Amendment Text: H.Amdt.168 — 113th Congress (2013-2014)

There is one version of the amendment.

Shown Here:
Amendment as Offered (06/14/2013)

This Amendment appears on page H3596-3597 in the following article from the Congressional Record.



[Pages H3594-H3636]
                              {time}  0910
        NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2014

  The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. Forbes). Pursuant to House Resolution 
260 and rule XVIII, the Chair declares the House in the Committee of 
the Whole House on the state of the Union for the further consideration 
of the bill, H.R. 1960.
  Will the gentleman from Illinois (Mr. Hultgren) kindly resume the 
chair.

                              {time}  0912


                     In the Committee of the Whole

  Accordingly, the House resolved itself into the Committee of the 
Whole House on the state of the Union for the further consideration of 
the bill (H.R. 1960) to authorize appropriations for fiscal year 2014 
for military activities of the Department of Defense and for military 
construction, to prescribe military personnel strengths for such fiscal 
year, and for other purposes, with Mr. Hultgren (Acting Chair) in the 
chair.
  The Clerk read the title of the bill.
  The Acting CHAIR. When the Committee of the Whole rose Thursday, June 
13, 2013, the seventh set of en bloc amendments offered by the 
gentleman from California (Mr. McKeon) had been disposed of.
  The Chair understands that amendment No. 18 will not be offered.

[[Page H3595]]

               Amendment No. 19 Offered by Mrs. Walorski

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to the order of the House of June 13, 
2013, it is now in order to consider amendment No. 19 printed in part B 
of House Report 113-108.
  Mrs. WALORSKI. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 405, after line 9, insert the following:

     SEC. 1040B. PROHIBITION ON TRANSFER OR RELEASE OF INDIVIDUALS 
                   DETAINED AT GUANTANAMO TO YEMEN.

