. Enough, already.
  Mr. Chairman, the Pentagon is like that teenager. You keep giving the 
kid the keys to the car, and he keeps crashing it. It's time we cut him 
off.
  We must draw the line, and we must draw it here. No more funding for 
Libya; no more continuance in Libyan hostilities. I urge my colleagues 
to support this amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. POE of Texas. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. POE of Texas. Mr. Chairman, the President says we have gone to 
war in the name of humanity. In other words, the President's little war 
in Libya is so that we can preserve humanity in Libya.
  In the history of peoples, as the gentleman from California has 
pointed out, and the histories of countries, it has always been the 
king, the dictator, the tyrant, the chief, the leader that has sent 
that particular country to war.
  So when our ancestors got together and they formed a new and perfect 
Union, they decided it would not be the leader, which we call the 
President, it would be the people that would decide if we went to war. 
They gave that power to the Congress of the United States and only 
Congress can declare war, not the President.

                              {time}  1310

  But this is the President's war; and the President, in my opinion, is 
in violation of the Constitution. He has led America to our third war. 
Whether or not the war powers resolution is constitutional or not, we 
can debate that. But he is in violation of it, too, because we're still 
engaged in war, whether you call it hostilities or not. Some say it's 
not hostile. Well, you be one of the recipients of one of those cruise 
missiles on the ground somewhere in Libya, and you might think that's a 
hostile environment towards you. But this country is spending money on 
a third war, and it is unconstitutional.
  Our ancestors had comments about the leader, the king, leading us 
into war. The writer of the Constitution wrote a letter. James Madison 
said that ``the Constitution supposes what the history of all 
governments has always demonstrated, that it is the executive branch 
most interested in war and most prone to it. It has accordingly with 
studied care vested the

[[Page H4693]]

question in this country of war in the legislative body.''
  The first Commander in Chief, the first President of the United 
States, George Washington, said that ``the Constitution vests the power 
of declaring war with Congress, therefore no offensive expedition of 
importance can be undertaken until after they have deliberated upon the 
subject and Congress has authorized such a measure.''
  It is our history, it is our heritage, it is our Constitution, and it 
is our principle that Congress must declare war, Congress must be the 
one to engage in war. And in my opinion, the President has violated 
that Constitution. He has violated the law of the land and the war 
powers resolution; and it's Congress' duty now, it is our turn and it 
is our responsibility to weigh in on this war and stop money from going 
to this war.
  Where the President got the $700-plus million that has already been 
spent on this war, we don't know. We just want to make sure no more 
money is spent on this unconstitutional action.
  Muammar Qadhafi is a tyrant. He's an outlaw. There are a lot of bad 
guys in the world, Mr. Chairman, and is it now the policy of the 
President to pick out the ones he does not like and start blowing up 
that country in the name of humanity? We don't know.
  So Congress must resume, regain, its rightful authority and role and 
make sure that we do not fund the President's little war, or any other 
future wars, without congressional approval.
  Mr. Chairman, instead of spending money blowing up Libya, we ought to 
spend that American taxpayer money in the United States building the 
United States and rebuilding America and not destroying somebody else's 
country and being involved in somebody else's civil war.
  And that's just the way it is.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. ELLISON. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Minnesota is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. ELLISON. Mr. Chairman, we should not turn our backs on the Libyan 
people. I want to remind my colleagues that NATO's campaign in Libya 
has saved countless lives. Our actions and those of NATO were the only 
thing that stopped Qadhafi from committing unspeakable crimes against 
humanity. In fact, when the United States and NATO intervened, Qadhafi 
was on the footsteps of Misrata and threatening to kill without mercy. 
Qadhafi's forces were on the brink of Benghazi hours before NATO's 
operation began. Qadhafi literally said that he would kill people with 
``no mercy, no pity.'' He said he would go ``house by house, room by 
room.'' Those are the words of a shameless, ruthless killer; and we had 
to do something, and I'm glad that we did.
  Constituents of my district whose roots come from Libya have made it 
clear to me that they want me to stand together with humanity, stand 
together with vulnerable people. But let me be clear, this is not Iraq, 
and this will not be the Iraq war. We did not unilaterally declare war 
on another country. On the contrary, our actions were with the 
international community, sanctioned by the United Nations, the Arab 
League and, most importantly, the Libyan people themselves.
  Our role is limited and constrained, no boots on the ground. We 
essentially are helping to supply and refuel and add surveillance. Do 
we want to signal to other murderous dictators while the people are 
standing up for democracy that they have a free hand to slaughter their 
public? I hope not.
  I say listen to regular Libyans on the street today. They want more 
NATO involvement, not less. They want the United States to remain 
involved. If we pull out now, the NATO coalition could fall apart and 
tens of thousands of refugees fleeing Qadhafi's wrath would jeopardize 
the fragile democratic transitions in both Egypt and Tunisia. This 
issue has regional implications. It's not limited to Libya alone.
  As my constituents know, and my legislative record reflects, I was 
adamantly against the Iraq war and I am adamantly in favor of a faster 
withdrawal from Afghanistan. In fact, I'm almost always against the use 
of the military option. Seldom is it the right course, in my opinion. 
But ``seldom'' doesn't mean ``always.'' Srebrenica, Darfur and Rwanda 
all warranted our engagement as Libya does today. We made it to the 
Balkans, but we didn't make it to Darfur or Rwanda, and literally 
millions of people died because of that.
  But at the same time, I cannot turn a blind eye to the slaughter of 
innocent people. My hope is that the day may never come when I will 
ignore the cries of innocent people being murdered by a dictator or 
while we cozy up to a murderous dictator. I cannot turn my back on 
people demanding the same freedoms we enjoy in America.
  I understand my colleagues' aversion to military conflict. I share 
it. I understand their fear of mission creep. I share that. But I also 
understand that when people are being murdered wholesale, being 
ethnically cleansed, being the targets of genocide, the world, 
including the United States, cannot and must not stand back and watch. 
For the sake of the Libyan people and all demanding freedom in the 
Middle East, I urge my colleagues to support this resolution 
authorizing the use of limited force.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. NUGENT. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Florida is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. NUGENT. Mr. Chairman, today I was planning to offer my own 
amendment which would hold the President accountable to the War Powers 
Act with regard to his operation in Libya. My intention was to expose 
the President's clear violation of this important law. However, I was 
concerned some wording could have raised a point of order. That being 
said, I'm proud to cosponsor Mr. Kucinich's important amendment, which 
will completely cut off funds for this illegal war.
  Mr. Chairman, on March 19, President Obama announced he had 
authorized U.S. military forces to conduct operations in Libya. 
Unfortunately, the President did this without receiving authorization 
from Congress even though he made sure to get the U.N.'s approval. By 
not being open and honest with Congress, he left Members in the dark 
and unsure of what our ultimate mission was. To this day, the President 
hasn't come to Congress to ask for formal approval.
  Initially, when the President committed our military operations in 
Libya, he said it would be days, not months. Well, now we are 
definitely talking months because it is a little over a week we've been 
engaged in military operations in Libya for nearly 4 months. In an 
effort to escape his responsibility, to this day the President has 
refused to acknowledge that the U.S. is engaged in hostilities in 
Libya. That being said, those in the Pentagon seem to disagree with the 
President on this issue.
  While the President has turned a blind eye to truth, the Department 
of Defense has decided to award imminent danger pay to servicemembers 
who fly over Libya and for those who serve on ships within 110 nautical 
miles of the shore. As of June 3, 93 percent of the cruise missiles, 66 
percent of the personnel, 50 percent of the ships, and 50 percent of 
the planes used in NATO operations against Libya were by the United 
States of America.
  Mr. Chair, firing a cruise missile at Libya qualifies as hostilities. 
In early June, it was estimated that Libya was already costing the 
American taxpayers over $700 million.
  I have three sons that are currently in the military, and I will 
support our troops no matter where the President sends them. However, I 
cannot support Obama's decision to commit our military forces' 
operations without the required congressional authorization. That's why 
I cosponsored this amendment, the 2012 Department of Defense 
appropriations bill Kucinich amendment.
  With that, I ask all my colleagues, all Members, to come down here on 
the House floor and to express support for this important amendment, to 
reclaim our Constitution, to reclaim the validity of this Congress as 
relates to committing troops to war.
  Mr. Chairman, I support this amendment. I encourage all my colleagues 
to support this amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.

                              {time}  1320

  Mr. DICKS. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the requisite number of 
words.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Washington is recognized for 5 minutes.

[[Page H4694]]

  Mr. DICKS. I believe this is an important debate in the House today 
as we, appropriately, exercise congressional oversight of the use of 
force and the costs associated with our engagement in Libya.
  In my judgment, the President's initial commitment of U.S. air power 
and naval forces to support the international effort was appropriate, 
and certainly within his power as Commander in Chief. In March, the 
President clearly outlined the rationale for our involvement in this 
military action. Now if I were advising the President, I would have 
said send up a resolution and get approval from the House and the 
Senate. There is no question that would have been the preferred course 
of action.
  The U.S. effort was undertaken in concert with a broad coalition of 
nations, and it followed a resolution adopted in the United Nations 
Security Council authorizing ``all necessary measures'' to protect 
Libyan civilians attempting to overthrow the oppressive regime of 
Muammar al Qadhafi. The Qadhafi government's response to the uprising, 
inspired by the ``Arab Spring'' movement, was to use force against 
civilians and opposition forces, and the brutal measures prompted the 
international outcry and the United Nations action. While the direct 
U.S. leadership of this effort lasted a brief time, U.S. forces remain 
engaged in the NATO operation.
  When I hear many of my colleagues speak in favor of abandoning this 
cause, I believe it is important to reflect on the fundamental reason 
why we are concerned here. This is the same individual, Muammar al 
Qadhafi, who had been planning terrorist actions against United States 
citizens and others for decades. This is the same terrorist leader 
against whom President Ronald Reagan authorized a military strike in 
1986--and he didn't ask Congress for approval--following the bombings 
in Berlin and definitive proof of Qadhafi's involvement in other 
terrorist activity. At that time, President Reagan publicly denounced 
Qadhafi as the ``Mad Dog of the Middle East'' who espoused the goal of 
world revolution.
  Mr. Chairman, I can only wonder what Ronald Reagan would say today 
about those who would propose immediate withdrawal of U.S. assistance 
to the broad coalition of nations attempting to finish the job that 
President Reagan started.
  Now, just to make it clear, the administration, when they sent up 
their report under the Boehner amendment, I believe, they did list out 
the military cost for the operation. Daily operations up to June 3 were 
$313.7 million; munitions, $398.3 million; global lift and sustain, 
$1.6 million. The subtotal for military operations was $713.6 million. 
And then the drawdown of DOD supplies, $1.3 million; humanitarian 
assistance, $1 million; for a total of $715.9 million.
  Now munitions come out of the munition funds; daily operations come 
out of O funds for the Army and the Navy. The estimate by September 
30, 2011, is that daily operations will total $618 million; munitions, 
$450 million; global lift and sustain, $10 million; for a total of 
$1.078 billion. Drawdown of DOD supplies would be $25 million and 
humanitarian assistance of $1 million, for a total of $1.104 billion. I 
think that is a pretty clear indication.
  Now, our chairman is absolutely correct. They have not asked for a 
supplemental here. They are going to use existing funds that we have 
already appropriated to take care of this operation. And of course we 
would all like to see this thing resolved as quickly as possible, and a 
political settlement may be possible. But I think it would be wrong to 
undermine the President and our country and our involvement with NATO 
and with the U.N. and with our Arab allies on this subject.
  I urge a ``no'' vote on the Amash-Kucinich amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. HOYER. Mr. Chair, last month, the House voted against defunding 
the American military mission in Libya. That was the right decision, 
and it still is: along with our NATO allies, we intervened in Libya in 
response to Moammar Gadhafi's violent repression of his own people, and 
the explicit promise of worse to come. It's also important to remember 
that Gadhafi has more American blood on his hands than anyone other 
than Osama bin Laden. And we must remember that we intervened in 
response to calls from the Arab League, the United Nations, the 
European Union, and a unanimous NATO.
  Our allies have taken the leading role in Libya, but it is crucial 
that America continue to support them. It's crucial because the 
campaign against Gadhafi has made significant progress, which would be 
dramatically set back by a sudden withdrawal of American support; 
because that sudden withdrawal of support could endanger civilian lives 
and stall democratic movements across the Middle East; and because it 
would represent a failure to keep faith with our NATO allies. As I said 
the last time this issue came to the floor: either we are in an 
alliance, or we are not. And if we are, that means supporting our 
allies in their time and place of need, so that they will continue to 
do the same for us--a principle that is especially important when 
civilian lives are at stake. I urge my colleagues to oppose this 
amendment.
  The CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman 
from Michigan (Mr. Amash).
  The question was taken; and the Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. DICKS. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further proceedings on 
the amendment offered by the gentleman from Michigan will be postponed.


                       Announcement by the Chair

  The CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, proceedings will now 
resume on those amendments printed in the Congressional Record on which 
further proceedings were postponed, in the following order:
  Amendment No. 1 by Ms. Lee of California.
  An amendment by Mr. Garamendi of California.
  An amendment by Mr. Nadler of New York.
  Amendment No. 1 by Mr. Poe of Texas.
  Amendment No. 2 by Ms. Lee of California.
  Amendment No. 41 by Mr. Cohen of Tennessee.
  An amendment by Mr. Cicilline of Rhode Island.
  An amendment by Mr. Cohen of Tennessee.
  Amendment No. 2 by Mr. Poe of Texas.
  Amendment No. 1 by Ms. McCollum of Minnesota.
  Amendment No. 2 by Ms. McCollum of Minnesota.
  Amendment No. 13 by Mr. Cole of Oklahoma.
  An amendment by Mr. Amash of Michigan.
  The Chair will reduce to 2 minutes the time for the second through 
the 11th vote. The final two votes will be 5-minute votes.


                      Amendment Offered by Ms. Lee

  The CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a recorded vote 
on amendment No. 1 offered by the gentlewoman from California (Ms. Lee) 
on which further proceedings were postponed and on which the noes 
prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 97, 
noes 322, not voting 12, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 502]

                                AYES--97

     Amash
     Baca
     Baldwin
     Bass (CA)
     Becerra
     Blumenauer
     Boswell
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Campbell
     Capuano
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Clyburn
     Coble
     Cohen
     Costello
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Davis (IL)
     DeFazio
     Doyle
     Duncan (TN)
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Eshoo
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Frank (MA)
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hastings (FL)
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Holt
     Honda
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Kucinich
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Markey
     Matsui
     McGovern
     Michaud
     Moore
     Murphy (CT)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Olver
     Pallone
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paul
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Polis
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Richardson
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rush
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Schakowsky
     Scott (VA)
     Serrano
     Shuler
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Speier
     Stark
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Towns
     Tsongas
     Velazquez

[[Page H4695]]


     Visclosky
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Woolsey

                               NOES--322

     Ackerman
     Adams
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Andrews
     Austria
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (NH)
     Benishek
     Berg
     Berkley
     Berman
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (FL)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Canseco
     Capito
     Capps
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Chandler
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conaway
     Connolly (VA)
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Cuellar
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (KY)
     DeGette
     Denham
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Dold
     Donnelly (IN)
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Engel
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallegly
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Heck
     Heinrich
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hochul
     Holden
     Hoyer
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Inslee
     Israel
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jordan
     Kaptur
     Kelly
     Kildee
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kissell
     Kline
     Labrador
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Landry
     Langevin
     Lankford
     Larsen (WA)
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Levin
     Lewis (CA)
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Long
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Lynch
     Mack
     Maloney
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCollum
     McCotter
     McDermott
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, Gary
     Moran
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pascrell
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pence
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Peterson
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Price (NC)
     Quayle
     Rahall
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Reyes
     Ribble
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (AR)
     Ross (FL)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Schiff
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Sutton
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Van Hollen
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Walz (MN)
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Wu
     Yarmuth
     Yoder
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--12

     Cantor
     Cleaver
     Conyers
     Culberson
     DeLauro
     Giffords
     Keating
     Lewis (GA)
     Miller, George
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Wasserman Schultz


                       Announcement by the Chair

  The CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining in this 
vote.

                              {time}  1351

  Messrs. CONNOLLY of Virginia, MILLER of North Carolina, SCOTT of 
South Carolina, and LYNCH changed their vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  Messrs. BRADY of Pennsylvania, CROWLEY, and MURPHY of Connecticut 
changed their vote from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                   Amendment Offered by Mr. Garamendi

  The CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a recorded vote 
on the amendment offered by the gentleman from California (Mr. 
Garamendi) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which the 
noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 133, 
noes 295, not voting 3, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 503]

                               AYES--133

     Amash
     Baldwin
     Bass (CA)
     Bass (NH)
     Becerra
     Benishek
     Berman
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Boswell
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Campbell
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coble
     Cohen
     Conyers
     Costello
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Davis (IL)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duncan (TN)
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Eshoo
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Frank (MA)
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Heinrich
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Holt
     Honda
     Inslee
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Kucinich
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Lewis (GA)
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lujan
     Maloney
     Markey
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Olver
     Pallone
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paul
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Peters
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Polis
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Richardson
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Roybal-Allard
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Scott (VA)
     Serrano
     Sherman
     Shuler
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Speier
     Stark
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Towns
     Tsongas
     Upton
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--295

     Ackerman
     Adams
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Andrews
     Austria
     Baca
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Berg
     Berkley
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (FL)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Chandler
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conaway
     Connolly (VA)
     Cooper
     Costa
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Cuellar
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (KY)
     Denham
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Dold
     Donnelly (IN)
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Engel
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallegly
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Heck
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Hochul
     Holden
     Hoyer
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Israel
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jordan
     Kaptur
     Kelly
     Kildee
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kissell
     Kline
     Labrador
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Landry
     Langevin
     Lankford
     Larsen (WA)
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Levin
     Lewis (CA)
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Lynch
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCotter
     McDermott
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, Gary
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pascrell
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pence
     Perlmutter
     Peterson
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Price (NC)
     Quayle
     Rahall
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Reyes
     Ribble
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (AR)
     Ross (FL)
     Rothman (NJ)

[[Page H4696]]


     Royce
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Ryan (WI)
     Scalise
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schwartz
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Sewell
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Van Hollen
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--3

     Culberson
     Giffords
     Keating

                              {time}  1357

  Ms. PELOSI changed her vote from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                    Amendment Offered by Mr. Nadler

  The CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a recorded vote 
on the amendment offered by the gentleman from New York (Mr. Nadler) on 
which further proceedings were postponed and on which the noes 
prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 174, 
noes 251, not voting 6, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 504]

                               AYES--174

     Ackerman
     Andrews
     Baca
     Bachmann
     Baldwin
     Bass (CA)
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berman
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Boswell
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Castor (FL)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Costello
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Foxx
     Frank (MA)
     Franks (AZ)
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Gibson
     Gonzalez
     Goodlatte
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Heinrich
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holden
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Inslee
     Israel
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Kaptur
     Kildee
     Kissell
     Kucinich
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Markey
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Olver
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paul
     Paulsen
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Peters
     Pingree (ME)
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reyes
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Serrano
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stark
     Stutzman
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Towns
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--251

     Adams
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Amash
     Austria
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (NH)
     Benishek
     Berg
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Cardoza
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Chandler
     Coble
     Cole
     Conaway
     Cooper
     Costa
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Cuellar
     Davis (KY)
     Denham
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dicks
     Dold
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallegly
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Heck
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herrera Beutler
     Hinojosa
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jordan
     Kelly
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Landry
     Lankford
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Lewis (CA)
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCotter
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meehan
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, Gary
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pearce
     Pence
     Perlmutter
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (AR)
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Ryan (WI)
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Scalise
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuler
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stivers
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Visclosky
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Walz (MN)
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--6

     Coffman (CO)
     Culberson
     Giffords
     Keating
     Neugebauer
     Whitfield


                       Announcement by the Chair

  The CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining in this 
vote.

                              {time}  1400

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated against:
  Mr. WHITFIELD. Mr. Chairman, on rollcall No. 504, had I been present, 
I would have voted ``no.''


                 Amendment Offered by Mr. Poe of Texas

  The CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a recorded vote 
on amendment No. 1 offered by the gentleman from Texas (Mr. Poe) on 
which further proceedings were postponed and on which the noes 
prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 131, 
noes 297, not voting 3, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 505]

                               AYES--131

     Adams
     Amash
     Baldwin
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (NH)
     Benishek
     Berg
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blumenauer
     Braley (IA)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Campbell
     Capuano
     Chaffetz
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Coble
     Cohen
     Conyers
     Costello
     Cummings
     DeFazio
     DesJarlais
     Doggett
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Edwards
     Emerson
     Engel
     Filner
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Frank (MA)
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibson
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gowdy
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Gene
     Griffith (VA)
     Hall
     Heck
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Holt
     Honda
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Jackson (IL)
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kaptur
     Kucinich
     Labrador
     Landry
     Lankford
     LaTourette
     Lee (CA)
     Lewis (CA)
     LoBiondo
     Lummis
     Lynch
     Marchant
     Markey
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McKinley
     Michaud
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, Gary
     Mulvaney
     Napolitano
     Nugent
     Olver
     Pallone
     Paul
     Payne
     Pearce
     Peters
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Poe (TX)
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Reed
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Schilling
     Schrader
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sessions
     Slaughter
     Southerland
     Stark
     Stearns
     Stutzman
     Thompson (PA)
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Velazquez
     Walsh (IL)
     Waters
     Welch
     West

[[Page H4697]]


     Westmoreland
     Woodall
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Yoder
     Young (AK)

                               NOES--297

     Ackerman
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Andrews
     Austria
     Baca
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Bass (CA)
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berman
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boswell
     Boustany
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Brown (FL)
     Bucshon
     Burton (IN)
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Capps
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Chabot
     Chandler
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clyburn
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conaway
     Connolly (VA)
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     Davis (KY)
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Denham
     Dent
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Dold
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Dreier
     Ellison
     Ellmers
     Eshoo
     Farenthold
     Farr
     Fattah
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gallegly
     Garamendi
     Gardner
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gonzalez
     Gosar
     Granger
     Green, Al
     Griffin (AR)
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Gutierrez
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (FL)
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Heinrich
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holden
     Hoyer
     Huelskamp
     Inslee
     Israel
     Issa
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Kelly
     Kildee
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kissell
     Kline
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     Latta
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Long
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Maloney
     Manzullo
     Marino
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McCotter
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Nadler
     Neal
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paulsen
     Pelosi
     Pence
     Perlmutter
     Peterson
     Pitts
     Platts
     Polis
     Pompeo
     Price (NC)
     Quayle
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Reyes
     Ribble
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (AR)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schwartz
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Shuler
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sires
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stivers
     Sullivan
     Sutton
     Terry
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thornberry
     Tipton
     Towns
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Upton
     Van Hollen
     Visclosky
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Watt
     Waxman
     Webster
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Yarmuth
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--3

     Culberson
     Giffords
     Keating


                       Announcement by the Chair

  The CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1404

  Mr. CONYERS changed his vote from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                      Amendment Offered by Ms. Lee

  The CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a recorded vote 
on amendment No. 2 offered by the gentlewoman from California (Ms. Lee) 
on which further proceedings were postponed and on which the noes 
prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 114, 
noes 314, not voting 3, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 506]

                               AYES--114

     Amash
     Baca
     Baldwin
     Bass (CA)
     Becerra
     Benishek
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Castor (FL)
     Chaffetz
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coble
     Cohen
     Conyers
     Costello
     Courtney
     Cummings
     Davis (IL)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duncan (TN)
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Eshoo
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Frank (MA)
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hirono
     Holt
     Honda
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Kucinich
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Markey
     Matsui
     McGovern
     Michaud
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Murphy (CT)
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Olver
     Pallone
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paul
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Price (NC)
     Rangel
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Roybal-Allard
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Schakowsky
     Schrader
     Serrano
     Sherman
     Slaughter
     Speier
     Stark
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Towns
     Tsongas
     Velazquez
     Waters
     Watt
     Welch
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--314

     Ackerman
     Adams
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Andrews
     Austria
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (NH)
     Berg
     Berkley
     Berman
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boswell
     Boustany
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chandler
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conaway
     Connolly (VA)
     Cooper
     Costa
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (KY)
     Denham
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Dold
     Donnelly (IN)
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Engel
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallegly
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (FL)
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Heck
     Heinrich
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Hinojosa
     Hochul
     Holden
     Hoyer
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Inslee
     Israel
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jordan
     Kaptur
     Kelly
     Kildee
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kissell
     Kline
     Labrador
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Landry
     Langevin
     Lankford
     Larsen (WA)
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Lewis (CA)
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCollum
     McCotter
     McDermott
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Moran
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Nadler
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pascrell
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pence
     Peterson
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Polis
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Reyes
     Ribble
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (AR)
     Ross (FL)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Ryan (WI)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Schiff
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schwartz
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Sewell
     Shimkus
     Shuler
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sires
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Van Hollen
     Visclosky
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waxman
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf

[[Page H4698]]


     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--3

     Culberson
     Giffords
     Keating


                       Announcement by the Chair

  The CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1408

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                 Amendment No. 41 Offered by Mr. Cohen

  The CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a recorded vote 
on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Tennessee (Mr. Cohen) on 
which further proceedings were postponed and on which the noes 
prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 210, 
noes 217, not voting 4, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 507]

                               AYES--210

     Amash
     Andrews
     Baca
     Baldwin
     Bass (CA)
     Bass (NH)
     Becerra
     Benishek
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Boswell
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (FL)
     Butterfield
     Campbell
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Carney
     Castor (FL)
     Chaffetz
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coble
     Cohen
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Costello
     Courtney
     Critz
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DesJarlais
     Deutch
     Dicks
     Doggett
     Dold
     Doyle
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Emerson
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Fitzpatrick
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Frank (MA)
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibson
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gowdy
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Gutierrez
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Hastings (FL)
     Heinrich
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holden
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hurt
     Inslee
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Kaptur
     Kind
     Kissell
     Kucinich
     Labrador
     Lankford
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Marchant
     Markey
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     Meehan
     Michaud
     Miller (MI)
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (CT)
     Murphy (PA)
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Olver
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paul
     Payne
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Poe (TX)
     Polis
     Posey
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reed
     Ribble
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rothman (NJ)
     Royce
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Scott (SC)
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Shuler
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Speier
     Stark
     Stearns
     Stutzman
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Towns
     Tsongas
     Upton
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Waxman
     Welch
     Woodall
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Yarmuth
     Yoder
     Young (AK)

                               NOES--217

     Ackerman
     Adams
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Austria
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Berg
     Berkley
     Berman
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Calvert
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carnahan
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chandler
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conaway
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Cuellar
     Davis (KY)
     Denham
     Dent
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Donnelly (IN)
     Dreier
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallegly
     Gardner
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gonzalez
     Gosar
     Granger
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Heck
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Hinojosa
     Huelskamp
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Israel
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jordan
     Kelly
     Kildee
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Landry
     Langevin
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Levin
     Lewis (CA)
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marino
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCotter
     McDermott
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller, Gary
     Myrick
     Nadler
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pelosi
     Pence
     Pitts
     Platts
     Pompeo
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Reyes
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (AR)
     Ross (FL)
     Roybal-Allard
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Ryan (WI)
     Scalise
     Schakowsky
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schwartz
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Southerland
     Stivers
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Van Hollen
     Walberg
     Walz (MN)
     Watt
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--4

     Camp
     Culberson
     Giffords
     Keating


                       Announcement by the Chair

  The CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1411

  Mr. COFFMAN of Colorado changed his vote from to ``aye'' to ``no.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated against:
  Mr. CAMP. Mr. Chair, on rollcall No. 507 I was unavoidably detained. 
Had I been present, I would have voted ''no.''