       None of the amounts authorized to be available to the 
     Department of Defense may be used to transfer, release, or 
     assist in the transfer or release, during the period 
     beginning on the date of enactment of this Act and ending on 
     December 31, 2014, any individual detained at Guantanamo (as 
     such term is defined in section 1033(f)(2)) to the custody or 
     control of the Republic of Yemen or any entity within Yemen.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 260, the gentlewoman 
from Indiana (Mrs. Walorski) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from Indiana.
  Mrs. WALORSKI. Mr. Chairman, in May, the President declared a renewed 
intention to transfer detainees from Guantanamo ``to the greatest 
extent possible.'' He also announced he was lifting his self-imposed 
suspension on the transfers of detainees to Yemen.
  This, I believe, is a dangerous policy. It is dangerous for our 
troops fighting overseas. It is also dangerous for citizens living in 
the homeland.
  The amendment I am offering prohibits the Department of Defense from 
transferring Gitmo detainees to Yemen for one year. In other words, 
this amendment simply puts into the law the President's previous 
judgment that transfers to Yemen should be suspended.
  Those listening to the debate today might be asking: ``Why is this 
prohibition needed?'' For starters, the Defense Department should not 
transfer detainees to Yemen because they represent some of the most 
dangerous terrorists known in the world.
  It is important to note that these individuals are still in Gitmo 
because even the Obama administration believes they are being legally 
held. The Bush administration didn't feel comfortable transferring 
these terrorists. After Yemen was the starting point for the foiled 
airline bombing over Detroit, the Obama administration correctly 
decided not to transfer these terrorists back to that troubled nation.
  These individuals pose a real threat to the United States. Detainees 
at Gitmo pose a real threat to our national security. Transfers to 
Yemen should be prohibited because Yemen has become a hotbed for 
terrorist activity. In fact, al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula--which 
is widely believed to be the most lethal of all al Qaeda affiliates--is 
based in Yemen.
  Director of National Intelligence James Clapper testified in 2011 
that AQAP remains the affiliate most likely to conduct a transnational 
attack. This is an organization with which we are at war, an 
organization that is resolute on killing as many Americans as they can 
if we don't stop them first.
  It makes no sense to send terrorists to a country where there is an 
active al Qaeda network that we know has been engaged in targeting the 
U.S. The Christmas Day Detroit bombing attempt, the ink cartridge bomb 
plot, and the radicalization of the Fort Hood shooter all can be traced 
back to Yemen.
  Let's look at the facts. We should not be in the business of sending 
Gitmo detainees to Yemen because, one, they represent some of the most 
dangerous terrorists in the world and, two, Yemen is home of the most 
active al Qaeda affiliate, and lastly, because Yemen has a poor track 
record of securing its prisons.
  A Yemen citizen, the convicted mastermind of the USS Cole bombing who 
took the lives of 17 American sailors, was being held by Yemeni 
authorities when he escaped from prison in 2003. Luckily, he was 
recaptured, but he was able to escape again from Yemeni custody in 2006 
along with 22 other terrorists.
  Why risk another jailbreak by people who intend to do us harm? This 
is a commonsense amendment with the purpose of protecting Americans.
  My amendment does not say the President can't transfer detainees 
elsewhere. My amendment is only in effect for 1 year to give Yemen time 
to demonstrate it can safely and securely handle Gitmo transfers.
  Before taking additional steps, I also believe it is prudent that 
Congress receive the Department of Defense's report on factors that 
contribute to re-engagement so that informed choices about future 
transfers can be made. This report is mandated by law, and it is 
currently overdue.
  In closing, I want to share a statistic from the Office of the 
Director of National Intelligence. In 2012, ODNI reported that the 
combined suspected and confirmed re-engagement rate of former Gitmo 
detainees has risen to an alarming 27.9 percent. When I speak with 
constituents--moms and dads--back home who ask me how safe we really 
are, this rate of re-engagement comes to mind.
  I ask my colleagues to consider the national security implications of 
transferring detainees to Yemen, and join me in support of my 
amendment.
  Mr. Chairman, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. SMITH of Washington. Mr. Chairman, I claim time in opposition to 
the amendment.
  The ACTING CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. SMITH of Washington. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself 2 minutes.
  The 56 inmates that we are talking about at Guantanamo are not the 
most dangerous terrorists in the world. In fact, the intel community 
and the Department of Defense determined they were acceptable risks for 
release back to Yemen, back to their home country. Not everybody that 
we rounded up and took to Guantanamo, unfortunately, turned out to be 
the very, very dangerous terrorists that we thought they were.
  The problem we confront with these 56 that we've determined are not a 
grave threat to the country, determining that if there is any minimal 
threat whatsoever we are simply going to hold them forever is, well, 
quite frankly, un-American. That is contrary to our values, to say that 
we are going to hold somebody indefinitely--I gather forever--because 
we think there might possibly be some risk. That's not the way the 
Constitution is supposed to work.
  More than anything, this amendment restricts the President's 
flexibility. If the President determines that this is safe, if the 
intelligence community determines this is safe, if the Defense 
Department determines this is safe, they ought to have that option. 
This amendment takes that option away and, once again, makes Gitmo the 
classic Hotel California: ``You can check in any time you want, but you 
can never leave.''
  We cannot warehouse people forever. We need to give the President 
options, not restrict them.
  There are certification requirements that will always be in place to 
make sure that the Secretary of Defense, before releasing these people, 
certifies that he believes it is an acceptable risk. We will have to 
have that. But I think an absolute prohibition ties the hands of the 
President in an unhelpful way.
  With that, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mrs. WALORSKI. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Arkansas (Mr. Cotton).
  Mr. COTTON. Mr. Chairman, I want to thank the gentlelady from Indiana 
for her effort on this very important amendment. For 4-plus years, the 
Obama administration has declined to transfer these terrorists at 
Guantanamo to Yemen. I would suggest that nothing has changed, if you 
look at the facts of the matter.

                              {time}  0920

  Yemen remains a partner in our war on terror, but it still has weak 
capabilities. It still has not yet demonstrated the ability to house 
such terrorists or to deter terrorist activity in its own quarters as 
we've seen from things like the underwear bombing plot or the Fort Hood 
massacre. If we transfer these terrorists to Yemen, we cannot know for 
sure that it will not mean more attacks on our soldiers in Afghanistan, 
on our Ambassadors at our Embassies around the world, on our citizens 
around the world, here in the United States, or in allied countries.
  I urge my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to support this 
temporary and

[[Page H3596]]

restrained amendment to ensure that terrorists at Guantanamo Bay do not 
escape back onto the battlefronts of the war on terror.
  Mr. SMITH of Washington. I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from New 
Jersey (Mr. Andrews).
  (Mr. ANDREWS asked and was given permission to revise and extend his 
remarks.)
  Mr. ANDREWS. I thank my friend for yielding.
  There is more agreement here than meets the eye. I think everyone in 
this Chamber agrees that no person who is a dangerous threat to the 
people of the United States should be released. I think most people in 
this Chamber agree that, if the Government of Yemen is unprepared to 
effectuate adequate security means, then no person should be released 
to Yemen.
  The question here is who gets to make that decision. In this 
instance, the people who know the most about this--the leaders of our 
intelligence community, of our military, of our law enforcement 
community--have reviewed the specific details of 56 cases, and they 
have concluded based upon their review of those details that the right 
thing to do is to release these detainees to Yemen if and when they are 
satisfied that Yemen's security measures are appropriate.
  The question here really comes down to whether this judgment should 
be made by the Members of this body, who have varying degrees of 
knowledge about this issue--including the gentlelady, who has very 
diligently learned a lot about this issue and cares a lot about it--or 
whether the decision should be made by people whom we have entrusted 
with the defense of our country, who have developed specific, granular, 
factual expertise about this question. I believe this is a case where 
the proper decision belongs with those experts, where the proper 
decision belongs with those who know the most about this matter. 
Rigidly limiting the options of those experts is a mistake.
  So, although I believe we share the same intentions here, we don't 
share the same view of this amendment. I believe that the decision 
should be made by those best positioned to make it. If and when they 
determine that security conditions in Yemen are appropriate, then the 
decision to release should be made. In my view, that's the right 
process. I urge a ``no'' vote on this amendment.
  Mr. SMITH of Washington. I yield myself the balance of my time just 
to say that I completely agree with the arguments of the gentleman from 
New Jersey.
  It's not a question of whether or not these people should be 
released. It's a question of who should make that decision. Should 
Congress make that decision and restrict the President? restrict the 
intelligence community? restrict the Department of Defense? As the 
gentleman from Arkansas pointed out, Yemen has been a very capable and 
helpful partner in the war against al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula.
  I believe these decisions are best left to the experts and not to 
have Congress restrict them and limit their options. With that, I urge 
opposition to the amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from Indiana (Mrs. Walorski).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. SMITH of Washington. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from Indiana 
will be postponed.


          Amendment No. 20 Offered by Mr. Smith of Washington

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to the order of the House of June 13, 
2013, it is now in order to consider amendment No. 20 printed in part B 
of House Report 113-108.
  Mr. SMITH of Washington. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the 
desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Strike sections 1032, 1033, and 1034.
       Page 399, line 9, strike ``120 days'' and insert ``60 
     days''.
       Page 402, lines 6 through 7, strike ``90 days after the 
     date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Defense'' 
     and insert ``30 days after the date of the enactment of this 
     Act, the President''.
       Page 402, lines 8 through 9, strike ``of the Department of 
     Defense''.
       Page 402, line 10, after ``principal responsibility'' 
     insert the following: ``, in consultation with the Secretary 
     of Defense, the Attorney General, and the intelligence 
     community (under the meaning given such term section 3(4) of 
     the National Security 18 Act of 1947 (50 U.S.C. 3003(4)),''.
       Page 402, line 12, after ``Cuba'' insert the following: ``, 
     and the closure of the detention facility at such Naval 
     Station''.
       Page 402, line 14, after ``transfers'' insert the 
     following: ``and such closure''.
       Page 403, line 5, strike ``120 days'' and insert ``60 
     days''.
       Page 403, line 20, strike ``120 days'' and insert ``60 
     days''.
       Page 404, line 24, strike ``90 days'' and insert ``60 
     days''.
       Page 405, after line 9, insert the following:

     SEC. 1040B. GUANTANAMO BAY DETENTION FACILITY CLOSURE ACT OF 
                   2013.