                   Amendment Offered by Mr. Cicilline

  The CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a recorded vote 
on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Rhode Island (Mr. 
Cicilline) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which the 
noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 145, 
noes 283, not voting 3, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 508]

                               AYES--145

     Amash
     Baca
     Baldwin
     Bass (CA)
     Bass (NH)
     Becerra
     Benishek
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Boswell
     Braley (IA)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (FL)
     Buchanan
     Campbell
     Capps
     Cardoza
     Chaffetz
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Coble
     Conyers
     Costa
     Costello
     Cummings
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DesJarlais
     Deutch
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Foxx
     Frank (MA)
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Garrett
     Goodlatte
     Gowdy
     Graves (GA)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holden
     Holt
     Honda
     Hurt
     Inslee
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Kind
     Kissell
     Kucinich
     Labrador
     Larsen (WA)
     Lee (CA)
     Lewis (GA)
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lummis
     Maloney
     Matsui
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, George
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (CT)
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Olver
     Pallone
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paul
     Payne
     Peters
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Poe (TX)
     Polis
     Posey
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Ribble
     Richardson
     Rigell
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rothman (NJ)
     Royce
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Schrader
     Schweikert
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sewell
     Shuler
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Speier
     Stark
     Stearns
     Stutzman
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tonko
     Towns
     Upton
     Velazquez
     Walsh (IL)
     Waters
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Woodall
     Woolsey

[[Page H4699]]



                               NOES--283

     Ackerman
     Adams
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Andrews
     Austria
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Berg
     Berkley
     Berman
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boustany
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Capuano
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Chabot
     Chandler
     Clyburn
     Coffman (CO)
     Cohen
     Cole
     Conaway
     Connolly (VA)
     Cooper
     Courtney
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     Davis (KY)
     DeLauro
     Denham
     Dent
     Diaz-Balart
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Dold
     Donnelly (IN)
     Dreier
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallegly
     Gardner
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez
     Gosar
     Granger
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Gutierrez
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Heck
     Heinrich
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hoyer
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Israel
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jordan
     Kaptur
     Kelly
     Kildee
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Landry
     Langevin
     Lankford
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Levin
     Lewis (CA)
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Lynch
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     Markey
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCollum
     McCotter
     McDermott
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, Gary
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Nadler
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pascrell
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pelosi
     Pence
     Perlmutter
     Peterson
     Pitts
     Platts
     Pompeo
     Price (GA)
     Price (NC)
     Quayle
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Reyes
     Richmond
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (AR)
     Ross (FL)
     Roybal-Allard
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Ryan (WI)
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schwartz
     Scott (SC)
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Sessions
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Southerland
     Stivers
     Sullivan
     Sutton
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Tipton
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Van Hollen
     Visclosky
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Watt
     Waxman
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Wu
     Yarmuth
     Yoder
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--3

     Culberson
     Giffords
     Keating


                       Announcement by the Chair

  The CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining in the vote.

                              {time}  1415

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                     Amendment Offered by Mr. Cohen

  The CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a recorded vote 
on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Tennessee (Mr. Cohen) on 
which further proceedings were postponed and on which the noes 
prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 119, 
noes 306, not voting 6, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 509]

                               AYES--119

     Amash
     Baca
     Baldwin
     Bass (CA)
     Becerra
     Benishek
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Boswell
     Braley (IA)
     Broun (GA)
     Campbell
     Capps
     Capuano
     Chaffetz
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coble
     Cohen
     Conyers
     Costello
     Davis (IL)
     DeFazio
     DeLauro
     Deutch
     Doggett
     Dold
     Doyle
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellison
     Eshoo
     Farr
     Filner
     Frank (MA)
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Gibson
     Gohmert
     Gowdy
     Graves (GA)
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hastings (FL)
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holt
     Honda
     Inslee
     Jackson (IL)
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Kucinich
     Lee (CA)
     Lewis (GA)
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Maloney
     Markey
     Matsui
     McGovern
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (CT)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Olver
     Pallone
     Paul
     Payne
     Peters
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Polis
     Posey
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Ribble
     Richardson
     Rigell
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Scott (VA)
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sherman
     Slaughter
     Speier
     Stark
     Stearns
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tonko
     Towns
     Velazquez
     Walsh (IL)
     Waters
     Welch
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)

                               NOES--306

     Ackerman
     Adams
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Andrews
     Austria
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (NH)
     Berg
     Berkley
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boustany
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Brown (FL)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Chabot
     Chandler
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conaway
     Connolly (VA)
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (KY)
     DeGette
     Denham
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Donnelly (IN)
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Edwards
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Engel
     Farenthold
     Fattah
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallegly
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gonzalez
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Granger
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Al
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Heck
     Heinrich
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Holden
     Hoyer
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Israel
     Issa
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jordan
     Kaptur
     Kelly
     Kildee
     Kind
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kissell
     Kline
     Labrador
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Landry
     Langevin
     Lankford
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Levin
     Lewis (CA)
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Long
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Lynch
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCollum
     McCotter
     McDermott
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, Gary
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pelosi
     Pence
     Perlmutter
     Peterson
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Price (GA)
     Price (NC)
     Quayle
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Reyes
     Richmond
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (AR)
     Ross (FL)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Ryan (WI)
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Sessions
     Sewell
     Shimkus
     Shuler
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sires
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Southerland
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Sutton
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Tipton
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Upton
     Van Hollen
     Visclosky
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Watt
     Waxman
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--6

     Berman
     Culberson
     Giffords
     Keating
     King (IA)
     Stivers


                       Announcement by the Chair

  The CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining in this 
vote.

[[Page H4700]]

                              {time}  1419

  Ms. WATERS changed her vote from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                 Amendment Offered by Mr. Poe of Texas

  The CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a recorded vote 
on amendment No. 2 offered by the gentleman from Texas (Mr. Poe) on 
which further proceedings were postponed and on which the noes 
prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 140, 
noes 285, not voting 6, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 510]

                               AYES--140

     Adams
     Amash
     Baldwin
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (NH)
     Benishek
     Berg
     Berman
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blumenauer
     Braley (IA)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Campbell
     Capito
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Chaffetz
     Clarke (MI)
     Clay
     Coble
     Cohen
     Conyers
     Costa
     Costello
     Cummings
     DeFazio
     DesJarlais
     Deutch
     Doggett
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Emerson
     Eshoo
     Farenthold
     Filner
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Foxx
     Frank (MA)
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gowdy
     Graves (GA)
     Green, Gene
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Hall
     Harris
     Heck
     Heinrich
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Hochul
     Honda
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hurt
     Jackson (IL)
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kaptur
     Kucinich
     Labrador
     Landry
     LaTourette
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lummis
     Lynch
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McKinley
     McNerney
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Moran
     Mulvaney
     Napolitano
     Nugent
     Paul
     Pearce
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Poe (TX)
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Renacci
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Roe (TN)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Royce
     Ryan (OH)
     Schilling
     Scott (SC)
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Shuster
     Slaughter
     Southerland
     Speier
     Stark
     Stutzman
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (PA)
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walsh (IL)
     Waters
     Welch
     West
     Woodall
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Young (AK)

                               NOES--285

     Ackerman
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Andrews
     Austria
     Baca
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Bass (CA)
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boswell
     Boustany
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Brown (FL)
     Bucshon
     Burton (IN)
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Chabot
     Chandler
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (NY)
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conaway
     Connolly (VA)
     Cooper
     Courtney
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     Davis (KY)
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Denham
     Dent
     Diaz-Balart
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Dold
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Dreier
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Ellmers
     Engel
     Farr
     Fattah
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gallegly
     Garamendi
     Gardner
     Gibbs
     Gonzalez
     Gosar
     Granger
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Al
     Griffin (AR)
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Gutierrez
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harper
     Hartzler
     Hastings (FL)
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Holden
     Holt
     Hoyer
     Huelskamp
     Hunter
     Inslee
     Israel
     Issa
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, Sam
     Kelly
     Kildee
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kissell
     Kline
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Langevin
     Lankford
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     Latta
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis (CA)
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     Long
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Maloney
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matheson
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McCotter
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Moore
     Murphy (CT)
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Nadler
     Neal
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Olver
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paulsen
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Pence
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Peterson
     Pitts
     Platts
     Polis
     Pompeo
     Price (NC)
     Quayle
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Reyes
     Ribble
     Richardson
     Rivera
     Roby
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (AR)
     Ross (FL)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (WI)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Schweikert
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Sessions
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Shuler
     Simpson
     Sires
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Stearns
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thompson (MS)
     Thornberry
     Tipton
     Towns
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Upton
     Van Hollen
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Watt
     Waxman
     Webster
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Yarmuth
     Yoder
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--6

     Culberson
     Giffords
     Keating
     Markey
     Smith (NJ)
     Stivers


                       Announcement by the Chair

  The CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining in this 
vote.

                              {time}  1422

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                   Amendment Offered by Ms. McCollum

  The CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a recorded vote 
on amendment No. 1 offered by the gentlewoman from Minnesota (Ms. 
McCollum) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which the 
noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 226, 
noes 201, not voting 4, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 511]

                               AYES--226

     Ackerman
     Altmire
     Amash
     Bachmann
     Baldwin
     Barrow
     Bass (CA)
     Bass (NH)
     Becerra
     Benishek
     Berg
     Berman
     Biggert
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boswell
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brooks
     Butterfield
     Campbell
     Cantor
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Chandler
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cohen
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Costello
     Courtney
     Critz
     Cuellar
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Dold
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Eshoo
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Flake
     Frank (MA)
     Franks (AZ)
     Fudge
     Gallegly
     Garamendi
     Gardner
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Graves (GA)
     Green, Al
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harper
     Hartzler
     Heck
     Heinrich
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holden
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hurt
     Inslee
     Israel
     Jackson (IL)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (IL)
     Jones
     Kaptur
     Kildee
     Kind
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kucinich
     Labrador
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Long
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lummis
     Mack
     Maloney
     Manzullo
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McClintock
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McKeon
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller, Gary
     Miller, George
     Moran
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (CT)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Noem
     Olver
     Paul
     Paulsen
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Peters
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quayle
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Reed
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Richardson
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Royce
     Ruppersberger
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schmidt
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sessions
     Sherman
     Smith (NJ)

[[Page H4701]]


     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stark
     Stearns
     Sutton
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Tierney
     Tipton
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Waters
     Waxman
     Welch
     West
     Westmoreland
     Woodall
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Yarmuth
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--201

     Adams
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Andrews
     Austria
     Baca
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Berkley
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (FL)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Calvert
     Camp
     Canseco
     Capito
     Capps
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Clyburn
     Cole
     Conaway
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Davis (KY)
     DeFazio
     Denham
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dreier
     Engel
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Frelinghuysen
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez
     Granger
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Grimm
     Gutierrez
     Hall
     Harris
     Hastings (FL)
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Hinchey
     Huelskamp
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Issa
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Jordan
     Kelly
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kissell
     Kline
     Lamborn
     Landry
     Lankford
     Larson (CT)
     Latta
     Lewis (CA)
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Lynch
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McCotter
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller (NC)
     Moore
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Neugebauer
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Pearce
     Pence
     Perlmutter
     Peterson
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Rahall
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Reyes
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (AR)
     Ross (FL)
     Runyan
     Rush
     Ryan (WI)
     Scalise
     Schilling
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Sewell
     Shimkus
     Shuler
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Towns
     Turner
     Upton
     Walberg
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Watt
     Webster
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Yoder
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)

                             NOT VOTING--4

     Culberson
     Giffords
     Keating
     Markey


                       Announcement by the Chair

  The CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining in this 
vote.

                              {time}  1427

  Messrs. McCARTHY of California and BURGESS changed their vote from 
``aye'' to ``no.''
  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                   Amendment Offered by Ms. McCollum

  The CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a recorded vote 
on amendment No. 2 offered by the gentlewoman from Minnesota (Ms. 
McCollum) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which the 
noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 167, 
noes 260, not voting 4, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 512]

                               AYES--167

     Ackerman
     Akin
     Alexander
     Baldwin
     Barrow
     Bass (CA)
     Becerra
     Berman
     Bishop (NY)
     Bishop (UT)
     Blumenauer
     Bono Mack
     Braley (IA)
     Broun (GA)
     Burgess
     Camp
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Chabot
     Chandler
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Coffman (CO)
     Cohen
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Costa
     Costello
     Courtney
     Critz
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Deutch
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gonzalez
     Gosar
     Green, Al
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Heinrich
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Huizenga (MI)
     Israel
     Jackson (IL)
     Jones
     Kaptur
     Kildee
     Kind
     Kingston
     Kucinich
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Markey
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moran
     Neal
     Noem
     Olver
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Paul
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Reichert
     Richmond
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Royce
     Rush
     Ryan (WI)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schmidt
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Sensenbrenner
     Sherman
     Slaughter
     Speier
     Stark
     Stearns
     Stivers
     Sutton
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Towns
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Walden
     Waters
     Waxman
     Wilson (FL)
     Woolsey
     Wu

                               NOES--260

     Adams
     Aderholt
     Altmire
     Amash
     Andrews
     Austria
     Baca
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (NH)
     Benishek
     Berg
     Berkley
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Boren
     Boswell
     Boustany
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Brown (FL)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burton (IN)
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Campbell
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Chaffetz
     Clyburn
     Coble
     Cole
     Conaway
     Cooper
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Cuellar
     Davis (KY)
     Denham
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dold
     Donnelly (IN)
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Frank (MA)
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallegly
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (FL)
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Heck
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Holden
     Huelskamp
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Inslee
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Jordan
     Kelly
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kissell
     Kline
     Labrador
     Lamborn
     Landry
     Lankford
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Lewis (CA)
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCotter
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     Meehan
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, Gary
     Moore
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (CT)
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neugebauer
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pence
     Peterson
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Rahall
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Renacci
     Reyes
     Ribble
     Richardson
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (AR)
     Ross (FL)
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Ryan (OH)
     Scalise
     Schilling
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sessions
     Sewell
     Shimkus
     Shuler
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sires
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Southerland
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Visclosky
     Walberg
     Walsh (IL)
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Watt
     Webster
     Welch
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yarmuth
     Yoder
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--4

     Culberson
     Giffords
     Issa
     Keating


                       Announcement by the Chair

  The CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining in this 
vote.

                              {time}  1432

  Messrs. LoBIONDO and MACK changed their vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  Mr. GUTIERREZ and Ms. SUTTON changed their vote from ``no'' to 
``aye.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.

[[Page H4702]]

                  Amendment No. 13 Offered by Mr. Cole

  The CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a recorded vote 
on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Oklahoma (Mr. Cole) on 
which further proceedings were postponed and on which the ayes 
prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The CHAIR. This will be a 5-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 225, 
noes 201, not voting 5, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 513]

                               AYES--225

     Adams
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Amash
     Bachmann
     Baldwin
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (NH)
     Becerra
     Benishek
     Berg
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Braley (IA)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burton (IN)
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Capito
     Capuano
     Carson (IN)
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Coble
     Cole
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Cummings
     Davis (KY)
     DeFazio
     Denham
     DesJarlais
     Doggett
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Emerson
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Foxx
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gallegly
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herrera Beutler
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Honda
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jackson (IL)
     Jenkins
     Johnson (IL)
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kaptur
     Kingston
     Kline
     Kucinich
     Labrador
     Landry
     Lankford
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Lee (CA)
     Lewis (CA)
     Lewis (GA)
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Lynch
     Mack
     Maloney
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Markey
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCotter
     McGovern
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meehan
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Moore
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Napolitano
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunnelee
     Palazzo
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paul
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Richardson
     Rigell
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Roskam
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Runyan
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Scalise
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schrader
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sessions
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NJ)
     Southerland
     Stark
     Stearns
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Waters
     Webster
     Welch
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Yoder
     Young (AK)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--201

     Ackerman
     Altmire
     Andrews
     Austria
     Baca
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Bass (CA)
     Berkley
     Berman
     Biggert
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blackburn
     Blumenauer
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boswell
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Brown (FL)
     Burgess
     Butterfield
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capps
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carter
     Castor (FL)
     Chandler
     Chu
     Clyburn
     Coffman (CO)
     Cohen
     Conaway
     Connolly (VA)
     Costa
     Costello
     Courtney
     Critz
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Dent
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Dold
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Dreier
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Ellmers
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Frank (MA)
     Franks (AZ)
     Garamendi
     Gonzalez
     Granger
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grimm
     Gutierrez
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (FL)
     Hayworth
     Heinrich
     Higgins
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holden
     Holt
     Hoyer
     Hunter
     Inslee
     Israel
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Kelly
     Kildee
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kissell
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Levin
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Marino
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Myrick
     Nadler
     Neal
     Nunes
     Olson
     Olver
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Pence
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quayle
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reichert
     Reyes
     Richmond
     Rivera
     Roby
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (MI)
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Ross (AR)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schock
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Shuler
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thornberry
     Tonko
     Towns
     Tsongas
     Visclosky
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Watt
     Waxman
     Wilson (FL)
     Wolf
     Yarmuth
     Young (FL)

                             NOT VOTING--5

     Culberson
     Giffords
     Keating
     McHenry
     Scott, David


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (Mr. Terry) (during the vote). There are 2 minutes 
remaining in this vote.

                              {time}  1439

  Mr. COFFMAN of Colorado changed his vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated for:
  Mr. McHENRY. Mr. Chair, on rollcall No. 513, I was unavoidably 
detained. Had I been present, I would have voted ``aye.''


                     Amendment Offered by Mr. Amash

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Michigan 
(Mr. Amash) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 5-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 199, 
noes 229, not voting 3, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 514]

                               AYES--199

     Adams
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Amash
     Bachmann
     Baldwin
     Bass (NH)
     Becerra
     Benishek
     Berg
     Bilbray
     Bishop (UT)
     Boustany
     Braley (IA)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Campbell
     Capito
     Capuano
     Carson (IN)
     Cassidy
     Chaffetz
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conyers
     Costello
     Cummings
     Davis (IL)
     Davis (KY)
     DeFazio
     Denham
     DesJarlais
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Edwards
     Eshoo
     Farenthold
     Farr
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Flake
     Fleming
     Flores
     Foxx
     Frank (MA)
     Fudge
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Grijalva
     Guinta
     Gutierrez
     Hall
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Honda
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hurt
     Jackson (IL)
     Johnson (IL)
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kaptur
     Kingston
     Kucinich
     Labrador
     Landry
     Lankford
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     Latta
     Lee (CA)
     Lewis (GA)
     LoBiondo
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Long
     Lujan
     Lummis
     Lynch
     Mack
     Maloney
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Markey
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McGovern
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McMorris Rodgers
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Mulvaney
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paul
     Paulsen
     Payne
     Pearce
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Reed
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Richardson
     Rigell
     Roe (TN)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Roskam
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sessions
     Sherman
     Simpson
     Slaughter
     Smith (NJ)
     Southerland
     Speier
     Stearns
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Tierney
     Tipton
     Towns
     Tsongas
     Upton
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walberg
     Walsh (IL)
     Waters
     West
     Westmoreland

[[Page H4703]]


     Wilson (SC)
     Wolf
     Woodall
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Young (AK)

                               NOES--229

     Ackerman
     Altmire
     Andrews
     Austria
     Baca
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (CA)
     Berkley
     Berman
     Biggert
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Blumenauer
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boswell
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Brown (FL)
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capps
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carter
     Castor (FL)
     Chabot
     Chandler
     Chu
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Conaway
     Connolly (VA)
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Davis (CA)
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Dent
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Dold
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Dreier
     Ellison
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Engel
     Fattah
     Filner
     Fleischmann
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallegly
     Garamendi
     Gerlach
     Granger
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Harper
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Heinrich
     Herger
     Higgins
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holden
     Holt
     Hoyer
     Hunter
     Inslee
     Israel
     Issa
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Kelly
     Kildee
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kissell
     Kline
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     LaTourette
     Levin
     Lewis (CA)
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Marino
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McCotter
     McDermott
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Mica
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, Gary
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Neal
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Olver
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pelosi
     Pence
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Platts
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quayle
     Rahall
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Reyes
     Richmond
     Rivera
     Roby
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Ross (AR)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott, David
     Sewell
     Shimkus
     Shuler
     Shuster
     Sires
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Stark
     Stivers
     Sullivan
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tonko
     Turner
     Van Hollen
     Walden
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Watt
     Waxman
     Webster
     Welch
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Yarmuth
     Yoder
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--3

     Culberson
     Giffords
     Keating


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There are 2 minutes left in this 
vote.

                              {time}  1446

  Mr. WESTMORELAND changed his vote from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                 Amendment No. 2 Offered by Mr. Rigell

  Mr. RIGELL. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), add the 
     following:
       Sec. __.  None of the funds made available by this Act may 
     be used to support Operation Odyssey Dawn or Operation 
     Unified Protector.

  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Virginia is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. RIGELL. Mr. Chairman, each Member of this body has the duty to 
protect the separation of powers that was so wisely woven into our 
Constitution by our Founding Fathers and which forms the very 
foundation of how we govern this great Nation.
  Mr. Chairman, an egregious ongoing breach of the separation of powers 
is taking place at this very hour; specifically, the usurpation of a 
power given only to Congress, that found in article I, section 8 of the 
Constitution: only Congress can declare war.
  Known initially as Operation Odyssey Dawn and now as Operation 
Unified Protector, military intervention easily rising to the 
definition of war is being carried out in Libya. It is being carried 
out with the bravery, exceptional professionalism and commitment to 
victory that define our fellow Americans who serve in our Armed Forces. 
And before I address the mission itself, I first applaud their 
willingness to sacrifice so much for their fellow Americans.
  Mr. Chairman, a careful review of the President's case for support of 
his actions in Libya leads me to this sobering but firm conclusion. The 
President's use of force in Libya is unwise and it is unconstitutional. 
The level of military resources being employed both in personnel and 
equipment, the amount of ordnance delivered, and the damage inflicted 
constitute acts of war. At the very minimum, they meet the definition 
of ``hostilities'' under the War Powers Resolution. Yet not one of the 
three criteria delineated in the War Powers Resolution that would 
justify his action has been met.
  There has been no declaration of war. There has been no statutory 
authority issued. There has been no evidence that an attack on American 
forces was imminent or had occurred.
  Now if a Tomahawk missile was launched into any American city, 
whether Los Angeles, Chicago, or even my home city of Virginia Beach, 
would that not meet our definition of hostilities? Absolutely, it 
would.
  Now, Mr. Chairman, this is the pivotal issue: The military force 
being directed toward Libya easily triggers the definition of 
hostilities. The legal opinion upon which the administration stakes the 
legitimacy of its actions in Libya is thinner than the paper on which 
it is written. It is not based on law but something that he refers to 
as the ``national interest,'' a term that the President, in his wisdom, 
believes he can solely define himself. His Office of Legal Counsel 
concluded that: ``President Obama could rely on his constitutional 
power to safeguard the national interest by directing the anticipated 
military operations in Libya which were limited in their nature, scope, 
and duration''--listen carefully here--``without prior congressional 
authorization.''

                              {time}  1450

  Disregarding the legal opinions of the Pentagon's general counsel and 
the acting head of the Justice Department's Office of Legal Counsel, 
both of whom told the White House they believed that the military's 
operations in Libya amounted to ``hostilities,'' the President plowed 
ahead.
  Mr. Chairman, a President's opinion of the War Powers Resolution does 
not negate its authority.
  Though required by law, there was no check; there was no balance. 
Even the broadest interpretation of article I, section 8 cannot corral 
the interpretation held by the President of his unilateral right to 
engage U.S. forces in combat. It is irreconcilable with our 
Constitution. The President has taken America into a war in the midst 
of a financial crisis, in yet another Muslim nation, in pursuit of a 
military objective that is ambiguous and constantly morphing.
  Though I disagree with the President's actions in Libya, I stand here 
today not motivated by partisanship. Now, if I woke up tomorrow morning 
and learned that the President had taken action to defend this great 
country from imminent danger and attack, I would be the first to stand 
next to him and affirm his action. If America should go to war, it must 
be done so in a very careful, deliberative manner and as a last 
measure.
  It must be done so in a way that is fully consistent with our 
Constitution. That is not the case here.
  My amendment is necessary because only by using the power of the 
purse can we end an unwise war and meet our duty, our high duty, to 
preserve the separation of powers. Now is the time to act.
  I respectfully ask my colleagues to join me in supporting this 
amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. DICKS. I rise in opposition to the gentleman's amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Washington is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. DICKS. On March 19, 2011, coalition forces launched Operation 
Odyssey Dawn to enforce U.N. Security Council Resolution 1973 to 
protect the Libyan people from the brutal regime of Muammar al Qadhafi. 
Operation Odyssey Dawn ended on March 31, 2011, and transitioned to the 
NATO-led Operation Unified Protector, which continues today.

[[Page H4704]]

  Operation Odyssey Dawn has ceased operations; therefore part of this 
amendment is no longer relevant. However, the NATO-led mission to 
defeat Qadhafi and to protect the people of Libya was undertaken in 
concert with a broad coalition of nations, including the Arab League, 
and it followed resolutions adopted in the United Nations Security 
Council, authorizing ``all necessary measures.''
  This amendment would end our involvement unilaterally. I believe this 
could materially harm our relationship with NATO allies from whom we 
will undoubtedly require support in the future and who have been our 
partners since 1949. We should let the mission with our NATO allies 
continue so we can defeat Qadhafi and protect the Libyan people.
  I urge all of my colleagues to vote ``no'' on this amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Virginia (Mr. Rigell).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. RIGELL. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Virginia 
will be postponed.


                    Amendment Offered by Ms. Norton

  Ms. NORTON. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), insert the 
     following:
       Sec. __.  The amount otherwise made available by this Act 
     for ``Operation and Maintenance--Environmental Restoration, 
     Formerly Used Defense Sites'' is hereby reduced and increased 
     by $1,000,000.

  Ms. NORTON (during the reading). Mr. Chairman, I ask unanimous 
consent to waive the reading of the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentlewoman from the District of Columbia?
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. Mr. Chairman, I object.
  The Acting CHAIR. Objection is heard.
  The Clerk will continue to read.
  The Clerk continued to read.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentlewoman from the District of Columbia is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
  Ms. NORTON. Mr. Chairman, more than 25 years ago, the Congress 
charged the Defense Department to identify and then to clean up and 
remediate properties which the department had owned or leased in order 
to test chemical munitions. Congress did so because these munitions had 
left hazardous substances related to the work of the department. There 
are more than 2,000 such sites in nearly every State, all the 
Territories and in the District of Columbia.
  My concern is with those sites in congested residential parts of our 
country where there may be dense populations located by formerly used 
defense sites. A classic case and perhaps the most important--but I'm 
sure not the only one--was the World War I chemical weapons site for 
the United States of America. It happened to have been right here in 
Northwest Washington, DC, in a portion of what is now American 
University and its surrounding neighborhood known as Spring Valley.
  The Army is making good on its duty to clean up these formerly used 
defense sites (FUDS), including the site in the District of Columbia, 
but we have no information on the health effects of these leftover 
chemical munitions. They have been found in people's back and front 
yards. They have been found, at least here, in people's gardens. Entire 
houses and garages, as it turns out, unknowingly were built on this 
debris. The site here in the District of Columbia was found by accident 
by a utility contractor digging into a trench. The neighborhood had no 
knowledge. The city had no knowledge of these leftover munitions. 
Again, I stress that there are surely other sites around the United 
States, and I cite this case as an example.
  This land, in the District of Columbia at least, was used for the 
research and development and testing of chemical explosives, and it was 
able to be done in this city because there wasn't any local government, 
and there wasn't any home rule. I guess, since the city was 
administered by the Federal Government, they could simply make a 
munitions testing site in this city. Hundreds of pounds of chemical 
agents and explosives were developed and released throughout the 
environment. We have found in the Spring Valley section of the city 
arsine projectiles, mustard gas projectiles, lewisite projectiles, and 
other kinds of chemical toxic waste left over from undetonated 
ordnances.
  When World War I was over, the Army simply used the site where they'd 
been doing the testing as a dumpsite. They buried these munitions right 
where they were testing. Now, that was the way in which you disposed of 
these munitions at the time. In the Spring Valley area that is a 
classic case, there are 1,200 private homes, 30 Embassies and foreign 
properties, Sibley Hospital, Wesley Seminary. There may be other 
metropolitan areas that have formerly used defense sites as well. 
Spring Valley may be the prime target because it is such a well-
established neighborhood where chemical agents and munitions were once 
used.