       (a) Short Title.--This section may be cited as the 
     ``Guantanamo Bay Detention Facility Closure Act of 2013''.
       (b) Use of Funds.--Notwithstanding any other provision of 
     law, amounts authorized to be appropriated by this Act or 
     otherwise made available to the Department of Defense may be 
     used to--
       (1) construct or modify any facility in the United States, 
     its territories, or possessions to house any individual 
     detained at Guantanamo for the purposes of detention or 
     imprisonment;
       (2) transfer, release, or assist in the transfer or release 
     to or within the United States, its territories, or 
     possessions an individual detained at Guantanamo; or
       (3) transfer an individual detained at Guantanamo to the 
     custody or control of the individual's country of origin, any 
     other foreign country, or any other foreign entity.
       (c) Notice to Congress.--Not later than 30 days before 
     transferring any individual detained at Guantanamo to the 
     United States, its territories, or possessions, or to a 
     foreign country or entity, the President shall submit to 
     Congress a report about such individual that includes--
       (1) notice of the proposed transfer; and
       (2) the assessment of the Secretary of Defense and the 
     intelligence community (under the meaning given such term 
     section 3(4) of the National Security 18 Act of 1947 (50 
     U.S.C. 3003(4)) of available evidence relating to the threat 
     posed by the individual, any security concerns about the 
     individual, the likelihood that the individual will engage in 
     recidivism, and humanitarian concerns about the individual, 
     including--
       (A) the likelihood the detainee will resume terrorist 
     activity if transferred or released;
       (B) the likelihood the detainee will reestablish ties with 
     al-Qaeda, the Taliban, or associated forces that are engaged 
     in hostilities against the United States or its coalition 
     partners if transferred or released;
       (C) the likelihood of family, tribal, or government 
     rehabilitation or support for the detainee if transferred or 
     released;
       (D) the likelihood the detainee may be subject to trial by 
     military commission; and
       (E) any law enforcement interest in the detainee.
       (d) Prohibition on Use of Funds.--No amounts authorized to 
     be appropriated or otherwise made available to the Department 
     of Defense may be used after December 31, 2014, for the 
     detention facility or detention operations at United States 
     Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
       (e) Periodic Review Boards.--The Secretary of Defense shall 
     ensure that each periodic review board established pursuant 
     to Executive Order No. 13567 or section 1023 of the National 
     Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012 (Public Law 
     112-81; 125 Stat. 1564; 10 U.S.C. 801 note) is completed by 
     not later than 60 days after the date of the enactment of 
     this Act.
       (f) Individual Detained at Guantanamo.--In this section, 
     the term ``individual detained at Guantanamo'' means any 
     individual located at United States Naval Station, Guantanamo 
     Bay, Cuba, as of October 1, 2009, who--
       (1) is not a citizen of the United States or a member of 
     the Armed Forces of the United States; and
       (2) is--
       (A) in the custody or under the control of the Department 
     of Defense; or
       (B) otherwise under detention at United States Naval 
     Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
       In section 2901, strike subsections (a), (b), and (c).
       Page 646, lines 11 and 12, strike ``120 days'' and insert 
     ``60 days''.
       Page 648, after line 5, insert the following:
       (F) The estimated security costs associated with trying 
     such individuals in courts established under Article III of 
     the Constitution or in military commissions conducted in the 
     United States, including the costs of military personnel, 
     civilian personnel, and contractors associated with the 
     prosecution at such location, including any costs likely to 
     be incurred by other Federal departments or agencies, or 
     State or local governments.
       (G) A plan developed by the Attorney General, in 
     consultation with the Secretary of Defense, the Secretary of 
     State, the Director of National Intelligence, and the heads 
     of other relevant departments and agencies,

[[Page H3597]]