                              {time}  1500

  The amendment requires the Secretary to allocate $1 million to study 
the human health effects of left-over munitions in congested 
residential areas. Just as the Department of Defense and the Army have 
acknowledged their obligation to clean up and remove hazardous 
substances, especially munitions that have been left behind through 
their testing, they also have the obligation to investigate whether 
there are any remaining health effects. That is all we are asking; that 
there be a study as to whether there are any remaining health effects 
at this former munitions site from World War I and other sites like it 
in congested residential areas.
  The Acting CHAIR. The time of the gentlewoman has expired.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. Mr. Chairman, I rise in opposition to the 
amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from New Jersey is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. I would like to acknowledge the gentlewoman's hard 
work to clean up this part of the District of Columbia.
  Our bill provides $276.5 million in the Environment Restoration 
Account, formerly the Used Defense Site Account. The Department has the 
authority to provide funding to those projects that it deems of the 
highest priority and that pose the greatest risk to environmental and 
human health.
  If the Department believes that funding such a study as the 
gentlewoman from the District of Columbia suggests is important, the 
Department has the ability to do so. For these reasons, we do oppose 
the amendment.
  Mr. DICKS. Will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. I yield to the gentleman from Washington.
  Mr. DICKS. I also appreciate the gentlewoman's amendment, and I will 
work with you on seeing if we can talk to the military to use 
environmental restoration funds if your amendment doesn't succeed.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from the District of Columbia (Ms. Norton).
  The amendment was rejected.
  Mr. PASCRELL. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from New Jersey is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. PASCRELL. I would like to ask the gentleman from Florida, Mr. 
Chairman, to engage in a colloquy on the need for traumatic brain 
injury funding for post-acute guidelines for our returning troops.
  Mr. Chairman, it is my understanding that medical treatment 
guidelines for post-acute rehabilitation of moderate and severe TBI do 
not exist today. Recognizing this, Mr. Platts from Pennsylvania and Ms. 
Giffords from Arizona included an amendment in the National Defense 
Authorization for fiscal year 2012 that would require the Department of 
Defense to implement post-acute treatment guidelines for traumatic 
brain injury. This provision was supported by

[[Page H4705]]

the cochairs of the Brain Injury Task Force--myself, Mr. Platts, 
bipartisan. It is my hope that the Uniformed Services University of the 
Health Sciences be able to begin the project as soon as possible. Over 
the years, the TBI Task Force has addressed many gaps for our 
servicemembers.
  I now yield to the gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Platts).
  Mr. PLATTS. I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  As cochair of the Traumatic Brain Injury Task Force, I am honored to 
join with the gentleman from New Jersey in support of implementing 
post-acute treatment guidelines.
  Before 2007, there were no funds in the budget for traumatic brain 
injury treatments, but with the dedicated efforts of Chairman Young and 
other members of the Appropriations Committee, through their efforts we 
were not only able to provide funding, but more importantly, to sustain 
a significant level of funding over the past number of years.
  As we continue to address new gaps for our servicemembers suffering 
TBIs, in this 2012 authorization bill that was passed in the committee 
and moving forward through the process we requested $1 million to fund 
these post-acute guidelines that the gentleman from New Jersey has 
referenced. It is our understanding that while TBI funding in the 
Defense appropriations bill is not separated by purpose, it is our 
understanding that the Department uses the overall funding for 
traumatic brain injury research for authorized purposes.
  Is our understanding correct, Mr. Chairman?
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. PASCRELL. I yield to the gentleman from Florida.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. The gentleman is correct. In this bill, the 
committee has provided an additional $125 million for TBI research. 
It's above the fully funded budget request of $415 million. And it has 
been our long-standing policy that this increased funding is provided 
at the discretion of the Department. Historically, this subcommittee 
has provided increased funding for TBI research but refrained from 
directing how that money should be spent, allowing the Department to 
prioritize how best to use that funding for authorized purposes.
  Mr. PASCRELL. Mr. Chairman, reclaiming my time, may I also clarify 
that should the authorization bill pass with this provision on post-
acute guidelines that the Department then has the needed amount of $1 
million to really accomplish this objective which we have.
  Mr. Chairman, I would request, as usual, your deepest cooperation. 
And no one has done more for our troops than you.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. PASCRELL. I yield to the gentleman from Florida.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. I thank the gentleman.
  I would say to the gentleman that he is correct; should the provision 
be carried on the final authorization bill, then the Department would 
have sufficient resources to fund the provisions should they decide to 
based on this appropriations bill.
  Mr. PASCRELL. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
  I yield to my brother, the gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Platts).
  Mr. PLATTS. I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  I would just like to add my words of great thanks to Chairman Young, 
who has been a great leader in doing right by our men and women in 
uniform in all fashion, and especially those who have suffered 
traumatic brain injury. As a Nation, we are indebted to you and your 
staff for your great leadership.
  Mr. PASCRELL. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.


                  Amendment No. 61 Offered by Ms. Foxx

  Ms. FOXX. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), insert the 
     following:
       Sec. __.  None of the funds made available by this Act may 
     be used in contravention of section 7 of title 1, United 
     States Code (the Defense of Marriage Act).

  The Acting CHAIR. The gentlewoman from North Carolina is recognized 
for 5 minutes.
  Ms. FOXX. Mr. Chairman, what sets the United States apart from many 
other countries that have lots of resources are our values, and that we 
are a Nation of laws. We may not agree with all of our laws, but they 
are the laws of our land, and not even the President can decide which 
laws to enforce and which not to enforce. Yet this administration has 
said it will not enforce the Defense of Marriage Act.
  The Department of Defense maintains that the repeal of Don't Ask, 
Don't Tell does not directly challenge the Defense of Marriage Act, 
which protects the right of individual States to define marriage as the 
union between a man and a woman. In February, 2011, Attorney General 
Eric Holder announced that the Department of Justice would no longer 
defend the Defense of Marriage Act in Federal court. However, the House 
of Representatives has expressed its intent to continue legal defense 
of the statute along with other laws of our country.
  My proposed amendment would reaffirm Congress' assertion that funds 
may not be used in contravention of section 7 of title I, United States 
Code, the Defense of Marriage Act. The Department of the Navy has 
already demonstrated how pressures to accommodate same-sex couples can 
quickly lead to policy changes that are ultimately contrary to previous 
assurances given with regard to the repeal of Don't Ask, Don't Tell and 
in contravention of the Defense of Marriage Act.
  On April 13, 2011, the Office of the Chief of Navy Chaplains, in a 
memo titled ``Revision of Chaplain Corps Tier 1 Training,'' directed 
that training be revised to accommodate same-sex marriages on military 
bases that are located in States where same-sex marriage is legal. The 
memo stated, ``This is a change to previous training that stated same-
sex marriages are not authorized on Federal property.'' The memo 
further authorized the participation of a military chaplain in a same-
sex civil marriage ``if it is conducted in accordance with the laws of 
a State which permits same-sex marriages or unions,'' and if the 
chaplain is otherwise certified to officiate. This calls into question 
the intent of the Department of Defense with regard to compliance with 
existing Federal law under the Defense of Marriage Act.
  Congress should establish policy guidance on this issue that will 
cover numerous contingencies and unexpected situations in the future. 
It is irresponsible for the Department of Defense to dismiss all 
concerns about issues involving marriage status by pointing to the 
existence of the Defense of Marriage Act.

                              {time}  1510

  There's no contingency plan to address this issue should the Federal 
courts invalidate the Defense of Marriage Act. In fact, the 
administration is inviting that very policy. Federal court orders could 
suddenly overturn current policies of the Department of Defense, which 
is not likely to resist or oppose new directives that disregard the 
intent of the Defense of Marriage Act. Congress can and should enact a 
policy making it clear that Defense Department funds should not be used 
in ways that violate Federal laws, including the Defense of Marriage 
Act.
  I urge my colleagues to support this amendment and the underlying 
bill.
  With that, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. DICKS. I rise in opposition to the gentlelady's amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Washington is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. DICKS. Issues such as the Defense of Marriage Act represent 
policy questions that are not suited to appropriation bills. Indeed, 
this amendment does not address any specific program funding matter 
addressed in the bill now before the House.
  To the extent that this amendment has any connection to the 
Department of Defense, I believe that such a policy issue is 
appropriately addressed within the domain of the House Armed Services 
Committee. I urge my colleagues to reject this amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. BURTON of Indiana. I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.

[[Page H4706]]

  (Mr. BURTON of Indiana asked and was given permission to revise and 
extend his remarks.)
  Mr. BURTON of Indiana. I won't be redundant. I'll just follow up on 
what my colleague Representative Foxx said in proposing this amendment 
for the two of us.
  This is merely a move to make sure that legislation that has already 
passed, the Defense of Marriage Act and in the authorization bill 
dealing with the Department of Defense, coincides with the 
appropriation bill that we're talking about today.
  There's been some confusion in the Department of Defense, in the 
facilities at these military bases, that there could be marriages 
between two men or two women. The Defense of Marriage Act and the 
authorization bill clearly state that that cannot happen and will not 
happen because it would be a violation of the Defense of Marriage Act 
which has passed this body.
  And even though the administration has chosen not to be involved in 
this issue, I believe it's incumbent on the Congress to make this issue 
very clear so that we don't have confusion on these military bases when 
we talk about same sex marriages.
  I think it is imperative that we make absolutely clear in both the 
appropriation bill and the authorization bill, as well as the Defense 
of Marriage Act, what the law is, what it's intended to do, so that 
it's very clear to the military so they don't have any difficulty in 
making decisions on this particular issue.
  I want to thank my good friend and colleague, Representative Virginia 
Foxx for introducing this amendment on behalf of the both of us.
  She and her staff, especially Javier Sanchez, have thoroughly 
examined the confusing messages and conflicting protocols within the 
Department of Defense related to the implementation of the Defense of 
Marriage Act.
  Why is this Amendment Needed?
  (1) This amendment reinforces language that was included in the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012 that passed the 
House on May 26, 2011.
  Section 534 of the FY 2012 National Defense Authorization Act 
reaffirms the policy of the Defense of Marriage Act by stating that the 
word ``marriage'' included in any ruling, regulation, or interpretation 
of the Department of Defense (DoD) applicable to a service member or 
civilian employee of the Department of Defense shall mean only a legal 
union between one man and one woman.
  And, Section 535 establishes that marriages performed on DoD 
installations or marriages involving the participation of DoD military 
or civilian personnel in an official capacity, to include chaplains, 
must comply with the Defense of Marriage Act.
  This amendment does not impose a new restriction on the Department of 
Defense.
  It is a straightforward in its purpose and text. It simply aligns the 
Department of Defense appropriations bill we are considering today with 
the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012 that passed 
the House May 26, 2011.
  The amendment ensures that defense dollars are not used to implement 
policy changes that violate the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA).
  I believe that appropriations and authorization bills should be 
compatible, where possible, and by adopting the Foxx-Burton amendment, 
we will do just that for the Defense of Marriage Act.
  This is the only opportunity we have to synchronize DoD funding to 
the DOMA policy provisions contained in the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012.
  (2) The amendment settles--once and for all--any confusion and/or 
misinformation within the DoD about the abilities of its personnel to 
perform same-sex marriages as well as the use of its facilities.
  It is important that we pass this amendment, which is a 
straightforward statement reaffirming Congress' assertion that funds 
may not be used in contravention of section 7 of title 1, United States 
Code (Defense of Marriage Act).
  The law ensures the States would not have to recognize same-sex 
marriages from other States, and that the Federal Government would 
recognize only the union of one man and one woman as marriage.
  Offering up Federal facilities and Federal employees for the use in 
same-sex marriages violates DOMA, which is still the law of the land 
and binds our military.
  (3) President Obama's Administration is on record that it will no 
longer defend DOMA thus leaving it up to Congress to defend against 
challenges to DOMA.
  I am confident that activist lawyers and judges will begin 
challenging inconsistencies in marriage status for military personnel. 
For example, a same-sex couple who was married in a State where same-
sex marriage is recognized sues because they are denied military family 
housing. The resolution of this kind of litigation would propel the 
courts into policy matters that Congerss should decide.
  Bottom line.
  This amendment--in conjunction with the Sections 534 and 535 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012--will allow 
Congerss to speak with one voice on the Defense of Marriage Act.
  If Congress fails to speak clearly on this issue, we are certain to 
see more conflicting and confusing DOMA protocols emerging in the 
Department of Defense. And, it will be with the blessing of the White 
House.
  Let's keep our Department of Defense focused on the missions at hand.
  Congress can and should make it clear that Defense Department funds 
should not be used in ways that violate Federal laws, including the 
Defense of Marriage Act.
  Support the Foxx-Burton Amendment. Let's leave the guesswork out of 
it.
  With that, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. HOYER. Mr. Chair, last year, Congress voted to repeal the 
counterproductive and unjust policy of ``Don't Ask, Don't Tell.''
  But despite overwhelming evidence that repeal will strengthen our 
military, despite strong support for repeal among our troops and the 
American people, despite support for repeal from military leaders like 
the Secretary of Defense and the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, 
and despite a Federal court order that the Government stop enforcing 
DADT immediately, Republicans are still pushing to keep this shameful 
policy in place.
  Under DADT, 13,500 gay men and women were discharged simply because 
of who they were. These were troops who had served our country 
honorably and bravely; 1,000 of them filled what the military calls 
``critical occupations,'' such as engineering and interpretation of 
languages like Arabic and Farsi.
  Our closest allies--countries like Britain, Canada, and Israel--know 
better than to throw that kind of service and expertise away.
  Yet the amendment offered by Mr. Huelskamp would force our military 
to stop training its Chaplain Corps to prepare for the repeal of DADT. 
This amendment would substitute Congress's micromanagement for the 
judgment of our military leaders on training issues, and it is a 
transparent attempt to interfere with the repeal of DADT in any way 
possible.
  The amendment offered by Ms. Foxx is in a similar vein. It would 
prohibit defense appropriations in contravention of the Defense of 
Marriage Act, or DOMA.
  DOMA is discriminatory and should be ruled unconstitutional--but as 
long as it is law, it clearly applies to all Federal agencies, 
including the Defense Department.
  That makes this amendment entirely unnecessary. Let's see it for what 
it is: Republicans' effort to change the subject from open service--an 
argument they've lost--to marriage equality--an argument they're still 
in the process of losing.
  I urge my colleagues to oppose both amendments which put partisan 
belief in the exclusion of gays above the strength of our military.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from North Carolina (Ms. Foxx).
  The amendment was agreed to.
  Mr. BERMAN. Mr. Chair, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from California is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. BERMAN. I rise to engage Mr. Dicks in a colloquy regarding an 
important area of funding for the Department of Defense.
  For more than a decade, the Department of Defense has funded programs 
to support established university programs that promote region-wide 
informal conferences and task forces on arms control, regional 
security, and related topics to the Middle East for Arab, Israeli, and 
other officials and experts.
  These programs serve an important national security objective--
fostering an alternative means of dialogue and engagement in an area of 
unparalleled significance to the United States. I know of one such 
program in Los Angeles, and I urge the Department to continue funding 
such programs.
  I yield to the gentleman from Washington (Mr. Dicks), the ranking 
member, for his thoughts on this issue.
  Mr. DICKS. First of all, I appreciate the gentleman yielding.
  And I thank you, Mr. Berman, for your comments and agree that such 
programs that support university programs promoting Middle East 
conferences and task forces on arms control, regional security, and 
other issues

[[Page H4707]]

for Arab, Israeli, and other officials are important and beneficial. I 
hope the Department of Defense funds such programs accordingly, and I 
will work with the gentleman to ensure that that happens.
  Mr. BERMAN. I thank the gentleman.
  I yield back the balance of my time.


                Amendment No. 64 Offered by Mr. Michaud

  Mr. MICHAUD. I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), insert the 
     following:
       Sec. __.  None of the funds made available by this Act may 
     be used in contravention of section 2533a of title 10, United 
     States Code (popularly known as the ``Berry Amendment'').

  The Acting CHAIR. The gentlemen from Maine is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. MICHAUD. I rise today to offer an amendment with Mr. Kissell to 
ensure that no funds in this bill are spent in violation of the Berry 
Amendment.
  The Berry Amendment requires DOD to procure certain categories of 
products from American manufacturers including food, clothing, fabrics, 
stainless steel, and certain tools. It was enacted to ensure that the 
United States troops wore military uniforms made in the U.S.A. and to 
ensure that U.S. troops were fed American-made food.
  The Berry Amendment has been on the books for 70 years. Yet, in 
recent years, some in Congress have tried to weaken it. At a time of 9 
percent unemployment and when employment in the U.S. manufacturing 
sector is on the decline, it is more important than ever for Congress 
to reiterate its support for existing law that promotes domestic 
procurement.
  I urge my colleagues to support American manufacturing and to promote 
American food and uniforms for our troops by voting for the Michaud-
Kissell Amendment.
  At this time, I yield to the gentleman from North Carolina (Mr. 
Kissell).
  Mr. KISSELL. I would like to thank my colleague for yielding to me.
  Mr. Chairman, for 70 years, as my colleague pointed out, the Berry 
Amendment has served this Nation well. It has given our fine military 
forces the best of American-made equipment and has guaranteed the 
American people the opportunity to make that equipment. It is a matter 
of national security. And it should not be a matter, as the intent of 
Congress has been clear for 70 years, it shouldn't be a matter of us 
standing up to reaffirm this amendment.
  But as my colleague said, there have been efforts made to weaken the 
Berry Amendment, to get around the Berry Amendment, and we simply want 
to remind all folks involved that the Berry Amendment is the intent of 
Congress. It has been the law for 70 years. And we need to continue 
with the Berry Amendment that any funds that are being spent should be 
spent in total compliance with the Berry Amendment.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. MICHAUD. I yield to the gentleman from Florida.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  I would like to advise him that we're prepared to accept this 
amendment.
  Mr. MICHAUD. I thank the chairman very much.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Maine (Mr. Michaud).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                    Amendment Offered by Mr. Kissell

  Mr. KISSELL. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), insert the 
     following:
       Sec. __.  None of the funds made available by this Act may 
     be used to enter into a contract, memorandum of 
     understanding, or cooperative agreement with, or provide a 
     loan or loan guarantee to, any United States commercial air 
     carrier if that contract, memorandum of understanding, 
     cooperative agreement, loan, or loan guarantee allows the air 
     carrier to charge baggage fees to any member of the Armed 
     Forces who is traveling on official military orders and is 
     being deployed overseas or is returning from an overseas 
     deployment.

                              {time}  1520

  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from North Carolina is recognized for 
5 minutes.
  Mr. KISSELL. Mr. Chairman, this is a very simple, to-the-point 
amendment.
  We have heard recently about members of our armed services traveling 
on official military business being charged excess baggage fees by our 
commercial airlines here in the United States. This amendment would not 
make any funds available for entering into any contracts, memorandums 
of understanding, cooperative agreements, loans or loan guarantees with 
any United States commercial airlines where those contracts, 
memorandums of understanding, cooperative agreements, loans or loan 
guarantees would allow for excess baggage fees for any member of the 
armed services traveling on official military business.
  Our folks, when they're traveling and protecting our Nation, 
shouldn't have to worry about this, and we as a Nation shouldn't have 
to pay extra fees beyond the millions upon millions of dollars that we 
already pay to these airlines. This just should be business as usual, 
and I encourage all my colleagues to vote in support of this amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Mr. Chairman, I rise in support of this 
amendment.
  Our troops and their families are being asked to make sacrifice after 
sacrifice after sacrifice. We should be at a point of trying to make 
things better for them, make things easier for them; and I would say 
that one of the things that we can do is to adopt the gentleman's 
amendment to at least give them some relief when they're coming back 
from the war that we sent them to without charging them extra money to 
get back home with their belongings.
  I applaud the gentleman for offering this amendment, and I rise in 
strong support.
  Mr. DICKS. Will the chairman yield?
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. I yield to the gentleman from Washington.
  Mr. DICKS. I, too, agree with the chairman. This is one of those 
situations where I think we have to step in and take action for our 
troops. This is a good amendment, and I urge its adoption.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from North Carolina (Mr. Kissell).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                     Amendment Offered by Ms. Eshoo

  Ms. ESHOO. I have an amendment at the desk, Mr. Chairman.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), insert the 
     following:
       Sec. __.  None of the funds made available in this Act may 
     be used to enter into a contract with a corporation or other 
     business entity that does not disclose its political 
     expenditures.

  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Mr. Chairman, I reserve a point of order on the 
amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman reserves a point of order.
  The gentlewoman from California is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Ms. ESHOO. Mr. Chairman, I rise for the third time this year to call 
for transparency and disclosure in our system and throughout our 
government. This appropriations bill will spend hundreds of billions of 
taxpayer dollars next year; and a huge portion of it, a portion that's 
impossible to quantify, will go to contractors. Some are small, others 
rank among the world's largest companies. As we meet today, the 
workforce of contractors in Afghanistan is the same size as the 
workforce of the uniformed personnel there; and since 2005, we've spent 
approximately $12 billion on contractors in Afghanistan. Today, there 
are more private contractors than uniformed personnel in Iraq, and 
we've spent $112 billion on contractors in Iraq since 2005.
  The Federal Government does business with thousands of contractors 
who receive billions of dollars in taxpayer

[[Page H4708]]

money. They should be required to disclose their political spending, 
and that's what my amendment will accomplish.
  In 2002 when we voted to pass the historic McCain-Feingold campaign 
finance bill, most Republicans voted ``no,'' saying we needed 
disclosure, not soft money restrictions. They said we needed to put 
spending out in the open and let the voters assess it. Today, when the 
President proposes requiring contractors to simply disclose their 
spending, not to limit it, Republicans are up in arms. They say it will 
politicize the contracting process; but when contractors can spend 
money in elections, the contracting process is already politicized.
  My amendment is modest and it's simple: It will bring this 
information out into the open and let the public decide for themselves. 
The public deserves to know what happens with their tax money.
  Mr. Chairman, this is not a revolutionary idea. For the last 17 
years, the SEC requires bond dealers to limit their campaign 
contributions to the officials in the cities that issue bonds. It 
requires them to disclose their contributions, providing the public 
with transparency. The rule was challenged and upheld in court, and my 
amendment really adheres to the same principle. To quote Senator Mitch 
McConnell from 2003: ``Why would a little disclosure be better than a 
lot of disclosure?''
  I agree with Senator McConnell. With public dollars come public 
responsibilities. Disclosure would fulfill this responsibility. I urge 
my colleagues to support this amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.


                             Point of Order

  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Mr. Chairman, I make a point of order against 
the amendment because it proposes to change existing law and 
constitutes legislation in an appropriation bill and therefore violates 
clause 2 of rule XXI.
  The rule states in pertinent part:
  ``An amendment to a general appropriation bill shall not be in order 
if changing existing law.'' This amendment requires a new 
determination.
  I ask for a ruling from the Chair.
  The Acting CHAIR. Does any Member wish to speak on the point of 
order? Seeing none, the Chair is prepared to rule.
  The Chair finds that this amendment includes language requiring a new 
determination of whether certain political contributions were 
disclosed. The amendment therefore constitutes legislation in violation 
of clause 2 of rule XXI.
  The point of order is sustained, and the amendment is not in order.


                   Amendment Offered by Mr. Mulvaney

  Mr. MULVANEY. I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), insert the 
     following:
       Sec. __.  The total amount of appropriations made available 
     by this Act is hereby reduced by $17,192,000,000, not to be 
     derived from amounts of appropriations made available by 
     title IX.

  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from South Carolina is recognized for 
5 minutes.
  Mr. MULVANEY. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
  By way of brief summary, this amendment would freeze the base 
Department of Defense funding at 2011 levels. It is roughly a $17 
billion reduction, or a 3 percent reduction over the bill that's 
currently before us. Again, it takes it back to the 2011 levels that we 
passed just recently in H.R. 1 during the continuing resolution debate.
  This is not, Mr. Chairman, a new idea. It's not even my idea. The 
Domenici-Rivlin bipartisan deficit reduction plan also proposed exactly 
this--freezing base defense spending at 2011 levels.

                              {time}  1530

  During the budget debate, the one substantive bipartisan amendment 
that passed was an amendment that was a sense of the Committee that 
said that defense spending needed to be on the table as we look at 
spending reductions for 2012. And most importantly, the President's 
fiscal commission, the Simpson-Bowles Commission, also recommended 
exactly what this amendment does today, keeping defense spending at 
2011 levels.
  I happen to believe that at least, especially in this area, the 
Simpson-Bowles Commission is correct. And I want to read from the 
commission's report: ``Every aspect of the discretionary budget must be 
scrutinized. No agency can be off limits, and no program that spends 
too much or achieves too little can be spared. Any serious attempt,'' 
and I will say that again, ``any serious attempt to reduce the deficit 
will require deliberate, planned reductions in both domestic and 
defense spending.''
  Personally, I like to think that I am serious about cutting our 
deficits. I hope that I am not alone. Many of us have gone around back 
home and told people how serious we are. But how can we look them in 
the eye and tell them that we are serious about cutting this deficit 
and about cutting spending and then come in and plus-up the base 
defense budget?
  Admiral Mullen himself said that with the increasing defense budget, 
which is almost double over the last 10 years, it has not forced us, 
that's the Defense Department, to make the hard trades. It hasn't 
forced us to prioritize. It hasn't forced us to do the analysis.
  We just received a Budget Committee memo today that said of the 92 
major defense acquisition programs, 69 percent of them are over-budget. 
One in every five of them is over-budget by at least 50 percent. That 
is simply not right. It's not what our families are having to do. It's 
not what our States are having to do. It's not even what we have chosen 
to do in other areas of the budget. We have made hard decisions. We 
have made hard choices. The Defense Department needs to do exactly the 
same.
  This amendment will not in any way limit our national defense 
capabilities. It will not put a single soldier at more risk. It simply 
holds defense spending exactly where we were 3 months ago when we 
approved the CR.
  Having been here about 6 months, there is one thing that I have 
learned being a freshman. And for the folks who are here for the first 
time, the message is this: talk is cheap. Talk is especially cheap. 
It's very easy for us to go home and tell folks how important it is to 
cut spending, how serious we are about cutting spending. But nothing 
sends the message that we are really serious about it like cutting 
spending on something that is important to us. It's easy to cut things 
that we don't like. It is hard to cut things that are important to us. 
And defense spending is critically important to me and to the folks of 
this Nation and to the folks of South Carolina.
  But if we're going to send a message that we are really serious about 
cutting spending, then everything needs to be on the table. And holding 
defense spending simply at 2011 levels and passing this amendment would 
help show everybody that we are really serious about fixing this 
difficulty.
  With that, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. DICKS. I rise in opposition to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Washington is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. DICKS. This amendment follows the Lee amendment and the Garamendi 
amendment in cutting about $17.1 billion from the Overseas Contingency 
Operation Fund. I myself feel that we could be reducing our troop 
levels faster, but I don't think we should take the money out at this 
point until we have a better understanding of the pace of the 
withdrawal.
  Now, we know the President's plan is 10,000 this year and another 
23,000 next year. And so there will be some savings in the overseas 
contingency account as those troops come home. But I think it's too 
early to make a decision on that. Better left to do it in conference, 
where we can make a reasoned judgment and talk to the Pentagon and the 
Congressional Research Service so that we have a better idea of how 
much savings this will be. I feel that this is premature at this point. 
The other two amendments were soundly defeated, and I think the same 
fate will be here.
  I yield to the gentleman from South Carolina.
  Mr. MULVANEY. Just for clarification, the amendment only makes the 
change to the base spending. It does not change anything in title 9. It 
does not change overseas contingencies in any way. It is simply the 
base portion

[[Page H4709]]

of the DOD budget. Thank you for yielding.
  Mr. DICKS. That's even worse. I would doubly oppose the gentleman's 
amendment on that part of it. So let's defeat this amendment, as we 
defeated the others.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. I rise in opposition to this amendment. I am 
one of the original budget cutters in this Congress. But I will not cut 
a defense budget to the point that it adversely affects our troops or 
adversely affects our country's readiness. And we could be getting 
close to that.
  This year, Secretary Gates made his recommendation, which resulted in 
the President's budget request being $13 billion less than we had 
anticipated for national defense. In addition to that, this committee 
recommended, and this Congress will pass sometime today or tomorrow, a 
bill that is $9 billion less than the President requested. So we have 
cut and saved money everywhere we could without affecting readiness and 
without having an adverse effect on our troops.
  If we start cutting too deep--and we were careful with this $9 
billion reduction, very careful--we don't want to see that we have to 
cancel training for returning troops. We don't want to have to cancel 
Navy training exercises. We don't want to have to slow down or reduce 
Air Force flight training. We don't want to delay or cancel maintenance 
of aircraft, ships, and vehicles. We don't want to delay important 
safety and quality-of-life repairs to facilities and to military 
barracks. If we do those things, we are affecting our readiness. 
Training relates to readiness.
  Training is a large part of the money in the base bill, not the 
overseas contingency operations account, but the base bill, which is 
what this amendment reduces. This amendment could be getting us very 
close to a dangerous situation where troops and readiness are affected. 
And there is just no way that I can even appear to support this 
amendment. I rise in strong opposition to this amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from South Carolina (Mr. Mulvaney).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. MULVANEY. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from South 
Carolina will be postponed.