     identifying a disposition, other than continued detention at 
     United States Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, for each 
     individual detained at such Naval Station as of the date of 
     the enactment of this Act who is designated for prosecution. 
     Such a disposition may include transfer to the United States 
     for trial or detention pursuant to the law of war, transfer 
     to a foreign country for prosecution, or release.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 260, the gentleman 
from Washington (Mr. Smith) and a Member opposed each will control 10 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Washington.
  Mr. SMITH of Washington. I yield myself 3 minutes.
  This is a very straightforward amendment that simply asks the 
President to put together a plan to close Guantanamo Bay.
  One of the complaints in recent weeks is that we've seen Guantanamo 
become more and more untenable. It continues to be an international 
eyesore. Way back in 2007, President George W. Bush said it should be 
closed. Then-candidate John McCain said it should be closed. As 
recently as last week, Senator McCain and some other Senators went down 
and reached that conclusion as well. I think a justifiable criticism of 
that has come from the other side of the aisle that said, well, you 
can't close it unless you've got a plan for what to do with the inmates 
and a plan for how to close it, and that is exactly what this amendment 
does.
  It requires the President within 60 days to come up with a plan for 
closing Guantanamo Bay prison, and then it also removes all of the 
restrictions that are in this bill that would stop him from generating 
that plan.
  The bottom line is that we do not need Guantanamo. Guantanamo was set 
up in the first place in the hopes that, because it wasn't actually on 
American soil, we could somehow hold people outside the normal bounds 
of due process and the Constitution, but the Court ruled otherwise. The 
Court ruled that habeas does apply because Guantanamo is effectively 
under the control of the United States. So there is no benefit there. 
There are no greater rights in the U.S. than there are in Guantanamo. 
We just continue to have this prison that has been set up in a way that 
the international community cannot stand, and it makes a problem for us 
in terms of being able to cooperate with our allies and to have the 
ability to get that cooperation to properly prosecute the war on 
terror.
  So I am simply asking that we put a plan in place so that we can 
close Guantanamo Bay once and for all--something that Republicans and 
Democrats alike have said that they've wanted to do. We simply haven't 
taken the steps necessary.
  The prison is becoming very, very expensive. There is $250 million in 
MilCon contained in this bill just to keep it at a somewhat temporary 
status. Beyond that, the prospect of the United States' simply 
warehousing 166 people forever with no end in sight is contrary, again, 
I think, to our values and to our process.
  I really want to emphasize the fact that we have here in the United 
States well over 300 terrorists incarcerated. There is a notion that 
somehow we couldn't possibly accommodate them here because of the 
threat, but we have Ramzi Yousef, and we have the Blind Sheikh. We have 
some of the most notorious terrorists in the world housed here already 
safely and securely. That is simply not an argument against doing this. 
The temporary facilities down at Guantanamo are not sustainable.
  Now, I'm not going to rush this and say we've got to close it 
tomorrow if we don't have a plan. I'm simply requiring the President to 
come up with that plan, and then am giving him the legislative freedom 
to develop that plan as what we've done in this bill far too often is 
to have restricted that.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. McKEON. Mr. Chairman, I rise to claim the time in opposition to 
the gentleman's amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from California is recognized for 10 
minutes.
  Mr. McKEON. I yield 2 minutes to my friend and colleague, the 
chairman of the Seapower Subcommittee on the Armed Services Committee, 
the gentleman from Virginia (Mr. Forbes).
  Mr. FORBES. Mr. Chairman, on May 28, 2010, I stood on this floor and 
made a motion that effectively stopped some of the worst terrorists in 
the world at Guantanamo Bay from being transferred to the soil in the 
United States. At that particular point in time, the then-chairman of 
the Armed Services Committee, Democrat Ike Skelton, stood on the floor 
and said this:

       We are in a position to accept this motion. I just wish to 
     point out that there is no difference between the Democrats 
     and Republicans when it comes to fighting terrorism.

  Today, we step on a course with this amendment to change that as the 
highest ranking Democrat on the Armed Services Committee seeks to 
overturn, essentially, that motion.
  Mr. Chairman, if the gentleman were asking that these terrorists be 
brought to his district, that would be one thing, but he knows that's 
very unlikely. What you're having with this motion is very generously 
saying that they could be brought to any of our districts. We are 
hearing a uniform chorus stand up from North Carolina, Virginia, Guam, 
and every other place, saying, Don't bring them to my district.
  The reason is they know two things: they know the moment they touch 
U.S. soil they will receive additional constitutional rights that no 
one in this room can argue what they are exactly; secondly, they have 
placed a target on every elementary school, on every shopping mall, on 
every small business in that district by other terrorists.

                              {time}  0930

  That's why, Mr. Chairman, it's important that we come together 
unified and send a message to the President that we might not be able 
to stop every terrorist from coming to U.S. soil, but we can stop these 
terrorists by defeating this amendment.
  Mr. SMITH of Washington. I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from New 
York (Mr. Nadler).
  Mr. NADLER. I thank the gentleman.
  Mr. Chairman, I rise in support of the Smith-Moran-Nadler amendment, 
which provides a six-part plan for closing Gitmo.
  The amendment will remove the existing limitations on transfers, 
strike the current requests for construction at Gitmo, and end funding 
for the facility on December 31, 2014.
  The time to close Guantanamo is now. It is a stain on our national 
honor. We are holding 166 people at Gitmo, 86 of whom have been cleared 
for release, that is to say they have been found guilty of nothing and 
judged not to pose any danger. There is no reason and no right for us 
to hold them further.
  Mr. Chairman, I wonder which of our colleagues doesn't believe in the 
American system of justice. I wonder which one of us does not trust our 
own American court. I wonder who among us does not believe in the Bill 
of Rights, who does not believe in the right to counsel or that people 
should be presumed innocent until proven guilty. What we have at Gitmo 
is a system that is an affront to those beliefs and to America.
  In the last decade, we have begun to let go of our freedoms bit by 
bit with each new executive order, each new court decision and, yes, 
each new act of Congress. We have begun giving away our rights to 
privacy, a right to our day in court when the government harms us; and 
with this legislation, we are continuing down the path of destroying 
the right to be free from imprisonment without due process of law.
  I want to commend the gentleman from Washington and the gentleman 
from Virginia for fighting to close the detention facility at 
Guantanamo.
  The language in this bill without our amendment prohibits moving any 
detainees into the United States and guarantees that we will continue 
holding people indefinitely, people who are not necessarily terrorists 
and who we only suspect to be terrorists and have not had a day in 
court to prove they are or are not terrorists. We will continue to hold 
them indefinitely without charge, contrary to every tradition this 
country stands for, contrary to due process and civil rights.
  Because of this momentous challenge to the founding principles of the 
United States, that no person may be deprived of liberty without due 
process of law--and certainly not indefinitely without due process of 
law--we must close the detention facilitate at Gitmo now in order to 
restore our national honor.