           Amendment No. 71 Offered by Ms. Bass of California

  Ms. BASS of California. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the 
desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), insert the 
     following:
       Sec. __.  None of the funds made available by this Act may 
     be used in contravention of section 1590 or 1591 of title 18, 
     United States Code, or in contravention of the requirements 
     of section 106(g) or (h) of the Trafficking Victims 
     Protection Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 7104(g) or (h)).

  The Acting CHAIR. The gentlewoman from California is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Ms. BASS of California. Mr. Chairman, this bipartisan amendment is 
simple. It prohibits the Defense Department from being used to engage 
in or facilitate human trafficking. Thousands of private contracting 
defense firms, including some of the industry's biggest names, such as 
DynCorp International and Halliburton subsidiary KBR, have been linked 
to trafficking-related incidents. Thousands of nationals from 
impoverished countries are lured by the promise of good jobs, but 
sometimes end up victims of scams that leave them virtual slaves, with 
no way to return home or seek legal recourse.
  Despite this, allegations against Federal contractors engaged in 
illegal labor practices ranging from contract-worker smuggling to human 
trafficking in Iraq and Afghanistan continue to surface in the media.
  A recent New Yorker article illustrates the urgent need for this 
amendment. The article tells the story of two women from Fiji who 
thought they were going to lucrative jobs in Dubai, but ended up, 
quoting the article, unwitting recruits for the Pentagon's invisible 
army of more than 70,000 cooks, cleaners, construction workers, 
beauticians, et cetera, from the world's poorest countries who service 
U.S. military contracts in Iraq and Afghanistan.
  These two women were asked to deliver resumes, hand over passports, 
submit to medical tests, and they had to pay $500 to a recruiting firm. 
They were lured to Iraq under false pretenses and then told they would 
be making $700 a month. That was after they believed they were going to 
be making $3,800 a month, 10 times the normal salary in their home 
country.

                              {time}  1540

  What they didn't realize was that they were contracted to work 12 
hours a day, 7 days a week. They were also victims of sexual harassment 
and assault.
  After complaining, they were sent off base for making trouble and 
held for a month while their passports and ID badges were confiscated 
by the subcontracting company. The company that hired them was 
initially reprimanded but still operates in Fiji and still has a 
contract with the U.S. military.
  Meanwhile, allegations against Federal contractors engaged in 
commercial sex and labor exploitation continue.
  Mr. Chair, I yield to the gentlewoman from New York (Mrs. Maloney).
  Mrs. MALONEY. I rise in strong support of this amendment, which will 
prevent U.S. taxpayer dollars from being used to facilitate human 
trafficking and labor abuses on U.S. military bases.
  As cochair of the bipartisan Congressional Caucus on Human 
Trafficking, I am particularly concerned that workers from South Asia 
and Africa are being trafficked to work on U.S. military bases and that 
U.S. taxpayer dollars are spent to unlawfully lure and transport them 
to work in extreme conditions.
  It is Army policy to oppose all activities associated with human 
trafficking. This must include the supply chain that provides services 
to our servicemembers defending our country.
  We must have strong oversight over our contracting system to ensure 
that it is free from human rights abuses, and this amendment works 
toward that end.
  I urge my colleagues to join us in fighting human trafficking and 
support this amendment.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Will the gentlewoman yield?
  Ms. BASS of California. I yield to the gentleman from Florida.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. I would just like to advise the gentlewoman 
that I consider this an extremely important amendment and I am happy to 
accept it.
  Ms. BASS of California. Thank you.
  Mr. DICKS. Will the gentlewoman yield?
  Ms. BASS of California. I yield to the gentleman from Washington.
  Mr. DICKS. We will be glad to accept the amendment. We appreciate 
your hard work in this effort.
  Ms. BASS of California. I yield to the gentleman from Illinois (Mr. 
Davis).
  Mr. DAVIS of Illinois. I would like to thank the gentlemen for 
accepting the amendment.
  Mr. Chair, I rise today in support of the Bass-Maloney Amendment, 
which cuts funding to subcontractors in the U.S. Defense Department. 
This amendment would prevent funding from being used by subcontractors 
hired by the Defense Department who engage in unlawful activities of 
human trafficking and labor abuses on military bases.
  At a time where we are going across the board looking for all the 
budget cuts we can find to help reduce the national debt, it only makes 
sense to eliminate funding to these nefarious individuals who are 
performing atrocious acts on our military soil and are not representing 
what this great country stands for. We as Americans cannot fund human 
trafficking nor can we allow labor abuse; these abuses are not what 
this country stands for and it's our job as lawmakers to do everything 
in our power to put an end to such crimes.
  We can send a loud message with this amendment that the United States 
does not stand for such horrible crimes. So I join my

[[Page H4710]]

colleagues in support of the Bass-Maloney Amendment to H.R. 2219.
  Ms. BASS of California. I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from California (Ms. Bass).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                    Amendment Offered by Mr. Runyan

  Mr. RUNYAN. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), insert the 
     following:
       Sec. __.  None of the funds in this Act may be used to 
     procure air transportation from a commercial air carrier for 
     a member of the Armed Forces who is traveling under orders to 
     deploy to or return from an overseas contingency operation 
     under terms that allow the carrier to charge the member fees 
     for checked baggage other than for bags weighing more than 80 
     pounds or bags in excess of four per individual.

  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from New Jersey is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. RUNYAN. I thank my colleague from New York (Mr. Grimm) for his 
support on this amendment.
  Mr. Chairman, I rise today in support of the Runyan-Grimm amendment 
which seeks excess baggage fees being charged to servicemembers 
deploying or returning from an overseas contingency operation.
  This issue was brought to light early in June when a group of Army 
Reservists traveling back from Afghanistan were charged $200 each for 
checking a fourth bag, some of which contained U.S. Government 
equipment like an M4 rifle, a grenade launcher, and a 9-millimeter 
pistol. The soldiers posted a YouTube video, titled, ``Delta Airlines 
Welcomes Soldiers Home,'' expressing their frustrations for what they 
had experienced.
  After serving our country in theater and enduring an 18-hour layover 
on their trip home, the warm welcome this group received was a $2,800 
out-of-pocket expense. This is an unacceptable slap in the face, 
whether it was intentional or not. Applying these charges to those 
headed to or returning from the fight is an insult to them and their 
service to our Nation.
  My amendment would make none of the funds available by this act to be 
used to pay any commercial air carrier if that airline charges excess 
baggage fees for the first four pieces of checked luggage that are 80 
pounds or less per servicemember. This amendment is a reasonable 
compromise, whose primary purpose is taking care of our warfighters 
while not allowing the system to be abused.
  Our soldiers, sailors, airmen, and marines risk their lives to 
protect the freedoms we all enjoy. They take great personal sacrifices 
to defend our country. There is no doubt they should be provided with 
any reasonable accommodations while traveling on orders to or from 
theater of operations. Most importantly, they should not have to endure 
personal financial hardship as a result of traveling to and from 
overseas contingency operations. $200 is a large amount of money to pay 
out of pocket, especially for those who are enlisted.
  It shouldn't take a YouTube video and bad publicity to convince any 
of us to do the right thing. With this amendment, we are sending a very 
strong message that our warfighters are individuals who are serving our 
country and not for an addition to a profit margin.
  The amendment is endorsed by the VFW and the National Guard 
Association of the United States. I hope all my colleagues will stand 
with me in support of our soldiers, sailors, airmen, and marines by 
voting in favor of this amendment.

                                        National Guard Association


                                   of the United States, Inc.,

                                    Washington, DC., July 7, 2011.
     Hon. John Runyan,
     House of Representatives, Longworth Office Building, 
         Washington, DC.
       Dear Representative Runyan: We are writing to express our 
     strong support for your recently proposed amendment to H.R. 
     2219, the FY12 Defense Appropriations bill to target and deny 
     funds to commercial airlines who would charge excess baggage 
     fees to servicemembers deploying and returning from overseas 
     contingency operations. The National Guard Association of the 
     United States represents over 45,000 members of the National 
     Guard, their families and employers.
       NGAUS believes in the fair treatment of our servicemembers, 
     including our Guard and Reserve, when they deploy and return 
     from overseas operations. The incident this past June where 
     soldiers were charged excess baggage fees for equipment by an 
     airline was outrageous. This amendment would appropriately 
     target the program airlines participate in for supporting 
     additional airlift capability for troops/baggage and 
     equipment while denying funds made available in the bill to 
     those airlines who violate tile program and charge baggage 
     fees for the first four pieces of baggage (not exceeding 80 
     lbs and not including any carry-on baggage).
       The National Guard Association of the United States 
     strongly supports your efforts to correct unfair treatment by 
     airlines in regards to our members of the National Guard and 
     our Armed Forces deploying or coming home from overseas 
     contingency operations.
           Sincerely,

                                                  Gus Hargett,

                                         Major General, USA (Ret),
                                                 President, NGAUS.

  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Mr. Chairman, I rise to thank the gentleman for 
the hard work that he has done on this amendment. I associate myself 
with his comments because I strongly agree with everything that he 
said, and I am happy to accept the amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from New Jersey (Mr. Runyan).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                 Amendment No. 8 Offered by Mr. Sherman

  Mr. SHERMAN. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The Clerk designated the amendment.
  Mr. SHERMAN. I ask that the Clerk read the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the Clerk will report the 
amendment.
  There was no objection.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       At the end of the bill, before the short title, insert the 
     following:
       Sec. __.  None of the funds made available by this Act may 
     be used in contravention of the War Powers Resolution (50 
     U.S.C. 1541 et seq.).

  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from California is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. SHERMAN. I had the Clerk read the amendment to show how short and 
how simple it is. It simply says that none of the money appropriated in 
this bill can be used to violate the War Powers Resolution, which is 
the law of the land found in title 50.
  The War Powers Resolution simply states that a President may not 
deploy our troops into hostilities or our military forces into 
hostilities for more than 60 days if the President does not have 
congressional authorization. In the absence of such authorization, the 
President has 30 days to withdraw.
  This is the exact same amendment that we considered 3 weeks ago on 
the MilCon appropriations bill. At that time it got the support of 60 
percent of the Republicans and 61 percent of the Democrats, and I hope 
that those who voted for the bill or the amendment 3 weeks ago would 
vote the same way today. I hope to be able to persuade a few who voted 
the other way last time.
  This amendment is important, even if we weren't engaged in Libya at 
all, because for the last several administrations, Presidents have been 
captured by the siren song of extremist lawyers who are part of the 
permanent executive branch. They tell the President that the President 
of the United States, acting alone, can deploy our troops into 
hostilities for unlimited duration, for any purpose, and, in any 
quantity, any assets can be deployed.

                              {time}  1550

  We are told that there are no limits on the President's power as 
Commander in Chief. Well, the War Powers Act says otherwise, and it is 
the law of the land. Now these extremist attorneys in the executive 
branch have gone a little further. They have added insult to injury by 
floating the idea that a resolution by NATO, the Arab League, or the 
United Nations can substitute for an authorization from both Houses of 
Congress, or they have said that briefing the leadership of Congress is 
a substitute for enacting an authorization. But even the most extremist 
attorneys in the executive branch admit we have the power of the purse, 
and we can prevent the funds provided by this appropriations bill from 
being used to violate the War Powers Act.

[[Page H4711]]

  If we were to do otherwise, we would be abdicating our own 
responsibility, for if Congress habitually appropriates funds knowing 
that they will be used to violate the law of the land, then we would be 
complicit in undermining democracy and the rule of law here in the 
United States.
  Now we on this side admire the President of the United States. But 
even if you would grant this President unlimited power to deploy 
unlimited forces for unlimited duration, if you ignore the War Powers 
Act today, you are granting that power to the next President. And those 
of us who are in good health will all live to see a President that we 
disagree with. And even if you agree with exactly what's happening in 
Libya, it is important that we draw a line and say that the conduct of 
our foreign policy must be consistent with U.S. law.
  Now as a practical matter, this President has taken the extreme 
position that we are not engaged in hostilities in Libya. So what will 
be the practical effect of this amendment? First, I think he will 
reconsider that decision, because I think the lawyers behind it took 
refuge in the belief that the War Powers Act was somehow not binding on 
the administration. With this amendment, the War Powers Act is binding 
because we do have the constitutional right to limit the use of funds.
  Furthermore, at a minimum, this amendment would prevent the President 
from deploying regular ground forces to Libya. Now I realize he doesn't 
intend to do that at this time. But, clearly, this President could not 
claim that armored divisions deployed in a war zone were not engaged in 
hostilities. So the minimum practical effect of this amendment is to 
limit Presidential power to what is going on now and not to introducing 
major combat operations.
  Now, I support a limited effort to bring democracy and the rule of 
law to the people of Libya. That's not what this amendment is about. 
This amendment is about democracy and the rule of law here in the 
United States. I think that if we pass this amendment, and if we can 
get the Senate to do likewise, that the President will come to Congress 
and seek an authorization for what is going on in Libya. And at that 
time, Congress will be able to influence our policy. I think we would 
insist on a legal limitation to limit our efforts to just air forces 
and perhaps ground rescue operations. I believe that we would insist 
that we have the right to review that policy every 3 or 6 months. I 
believe that we would insist that the $33 billion of Qadhafi assets 
which have been frozen by the U.S. Treasury be used to finance this 
operation, instead of American taxpayer dollars. And I believe that we 
would insist that the rebels in Benghazi disassociate themselves from 
the al Qaeda operatives in their midst and from the Libyan Islamic 
Fighting Group.
  But we can't insist on anything if we accept the view of extremist 
attorneys in the executive branch who view Congress as merely an 
advisory body. A review of the law and a review of the Constitution 
indicates that Congress has and should not be derelict in exercising a 
role in forming American foreign policy.
  The Acting CHAIR. The time of the gentleman has expired.
  Mr. DICKS. I rise in opposition to the gentleman's amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Washington is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. DICKS. The amendment prohibits the use of funds in this bill to 
breach the War Powers Act. However, the proponents hope this language 
will compel the administration to change our response to the crisis in 
Libya.
  I oppose the amendment on two different grounds. First, the language 
of the amendment cannot possibly deliver what the proponents claim. 
Second, what the proponents hope to accomplish would harm the efforts 
of our allies, working against our national interests and benefiting 
Qadhafi.
  The language can't deliver on the proponents' promises for two 
reasons. First, the amendment restricts the use of funds in this bill, 
but none of the $118.7 billion in the overseas contingency portion of 
the bill are designated for Libya. Second, the language merely requires 
compliance with the War Powers Act, but the heart of the proponents' 
difference with the President is a matter of interpretation about what 
constitutes compliance. The amendment takes us no closer to a 
resolution of that difference.
  I would oppose the amendment even if the language could accomplish 
what the proponents hope for. To further restrict our role in Libya 
puts us on the wrong side of history and on the wrong side of the Arab 
Spring. It would hinder the efforts of our allies, if not making NATO's 
mission impossible and prolonging Qadhafi's tenuous hold on power.
  To address the matter of Libya, I believe that language--similar to 
the language introduced in the other body by Senators Kerry and McCain, 
is the appropriate course of action at this time--this language 
preserves the understanding between the administration and Congress 
that U.S. ground forces are not appropriate at this time, and it 
requires regular and detailed reports from the administration to the 
Congress.
  Now I must say that I, too, agree that the President would always be 
better served, as President Bush did and President Clinton, to come to 
Congress to get approval of the authorization. But to unilaterally 
overturn an effort that includes NATO, the Arab League, and the United 
Nations saying that this horrific act would take place against the 
people of Libya, is just, I think, a big mistake, and it would 
undermine U.S. foreign policy that's been consistent since 1949 when 
NATO was established. So I urge a ``no'' vote on this amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from California (Mr. Sherman).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. SHERMAN. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from California 
will be postponed.


                  Amendment Offered by Mr. Rohrabacher

  Mr. ROHRABACHER. Mr. Chairman, I offer an amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), add the 
     following:
       Sec. __. None of the funds made available by this Act may 
     be used to provide assistance to Pakistan.

  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from California is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. ROHRABACHER. Mr. Chairman, I rise in support of my amendment, 
which states, as you have just heard, no funds in this bill may go to 
Pakistan.
  Pakistan is a country on which we have spent billions and billions of 
dollars. We've given them $18 billion just since 9/11--not to mention 
the many billions of dollars we gave to them during the Cold War. What 
has all that spending achieved for the people of the United States? 
Pakistan is now the best friend to America's worst enemies: radical 
Islam and, yes, an emerging and belligerent China. Wake up, America.
  Was anyone really surprised to find Osama bin Laden was living in a 
luxurious mansion in plain view in a military-dominated Pakistani city? 
Let me admit that even I was surprised that the Pakistani Government 
was so bold, so open in its contempt of the people of the United 
States, as to arrest five of its citizens for helping us bring to 
justice Osama bin Laden, that terrorist radical fiend whose leadership 
led to the slaughter of 3,000 Americans on 9/11.
  The Pakistan Intelligence Service, the ISI, is today, as it always 
has been, a friend of radical Islam and an enemy of Western democracy. 
With American acquiescence and Saudi financing, the Pakistani 
Government--read that the ISI--the Pakistani Government created the 
Taliban as Islamabad's vanguard for the conquest of Afghanistan. In the 
process, they set in place a fundamentalist anti-Western radical 
Islamic terrorist state.
  Let's note that even after 9/11, after 3,000 of our citizens had been 
slaughtered, the ISI continued to covertly support radical Islamic 
terrorists, and they are still engaged in such hostile

[[Page H4712]]

acts, even as American lives are being lost even today.

                              {time}  1600

  In 2010, the London School of Economics published a report that found 
agents of the ISI--this is 2010, long after 9/11--were ``funding and 
training the Afghan Taliban.'' And to top things off, there is 
substantial reporting that has been done that suggests that Pakistani 
diplomats are lobbying the Afghan Government leaders, suggesting that 
they dump the United States and turn to China for a partnership and 
reconstruction.
  This isn't shame on them; this is shame on us. Washington may be able 
to coerce and bribe Islamabad into doing us a favor now and then, but 
it is time to face reality. The goals and values of the United States 
and Pakistan are fundamentally at odds. Wake up, America. This bill 
would provide for another $1 billion to Pakistan. The Pakistani 
Government and Pakistan, they are not our friends. Why are we borrowing 
money from China to give to a government that has betrayed us time and 
time again?
  Therefore, I urge adoption of my amendment to eliminate any funding 
in this appropriations bill from going to Pakistan.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. DICKS. Mr. Chairman, I rise in opposition to the gentleman's 
amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR (Mr. Hastings of Washington). The gentleman is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. DICKS. The bill includes approximately $2.4 billion to support 
the Pakistani military. Of this amount, $1.1 billion is for the 
Pakistan Counterinsurgency Fund, and approximately $1.3 billion is 
provided through Coalition Support Funds.
  The Pakistan Counterinsurgency Fund provides for the training and 
equipping of Pakistani forces specifically to aid U.S. counterterrorism 
objectives. Coalition Support Funds are used to reimburse the Pakistani 
military for operations which generally support U.S. counterterrorism 
objectives.
  In the wake of Osama bin Laden's killing by U.S. Special Forces, 
serious questions have arisen about Pakistan's reliability as a 
strategic partner, and I agree with the gentleman from California that 
this has raised serious questions here in the United States about the 
reliability of one of our partners. And also, there are questions about 
President Karzai in Afghanistan as well.
  Now, the relationship with Pakistan has always been difficult. It 
reminds me a great deal, during World War II, of our relationship with 
the Soviet Union, Russia. That was a difficult relationship, but it was 
essential at that time. And it is essential at this point. This 
relationship has helped the U.S. make progress against terrorism, and 
the Pakistanis have allocated a significant part of their forces within 
their own borders to this mission, which we need to do more of on the 
federally administered tribal areas and in Quetta, where the Afghan 
Taliban leadership exists. And we need them to let us bring our Special 
Forces into Pakistan.
  Now, a complete withdrawal of U.S. assistance would likely polarize 
Pakistan and exacerbate significant pro- and anti-American rifts within 
their military and their government generally. Aggravating this divide 
would be counterproductive to U.S. objectives in the region.
  In addition to the counterterrorism activity, the fact of Pakistan's 
nuclear weapons capabilities provides ample reason for the United 
States to continue positive engagement, so I urge my colleagues to 
reject this amendment.
  Mr. ROHRABACHER. Will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. DICKS. I yield to the gentleman from California.
  Mr. ROHRABACHER. Is any of the money that we have in this bill going 
to end up financing the ISI? Will any of that money end up in the hands 
of the ISI?
  Mr. DICKS. I cannot say for certain. I don't think there is anything 
in this bill that I know of, any provision that provides funding 
directly to the ISI. Now, there may be. As the gentleman knows, there 
are other avenues in the intelligence world. But I don't know of 
anything specifically in this bill. And the ISI, I have just as much 
trouble with them as you do. But I don't think that we have anything 
specifically in the bill that funds them.
  Mr. ROHRABACHER. Is there any language in the bill that would prevent 
the money in this bill from going to the ISI?
  Mr. DICKS. No, I don't think there is any prohibition in this bill.
  Mr. ROHRABACHER. All right. Thank you very much.
  Mr. DICKS. Thank you.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from California (Mr. Rohrabacher).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. ROHRABACHER. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from California 
will be postponed.


                  Amendment No. 61 Offered by Ms. Foxx

  Mr. BISHOP of Utah. Mr. Chairman, I ask unanimous consent that the 
voice vote by which amendment No. 61 offered by the gentlewoman from 
North Carolina (Ms. Foxx) was adopted be vacated to the end that the 
Chair put the question de novo.
  The Acting CHAIR. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman 
from Utah?
  If not, the earlier voice vote is vacated.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment.
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. DICKS. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from North 
Carolina will be postponed.
  Mr. BISHOP of Utah. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. BISHOP of Utah. I would ask the subcommittee chairman, Mr. Young, 
if he would enter into a colloquy regarding the Minuteman III Warm Line 
Solid Rocket Motor Sustainment program.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. If the gentleman would yield, I would be very 
happy to enter into a colloquy with the gentleman from Utah.
  Mr. BISHOP of Utah. As the chairman is aware, the Air Force has 
proposed to terminate the Minuteman III Warm Line Solid Rocket Motor 
Sustainment program beginning in FY 2012. The Air Force has not 
presented this committee a viable plan to sustain this strategic weapon 
system beyond the year 2020 as these motors age out, and the program of 
record now requires the system to be deployed until 2030, which does 
leave a 10-year gap of vulnerability with no Minuteman III-specific 
industrial base to support this weapon system.
  Would the chairman agree that it is vitally important that the Air 
Force undertake what is called a smart closeout of this program to 
include taking definite steps to preserve the essential tools, the 
uniquely skilled workforce, suppliers, equipment, and production 
facilities needed to continue to produce and support the readiness of 
Minuteman III motors through their current operational life cycle 
through at least 2030?
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. I thank the gentleman from Utah for bringing 
this matter to our attention, and we do share his concern for the solid 
rocket motor industrial base.
  We understand that the Air Force is considering their options, and we 
certainly intend that they use closeout funding from the Minuteman III 
mod line in a wise manner. We believe that they should seriously 
consider a smart closeout, as the gentleman from Utah described, and 
should also consider incorporating the essential elements from the 
Minuteman III production line into existing production lines for other 
defense solid rocket booster programs in order to preserve both 
military capabilities and to ensure the best use of taxpayer funds.

[[Page H4713]]

  Mr. BISHOP of Utah. Reclaiming my time, Mr. Chairman, do you also 
agree that all funds provided for Minuteman III modification in this 
bill may only be used to support the current Minuteman III system and 
that no funds have been either requested in the President's budget 
request or provided by this committee to begin a new start program for 
a future, currently unauthorized Minuteman III follow-on capability?
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. I would respond that the purpose of the funding 
that we have provided for the Missile Modifications program is to 
support the operational capability of the Minuteman through 2030. This 
includes $34 million, as requested, for closeout of the warm line 
program. Development of any follow-on capability is still years away. 
And the gentleman is correct, a new start system would require 
authorization and appropriation by the Congress, which the Air Force 
has not requested and we have not provided. We intend that warm line 
funds be used in a manner that preserves the industrial base and does 
not diminish our future strategic capabilities.
  I commend the gentleman for his leadership in this area and look 
forward to working with him further on this issue.

                              {time}  1610

  Mr. BISHOP of Utah. Reclaiming my time, I thank the chairman for his 
kindness and his answers.
  Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.


                    Amendment Offered by Mr. Gohmert

  Mr. GOHMERT. I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), add the 
     following:
       Sec. __.  None of the funds made available by this Act may 
     be obligated, expended, or used in any manner to support 
     military operations, including NATO or United Nations 
     operations, in Libya or in Libya's airspace.

  Mr. DICKS. Mr. Chairman, I reserve a point of order on the 
gentleman's amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. A point of order is reserved.
  The gentleman from Texas is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. GOHMERT. Mr. Chairman, we have had a couple of amendments we've 
already voted on. In reviewing whether or not to withdraw my amendment, 
my concern comes on the review of Mr. Cole of Oklahoma, my dear friend, 
and the amendment that passed that he provided. His amendment says that 
none of the funds in the act may be used for supporting military 
activities of any group or individual not part of a country's Armed 
Forces. So it still could be used to supplement another country's Armed 
Forces through NATO or through the U.N.
  We have here a case where people on both sides recognize that the 
President moved forward and put our military in harm's way to go after 
a man who until March 1 was recognized by the United Nations as being a 
leader in human rights. In fact, it had elected him in 2003 to be the 
chairman of the Human Rights Commission of the U.N. We also know from 
our office's inquiry of our own military that we comprise 65 percent of 
NATO's military. So it is not comforting to think that this President 
has already gone beyond seizing on loopholes and is just ignoring laws 
in order to do what he wants because the Arab League asked him--not 
Congress, not the population of the United States, but the Arab League 
and some in NATO.
  It has not been established--and there are no indications it will be 
established--that the people who are going to replace Qadhafi will be 
better for us, for our national security or for our allies like Israel. 
So, if it's not good for this country's national security and if it's 
true as to what the gentleman Secretary Gates said, to whom the 
President recently awarded a Medal of Honor, that we have no national 
security interests in Libya, then we should not be committing our 
military in that direction.
  Even though the U.N. may support action in Libya and even though they 
may buy into this Arab Spring, we are already seeing that Iran is 
excited because it looks like they're going to get additional puppets. 
We found out this week that the leader of Iraq, Maliki, is giving in to 
the request of the leader of Iran and is going against his promise to 
us and to the people of Camp Ashraf that they'll be safe and secure. 
Now he's saying he's going to disband the camp.
  It is time to put America's national security and national interests 
first and not some whim of some President because someone outside the 
U.S. asked him. We know the Muslim Brotherhood, despite what some say, 
has been supporting terrorism. The evidence was clear in the Holy Land 
Foundation trial. We know that this administration has bent over 
backwards to appease such folks, so it is time for an amendment to make 
very clear, which this one does:
  Mr. President, it doesn't matter whether you're going to try to use 
our military through NATO, our military through the U.N., our military 
head-up for a reconnaissance rescue. It doesn't matter. You're not 
going to use them.
  For those who argue the War Powers is constitutional or is 
unconstitutional, I would humbly submit it does not matter. Even though 
the War Powers Act was passed as a curb against the President at the 
time, it is actually a gift to a President. This body has the power of 
the purse to cut off funding at any time it so desires, and the War 
Powers gave him a gift that said, Look, we'll give you days and days 
and days to come make your case before we cut you off.
  That's a gift.
  This President has shoved it back down our throats, and has said, I 
don't care what you think.
  It is time to use the constitutional powers of this body and say, 
``Enough.''
  In the hopes that people will vote for this amendment, I yield back 
the balance of my time.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. I find it a little difficult to listen to the 
arguments about the War Powers Act, because I agree with those 
arguments.
  First of all, in 1973, I think the Congress did give Presidents a 
gift of power not intended by the Constitution. The Constitution is 
very clear. It intends that war-making decisions would be made in 
conjunction with the Commander-in-Chief and the Congress, not the 
Commander-in-Chief by himself or herself and not the Congress alone, 
but while working together. That's not the way it has been happening 
lately. There hasn't been a real declaration of war under the 
Constitution since World War II, but we have fought in a lot of wars, 
and we have killed and wounded a lot of our kids.
  That's not the argument, though. I agree with all of those points. I 
think that Congress has a serious responsibility to review the War 
Powers Act and to make it what we think it ought to be, and that is a 
partner relationship between the Congress and the executive branch.
  Yet, while we hear these strong arguments about the War Powers Act 
and the separation of powers, these amendments don't really get the job 
done. If you want to cut off all funding for any activities in and 
around Libya, you would have to introduce a separate resolution that 
would simply say: No funds appropriated here or anywhere else can be 
used in the Libya operation.
  In this particular bill, there is no money for Libya, and the 
President has made it very clear that he is not going to use any funds 
from the fiscal year 2012 appropriation for Libya. We'll see if that 
changes, but we have that in writing. We're already there. We're 
already in the area. We're already flying missions. If this amendment 
should be agreed to, here is what we would not be able to do:
  We could not fly search and rescue missions for a downed pilot. We 
could not do ISR--Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance. We 
could not do aerial refueling for our coalition partners. We could not 
even be part of operational planning under this amendment.
  As much as I agree with what the gentleman is trying to accomplish, I 
can't support this amendment, because of the effect that it really has. 
If it could amend the War Powers Act and make the President be a 
partner with Congress, I'd say, Amen. Let's do it quickly. I think the 
Congress ought to do that, and I think we ought to be serious about 
doing that; but on this particular amendment, I've got to oppose

[[Page H4714]]

it because this is what we're dealing with, not the emotional 
discussions about the War Powers Act.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. DICKS. Mr. Chairman, I do not insist on my point of order.
  The Acting CHAIR. The reservation is withdrawn.
  Mr. DICKS. I rise in opposition to the gentleman's amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Washington is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. DICKS. The brutal regime of Muammar al Qadhafi has caused an 
international outcry, and the people of Libya have asked for our help. 
The NATO-led mission to defeat Qadhafi and protect the people of Libya 
was undertaken in concert with a broad coalition of nations, including 
the Arab League, and it followed resolutions adopted in the United 
Nations Security Council, authorizing ``all necessary measures.''

                              {time}  1620

  The amendment would end our involvement unilaterally. I believe this 
could materially harm our relationship with our NATO allies from whom 
we will undoubtedly require support in the future, and our NATO 
alliance has been a vital and successful part of U.S. foreign policy 
dating back to its formation in 1949.
  I do support a wider debate and greater oversight of the use and the 
cost of U.S. military forces engaged in the Libya operation, but I 
would point out that the administration did send up a detailed document 
that shows the money that has been spent thus far and what will be 
spent through the end of this fiscal year. We should let the mission 
with our NATO allies continue so we can replace Qadhafi and protect the 
Libyan people.
  I urge all my colleagues to vote ``no'' on this amendment. And I 
would just remind everyone that in 1986 President Reagan authorized a 
military strike following the bombings in Berlin and definitive proof 
of Qadhafi's involvement in other terrorist activities. At the time, 
President Reagan publicly denounced Qadhafi, the ``Mad Dog of the 
Middle East who espoused the goal of world revolution.''
  Mr. Chairman, I can only wonder what Ronald Reagan would say today 
about those who would propose immediate withdrawal of U.S. assistance 
to the broad coalition of nations attempting to finish the job that 
President Ronald Reagan started.
  Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Texas (Mr. Gohmert).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. GOHMERT. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Texas will 
be postponed.


                     Amendment Offered by Mr. Engel

  Mr. ENGEL. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), insert the 
     following:
       Sec. __.  None of the funds made available by this Act may 
     be used by the Department of Defense to lease or purchase new 
     light duty vehicles, for any executive fleet, or for an 
     agency's fleet inventory, except in accordance with 
     Presidential Memorandum-Federal Fleet Performance, dated May 
     24, 2011.

  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from New York is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. ENGEL. Mr. Chairman, on May 24, President Obama issued a 
Memorandum on Federal Fleet Performance, which requires all new light-
duty vehicles in the Federal fleet to be alternate fuel vehicles, such 
as hybrid, electric, natural gas, or biofuel, by December 31, 2015. My 
amendment echoes the Presidential memorandum by prohibiting funds in 
the Defense Appropriations bill from being used to lease or purchase 
new light-duty vehicles except in accord with the President's 
memorandum. I have introduced similar amendments to the Homeland 
Security Appropriations bill and the Agriculture Appropriations bill 
and intend to do it with other appropriations bills. Both were accepted 
by the majority and passed by voice vote.
  Our transportation sector is by far the biggest reason we send $600 
billion per year to hostile nations to pay for oil at ever-increasing 
costs, but America doesn't need to be dependent on foreign sources of 
oil for transportation fuel. Alternative technologies exist today that, 
when implemented broadly, will allow any alternative fuel to be used in 
America's automotive fleet.
  The Federal Government operates the largest fleet of light-duty 
vehicles in America. According to GSA, there are over 660,000 vehicles 
in the Federal fleet, with almost 197,000 being used by the Department 
of Defense. By supporting a diverse array of vehicle technologies in 
our Federal fleet, we will encourage development of domestic energy 
resources--including biomass, natural gas, coal, agricultural waste, 
hydrogen and renewable electricity. Expanding the role these energy 
sources play in our transportation economy will help break the leverage 
over Americans held by foreign government-controlled oil companies and 
will increase our Nation's domestic security and protect consumers from 
price spikes and shortages in the world oil markets.
  I ask my colleagues to support this amendment as both sides of the 
aisle have done in previous bills; and I want to mention on a similar 
note, I have worked in a bipartisan fashion with my colleagues, John 
Shimkus, Roscoe Bartlett and Steve Israel, to open the bipartisan Open 
Fuel Standard Act, H.R. 1687.
  Our bill would require 50 percent of new automobiles in 2014, 80 
percent in 2016, and 95 percent in 2017 to be warranted to operate on 
nonpetroleum fuels in addition to or instead of petroleum-based fuels. 
Compliance possibilities include the full array of existing 
technologies, including flex fuel, natural gas, hydrogen, biodiesel, 
plug-in electric drive and fuel cell, and a catch-all for new 
technologies. I mention it because it's similar to this, and I really 
believe that our energy policies obviously can only be done on a 
bipartisan basis.
  I encourage my colleagues to support this amendment, again as we've 
done on all the other bills where I have introduced it, and the Open 
Fuel Standard as we work toward breaking our dependence on foreign oil.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. I think the gentleman's amendment is a good 
amendment. I think we've seen this on other bills, and I am happy to 
accept the amendment.
  Mr. DICKS. Will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. I yield to the gentleman from Washington.
  Mr. DICKS. I appreciate the gentleman's willingness to accept the 
amendment, and I too think it's a good amendment and a good idea.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my 
time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from New York (Mr. Engel).
  The amendment was agreed to.


               Amendment No. 89 Offered by Mr. Neugebauer

  Mr. NEUGEBAUER. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), insert the 
     following:
       Sec. __.  None of the funds made available by this Act may 
     be used to reduce the number of B-1 aircraft of the Armed 
     Forces.

  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Texas is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. NEUGEBAUER. Mr. Chairman, I rise today in support of the B-1 
bomber.
  This is a very simple amendment. Basically, it just says it prevents 
any funds in this bill from being used to retire the B-1 bombers during 
the coming fiscal year.
  Currently, as you know, about 163 planes are in our bomber fleet, 
which is about 3 percent of our total fleet. Currently, we are going 
through an analysis of what our bomber fleet is going

[[Page H4715]]

to look like in the future, and part of that is from the START Treaty. 
What we feel is appropriate is for us to not look at reductions in the 
bomber fleet on a piecemeal basis, but to look at it as a total picture 
once we have done the analysis and seen how many of the planes will not 
be needed for nuclear capability moving forward.
  The B-1 is kind of an interesting plane. It doesn't get a lot of 
attention, but what it does is it works 24-7 and has in the theaters 
that we're involved in for a number of years. In fact, it has been our 
number one bomber of choice for a number of years and until recently 
was the only bomber seen in active duty.
  I am pleased to be supported in this effort by Congressman 
Thornberry, who is vice chairman of the Armed Services Committee, as 
well as my colleague, Mr. Conaway.
  At this time, I would like to yield to one of the cosponsors of this 
amendment, the gentlewoman from South Dakota (Mrs. Noem).
  Mrs. NOEM. I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  Mr. Chairman, I rise in strong support of this amendment that is 
offered by the gentleman from Texas.
  The B-1 bomber is the workhorse of our long-range bomber fleet and 
has been flying missions over Iraq and Afghanistan for nearly a decade. 
More importantly, the B-1 bomber from the 28th Bomb Wing at Ellsworth 
Air Force Base in my home State of South Dakota just carried out air 
strike operations in Libya. In just under 2 days, Ellsworth generated 
aircraft loaded with conventional weapons that were able to strike 
targets halfway across the world.
  Regardless of what one thinks about our involvement in Libya, one 
thing that one cannot dispute is the B-1's capability to respond 
globally and its vital importance to our bomber fleet. Mr. Chairman, 
with the next generation bomber development still a decade or more 
away, the administration's proposal to retire six B-1s is short sighted 
and it's premature. What's more, it can't be reversed. Retired planes 
aren't mothballed and put away for a period of time. They are sent to 
the bone yard and they are used for parts. Mr. Chairman, we propose 
that no B-1s be irreversibly retired this year because of questions 
regarding the future of our bomber force structure and the B-1's proven 
track record in theater as our workhorse.
  I urge my colleagues to vote for a strong bomber fleet, a strong 
national defense, and I ask them to support this amendment.
  Mr. NEUGEBAUER. I yield to the distinguished chairman.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  The gentlelady from South Dakota just made a speech that I was about 
to make, so I would just simply say it's a good amendment, and I accept 
it.
  Mr. NEUGEBAUER. I thank the chairman, and I urge our colleagues to 
support a strong national defense and making sure that we have the 
appropriate number of bombers, and to vote in favor of the Neugebauer 
amendment.
  Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.

                              {time}  1630

  Mr. DICKS. I move to strike the requisite number of words.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Washington is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. DICKS. I would just say to the gentleman that the B-2 bomber has 
been used also on several of these military operations that we've used, 
and the B-2 is a stealthy airplane. We only have 20. As a member of the 
committee, I offered the multiyear purchase agreement so we could buy 
the B-1s. And we had a unanimous vote, I think, in our committee on 
that. It was very bipartisan.
  I agree with the gentleman that we don't have enough bombers. That's 
why I'm so strongly committed to the next-generation bomber. But as has 
been pointed out, that's going to be several years away. We tried to 
add some money this year to accelerate that because we do need a 
follow-on bomber.
  Mr. NEUGEBAUER. Would the gentleman yield?
  Mr. DICKS. Yes, I yield.
  Mr. NEUGEBAUER. I agree with the gentleman. And I think that our 
bomber fleet is extremely important, the B-1, the B-2, and obviously 
the B-52s. And as the gentleman knows, as we do not have a replacement 
bomber in the works at this particular point in time and until such 
time as we develop that, I think it's extremely important that we be 
strategic about what level we maintain our current fleet until we know 
what the replacement is going to be. And I agree with the gentleman.
  Mr. DICKS. Reclaiming my time, we only have 20 stealthy bombers. 
That's what some people don't understand. And the ability to penetrate 
China or the Soviet Union or wherever we might have to penetrate at 
some point, North Korea, we would be vulnerable with the B-52s and the 
B-1s to surface-to-air missiles.
  So making sure that we get a high-quality stealthy airplane to follow 
the B-2 is a matter of national importance. I support the amendment.
  I yield back my time.
  Mr. CONAWAY. Mr. Chair, I rise today to speak in support of the B-1 
bomber fleet. To echo what my colleague, Mr. Neugebauer has said, I too 
believe that we should carefully examine the way we modify our bomber 
fleet for the future.
  As part of the New Start Treaty, the U.S. and Russia will limit their 
nuclear capable delivery vehicles to a total of 700 deployed assets, 
including heavy bombers. At this time, we do not yet know what those 
cuts will look like. Preserving the size of our non-nuclear bomber 
fleet until we know the results of the New Start Treaty analysis is 
simply good policy.
  My colleagues on the Armed Services Committee and I are very 
concerned that if we go down this path and prematurely reduce a portion 
of the fleet, that we will regret that decision.
  Mr. Chair, I recognize that cuts need to be made. Every aspect of the 
budget needs to be thoroughly reviewed, but let's not make bad 
budgetary decisions without considering our mission capabilities first.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Texas (Mr. Neugebauer).
  The amendment was agreed to.
  Mrs. NAPOLITANO. I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentlewoman from California is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mrs. NAPOLITANO. Mr. Chairman, today I rise to address the ranking 
member of the House Appropriation's Committee on Defense, Mr. Dicks, 
and also the chair in a colloquy on the critical need to improve the 
recruitment, retention, and competitive compensation of the mental 
health professionals who can work with our Iraq and Afghanistan 
military servicemen and -women.
  Since 2001, 2,103 military members have died by suicide. And one in 
five servicemembers currently suffer from post-traumatic stress and/or 
major depression. We must ensure that an adequate number of mental 
health professionals are available to treat our soldiers.
  Mental health professionals must be retained by providing adequate 
pay and competitive benefits that are also available in the private 
sector. It is our duty and responsibility to our wounded warriors that 
we ensure their mental health services are secure and available when 
and where needed.
  I am submitting for the Record an article from the Army Times dated 
April 7, 2011, regarding the Senate Appropriations Committee Defense 
Subcommittee meeting of April 6 and quoting Army Surgeon General 
Lieutenant General Schoomaker, who stressed the severe lack of mental 
health professionals in the military, and his concern about retention, 
especially in the rural areas. The article states, ``Congress has been 
pressing the military health system to add more psychiatric doctors, 
nurses and social workers for several years. That has prompted the 
services to add about 1,500 full-time mental health professionals since 
2006--a 70 percent increase.''
  The article further says, ``But demand has continued to outpace that 
growth. Active-duty troops and their families were referred to off-base 
civilian mental health care professionals nearly 4 million times in 
2009, roughly double the number of off-base referrals in 2006, military 
data show.
  ``The dramatic increase in military suicides during the past several 
years has added urgency to congressional concerns. At the April 6 
hearing, all three military surgeons general told lawmakers about 
efforts to improve training, recruiting and retention of mental health 
professionals.''

[[Page H4716]]

  Senator Mikulski has suggested military training may be uniquely 
important because some civilian doctors and social workers have trouble 
understanding the troops' problems and mindset.
  I am also submitting for the Record a witness statement of July 14, 
2011, from the Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations of the 
Committee on Veterans Affairs, where the Deputy Director of Veterans 
Affairs and Rehabilitation Division, Jacob Gadd, expressed the 
challenges of hiring and retaining quality mental health specialists. 
Our servicemembers should not have to wait one more day for the help 
they deserve.
  As cochair of the Congressional Mental Health Care Caucus, I have met 
with many key military leaders to learn what the most critical issues 
are in addressing mental health services for our military men and 
women. I've repeatedly been informed that there have been woefully 
inadequate numbers of mental health professionals available to care for 
our men and women.
  Congress has a responsibility to see that our soldiers and veterans 
have the resources for quality care. Because this quality of care is 
dependent on the quantity of behavioral health specialists trained in 
war, PTS, we must successfully recruit and retain to work with our men 
and women who fight to ensure our precious daily freedoms.
  The legislation before you today provides $32.3 billion for the 
defense health program and military family programs, with $125 million 
of this going towards research of traumatic brain injury and 
psychological health treatment, hopefully to also include hyperbaric 
treatment research.
  We must insist on accountability that adequately trained behavioral 
health professionals are on hand when and where needed. I would like to 
work with the ranking member to obtain from the Department of Defense a 
detailed outline on their efforts for each military service--Army, Air 
Force, Navy, Marines, et cetera--to recruit, retain, and formulate the 
competitive salaries and benefits that will keep behavioral health 
specialists serving our men and women who have given so much to protect 
our freedoms.
  We place them in harm's way. It is our duty and obligation to ensure 
the best care is given to them.
  I yield to the ranking member.
  Mr. DICKS. I will work with the gentlelady on the Defense 
Department's plan to ensure adequate mental health services for our 
servicemembers.
  The Acting CHAIR. The time of the gentlewoman has expired.
  (On request of Mr. Dicks, and by unanimous consent, Mrs. Napolitano 
was allowed to proceed for 1 additional minute.)
  Mr. DICKS. Will the gentlelady continue to yield?
  Mrs. NAPOLITANO. I yield to the gentleman.
  Mr. DICKS. I would point out that the chairman of this committee, Mr. 
Young, and his wife, Beverly, have been some of the strongest advocates 
for our Wounded Warriors and he has led the fight in our committee to 
increase the funding for traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic 
stress disorder. So our committee has been very committed to this. It 
is one of our highest priorities.
  Mrs. NAPOLITANO. I thank Mr. Dicks, the ranking member, for working 
with me on this critical issue and look forward to working soon enough 
on this.

                             [Apr. 7, 2011]

             Panel Questions Adequacy of Mental Health Care

                          (By Andrew Tilghman)

       The military's top doctors faced heated questions on 
     Capitol Hill about whether there are enough mental health 
     professionals to meet the soaring demand from troubled 
     troops.
       ``Do you feel you have adequate mental health personnel?'' 
     asked Sen. Barbara Mikulski, D-Md., at an April 6 hearing of 
     the Senate Appropriations Committee's defense panel.
       Lt. Gen. Eric Schoomaker, the Army surgeon general, 
     acknowledged that the military would prefer to have more, but 
     cited an overall lack of mental health professionals 
     nationwide as a key challenge. ``I think the nation is facing 
     problems. As a microcosm of the nation, we have problems,'' 
     Schoomaker said.
       Congress has been pressing the military health system to 
     add more psychiatric doctors, nurses and social workers for 
     several years. That has prompted the services to add about 
     1,500 full-time mental health professionals since 2006--a 70 
     percent increase.
       But demand has continued to outpace that growth. Active-
     duty troops and their families were referred to off-base 
     civilian mental health care professionals nearly 4 million 
     times in 2009, roughly double the number of off-base 
     referrals in 2006, military data show.
       The dramatic increase in military suicides during the past 
     several years has added urgency to congressional concerns. At 
     the April 6 hearing, all three military surgeons general told 
     lawmakers about efforts to improve training, recruiting and 
     retention of mental health professionals.
       Mikulski suggested military training may be uniquely 
     important because some civilian doctors and social workers 
     have trouble understanding troops' problems and mindset.
       ``From what I understand . . . often in the first hour of 
     the first treatment, the military [patients] facing this 
     problem walk out and tell the counselor, essentially, to go 
     to hell because they don't feel they get it,'' she said.
       Schoomaker downplayed issues with nonmilitary 
     professionals.
       ``Frankly, I think . . . this warrior culture issue might 
     be present in some cases but not universally. Our people do a 
     good job with that,'' he said.
       Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., was concerned about reservists 
     who may not live near a military treatment facility and may 
     have problems finding mental health care. Schoomaker agreed 
     that reservists can face a significant challenge.
       ``We have residual problems . . . in reserve communities. 
     You go home to a community where access to care is a problem 
     for all care, but especially behavioral health,'' Schoomaker 
     said.
       That's also a problem for some active-duty posts in rural 
     areas. ``In the desert of California, for example, it's hard 
     to recruit and retain high-quality people,'' he said.
                                  ____


   Statement of Jacob B. Gadd, Deputy Director, Veterans Affairs and 
 Rehabilitation Division, The American Legion, to the Subcommittee on 
 Oversight and Investigations, Committee on Veterans' Affairs, United 
States House of Representatives, on ``Examining the Progress of Suicide 
    Prevention Outreach Efforts at the U.S. Department of Veterans 
                        Affairs'', July 14, 2010

       Mr. Chairman and Members of the Subcommittee:
       Thank you for this opportunity to submit The American 
     Legion's views on progress of the Suicide Prevention efforts 
     at the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to the 
     Subcommittee today. The American Legion commends the 
     Subcommittee for holding a hearing today to discuss this 
     timely and important issue.
       Suicide among service members and veterans has always been 
     a concern; it is the position of The American Legion that one 
     suicide is one too many. However, since the war in Iraq and 
     Afghanistan began, the numbers of service members and 
     veterans who have committed suicide have steadily increased. 
     As our service members are deployed across the world to 
     protect and defend our freedoms, we as a nation cannot allow 
     them to not receive the care and treatment they need when 
     they return home. The tragic and ultimate result of failing 
     to take care of our nation's heroes' mental health illnesses 
     is suicide.
       Turning first to VA's efforts in recent years with Mental 
     Health Care, The American Legion has consistently lobbied for 
     budgetary increases and program improvements to VA's Mental 
     Health Programs. Despite recent unprecedented increases in 
     the VA budget, demand for VA Mental Health services is still 
     outpacing the resources and staff available as the number of 
     service members and veterans afflicted with Post Traumatic 
     Stress (PTS) and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) continues to 
     grow, this naturally leads to VA's increase in mental health 
     patients.
       In 2008, RAND's Center for Military Health Policy Research, 
     an independent, nonprofit group, released a report on the 
     psychological and cognitive needs of all servicemembers 
     deployed in the past six years, titled, ``Invisible Wounds of 
     War: Psychological and Cognitive Injuries, Their 
     Consequences, and Services to Assist Recovery,'' which 
     estimated that more than 300,000 (20 percent of the 1.6 
     million) Iraq and Afghanistan veterans are suffering from PTS 
     or major depression and about 320,000 may have experienced 
     TBI during deployment.
       The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates 
     30,000-32,000 U.S. deaths from suicide per year among the 
     population. VA's Office of Patient Care and Mental Health 
     Services reported in April 2010 that approximately 20 percent 
     of national suicides are veterans. The National Violent Death 
     Reporting System reports 18 deaths per day by veterans and 
     VA's Serious Mental Illness Treatment, Research and 
     Evaluation Center reported about five deaths occur each day 
     among VA patients. In a recent AP article, it was cited that 
     there have been more suicides than service members killed in 
     Afghanistan.
       The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) has made 
     improvements in recent years for Mental Health and transition 
     between DoD and VA such as the Federal Recovery Coordinators, 
     Polytrauma Rehabilitation System of Care, Operation Enduring 
     Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom

[[Page H4717]]

     (OIF) case management teams, integrating mental health care 
     providers into primary care within VA Medical Center 
     Facilities and Community Based Outpatient Clinics (CBOCs), VA 
     Readjustment (Vet) Centers hiring of Global War on Terrorism 
     (GWOT) Counselors, establishing directives for TBI screening, 
     clinical reminders and a new symptom and diagnostic code for 
     TBI.
       Regarding suicide prevention outreach efforts, VA founded 
     the National Suicide Prevention Hotline, 1-800-273-TALK 
     (8255) by collaborating with the National Suicide Prevention 
     Lifeline where veterans are assisted by a dedicated call 
     center at Canandaigua VA Medical Center in New York. The call 
     center is staffed with trained VA crisis health care 
     professionals to respond to calls on a 24/7 basis and 
     facilitate appropriate treatment. VA reported in 2010 a total 
     of 245,665 calls, 128,302 of which were identified as 
     veterans. Of these veterans, 7,720 were rescues.
       VA hired Local Suicide Prevention Coordinators at all of 
     the 153 VA Medical Centers nationwide in an effort to provide 
     local and immediate assistance during a crisis, compile local 
     data for the national database and train hospital and local 
     community on how to provide assistance. One of the primary 
     responsibilities of the Local Suicide Prevention Coordinators 
     is to track and monitor veterans who are placed on high risk 
     of suicide (HRS). A safety plan for that individual veteran 
     is created to ensure they are not allowed to fall through the 
     cracks.
       In 2009, VA instituted an online chat center for veterans 
     to further reach those veterans who utilize online 
     communications. The total number of VeteransChat contacts 
     reported since September 2009 was 3,859 with 1471 mentioning 
     suicide. VA has also had targeted outreach campaigns which 
     included billboards, signage on buses and PSA's with actor 
     Gary Sinise to encourage veterans to contact VA for 
     assistance.


      The American Legion Suicide Prevention and Referral Programs

       The American Legion has been at the forefront of helping to 
     prevent military and veteran suicides in the community. The 
     American Legion approved Resolution 51, The American Legion 
     Develop a Suicide Prevention and Outreach Referral Program, 
     at the 2009 National Convention. In addition, VA's National 
     Suicide Prevention Coordinator Dr. Janet Kemp facilitated an 
     Operation S.A.V.E. Training for our Veterans Affairs and 
     Rehabilitation Commission members. VA Commission members 
     and volunteers subsequently developed American Legion state, 
     district and post training programs to provide referrals for 
     veterans in distress with VA's National Suicide Prevention 
     Hotline. The American Legion currently has over 60 posts 
     with active Suicide Prevention and Referral Programs.
       In December 2009, The American Legion took the lead in 
     creating a Suicide Prevention Assistant Volunteer Coordinator 
     position, under the auspices of VA's Voluntary Service 
     Office. Each local suicide prevention office is encouraged to 
     work with veteran service organizations and community 
     organizations to connect veterans with VA's programs in their 
     time of transition and need. The Suicide Prevention offices 
     can increase their training of volunteers to distribute 
     literature and facilitate training in order to further reach 
     veterans in the community.
       This year, The American Legion entered into a partnership 
     with the Defense Centers of Excellence's Real Warrior 
     Campaign to educate and encourage our members to help 
     transitioning service members and veterans receive the mental 
     health treatment they need. Additionally, during our 2010 
     National Convention we will have a panel to discuss 
     prevention, screening, diagnosis and treatment of TBI with 
     representatives from DoD, VA and the private sector.


                               Challenges

       Despite recent suicide prevention efforts, yet more needs 
     to be done as the number of suicides continues to grow. The 
     American Legion's System Worth Saving (SWS) program, which 
     conducts site visits to VA Medical Center facilities 
     annually, has found several challenges with the delivery of 
     mental health care. VA has the goal to recruit psychologists 
     from their current nationwide level of 3,000 to 10,000 to 
     meet the demand for mental health services. However, VA 
     Medical Center Facilities have expressed concerns with hiring 
     and retaining quality mental health specialists and have had 
     to rely on fee basis programs to manage their workload.
       The American Legion applauds last year's action by Congress 
     in passing Advance Appropriations for mandatory spending. 
     However, problems exist in VA itself in allocating the funds 
     from VA Central Office to the Veteran Integrated Service 
     Networks (VISNs) and to the local facilities. This delay in 
     funding creates challenges for the VA Medical Center Facility 
     in receiving its budget to increase patient care services, 
     hiring or to begin facility construction projects to expand 
     mental health services. VA's 2011 budget provides 
     approximately $5.2 billion for mental health programs which 
     is an 8.5 percent, or $410 million, increase over FY 2010 
     budget authorization. The American Legion continues to be 
     concerned about mental health funds being specifically used 
     for their intent and that Congress continue to provide the 
     additional funding needed to meet the growing demand for 
     treatment.
       Challenges in preventing suicide include maintaining 
     confidentiality and overcoming the stigma attached to a 
     service member or veteran receiving care. Additionally, the 
     issue of a lack of interoperable medical records between DoD 
     and VA, while being addressed by Virtual Lifetime Electronic 
     Records (VLER), still exists. The American Legion has 
     supported the VLER initiative and the timely and unfettered 
     exchange of health records between DoD and VA. Unfortunately, 
     DoD and VA still have not finalized both agencies ALTA and 
     VISTA architecture systems since the project began in 2007, 
     which limits DoD and VA's ability to track and monitor high 
     risk suicide patients during their transition from military 
     to civilian life. The American Legion recommends VA take the 
     lead in developing a joint database with the DoD, the 
     National Center for Health Statistics and the Centers for 
     Disease Control and Prevention to track suicide national 
     trends and statistics of military and veteran suicides.
       The American Legion continues to be concerned about the 
     delivery of health care to rural veterans. As mentioned, a 
     nationwide shortage of behavioral health specialists, 
     especially in remote areas where veterans have settled, 
     reduces the effectiveness of VA's outreach. No matter where a 
     veteran chooses to live, VA must continue to expand and bring 
     needed medical services to the highly rural veteran 
     population through telehealth and Virtual Reality Exposure 
     Therapy (VRET). DoD and VA have piloted VRET at bases at Camp 
     Pendleton, Camp Lejeune and the Iowa City VA Medical Center. 
     VRET is an emerging treatment that exposes a patient to 
     different computer simulations to help them overcome their 
     phobias or stress. The younger generation of veterans 
     identifies with computer technology and may be more apt to 
     self-identify online rather than at a VA Medical Center or 
     CBOC.
       Both DoD and VA have acknowledged the lack of research on 
     brain injuries and the difficulties diagnosing PTS and TBI 
     because of the comorbidity of symptoms between the two. The 
     Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center (DVBIC) developed 
     and continues to use a 4-question screening test for TB 
     today. At the same time, Mount Sinai School of Medicine in 
     New York developed the Brain Injury Screening Questionnaire 
     (BISQ), the only validated instrument by the Centers for 
     Disease Control to assess the history of TBI, which has over 
     100 questions with 25 strong indicators for detecting TB. 
     Mount Sinai has published data that suggest some of the 
     symptoms, particularly those categorized as ``cognitive,'' 
     when found in large numbers (i.e. 9 or greater), indicate the 
     person is experiencing complaints similar to those of 
     individuals with brain injuries. The American Legion wants to 
     ensure that DoD and VA are working with the private sector to 
     share best practices and improve on evidence-based research, 
     screening, diagnosis and treatment protocols of the 
     ``signature wounds'' of Iraq and Afghanistan.


                            Recommendations

       The American Legion has seven recommendations to improve 
     Mental Health and Suicide Prevention efforts for VA and DoD:
       (1) Congress should exercise oversight on VA and DoD 
     programs to insure maximum efficiency and compliance with 
     Congressional concerns for this important issue.
       (2) Congress should appropriate additional funding for 
     mental health research and to standardize DoD and VA 
     screening, diagnosis and treatment programs.
       (3) DoD and VA should expedite development of a Virtual 
     Lifetime Medical Record for a single interoperable medical 
     record to better track and flag veterans with mental health 
     illnesses.
       (4) Congress should allocate separate Mental Health funding 
     for VA's Recruitment and Retention incentives for behavioral 
     health specialists.
       (5) Establish a Suicide Prevention Coordinator at each 
     military installation and encourage DoD and VA to share best 
     practices in research, screening and treatment protocols 
     between agencies.
       (6) Congress should provide additional funding for 
     telehealth and virtual behavior health programs and providers 
     and ensure access to these services are available on VA's web 
     pages for MyHealthyVet, Mental Health and Suicide Prevention 
     as well as new technologies such as Skype, Apple i-Phone 
     Applications, Facebook and Twitter.
       (7) DoD and VA should develop joint online suicide 
     prevention service member and veteran training courses/
     modules on family, budget, pre, during and post deployment, 
     financial, TBI, PTSD, Depression information.
       In conclusion, Mr. Chairman, although VA has increased its 
     efforts and support for suicide prevention programs, it must 
     continue to reach into the community by working with Veteran 
     Service Organizations such as The American Legion to improve 
     outreach and increase awareness of these suicide prevention 
     programs and services for our nation's veterans. The American 
     Legion is committed to working with DoD and VA in providing 
     assistance to those struggling with the wounds of war so that 
     no more veterans need lose the fight and succumb to so tragic 
     a self-inflicted end.
       Mr. Chairman and Members of the Subcommittee, this 
     concludes my testimony.
  I yield back the balance of my time.


                     Amendment Offered by Mr. Gosar

  Mr. GOSAR. I have an amendment at the desk.

[[Page H4718]]

  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), insert the 
     following:
       Sec. __.  None of the funds made available by this Act may 
     be obligated or expended for assistance to the following 
     entities:
       (1) The Government of Iran.
       (2) Hamas.
       (3) Hizbullah.
       (4) The Muslim Brotherhood.

                              {time}  1640

  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Arizona is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. GOSAR. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
  I ask for your support of my limiting amendment that would prohibit 
any military expenditure that would assist any entity that has a policy 
calling for the destruction of the State of Israel.
  My amendment is specific and would prohibit this type of expenditure 
to any entity that has a policy calling for the destruction of the 
State of Israel. Most prominent, of course, is Iran. Just last month, 
Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad reiterated his nation's policy 
calling for the complete elimination of Israel.
  It is not just formally recognized states, however, we need to be 
concerned about. History has shown that entities we consider terrorist 
fringe groups sometimes, through force, manipulation and popular vote, 
take over the state apparatus. This happened in the Gaza Strip when 
Hamas, the Islamic Resistance Movement, won a plurality of legislative 
seats, 44 percent, in the 2006 election. The United States and Israel 
classify Hamas as a terrorist organization, but the United Nations, for 
example, does not. The Hamas Charter of 1988, never withdrawn or 
amended, states that ``Israel will exist and will continue to exist 
until Islam will obliterate it, just as it has obliterated others 
before it.'' This mirrors the Iranian policy, as that ``the reason for 
the Zionist regime's existence is questioned, and this regime is on its 
way to annihilation.''
  In the last budget, according to the State Department, U.S. military 
aid to Egypt totals over $1.3 billion annually in funding referred to 
as Foreign Military Financing. Currently, questions exist about the 
Muslim Brotherhood, now a key player in Egypt and potentially in Libya 
with the rebel opposition, and its hostility to Jews and the State of 
Israel. It is quite possible that extremist groups who seek the 
destruction of Israel are taking over the state operations in Egypt and 
part of Libya. Time will tell.
  My amendment would ensure that we do not use our money and military 
assistance to help any entity that will not recognize the right of 
Israel to exist and to exist peacefully. That includes the Muslim 
Brotherhood in Egypt. No other nation on Earth except Israel has had to 
face systematic, ideological and persistent existential threats.
  My amendment would prohibit military aid, assistance or funding to 
any nation, state or entity that espouses a policy that refuses to 
recognize Israel's right to peacefully exist. With the prospect of not 
receiving our money and assistance, the new Egyptian regime may take a 
more respectful approach to Israel. In this sense, my amendment takes a 
carrots approach.
  I appreciate your support of my amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Mr. Chairman, I rise to support the gentleman's 
amendment. I also want to support his reasons for offering this 
amendment. I think they are very well taken. The amendment is a good 
amendment, and I strongly support it.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Arizona (Mr. Gosar).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                     Amendment Offered by Mr. Welch

  Mr. WELCH. I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), insert the 
     following:
       Sec. __.  Not more than $200,000,000 of the funds provided 
     by title IX under the heading ``Operation and Maintenance, 
     Army'' may be available for the Commander's Emergency 
     Response Program, and the amount otherwise provided under 
     such heading is hereby reduced by $200,000,000.

  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Vermont is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. WELCH. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
  One of the major decisions that this Congress has to make and for 
which we need a recommendation from the Appropriations Committee for 
the Defense Subcommittee is whether nation-building is a wise strategy, 
a sustainable strategy, an affordable strategy, and an effective 
strategy in Afghanistan. We had a debate on that policy. There was a 
bipartisan vote, with 204 Members suggesting it was time to call into 
question the wisdom, sustainability and effectiveness of nation-
building.
  One of the things that we have provided to our commanders in order 
for them to be able to do hearts-and-minds civic projects, roads, 
bridges, schools is a $400 million fund that they can use completely at 
their discretion. Now, this sounds like a good idea. If you're going to 
ask the military to win the hearts and minds, not just use military 
power to fight battles, then a discretionary fund can seemingly make 
some sense. The question, though, is, upon review, it turns out that 
these roads, these bridges, these canals, almost the moment they're 
turned over to the Afghan authorities, fall into disrepair, disuse and 
neglect. It's not surprising.
  Number one, there is very little local government infrastructure in 
Afghanistan, and the fact that we build a road or a school doesn't 
necessarily mean there's a government or an authority there to be able 
to maintain it. So we build something, and the moment we turn the keys 
over, it falls into disuse and disrepair.
  Second, the expenses of doing this are enormous. It may make sense to 
do these civic projects, to create some goodwill, but do you do them, 
Mr. Chairman, in the middle of a shooting war? Or is it better to do 
that before or after the war, when you have a chance for this 
implementation to occur?
  Then, third, there's an immense amount of ripping off of this money 
from the American taxpayer. It gets lost. It gets picked up in graft 
that we all know about is too rampant in Afghanistan. According to a 
report in The Washington Post, half of this money, a minimum of $400 
million, is gone missing, it's wasted, and it is coming out of our 
taxpayer pockets.
  My amendment would cut in half the $400 million, reduce it to $200 
million, basically taking away that $200 million that is being utterly 
wasted. This is a commonsense, practical way to save money by stopping 
a policy that may be good in theory but in practice is a failure.

                [From the Washington Post, Jan. 4, 2011]

  U.S.-Funded Infrastructure Deteriorates Once Under Afghan Control, 
                              Report Says

                             (By Josh Boak)

       Roads, canals and schools built in Afghanistan as part of a 
     special U.S. military program are crumbling under Afghan 
     stewardship, despite steps imposed over the past year to 
     ensure that reconstruction money is not being wasted, 
     according to government reports and interviews with military 
     and civilian personnel.
       U.S. troops in Afghanistan have spent $2 billion over six 
     years on 16,000 humanitarian projects through the Commander's 
     Emergency Response Program, which gives a battalion-level 
     commander the power to treat aid dollars as ammunition.
       A report slated for release this month reveals that CERP 
     projects can quickly slide into neglect after being 
     transferred to Afghan control. The Afghans had problems 
     maintaining about half of the 69 projects reviewed in eastern 
     Laghman province, according to an audit by the Special 
     Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction.
       The spending in Afghanistan is part of the $5 billion 
     provided to U.S. military commanders for projects in Iraq and 
     Afghanistan since 2004. The new report is the latest to 
     identify shortcomings and missteps in the program, whose 
     ventures have included the Jadriyah Lake park in Iraq, 
     planned as a water park but now barren two years after a U.S. 
     military inauguration ceremony.
       The dilapidated projects in Afghanistan could present a 
     challenge to the U.S. strategy of shifting more 
     responsibility to Afghans. Investing in infrastructure, notes 
     President Obama's December review of the war, ``will give the 
     Afghan government and people the tools to build and sustain a 
     future of stability.''
       ``Sustainment is one of the biggest issues with our whole 
     strategy,'' said a civilian official who shared details from 
     a draft of the

[[Page H4719]]

     report. ``The Afghans don't have the money or capacity to 
     sustain much.'' The official spoke on the condition of 
     anonymity because the Defense Department is preparing a 
     response to the audit.
       Photos in the report show washed-out roads, with cracks and 
     potholes where improvised explosive devices can be hidden. 
     Among the projects profiled is a re-dredged canal that filled 
     with silt a month after opening.
       Multiple reports by the Government Accountability Office 
     have noted a lack of monitoring by the Pentagon. And because 
     formal U.S. oversight stops after a project is turned over to 
     Afghans, it is difficult to gauge how projects are maintained 
     countrywide.
       When asked whether the Afghans have trouble sustaining 
     projects, the U.S. military issued a statement saying it does 
     not have the information to provide an immediate answer.
       Gen. David H. Petraeus, the top U.S. commander in 
     Afghanistan, said in Senate testimony last year that CERP is 
     ``the most responsive and effective means to address a local 
     community's needs.'' He previously relied on the 
     discretionary fund as the commanding general in Iraq, where 
     $3.5 billion has been spent through the program. Over the 
     past two years, Petraeus has pushed for stricter controls to 
     stop any fraud and waste.
       In response to ``insufficient management,'' CERP guidance 
     for Afghanistan was revised in December 2009, according to a 
     statement by the military. The new guidance emphasizes the 
     need to meet with Afghan leaders when choosing what to fund. 
     It does not, however, require U.S. troops to continue 
     inspecting projects after they are placed under Afghan 
     control.
       Under the guidance, an Afghan governor, mayor or bureaucrat 
     must sign a letter promising to fund maintenance and 
     operations. But an October SIGAR audit of projects in 
     Nangahar province found that only two of the 15 files 
     examined contained a signed letter. Nor is there formal 
     reporting to the national or provincial Afghan governments of 
     what was spent and built, the audit said. That makes it 
     difficult for Afghans to know what they are supposed to 
     maintain.
       The provincial and district governments that take over the 
     projects do not have the money to sustain them because they 
     cannot collect taxes and they depend on the national 
     government for funding, said Army Maj. David Kaczmarek, the 
     civil affairs officer for Task Force Bastogne in eastern 
     Afghanistan.
       To teach the local governments how to request additional 
     funds from Kabul, Kaczmarek helped launch a program in the 
     summer that uses CERP dollars for the operation and 
     maintenance of some projects.
       The U.S. military tracks CERP projects with poorly 
     maintained computer databases. Before October 2009, the 
     database did not consistently record the villages or 
     districts where projects were undertaken, according to 
     military and civilian personnel who spoke on the condition of 
     anonymity because the master database is classified.
       A civilian official who examined the contents of the 
     database for a government assessment said the military cannot 
     account for the spending without knowing the villages and 
     districts that were project recipients.
       ``Let's say the project is not working,'' the official 
     said. ``Why would we want to fund that project again the next 
     year? Very little evaluation was done to decide what we fund 
     next.''
       The organizational problems have also frustrated attempts 
     to study the effectiveness of the $2 billion spent on CERP. A 
     paper co-written by Princeton University professor Jacob 
     Shapiro found that CERP funding helped reduce violence in 
     Iraq. Shapiro and his colleagues have struggled over the past 
     nine months to conduct a similar study for Afghanistan 
     because of the database.
       ``There's not a sense of how the program may or may not be 
     working in Afghanistan,'' Shapiro said.
       Army Lt. Col. Brian Stoll tried to clean up the database 
     while serving in Kandahar last year. He champions CERP as a 
     way to build confidence in the Afghan government, despite the 
     mess he found.
       Projects dating to 2006 had never been closed out, said 
     Stoll, who updated the files while working 12-hour days to 
     audit ongoing projects in southern Afghanistan.
       We never got it all cleaned up,'' Stoll said. ``It was like 
     a Hydra. You get part of it cleaned up and you find some more 
     along the way.''

  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. KINGSTON. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Georgia is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. KINGSTON. Mr. Chairman, I rise in opposition to the gentleman's 
amendment for a number of reasons, although I think he's made some good 
points, and certainly we want accountability to apply to this program 
as much as we want it to apply to anything. However, this is the same 
funding level as last year. The request was $425 million, and our 
commanders in the theater are telling us that that is even not high 
enough. So what we're doing with this amendment is actually cutting a 
level funding item from last year, cutting it in half.
  Now, what does the CERP money do, the Commander's Emergency Response 
Program money? Let's say an IED explodes, or maybe there is a bomb that 
blows up a storefront in the middle of the street. A commander can go 
in there and hire local labor to clear out the entrance to that small 
business or whatever it is and get it done quickly without having to 
put U.S. Army personnel in danger to do it and can do it quickly and 
effectively and therefore leave our soldiers in the field, leave our 
soldiers where they can be most effective with their time and their 
training, and it does promote some goodwill on the streets with the 
people.
  It has been said, well, all you're doing is renting a friend, and 
we're not going to be the first army that's fighting a war that rents 
friends, if you will. It really doesn't just rent a friend. It does 
create some long-term goodwill and does have an economic benefit of it. 
But the idea is to give the commander on the street some flexibility so 
that they can get the jobs done as the jobs arise and get them done 
quickly and turn them around.
  CERP money actually has been an effective tool, and it's enormously 
popular with our commanders who are on the ground. I believe one of the 
problems we have in Afghanistan, one of the problems we've always had, 
is that too many decisions are being made down the street at the 
Pentagon and not in Baghdad, not in Kabul, not in Kandahar, where the 
commanders are closest to the war front.
  For these reasons, Mr. Chairman, I urge a ``no'' vote.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Vermont (Mr. Welch).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. KINGSTON. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Vermont will 
be postponed.

                              {time}  1650


                 Amendment No. 30 Offered by Mr. Flores

  Mr. FLORES. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), add the 
     following new section:
       Sec. __.  None of the funds made available by this Act may 
     be used to enforce section 526 of the Energy Independence and 
     Security Act of 2007 (Public Law 110-140; 42 U.S.C. 17142).

  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Texas is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. FLORES. Mr. Chairman, I rise to offer my amendment, which would 
address another misguided Federal regulation. Section 526 of the Energy 
Independence and Security Act prohibits Federal agencies from entering 
into contracts for the procurement of alternative fuels unless their 
lifecycle greenhouse gases emissions are less than or equal to 
emissions from an equivalent conventional fuel produced from 
conventional petroleum sources. Simply stated, my amendment would stop 
the government from enforcing this ban on the Department of Defense.
  The initial purpose of section 526 was to stifle the Defense 
Department's plans to buy and develop coal-based or coal-to-liquid jet 
fuels. This was based on the opinion of environmentalists that coal-
based jet fuel produces more greenhouse gas emissions than traditional 
petroleum. I recently offered my similar amendment to both the MILCON 
VA and Ag appropriations bills, and they passed the House by voice vote 
each time.
  My friend Mr. Conaway of Texas also had similar language added to the 
Defense authorization bill to exempt the Defense Department from this 
burdensome regulation. We must ensure that our military becomes more 
energy independent and that it can effectively and efficiently rely on 
domestic and more stable sources of fuel.
  Our Nation's military should not be burdened with wasting its time 
studying fuel emissions when there is a simple fix, not restricting 
their fuel choices based on extreme environmental views, policies, and 
regulations

[[Page H4720]]

like section 526. In light of increasing competition with other 
countries for energy and fuel resources, and continued volatility and 
instability in the Middle East, it is more important than ever for our 
country to become more energy independent and to further develop and 
produce our domestic energy resources. Placing limits on Federal 
agencies', particularly the Defense Department, fuel choices is an 
unacceptable precedent to set in regard to America's energy policy and 
independence.
  On July 9, 2008, the Pentagon, in a letter to Senator James Inhofe 
stated: ``Such a decision would cause significant harm to the readiness 
of the Armed Forces because these fuels may be widely used and 
particularly important in certain geographic areas.''
  In summary, not only have extreme environmental views and policies 
created and burdened American families and businesses, but they also 
cause ``significant harm in readiness to the Armed Forces.''
  Mr. Chairman, section 526 makes our Nation more dependent on Middle 
Eastern oil. Stopping the impact of section 526 would help us promote 
American energy, improve the American economy, and create American 
jobs.
  To everyone watching these proceedings today, I would say this: 
following my remarks, you will hear speakers from the other side of the 
aisle make several claims regarding the merits of section 526. When you 
hear these claims, please remember the following facts about section 
526: it increases our reliance on Middle Eastern oil. It hurts our 
military readiness and our national security. It prevents the use of 
safe, clean, and efficient North American oil and gas. It increases the 
cost of American food and energy. It hurts American jobs and the 
American economy.
  I urge my colleagues to support passage of this commonsense 
amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. DICKS. I rise in opposition to the gentleman's amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Washington is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. DICKS. The Department of Defense alone is the largest single 
energy consumer in the world. Its leadership in this arena is critical 
to any credible approach to dealing with energy independence issues. 
Section 526 provides an opportunity for the Federal Government to play 
a substantial role in spurring the innovation needed to produce 
alternative fuels which will not further exacerbate global climate 
change.
  This provision has spurred development of advanced biofuels. These 
fuels are being successfully tested and proven today on U.S. Navy jets 
at supersonic speeds. It's a testament to American ingenuity. 
Unfortunately, section 526 is under assault by those who disagree with 
advanced biofuels production. They'd like us to continue our dependence 
on the fuels of the past. That's the wrong path to take. It's 
unsustainable and won't lead to the energy security we need.
  I urge my colleagues to vote ``no'' on the amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. CONAWAY. I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Texas is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. CONAWAY. Mr. Chairman, I join my colleague in asking to exempt 
the Department of Defense from section 526; 526 was added to the energy 
bill in a wrongheaded move to placate some notion that it would have 
some impact on global warming. It's wrong to require the Department of 
Defense in these times, where every single dollar is scarce and every 
single dollar should have a home, to require them to spend extra money 
beyond what they would normally spend for fuel for their planes.
  This amendment would also allow the continued development of coal-to-
liquid jet fuel, which would make this country much less dependent on 
foreign oil in terms of powering our jets and other engines. So 526, 
maybe it belongs in the Department of Energy bill, maybe it belongs 
somewhere else, but it does not belong in the Department of Defense 
spending bill because those dollars are scarce. They are going to get 
scarcer. And to require the Department of Defense to spend more money 
than they would have otherwise have spent on energy under this 
wrongheaded notion, in my view, is just simply bad policy.
  So I rise in support of my colleague's amendment, and I urge the 
adoption of his amendment when it comes to a vote.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. KINGSTON. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Georgia is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. KINGSTON. I support the gentleman's amendment, but I do want to 
understand one thing in terms of what it does to the military's options 
of purchasing domestic or even North American fuel. And the reason why 
I say that is, as I understand, the Department of Defense has three 
strategies in terms of energy, or using less energy. Number one is to 
increase the fight, decrease the fuel. Number three is increase the 
capacity. And then number two--and I am going in this order for a 
reason--is to increase the fuel options, the choices, to diversify the 
fuel sources. And it appears to me that 526 has inadvertently 
eliminated some of the options.
  I would like to yield to my friend from Texas (Mr. Flores) to explain 
that a little bit further, particularly with respect to domestic energy 
sources.
  Mr. FLORES. Thank you for the chance to provide further weight to 
this amendment.
  It's important to know that much of the oil that we import from the 
oil sands in Canada winds up being blended in several refined fuels 
throughout the United States. So if you took a literal reading of 
section 526, theoretically the military would not be able to use any of 
those fuels since the oil sands as a source is considered to be banned 
by section 526.
  The oil from Canada from the oil sands is stable North American oil 
and gas. And it is in large part produced by Americans and creating 
American jobs. Section 526 would cut off this safe, friendly, stable 
source of fuel to this country. And my amendment does nothing to 
restrict the military from looking at all alternative sources of fuel. 
It allows them to go with biofuels, whatever alternative energy sources 
they need. It just takes away burdensome restrictions that are based on 
environmental views that aren't proven.
  Mr. KINGSTON. Reclaiming my time, Mr. Chairman, what I am concerned 
about, with 84 million barrels of fuel produced every day, and America 
only having control of about 3 percent of that, yet consuming 25 
percent, wherever we can use a friendly source of fuel is something 
that we need to keep open as an option.
  With that, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Texas (Mr. Flores).
  The amendment was agreed to.

                              {time}  1700


                     Amendment Offered by Mr. Welch

  Mr. WELCH. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), add the 
     following:
       Sec. __.  None of the funds made available in this Act may 
     be used for tax collection purposes by the Afghan Ministry of 
     Finance.

  Mr. KINGSTON. Mr. Chairman, I reserve a point of order on the 
gentleman's amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Georgia reserves a point of 
order.
  The gentleman from Vermont is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. WELCH. Mr. Chairman, as you know, the American taxpayer is 
spending $2 billion a week in Afghanistan. Among the expenditures are 
payment for projects that are rebuilding infrastructure in 
Afghanistan--roads, bridges, schools, in some cases hospitals.
  The Washington Post recently reported that the Afghan Government is 
taxing American aid. We send the money there to build a road. We have 
to hire contractors in order to do that, and the Afghan Government is 
trying to tax that money for their own coffers.
  So it's not enough that our taxpayers are spending billions of 
dollars on projects to rebuild their infrastructure. The Afghan 
Government is literally trying to reach into the pocket and

[[Page H4721]]

double dip and tax our taxpayers for our taxpayers' generosity in 
giving them money. Now, how does that make any sense at all?
  Among the things that the Afghan officials are doing, after this was 
reported, is stepping up their efforts to grab that cash. They are 
doing things like threatening to detain contractors. If they don't pay 
up, take money that's assigned to build that road and put that money in 
the Afghan coffers, they, the Afghan officials, are threatening, Mr. 
Chairman, to detain our contractors. They are denying licenses to our 
contractors, again, in an effort to do what I could only call a 
shakedown.
  Third, they are revoking visas for unpaid tax bills. We are spending 
a substantial amount of our money rebuilding their infrastructure. We 
should not be taxed, nor should we allow our taxpayers, essentially, to 
be stuck up by the Afghan officials.
  This amendment, offered by my colleague from Washington, Ms. Herrera 
Beutler, would end that practice.
  So we believe this is overdue. There should be no tolerance for this 
double-dipping by the Afghan Government, and our amendment is an effort 
to crack down on that process.
  I thank my colleague from Washington for joining me in the amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.


                             Point of Order

  Mr. KINGSTON. Mr. Chairman, I make a point of order against the 
amendment because it proposes to change existing law and constitutes 
legislation on an appropriation bill and therefore violates clause 2 of 
rule XXI because it requires a new determination.
  The Acting CHAIR. Does any Member wish to be heard on the point of 
order?
  If not, the Chair is prepared to rule.
  The Chair finds that this amendment includes language requiring a new 
determination about the use of funds by a foreign government entity. 
The amendment, therefore, constitutes legislation in violation of 
clause 2, rule XXI.
  The point of order is sustained, and the amendment is not in order.
  Ms. HERRERA BEUTLER. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentlewoman from Washington is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Ms. HERRERA BEUTLER. We are working on making this amendment 
something that can be passed as a part of this bill, but I just want to 
speak in support of it and share part of the reason I am very honored 
to be working with the gentleman from Vermont on this.
  Basically, we are in Afghanistan right now helping to rebuild, or in 
many cases build from scratch, infrastructure. And when we leave that 
country--and I do hope it will be soon--we will leave that 
infrastructure behind. Power grids, water systems, trained law 
enforcement are the building blocks of a functioning society.
  We will spend or have spent hundreds of millions, if not billions, of 
dollars on improvements meant to better the lives of the people in 
Afghanistan.
  The reason I supported this amendment is we don't need to also be 
paying taxes to the Afghan Government for the privilege of rebuilding 
that country, and that's why I cosponsored the amendment.
  The Department of Defense funding should be focused on providing 
soldiers training in the field and on the front lines with the tools 
they need to protect themselves and defend our country. This amendment 
would uphold or, as it was offered, as we attempted, would uphold 
existing law and clarify existing agreements between the U.S. and 
Afghanistan, prohibiting Afghanistan from taxing U.S. subcontractors 
doing work in Afghanistan. So this ban on levying taxes would also 
apply to all subcontractors that may not have direct contracts with 
Afghanistan.
  In other words, if a company is working on a project funded by the 
U.S. Department of Defense, whether that company is a prime contractor 
or a subcontractor, that company should not be subject to taxes from 
the Afghan Government.
  It seems pretty simple. These are the contractors doing the work of 
rebuilding in Afghanistan, helping rebuild the infrastructure and 
hopefully allowing them to one day thrive independently.
  So common sense and financial prudence says the U.S. should not be 
subject to taxation for the rebuilding efforts it is paying for. That 
was what we were getting at with this amendment.
  Mr. KINGSTON. Will the gentlewoman yield?
  Ms. HERRERA BEUTLER. I yield to the gentleman from Georgia.
  Mr. KINGSTON. I think that the point you have raised is a very valid 
point and something that is very good discussion matter.
  Unfortunately, we believe that it is authorizing on an appropriation, 
as the Chair has confirmed, but that's probably the concern far more 
than the philosophical concern.
  So I think that if you and the gentleman can work on some other 
language, make another run at it, I cannot speak for the real chairman 
of the committee, but I think that there are going to be a number of 
people who would have sympathies with you because I think you have 
raised a very valid point.
  Ms. HERRERA BEUTLER. Very good. We will continue to work on this 
issue, and I thank you for hearing my point.
  I yield back the balance of my time.


                  Amendment No. 4 Offered by Mr. Cole

  Mr. COLE. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), insert the 
     following:
       Sec. __.  None of the funds made available by this Act may 
     be used to implement any rule, regulation, or executive order 
     regarding the disclosure of political contributions that 
     takes effect on or after the date of enactment of this Act.

  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Oklahoma is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. COLE. Mr. Chairman, in April a draft executive order was 
circulated that would require all companies bidding on Federal 
contracts to disclose all Federal campaign contributions.
  If enacted, this executive order would effectively politicize the 
Federal procurement process, in my opinion. Companies wouldn't merely 
be judged by the merits of their past performance, by the capability to 
do the job, but would also be obviously considered on the basis of who 
they gave money to or against.
  This would clearly chill the constitutionally protected right to 
donate to political parties, candidates and causes of one's choice; 
and, I think, frankly, that's exactly what the executive order, 
proposed executive order, is intended to do.
  My amendment would simply prohibit funds from this act being used to 
implement such an executive order.
  It doesn't change existing Federal campaign contribution law in any 
way. It doesn't prevent the disclosure of campaign contributions. It 
simply says we won't spend money from this bill to require campaign 
contribution information to be submitted along with bids for Federal 
contracts.
  This House has agreed to this concept on three previous occasions: 
once in the bill, once in an amendment to the Defense Authorization 
Act, and once in an amendment to the Defense Appropriations Act.
  Finally, it's worth noting that Congress has rejected an effort to do 
exactly what this proposed executive order intends to do when it failed 
to pass the DISCLOSE Act in 2010.
  Mr. Chairman, pay-to-play has no place in the Federal procurement 
contract, and we should try to keep politics out of the selection of 
vendors and businesses and contractors to go about doing Federal works. 
So I would urge the adoption of the amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. DICKS. I rise in opposition to the gentleman's amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Washington is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. DICKS. Our system has been improved by having public disclosure 
of political contributions. The more the public knows about where the 
money is coming from, the better off the citizenry is.
  The amendment is a legislative attempt to circumvent a draft 
executive order, which would provide for increased disclosure of the 
political contributions of government contractors, especially 
contributions given to third-party entities.

[[Page H4722]]

  Opposition exists for this effort because some believe this 
additional information could be used nefariously to create some kind of 
enemies list, like during the Nixon administration.

                              {time}  1710

  They argue that companies should not disclose more information 
because people in power could misuse that information to retaliate 
against them. Using the opposition's logic, all campaign disclosures 
would be bad. Government contractors already disclose contributions and 
expenditures by their PACs and those who contribute to them. 
Contributions by the officers and directors of government contractors 
are also required to be disclosed.
  These provisions are fine as they are written. The information is 
required to be provided already in law. And the executive order that 
the amendment would circumvent certainly enhances the quality of that 
information.
  Disclosure is good because disclosure of campaign contributions to 
candidates is good. Disclosure of companies making these disclosures is 
good. And I just worry that we have a situation here where companies or 
major entities could make enormous contributions secretly, and that's 
what we are trying to avoid. And the President's executive order is an 
attempt to do that. We already know that the Boeings, the Lockheeds, 
the General Dynamics and the Northrop Grummans all make campaign 
contributions, and they are all disclosed. What's wrong with 
disclosure?
  I urge a ``no'' on the gentleman's amendment.
  Mr. KINGSTON. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Georgia is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. KINGSTON. I accept the amendment because I believe that the 
things that Mr. Dicks is talking about in this amendment actually do 
move us in that direction.
  I would like to yield to Mr. Cole and ask him to clarify that because 
I want it confirmed.
  Mr. COLE. I would simply say to my good friend from Washington, who I 
respect frankly as much I do anybody in this Congress, the intent here 
is to make sure we never link political contributions with the awarding 
of government contracts. If we want to require additional disclosure, 
the Congress has it within its ability to do that, and indeed we 
considered something like this in 2010 and decided it was 
inappropriate. And that was a time when my friends on the other side of 
the aisle were in control of both Houses as well the Presidency.
  So I understand the concerns, but I think this is an inappropriate 
way to address them. Number one, the executive order, frankly, is 
legislating through the back door. If we want to change the campaign 
contribution laws in the United States, that needs to be done here, not 
by executive fiat.
  And, secondly, to link it with the contracting process is inevitably 
going to raise questions, create fears and doubt and I think without 
question chill political speech. So let's just simply keep contracting 
and the awarding of the contract by the Government of the United States 
separate from partisan political considerations and contributions. I 
think we would be better off.
  I thank my friend from Georgia for yielding.
  Mr. KINGSTON. I thank you.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Ms. ESHOO. I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentlewoman from California is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Ms. ESHOO. Mr. Chairman, I just listened with great curiosity to the 
comments that were made about the so-called intent of the legislation. 
I don't see my colleagues on the other side bringing forward 
legislation that you have the power to pass given the number of votes 
that you have for full disclosure.
  So if you're opposed to a draft executive order, if you're opposed to 
my coming to the floor and blocking every time I offer an amendment for 
disclosure in transparency, change it. You were for it before you went 
against it, the Republicans were. That's what the record is. So I rise 
in opposition to Representative Cole's amendment which blocks 
disclosure of contractor political spending.
  Now, this is not to create any kind of list. You can come up with all 
kinds of things about why you're against something and then try to 
label it. This is about disclosure. This is about sunshine. This is 
about disinfectant, and you're against it. I think that's a bad place 
to be. In fact, I think it's the wrong side of history.
  The draft of the President's order would require disclosure 
requirements for contractors who do business with the Federal 
Government. Now, any business that does business with the Federal 
Government is paid with taxpayer dollars. Why shouldn't there be 
transparency, accountability, and disclosure relative to those dollars? 
This amendment, your amendment, would prohibit disclosure, which I 
think is the exact wrong thing to do.
  We should oppose any amendment--we should oppose any amendment, 
Republican or Democrat--that's designed to keep the public less 
informed about what happens to their tax dollars. We know who supports 
this amendment. It's the American League of Lobbyists, the lobbyists 
for the lobbyists. Surprise, surprise.
  They're trumpeting their opposition to the President's draft order. 
We should be fighting for the taxpayers, not for the uber-, 
superlobbyists. What are we here for? We are here for the public 
interest, for the people. And yet there is an amendment on the floor 
that would destroy any attempt at disclosure.
  Again, I remember when the Republicans supported disclosure. When we 
wanted contribution limits, Republicans said, no, we need disclosure 
instead. Now that we are asking for disclosure, you're opposed to it. 
As I said, you were for it, now you're against it.
  The American people were very clear on this late last year when there 
was a CBS/New York Times poll, and that poll found that 92 percent of 
Americans support requiring outside groups to disclose how much money 
they have raised, where it came from and how it was used.
  Now we are going directly to taxpayer dollars, those that do business 
with the Federal Government. It's very simple to disclose. We should be 
listening to the American people, and I would ask my colleagues to vote 
against this amendment.
  This is a bad amendment. It's not good for the country. It's not good 
for our system. I don't believe it's why the people sent us here. And 
of all things to be stomping on and trying to snuff out, disclosure 
should not be one of them.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Oklahoma (Mr. Cole).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. VISCLOSKY. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Oklahoma 
will be postponed.


         Amendment No. 97 Offered by Mr. Frank of Massachusetts

  Mr. FRANK of Massachusetts. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the 
desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), insert the 
     following:
       Sec. __.  The total amount of appropriations made available 
     by this Act is hereby reduced by $8,500,000,000, not to be 
     derived from amounts of appropriations made available--
       (1) by title I (``Military Personnel'');
       (2) under the heading ``Defense Health Program'' in title 
     VI (``Other Department of Defense Programs''); or
       (3) by title IX (``Overseas Contingency Operations'').

  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. FRANK of Massachusetts. Mr. Chairman, this is a dangerous 
amendment. It's kind of a test of whether or not Members of this body 
believe what they say. Fortunately, I think for all concerned, the oath 
we take at the beginning of the session does not carry over to specific 
statements. So the fact that I believe this will probably, 
unfortunately, show a great gap between what people say and what they 
vote will have no consequences other than the public knowing it.

[[Page H4723]]

  We are at a time of austerity. We are at a time when the important 
programs, valid programs, are being cut back. And we were told by some, 
everything is on the table, there are no sacred cows, all those 
metaphors that are supposed to suggest that we will deal with 
everything. And then we get this appropriation from the Appropriations 
Committee for the military budget. At a time when we are cutting police 
officers on the streets of our cities, we are cutting back 
firefighters, we're cutting back maintenance of highways, of the 
construction of bridges to replace old bridges, when we are cutting in 
almost every capacity, the military budget gets a $17 billion increase 
for this fiscal year to the next.
  A $17 billion increase for the military budget simply does not fit 
with this argument that we are putting everything on the table. Yes, 
they say they're putting everything on the table, but there is a little 
bit of a problem with the preposition here--not the proposition, the 
preposition.

                              {time}  1720

  The military budget is not on the table. The military is at the 
table, and it is eating everybody else's lunch. We are cutting area 
after area. For example, we have been told by some on the Republican 
side that we cannot afford to go to the aid of those of our fellow 
citizens who have been the victims of natural disasters who have 
suffered enormous physical and, therefore, also psychological damage 
from tornadoes and floods unless we find the cuts elsewhere. But if we 
were not increasing the military budget by $17 billion over this year, 
then there would be no need to do that and you would not have to worry 
about that aid.
  Now, my colleagues, this is co-authored by the gentleman from 
California (Mr. Campbell), the gentleman from North Carolina (Mr. 
Jones), the gentleman from Texas (Mr. Paul), the gentleman from New 
Jersey (Mr. Holt), the gentlewoman from Wisconsin (Ms. Moore). We are 
being very moderate here. We are not saying don't give the Pentagon any 
more money. This amendment reduces by 50 percent the increase for the 
Pentagon. We are accepting $8.5 billion more.
  By the way, this, of course, does not affect the wars in Iraq and 
Afghanistan. It just occurred to me, maybe this was said earlier, the 
budget for Afghanistan, which we refuse to cut, reluctantly, 
regrettably, was voted out by the committee before the President 
announced a 10,000 troop reduction. So we are overfunding Afghanistan 
unless you think the President was kidding when he said we are going to 
bring down 10,000 troops. We funded 10,000 troops for next year that 
won't be there in Afghanistan. And that is the problem.
  We are saying to the Pentagon, You find it. Don't cut military 
personnel. Don't cut health, but perhaps some of the bases we maintain 
overseas, some of the subsidies we give to NATO. Lip service is paid 
here to an alliance in which they participate.
  Unfortunately, Mr. Chairman, I have to say it is true of the Obama 
administration and the members of the Appropriations Committee and the 
Armed Services Committee, they are the enablers of one of the great 
welfare dependencies in the history of the world: the ability of 
wealthy European nations, 61 years after the foundation of NATO, to get 
subsidized by America so their military budgets can be a small 
percentage of ours as percentage of the GDP so they can provide more 
services, better rail, better health care, and earlier retirement for 
their own people.
  This says to the Pentagon not that we are going to cut you. This 
gives them a greater than 1 percent increase at a time when everybody 
else is being cut. And it leaves it up to the Pentagon. Let's look at 
the bases that we have all over the world. Let's look at efficient 
procedures. Yes, there is inefficiency.
  You cannot mandate efficiency from the outside when you 
simultaneously give the entity in question the ability to spend without 
limit. You will never get efficiency, Mr. Chairman, at the Pentagon if 
we don't begin to subject them to the same kind of fiscal discipline 
that everybody else gets. And it is undeniable that the Pentagon is a 
great exception here.
  We are going to be telling American cities to continue to lay off 
cops, to continue to ignore important reconstruction projects that help 
with transportation. We are going to continue to cut back on 
firefighters. We are going to continue to quibble over financial 
disaster relief, but we will give the Pentagon, unless this amendment 
passes, an additional $17 billion that we cannot afford.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. COLE. I rise in opposition to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Oklahoma is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. COLE. Mr. Chairman, I want to offer a somewhat different 
perspective than my friend from Massachusetts does on the trend line of 
defense spending.
  Looking at the long term, defense spending has actually, over time, 
come down pretty dramatically as a percent of our gross national 
product. In 1960, at the height of the Cold War, we spent about 9 
percent of the GDP on defense. In 1980 in the great Reagan defense 
buildup, it was about 6 percent. It fell as low as 3.5 percent on the 
eve of 9/11. It is barely 5 percent, or in that range, today. So by 
historical standards, particularly since 1940, we do not spend a large 
percentage of the national wealth on defense.
  By the way, the same thing is true of the Federal budget. In 1960, 
about 50 percent of the Federal budget was defense spending. It was 
about 33 percent in 1980. It is about 18 or 19 percent today. Certainly 
a lot of money, and that is certainly not the only way in which to 
judge military spending, but if looked at in terms of the size of the 
Federal budget or the wealth of the country, defense has been, 
comparatively speaking, a bargain compared to other parts of the 
budget.
  I would also like to point out that, frankly, this Defense 
Subcommittee and the administration have worked to find additional 
economies. Secretary Gates made $78 billion in reductions over the next 
5 years, and this budget itself is below what the President of the 
United States asked us to appropriate by $9 billion. In addition, the 
Secretary has laid out a path for an additional $400 billion worth of 
savings.
  I think most Americans would be shocked to find out we are engaged in 
two or three wars, depending on how you want to count, with an Army 
that is almost 40 percent smaller than it was in 1982.
  So I yield to no one in terms of trying to find savings in defense, 
but I think the record ought to be clear: As a percentage of our 
national wealth, as a percentage of the Federal budget, what we spend 
on defense has come down. And, frankly, we ought to remember that we 
are at war; we are in a dangerous situation. This is not the first 
place to cut, although cut we have. In my opinion, I think it is the 
last place that we ought to cut.
  And the consequences of what my friend proposes, I think, would be 
terrific. We would be reducing and canceling training for returning 
troops, canceling Navy training exercises, reducing Air Force flight 
training, delaying or canceling maintenance of aircraft, ships, and 
vehicles, and delaying important safety and quality-of-life repairs.
  This is not the time for us to embark on additional cuts on top of 
the restraints in spending that we have already done as a House. I 
would urge the rejection of my friend's amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. HOLT. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the requisite numbers of 
words.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from New Jersey is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. HOLT. I rise in support of the amendment of the gentleman from 
Massachusetts.
  You know, all of Washington inside the Beltway is abuzz about how 
much we can save by cutting Federal spending. As the gentleman from 
Massachusetts (Mr. Frank) said, to us, this amendment is a test. Will 
we put every Federal agency's budget on the table in our quest to 
control spending and reduce debt, or are there privileged categories? 
Will we continue down the path of trying to balance the budget on the 
backs of the poor, the disabled, schoolchildren, and seniors?
  The Pentagon spending bill before us, some $650 billion, nearly two-
thirds of a trillion dollars, is about equal to all military spending 
of all the rest of the

[[Page H4724]]

world--all of our allies, all of our potential adversaries, and all of 
those countries that Americans rarely think about all put together.
  The amendment that Mr. Frank and I and some of our colleagues on both 
sides of the aisle are offering today is truly a modest proposal. It 
would simply cut the rate of increase in Pentagon spending. Instead of 
allowing a $17 billion increase over this year's level, it would cut 
that increase in half just to see if we are willing to do that.
  Now, my colleague, Mr. Cole, puts this, I think, in the wrong 
context. I mean, we should talk about, sure, in 1960 it was a larger 
part of the budget. That is before we had Medicare, before we had a lot 
of programs. But when you ask yourself is our military structured to 
deal with the problems this country faces and to expect from other 
countries in the world their share of what must be done, the answer 
surely is this is an unsustainable size.
  This amendment was born out of a series of discussions among Mr. 
Frank and Mr. Paul and Mr. Jones and some other Members and I have had 
over several months. Recently, we sent a joint letter that outlined our 
concerns about the state of our spending on national security. We point 
out not only the excessive, unquestioned overall size of military 
spending, but also that this is a result of the military that is indeed 
a remnant of the Cold War, to go back to Mr. Cole's comments. And it 
bears far more than our share of keeping the peace and is still 
structured to overwhelm the Soviet Union more than to deal with today's 
actual threats to our security.
  To take one example that the cosponsors of this amendment may or may 
not agree with me on but we might ask: Why do we need a replacement for 
the B-2 bomber?

                              {time}  1730

  It was not the B-2 bomber or any bomber that killed Osama bin Laden. 
It was U.S. Special Operations. Buying new nuclear bombers would simply 
be a form, I think, of defense sector corporate welfare to protect 
against a threat that went away decades ago. I could cite multiple 
additional disconnects between our defense spending priorities and the 
actual threats we face.
  One that comes to mind is Libya. As we note in our letter, it has 
been widely reported in the press that England and France have been 
pressing the United States to resume its earlier role in Libya because 
they've been unable to assume it themselves. The explanation is that 
only America has the capacity to respond.
  Our point precisely.
  We have allowed other nations in the world to grow into an 
overdependence on America's military and America's tax dollars and the 
expenditure of American money and lives far beyond what's appropriate 
for our share of world peacekeeping. All of us who support this 
amendment want to protect our country. That's precisely why we've 
offered our proposal and this amendment: To put ourselves on track for 
a better structured military.
  Spending money on cold war-era weapons to wage undeclared wars of 
choice is clear evidence of misguided, needlessly expensive priorities. 
If the House cannot even pass an amendment that simply cuts the rate of 
increase in Pentagon spending, it will never pass amendments that 
actually make the kinds of cuts that are truly necessary to restructure 
our defense in order to meet the real threats we face and to achieve 
the budget savings that we must secure for our financial future.
  I urge my colleagues to support this modest first step to rein in our 
out-of-control defense budget.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. McGOVERN. I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Massachusetts is recognized for 
5 minutes.
  Mr. McGOVERN. I rise in support of the Frank-Holt amendment.
  This is a modest amendment. Quite frankly, I wish the cut were 
greater than the cut being proposed here, because I think everybody in 
this Chamber knows that there is a great deal of waste and abuse that 
exists within our military spending. We have no-bid defense contracts. 
We go right down that road of all the contracts that we've divvied out 
and how wasteful they've been, and we're still building and preserving 
weapons systems that are remnants of the cold war that even our Joint 
Chiefs of Staff don't want. So there is savings to be had within the 
military.
  The other point I want to make is that, when we talk about national 
security and national strength, we ought to be talking about making 
sure that the people in this country can earn a decent living. National 
security should mean jobs. It should mean the strength of our 
infrastructure, the quality of our education system, which we are 
neglecting. My friends on the other side of the aisle want to balance 
the budget by cutting those very programs that, I think, provide our 
economic strength. When you go home to your districts, the first thing 
that people want to talk about is jobs. It is economic security.
  Why aren't we doing more to create jobs? Why aren't we talking more 
about jobs here in the Capitol?
  So I make those two points because I think this amendment is a modest 
amendment that moves us in the right direction and that moves this 
discussion in a better direction.
  At this point, Mr. Chairman, I would like to yield to the author of 
the amendment, the gentleman from Massachusetts (Mr. Frank).
  Mr. FRANK of Massachusetts. First of all, what we are saying is they 
get an increase. So, if you vote against this amendment, apparently you 
believe that they are 101\1/2\ percent efficient at the current level, 
because you're giving them, we would say, a 101\1/2\ percent increase. 
You must believe it's a 103 percent increase, those who vote against 
this. People pay lip service where there are some inefficiencies, but 
you will not get at them unless there is some limit to the spending.
  I particularly want to address the very odd notion that we should 
decide what we need to spend on the military today by using as a 
standard what the situation was 51 years ago. That's the problem. 
Fifty-one years ago, Germany was divided. The Communists controlled 
Czechoslovakia and Poland and Hungary and East Germany. Our Western 
allies were poor, and they were still recovering from 1945. The Soviet 
Union was very strong. That's precisely the problem. This budget out of 
the Appropriations Committee and from the administration, which is also 
incorrect on this, acts as if it were still 1960. The fact is that it 
is no longer appropriate for the rest of the world to expect us to put 
out so much of the burden. That's what the issue is.
  The gentleman from Oklahoma said, oh, well, we'll have to cut this 
here and that there.
  Why? Why don't we cut some of the money we spend in Europe, in Japan 
and in other wealthy and secure nations?
  This amendment tells the Pentagon, You're only going to get half of 
the $17 billion increase on top of the $500 billion-plus you already 
get. You decide where to stop spending.
  Well, are they able to stop spending overseas?
  Foreign aid is very unpopular, I think unduly unpopular. I like to 
help poor children and to fight disease, but the biggest foreign aid 
program in the history of the world is the American military budget and 
its foreign aid for the un-needy, its foreign aid for the wealthy. You 
want to talk about percentages of the GDP that are in the budget. What 
about Germany? What about England? What about France? What about Italy? 
What about Denmark? What about the Netherlands? All are our great 
allies, and none spend as much as half a percentage as we do.
  So what we now have here, apparently, the House is going to decide. 
When Members have said that the Pentagon should be subjected to fiscal 
discipline and that other needs will be taken into account and that the 
deficit is the greatest threat to national security--people have quoted 
Mike Mullen as saying that and Robert Gates as saying that--do the 
Members understand what it means? It means that you don't even cut the 
Pentagon, that you don't even level fund them, but you don't give them 
$17 billion additional. You give them $8.5 billion at a time when you 
are requiring cuts in very important programs.
  I will reemphasize that this is a House which says we can't afford to 
go to the aid of our fellow citizens who have been devastated by 
disasters in

[[Page H4725]]

the southeastern part of the country and elsewhere unless we make 
offsetting cuts. Well, to the extent that you give the Pentagon an 
additional $17 billion, you exacerbate that dilemma, and you make it 
harder to find the funds necessary to go to the aid of the people in 
this area.
  Yes, we want to keep the American people safe. I want to keep them 
safe from unsound bridges, from fires that can't be effectively 
combated, from food that isn't adequately tested, and from diseases. 
People are unsafe because we are cutting back on health research.
  Mr. McGOVERN. I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. VISCLOSKY. Mr. Chair, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Indiana is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. VISCLOSKY. I yield to the gentleman from Massachusetts (Mr. 
Frank).
  Mr. FRANK of Massachusetts. I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  The notion that the only danger to the American people is a Soviet 
Union which collapsed 20 years ago or whatever it is we are protecting 
people from in Germany and other bases such as that ignores the need 
for better public safety here, better public health here, research on 
disease, protection against disaster. It's one thing to go to the aid 
of people after a disaster, but let's do a better job of building those 
structures that can help diminish it.
  This is a central question: Are the Members of the House going to 
say, ``No, we didn't really mean it? No, the Pentagon is not subject to 
fiscal discipline''?
  My friend from Oklahoma said, oh, no, there were cuts; there's $78 
billion in cuts coming over the next 5 years. This is a $17 billion 
increase. How can that be a cut? It may be a cut from a $30 billion 
increase, and that $30 billion increase is a cut from a $200 billion 
increase, but it ain't a cut. It's a $17 billion increase, and we say 
let it only be an $8.5 billion increase.
  So the question is not are we going to treat the Pentagon more 
generously with less discipline than any other entity. We've conceded 
that. We're only asking that you cut in half the extent to which you 
are going to tell American cities to lay off cops, that you're going to 
say that we don't have enough to provide disaster relief without making 
cuts elsewhere, that you're going to cut health research, that you're 
going to cut food inspection, that you're going to cut fire service, 
that you're going to cut the reconstruction of bridges in America.
  Tens and tens of billions will be spent in Western Europe and on our 
allies that needed our help 61 years ago and 51 years ago but who don't 
need it today--in Japan and in other parts of the world where we're 
subsidizing their military budgets so they can spend more elsewhere.
  By the way, let me close with this: We talk about competition and 
things that count--our ability to spend money on community colleges, to 
provide aid so that people can become scientists and engineers, our 
ability to develop technology. All of those things are hampered by the 
drain on resources we get from spending military dollars in precisely 
those countries with which we are competing. England and Germany and 
France and the Netherlands and Denmark and Japan can all spend more on 
their education and on their technology--on those areas where we are 
competitive in a friendly way because we allow them to keep their 
military budgets to a much lower percentage of GDP than ours, and that 
is the relevant measure.

                              {time}  1740

  So we again have a test: Are Members so caught up in the history--and 
again, I thank the gentleman from Oklahoma for helping make the point; 
1960 is his reference point. Well, stay with the concerns of 1960 and 
use that as a reference point and things are not going to look very 
good in 2011.
  I thank my colleague from Indiana for yielding.
  Mr. VISCLOSKY. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Mr. Chairman, I'm having a hard time believing 
what I'm hearing in this Chamber when it comes to national defense. You 
don't get a bookkeeper or an accountant to make some sleight-of-hand 
number to come up with a defense number. That's not how you do it. The 
way you do it is decide what is the threat; what is threatening 
America, what is threatening our allies overseas, what is threatening 
our troops or our businesses around the world? Decide what that threat 
is, and then decide how we're going to meet that threat. That's how you 
come up with a defense number.
  Just imagine we are going back to the good old days of just slashing 
defense, gutting the victory fund, and the hangars were full of hangar 
queens--hangar queens being airplanes that can't fly because they don't 
have engines or they don't have parts. And in order to make one 
airplane fly, they had to cannibalize two or three others to get enough 
parts to make one airplane fly. Well, if you need three or four 
airplanes in the air but only one flies, somebody is in trouble. We 
don't want to go back to the days of a hangar queen, the ``hollow 
force'' so-called.
  And what about the troops out in combat facing a vicious enemy, and 
they get to the point where they haven't really experienced what they 
are about to experience because we didn't get that far in our training 
because the training was curtailed? When you start cutting back the 
money, you start cutting back the training, you start cutting back the 
flying hours, you start cutting back the ability of that soldier to 
reach out and say, hey, I know exactly how to do this because I was 
trained properly. Don't cut the training, don't do it. Don't cut our 
readiness by cutting training. Don't cut our readiness by having 
hangars full of hangar queens that can't fly or by having garages full 
of vehicles that can't run because of a lack of spare parts.
  This is just not good defense. You don't make your defense decisions 
based on some magical scheme or some solution that an accountant might 
come up with. You had better be very careful about what the threat is. 
We don't want any more Pearl Harbors; we don't want any more U.S. World 
Trades on 9/11; we don't want any more attacks on the Pentagon. We were 
not well enough prepared there with our intelligence. We need to make 
sure that we invest enough in intelligence to make sure that we stop 
those things before they happen.
  Defense is not something to play games with. Defense is not something 
to stand up and say, hey, I'm a cost-cutter. All of us are cost-cutters 
in our own way; some of us just have different priorities for what 
costs ought to be cut.
  Mr. Chairman, this is a very important amendment. This subcommittee 
did a very good job in reducing and saving over $9 billion on this bill 
alone. This is a terrible amendment. I hope that we overwhelmingly 
defeat this amendment.
  Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Massachusetts (Mr. Frank).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. FRANK of Massachusetts. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from 
Massachusetts will be postponed.


                  Amendment Offered by Mr. Fortenberry

  Mr. FORTENBERRY. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), insert the 
     following:
       Sec. II. None of the funds made available by this Act for 
     international military education and training, foreign 
     military financing, excess defense articles, assistance under 
     section 1206 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
     Fiscal Year 2006 (Public Law (109-163; 119 Stat. 3456), 
     issuance for direct commercial sales of military equipment, 
     or peacekeeping operations for the countries of Chad, Yemen, 
     Somalia, Sudan, Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Burma 
     may be used to support any military training or operations 
     that include child soldiers, as defined by the Child Soldiers 
     Prevention Act of

[[Page H4726]]

     2008, and except if such assistance is otherwise permitted 
     under section 404 of the Child Soldiers Prevention Act of 
     2008 (Public Law 110-457; 22 U.S.C. 2370c-1).

  Mr. FORTENBERRY (during the reading). Mr. Chairman, I ask unanimous 
consent to dispense with further reading of the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman 
from Nebraska?
  There was no objection.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Nebraska is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. FORTENBERRY. Mr. Chairman, in 2008, this body declared that the 
United States would not provide military assistance to countries found 
guilty of using child soldiers. With broad bipartisan support, we 
declared that this is an affront to human dignity and an affront to 
civilization itself, and we reaffirmed this policy earlier this year in 
the continuing resolution.
  It is the policy of our Nation that children--all children, no matter 
where they are--belong on playgrounds and not battlegrounds, Mr. 
Chairman. But that policy is at risk, and this body has an important 
decision to make. Six governments were found guilty of using child 
soldiers in 2010--Burma, Chad, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, 
Somalia, Sudan, and Yemen. As the law we passed provided, four were 
granted national security interest waivers last year in the hopes, Mr. 
Chairman, that they would take serious and aggressive strides toward 
ending this serious human rights violation. Somalia was also permitted 
to continue receiving peacekeeping assistance, effectively sanctioning 
only Burma, a country to which we provided no military assistance 
anyway.
  Mr. Chairman, this administration has been heavily criticized for 
this decision. And it is no surprise that in the newly released 2011 
child soldiers report, the same six countries were listed as violators 
once again. Mr. Chairman, we must ask, where is the progress? The 2011 
report needs to stand as a challenge to President Obama, the 
administration, and this Congress as well. We are operating 
inconsistently, obligated by law and civilized order itself to combat 
this most serious human rights violation--especially prevalent in the 
world's ungoverned spaces--but we continue with military assistance, 
with inattentiveness to stopping the pernicious use of child soldiers.
  Mr. Chairman, my amendment reaffirms current U.S. policy, lest we 
forget it. In the 2011 continuing resolution, we extended the Child 
Soldiers Prevention Act to cover peacekeeping operations, and my 
amendment is consistent with this. It also clarifies a point of law not 
mentioned in the Child Soldiers Prevention Act. Section 1206 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for fiscal year 2006 provides the 
Department of Defense the authority to train and equip foreign military 
forces. But according to its own terms and the State Department, 
section 1206 authorities may not be used to provide any type of 
equipment, supplies, or training that is otherwise prohibited by any 
other provision of law.
  Mr. Chairman, children in these countries are being preyed upon, 
innocent lives are being lost, children are being thrown into 
psychological hell. Girl soldiers and some boys are being subjected to 
grotesque sexual slavery and violence. They are property. Their lives 
are not their own. They are battered, beaten, victimized, stripped of 
dignity, hope, and a future, made to do unfathomable things by the 
world's worst criminals.
  Mr. Chairman, these criminals just aren't faceless rebels in the bush 
either. While there are plenty of those, we are talking now about 
governments that are guilty of this pernicious practice. And we need to 
make it clear: Are we going to tolerate this or not? William 
Wilberforce, the British statesman and unyielding abolitionist for whom 
our anti-human trafficking law is named, once said this: ``You may 
choose to look the other way, but you can never again say that you did 
not know.''

                              {time}  1750

  We must make it clear to these governments that we do now know and 
that we cannot look the other way, Mr. Chairman. With that, I urge my 
colleagues to support this amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the last word to 
express support for this good amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Nebraska (Mr. Fortenberry).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, proceedings 
will now resume on those amendments printed in the Congressional Record 
on which further proceedings were postponed, in the following order:
  Amendment No. 2 by Mr. Rigell of Virginia.
  Amendment No. 61 by Ms. Foxx of North Carolina.
  An amendment by Mr. Mulvaney of South Carolina.
  Amendment No. 8 by Mr. Sherman of California.
  An amendment by Mr. Rohrabacher of California.
  An amendment by Mr. Gohmert of Texas.
  An amendment by Mr. Welch of Vermont.
  Amendment No. 4 by Mr. Cole of Oklahoma.
  Amendment No. 79 by Mr. Frank of Massachusetts.
  The Chair will reduce to 2 minutes the time for any electronic vote 
after the first vote in this series.


                 Amendment No. 2 Offered by Mr. Rigell

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Virginia 
(Mr. Rigell) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 176, 
noes 249, not voting 6, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 515]

                               AYES--176

     Adams
     Akin
     Amash
     Bachmann
     Baldwin
     Bass (NH)
     Benishek
     Berg
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Boustany
     Braley (IA)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Campbell
     Capito
     Capuano
     Chaffetz
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Coble
     Cole
     Conyers
     Costello
     Cummings
     Davis (IL)
     Davis (KY)
     DeFazio
     Denham
     DesJarlais
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Emerson
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Flake
     Fleming
     Flores
     Foxx
     Frank (MA)
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Grijalva
     Guinta
     Hall
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harris
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck
     Herrera Beutler
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Honda
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hurt
     Jackson (IL)
     Johnson (IL)
     Jones
     Jordan
     Keating
     Kingston
     Kucinich
     Labrador
     Landry
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     Lee (CA)
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lummis
     Lynch
     Mack
     Maloney
     Manzullo
     Markey
     McClintock
     McGovern
     McHenry
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Moore
     Mulvaney
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Palazzo
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paul
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quigley
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Richardson
     Rigell
     Roe (TN)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Roskam
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Rush
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sessions
     Sherman
     Smith (NJ)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Thompson (PA)
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Upton
     Visclosky
     Walberg
     Walsh (IL)
     Waters
     West
     Westmoreland
     Wilson (SC)
     Woodall
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Yoder
     Young (AK)

                               NOES--249

     Ackerman
     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Andrews
     Austria
     Baca
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (CA)
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berman
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Blumenauer
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boswell
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Brown (FL)

[[Page H4727]]


     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capps
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Chabot
     Chandler
     Chu
     Clyburn
     Coffman (CO)
     Cohen
     Conaway
     Connolly (VA)
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Davis (CA)
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Dent
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Dold
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Dreier
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Ellmers
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Fleischmann
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gallegly
     Garamendi
     Gerlach
     Granger
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Gutierrez
     Harper
     Hartzler
     Hastings (FL)
     Hayworth
     Heinrich
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Higgins
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holden
     Holt
     Hoyer
     Hunter
     Inslee
     Israel
     Issa
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Kaptur
     Kelly
     Kildee
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kissell
     Kline
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     LaTourette
     Levin
     Lewis (CA)
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCaul
     McCollum
     McCotter
     McDermott
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, Gary
     Miller, George
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Neal
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Olver
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pelosi
     Pence
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Platts
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quayle
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Rehberg
     Reyes
     Richmond
     Rivera
     Roby
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Ross (AR)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schock
     Schwartz
     Scott, David
     Sewell
     Shimkus
     Shuler
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stark
     Stivers
     Sutton
     Terry
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thornberry
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Walden
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Watt
     Waxman
     Webster
     Welch
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Yarmuth
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--6

     Culberson
     Giffords
     Hinojosa
     Payne
     Schrader
     Towns

                              {time}  1818

  Mrs. BONO MACK, Ms. ZOE LOFGREN of California, and Messrs. CRAVAACK, 
NEAL, AL GREEN of Texas, TIERNEY, CROWLEY, and BARLETTA changed their 
vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  Ms. HANABUSA, Ms. MOORE, and Messrs. GARRETT of New Jersey, GONZALEZ, 
SHERMAN, GRIJALVA, HARRIS, GRAVES of Missouri, CONYERS, MILLER of 
Florida, SULLIVAN, and BILIRAKIS changed their vote from ``no'' to 
``aye.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated against:
  Mr. HINOJOSA. Mr. Chair, on rollcall No. 515, had I been present, I 
would have voted ``no.''


                  Amendment No. 61 Offered by Ms. Foxx

  The Acting CHAIR (Mr. Mack). The unfinished business is the demand 
for a recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from 
North Carolina (Ms. Foxx) on which further proceedings were postponed 
and on which the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 248, 
noes 175, not voting 8, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 516]

                               AYES--248

     Adams
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Amash
     Austria
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (NH)
     Benishek
     Berg
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Boren
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Canseco
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Chandler
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conaway
     Costello
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Cuellar
     Davis (KY)
     Denham
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Dold
     Donnelly (IN)
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallegly
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herrera Beutler
     Holden
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kelly
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kissell
     Kline
     Labrador
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Landry
     Lankford
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Lewis (CA)
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCotter
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meehan
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paul
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pence
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Rahall
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Roskam
     Ross (AR)
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Scalise
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuler
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--175

     Ackerman
     Andrews
     Baca
     Baldwin
     Bass (CA)
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berman
     Biggert
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bono Mack
     Boswell
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Castor (FL)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Frank (MA)
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Gonzalez
     Green, Al
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Hastings (FL)
     Hayworth
     Heinrich
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Inslee
     Israel
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kildee
     Kind
     Kucinich
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Markey
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Michaud
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Olver
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Pingree (ME)
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stark
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Yarmuth

                             NOT VOTING--8

     Cantor
     Cardoza
     Culberson
     Gibbs
     Giffords
     Payne
     Sullivan
     Towns

                              {time}  1822

  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                   Amendment Offered by Mr. Mulvaney

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded

[[Page H4728]]

vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from South Carolina (Mr. 
Mulvaney) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which the 
noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 135, 
noes 290, not voting 6, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 517]

                               AYES--135

     Amash
     Baldwin
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (NH)
     Benishek
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Boswell
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Braley (IA)
     Broun (GA)
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Campbell
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Chu
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Coble
     Costello
     Crowley
     Cummings
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Doyle
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Emerson
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Flake
     Foxx
     Frank (MA)
     Fudge
     Garrett
     Gibson
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Graves (GA)
     Green, Gene
     Griffith (VA)
     Gutierrez
     Hastings (FL)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Holt
     Honda
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hurt
     Inslee
     Jackson (IL)
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson (OH)
     Jordan
     Keating
     Kind
     Kucinich
     Labrador
     Landry
     LaTourette
     Lee (CA)
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Mack
     Maloney
     Manzullo
     McClintock
     McGovern
     McHenry
     Michaud
     Miller, Gary
     Miller, George
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (CT)
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Olver
     Pallone
     Paul
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Pitts
     Polis
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reed
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Richardson
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Ryan (OH)
     Scalise
     Schakowsky
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sessions
     Slaughter
     Southerland
     Stark
     Stearns
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Walsh (IL)
     Welch
     Woodall
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Yoder

                               NOES--290

     Ackerman
     Adams
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Andrews
     Austria
     Baca
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Bass (CA)
     Becerra
     Berg
     Berkley
     Berman
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boustany
     Brooks
     Brown (FL)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burton (IN)
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Capps
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Chandler
     Cicilline
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coffman (CO)
     Cohen
     Cole
     Conaway
     Connolly (VA)
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Cuellar
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     Davis (KY)
     DeLauro
     Denham
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Dold
     Donnelly (IN)
     Dreier
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Ellmers
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallegly
     Garamendi
     Gardner
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez
     Granger
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Al
     Griffin (AR)
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Heck
     Heinrich
     Herger
     Higgins
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holden
     Hoyer
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Israel
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Kaptur
     Kelly
     Kildee
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kissell
     Kline
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Langevin
     Lankford
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     Latta
     Levin
     Lewis (CA)
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Long
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Lynch
     Marchant
     Marino
     Markey
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCaul
     McCollum
     McCotter
     McDermott
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller (NC)
     Moore
     Moran
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pelosi
     Pence
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Price (NC)
     Quayle
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Reyes
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (AR)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (WI)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schiff
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Shuler
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sires
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Upton
     Visclosky
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--6

     Conyers
     Culberson
     Giffords
     Issa
     Payne
     Towns

                              {time}  1827

  Ms. SUTTON changed her vote from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                 Amendment No. 8 Offered by Mr. Sherman

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from California 
(Mr. Sherman) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 316, 
noes 111, not voting 4, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 518]

                               AYES--316

     Adams
     Akin
     Alexander
     Amash
     Andrews
     Austria
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Baldwin
     Barletta
     Bartlett
     Bass (CA)
     Bass (NH)
     Becerra
     Benishek
     Berg
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Bishop (UT)
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boswell
     Boustany
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Braley (IA)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (FL)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Capito
     Capps
     Capuano
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cohen
     Cole
     Conaway
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Costello
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Davis (IL)
     Davis (KY)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Denham
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Deutch
     Doggett
     Dold
     Doyle
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Farenthold
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Frank (MA)
     Franks (AZ)
     Fudge
     Gallegly
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gonzalez
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Graves (GA)
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Gutierrez
     Hall
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck
     Heinrich
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Holden
     Holt
     Honda
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Inslee
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Jenkins
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kildee
     Kingston
     Kline
     Kucinich
     Labrador
     Landry
     Langevin
     Lankford
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Lee (CA)
     Lewis (CA)
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lucas
     Lujan
     Lummis
     Lynch
     Mack
     Maloney
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Markey
     McCarthy (CA)
     McClintock
     McGovern
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McMorris Rodgers
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, Gary
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (CT)
     Myrick
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Neugebauer
     Nugent
     Nunnelee
     Palazzo
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paul
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pelosi
     Pence
     Peters
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Richardson
     Rigell
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Roskam
     Ross (AR)
     Ross (FL)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard

[[Page H4729]]


     Royce
     Runyan
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Schakowsky
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sessions
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Slaughter
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Southerland
     Speier
     Stark
     Stearns
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Sutton
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Tipton
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Upton
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Webster
     Welch
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--111

     Ackerman
     Aderholt
     Altmire
     Baca
     Barrow
     Barton (TX)
     Berkley
     Berman
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Black
     Blackburn
     Blumenauer
     Boren
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Cardoza
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Chandler
     Clyburn
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     DeLauro
     Diaz-Balart
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Donnelly (IN)
     Dreier
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Frelinghuysen
     Garamendi
     Gohmert
     Granger
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Al
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Herger
     Higgins
     Hochul
     Hoyer
     Israel
     Issa
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, Sam
     Kelly
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kissell
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Levin
     Long
     Lowey
     Luetkemeyer
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Marino
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCaul
     McCollum
     McCotter
     McDermott
     McKinley
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Moran
     Murphy (PA)
     Noem
     Nunes
     Olson
     Olver
     Owens
     Perlmutter
     Peterson
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quayle
     Rahall
     Reyes
     Richmond
     Rivera
     Roby
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (MI)
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Ruppersberger
     Schiff
     Schock
     Scott, David
     Shuler
     Sires
     Stivers
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thornberry
     Van Hollen
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Yoder

                             NOT VOTING--4

     Culberson
     Giffords
     Payne
     Towns

                              {time}  1832

  Mr. SMITH of Texas changed his vote from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                  Amendment Offered by Mr. Rohrabacher

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from California 
(Mr. Rohrabacher) on which further proceedings were postponed and on 
which the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 89, 
noes 338, not voting 4, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 519]

                                AYES--89

     Adams
     Amash
     Baldwin
     Barletta
     Bass (NH)
     Benishek
     Black
     Blumenauer
     Braley (IA)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Campbell
     Cardoza
     Clarke (MI)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Coble
     Cohen
     Conyers
     DeFazio
     DesJarlais
     Doggett
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Emerson
     Farenthold
     Filner
     Fincher
     Foxx
     Frank (MA)
     Garrett
     Gibson
     Gohmert
     Gowdy
     Graves (GA)
     Grijalva
     Guinta
     Harris
     Heck
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Hochul
     Honda
     Hultgren
     Jackson (IL)
     Johnson (IL)
     Jordan
     Keating
     Kucinich
     Landry
     LaTourette
     Lee (CA)
     LoBiondo
     Long
     McClintock
     Michaud
     Mulvaney
     Napolitano
     Nugent
     Pallone
     Paul
     Pearce
     Petri
     Poe (TX)
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Renacci
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Royce
     Ryan (OH)
     Schilling
     Schrader
     Schweikert
     Sensenbrenner
     Simpson
     Southerland
     Stark
     Stutzman
     Thompson (PA)
     Tiberi
     Walsh (IL)
     West
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (AK)

                               NOES--338

     Ackerman
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Andrews
     Austria
     Baca
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (CA)
     Becerra
     Berg
     Berkley
     Berman
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Bishop (UT)
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boswell
     Boustany
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Brown (FL)
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Capps
     Capuano
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Chandler
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (NY)
     Clyburn
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conaway
     Connolly (VA)
     Cooper
     Costa
     Costello
     Courtney
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     Davis (KY)
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Denham
     Dent
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Dold
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Dreier
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Ellmers
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fitzpatrick
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gallegly
     Garamendi
     Gardner
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gonzalez
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Granger
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Gutierrez
     Hall
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harper
     Hartzler
     Hastings (FL)
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Heinrich
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Holden
     Holt
     Hoyer
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Inslee
     Israel
     Issa
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Kaptur
     Kelly
     Kildee
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kissell
     Kline
     Labrador
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Langevin
     Lankford
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     Latta
     Levin
     Lewis (CA)
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Lynch
     Mack
     Maloney
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     Markey
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCaul
     McCollum
     McCotter
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, Gary
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Nadler
     Neal
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Olver
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paulsen
     Pelosi
     Pence
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Pitts
     Platts
     Polis
     Pompeo
     Price (NC)
     Quayle
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Reyes
     Ribble
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (AR)
     Ross (FL)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (WI)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schwartz
     Scott (SC)
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sessions
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Shuler
     Shuster
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stearns
     Stivers
     Sullivan
     Sutton
     Terry
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thornberry
     Tierney
     Tipton
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Upton
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Webster
     Welch
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Yarmuth
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--4

     Culberson
     Giffords
     Payne
     Towns

                              {time}  1836

  Mr. COHEN changed his vote from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                    Amendment Offered by Mr. Gohmert

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Texas (Mr. 
Gohmert) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which the 
noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 162, 
noes 265, not voting 4, as follows:

[[Page H4730]]

                             [Roll No. 520]

                               AYES--162

     Adams
     Akin
     Amash
     Bachmann
     Baldwin
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (NH)
     Benishek
     Bilbray
     Bishop (UT)
     Boustany
     Braley (IA)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Campbell
     Capito
     Chaffetz
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Coble
     Cole
     Conyers
     Davis (KY)
     DeFazio
     Denham
     DesJarlais
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Emerson
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Flake
     Fleming
     Flores
     Foxx
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Graves (GA)
     Griffin (AR)
     Grijalva
     Guinta
     Gutierrez
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harris
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck
     Herrera Beutler
     Himes
     Honda
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jackson (IL)
     Johnson (IL)
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kingston
     Kucinich
     Labrador
     Landry
     Lankford
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Lee (CA)
     Lewis (GA)
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lummis
     Lynch
     Mack
     Maloney
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McMorris Rodgers
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Mulvaney
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Noem
     Nugent
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paul
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Richardson
     Rigell
     Roe (TN)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sessions
     Sherman
     Simpson
     Smith (NJ)
     Southerland
     Stark
     Stearns
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Upton
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walberg
     Walsh (IL)
     Waters
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Wilson (SC)
     Wolf
     Woodall
     Woolsey
     Young (AK)

                               NOES--265

     Ackerman
     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Andrews
     Austria
     Baca
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Bass (CA)
     Becerra
     Berg
     Berkley
     Berman
     Biggert
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Blumenauer
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boswell
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Brown (FL)
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Chabot
     Chandler
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clyburn
     Coffman (CO)
     Cohen
     Conaway
     Connolly (VA)
     Cooper
     Costa
     Costello
     Courtney
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Dent
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Dold
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Dreier
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Ellmers
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Fleischmann
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Frank (MA)
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gallegly
     Garamendi
     Gerlach
     Granger
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Hanabusa
     Harper
     Hartzler
     Hastings (FL)
     Hayworth
     Heinrich
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Higgins
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holden
     Holt
     Hoyer
     Huelskamp
     Hunter
     Inslee
     Israel
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly
     Kildee
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kissell
     Kline
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Levin
     Lewis (CA)
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Marino
     Markey
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCaul
     McCollum
     McCotter
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Mica
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, Gary
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Neal
     Neugebauer
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Olver
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pelosi
     Pence
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Pingree (ME)
     Platts
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quayle
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Rehberg
     Reyes
     Richmond
     Rivera
     Roby
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (AR)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Sewell
     Shimkus
     Shuler
     Shuster
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stivers
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thornberry
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Van Hollen
     Walden
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Wu
     Yarmuth
     Yoder
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--4

     Culberson
     Giffords
     Payne
     Towns

                              {time}  1840

  Mr. BLUMENAUER changed his vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                     Amendment Offered by Mr. Welch

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Vermont 
(Mr. Welch) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 169, 
noes 257, not voting 5, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 521]

                               AYES--169

     Ackerman
     Altmire
     Amash
     Baca
     Baldwin
     Bass (CA)
     Becerra
     Benishek
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Boswell
     Braley (IA)
     Broun (GA)
     Buerkle
     Butterfield
     Campbell
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Castor (FL)
     Chaffetz
     Chandler
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Costa
     Costello
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Deutch
     Dicks
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duffy
     Duncan (TN)
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Farr
     Filner
     Fitzpatrick
     Flake
     Frank (MA)
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Garrett
     Gingrey (GA)
     Goodlatte
     Green, Gene
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Heinrich
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Hurt
     Inslee
     Israel
     Issa
     Jackson (IL)
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Keating
     Kildee
     Kind
     Kucinich
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Maloney
     Markey
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     Meeks
     Michaud
     Miller (MI)
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Olver
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paul
     Pelosi
     Peters
     Pingree (ME)
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Richmond
     Roybal-Allard
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Serrano
     Sewell
     Shuler
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Speier
     Stark
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Upton
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--257

     Adams
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Andrews
     Austria
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (NH)
     Berg
     Berkley
     Berman
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boustany
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Brown (FL)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Calvert
     Camp
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conaway
     Cooper
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Cuellar
     Davis (KY)
     Denham
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Dold
     Donnelly (IN)
     Dreier
     Duncan (SC)
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Farenthold
     Fattah
     Fincher
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallegly
     Gardner
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Al
     Griffin (AR)
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Heck
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herrera Beutler
     Hinojosa
     Holden
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jordan
     Kaptur
     Kelly
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kissell
     Kline
     Labrador
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Landry
     Lankford
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Levin

[[Page H4731]]


     Lewis (CA)
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Lynch
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCotter
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller, Gary
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pence
     Perlmutter
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Reyes
     Ribble
     Richardson
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (AR)
     Ross (FL)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Ryan (WI)
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Scalise
     Schiff
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Walberg
     Walz (MN)
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--5

     Culberson
     Giffords
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Payne
     Towns

                              {time}  1843

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                  Amendment No. 4 Offered by Mr. Cole

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Oklahoma 
(Mr. Cole) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which the 
ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 256, 
noes 170, not voting 5, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 522]

                               AYES--256

     Adams
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Amash
     Austria
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (NH)
     Benishek
     Berg
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Chandler
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conaway
     Connolly (VA)
     Cooper
     Costa
     Costello
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Cuellar
     DeFazio
     Denham
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dold
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallegly
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Heck
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herrera Beutler
     Holden
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jordan
     Kelly
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Landry
     Lankford
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Lewis (CA)
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCotter
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meehan
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paul
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pence
     Petri
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Rahall
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (AR)
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Ryan (WI)
     Scalise
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuler
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--170

     Ackerman
     Andrews
     Baca
     Baldwin
     Bass (CA)
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berman
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Boswell
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Castor (FL)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Conyers
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     Davis (KY)
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Deutch
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Frank (MA)
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Gonzalez
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Heinrich
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Inslee
     Israel
     Jackson (IL)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kildee
     Kind
     Kissell
     Kucinich
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Markey
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Michaud
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Olver
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stark
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Yarmuth

                             NOT VOTING--5

     Culberson
     Giffords
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Payne
     Towns

                              {time}  1847

  Mr. TURNER changed his vote from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


         Amendment No. 97 Offered by Mr. Frank of Massachusetts

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from 
Massachusetts (Mr. Frank) on which further proceedings were postponed 
and on which the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 181, 
noes 244, not voting 6, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 523]

                               AYES--181

     Ackerman
     Amash
     Andrews
     Baca
     Baldwin
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (CA)
     Bass (NH)
     Becerra
     Benishek
     Berman
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Boswell
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Campbell
     Capps
     Capuano
     Carney
     Castor (FL)
     Chaffetz
     Chu
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coble
     Cohen
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costello
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Davis (IL)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Deutch
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duffy
     Duncan (TN)
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Emerson
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Frank (MA)
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Gibson
     Goodlatte
     Graves (GA)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hastings (FL)
     Herrera Beutler
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono

[[Page H4732]]


     Holt
     Honda
     Huizenga (MI)
     Inslee
     Jackson (IL)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kind
     Kucinich
     Labrador
     Larsen (WA)
     LaTourette
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lummis
     Lynch
     Mack
     Maloney
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Markey
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McClintock
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McHenry
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Michaud
     Miller, Gary
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (CT)
     Myrick
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Paul
     Pelosi
     Peters
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Roybal-Allard
     Royce
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Schweikert
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sherman
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Southerland
     Speier
     Stark
     Stearns
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walsh (IL)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Woodall
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Yarmuth
     Yoder

                               NOES--244

     Adams
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Austria
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Berg
     Berkley
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (FL)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chandler
     Cicilline
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conaway
     Connolly (VA)
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Cuellar
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (KY)
     DeLauro
     Denham
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Dold
     Donnelly (IN)
     Dreier
     Duncan (SC)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallegly
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Heck
     Heinrich
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Higgins
     Hochul
     Holden
     Hoyer
     Huelskamp
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Israel
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson, Sam
     Kelly
     Kildee
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kissell
     Kline
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Landry
     Langevin
     Lankford
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     Latta
     Lewis (CA)
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Marino
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCaul
     McCotter
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meehan
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller (NC)
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Olver
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pence
     Perlmutter
     Peterson
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Reyes
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (AR)
     Ross (FL)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Ryan (WI)
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Scalise
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Sessions
     Sewell
     Shimkus
     Shuler
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walz (MN)
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--6

     Culberson
     Giffords
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Payne
     Tiberi
     Towns


                       Announcement by the Chair

  The CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining in this 
vote.

                              {time}  1851

  Mr. CARSON of Indiana changed his vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated against:
  Mr. TIBERI. Mr. Chair, on rollcall No. 523, had I been present, I 
would have voted ``no.''
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Mr. Chairman, I move that the Committee do now 
rise.
  The motion was agreed to.
  Accordingly, the Committee rose; and the Speaker pro tempore (Mr. 
Mack) having assumed the chair, Mr. Westmoreland, Chair of the 
Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union, reported that 
that Committee, having had under consideration the bill (H.R. 2219) 
making appropriations for the Department of Defense for the fiscal year 
ending September 30, 2012, and for other purposes, had come to no 
resolution thereon.

                          ____________________