[[Page H3598]]

  They will have no additional constitutional rights. The Supreme Court 
ruled that they have the same constitutional rights at Guantanamo as 
they do here.
  We must close this facility and restore our national honor. Support 
this amendment.
  Mr. McKEON. Mr. Chairman, I yield 2 minutes to my friend and 
colleague, the gentleman from Ohio, Dr. Wenstrup.
  Mr. WENSTRUP. Mr. Chairman, the Guantanamo Bay detention facility was 
established to hold unlawful enemy combatants captured during the war 
on terror.
  Any proposal to close the Guantanamo detention facility must first 
clearly address the transfer of remaining prisoners detained there. 
Many of the remaining detainees are the most hardened terrorists, 
including those responsible for the 9/11 mass murders of many 
Americans.
  There are three primary options: transfer to another country or 
transfer to the United States or stay put.
  Transferring these terrorists to another country comes with a 
substantial risk of reengaging as an American threat. The current 
reengagement rate of former Guantanamo detainees is nearly 28 percent.
  I served for 1 year in Iraq with the Army as a medical officer at one 
of the largest detention facilities there. Often after prison release 
deals made by entrusted decisionmakers, we saw the same people return 
for new offenses. Additionally, there were multiple escapes and 
attempted escapes, as well as attacks trying to free the detainees.
  I've been to Guantanamo, and the facilities there are a safe and 
secure location away from our soldiers on the battlefield. I don't 
think there are many people in Cuba that are trying to free the people 
that are held at Guantanamo, and this was not the case in Iraq, and it 
may not be the case should they be transferred to the United States.
  I believe the prisoners at Guantanamo Bay are being treated 
appropriately and in a way that we can be proud of as a Nation. The 
hunger strike policy is carried out humanely with the detainees treated 
as patients. The access to caregivers and medical facilities is the 
same for our troops as it is for those detained.
  Additionally, transfers to the United States would be very expensive. 
We've already built a courtroom there that cost us in the millions of 
dollars.
  These terrorist detainees pose a very real danger to our security in 
America. They mean us real harm. The President has the ability to 
certify transfers of detainees to other countries, but he has yet to do 
so. And until the President leads with a better solution, I firmly 
believe that keeping Guantanamo open is our best option, our safest 
option, and our most logical option.
  Mr. SMITH of Washington. I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from New 
Jersey (Mr. Andrews).
  (Mr. ANDREWS asked and was given permission to revise and extend his 
remarks.)
  Mr. ANDREWS. Mr. Chairman, I thank my friend for yielding.
  First, let me say that I think we all agree that our servicemembers 
who served us at Guantanamo have done a tremendous job and have brought 
great honor to our country. We thank and respect all of them.
  I also believe that there is unanimity here that if someone is a 
credible threat to the United States, they should be detained, tried, 
and brought to justice. The question is where to do that.
  Why should it be Guantanamo? Do defendants have greater rights if 
they are transferred from Guantanamo to a place in the United States? 
The Supreme Court has said, no, they don't. So there's no tactical 
advantage in a trial.
  Are they more likely to escape if they're transferred to the United 
States? History says ``no.'' The number of escapes from maximum 
prisons, the supermax prisons, in the United States has been zero.
  Is it less expensive to hold them at Guantanamo? Most certainly not. 
The average cost of incarcerating someone in a Federal maximum security 
supermax prison is $34,000 a year. The cost to the taxpayer of 
incarcerating someone at Guantanamo is over $1.6 million a year.
  Is there some strategic advantage globally to holding these detainees 
at Guantanamo? The opposite is true. General Petraeus, Admiral Mullen, 
other leaders of our intelligence and military forces have said that 
Guantanamo is the best recruiting device against the United States, 
around the world for those who are trying to sell the lie that the 
United States is an inhumane and unjust place.
  There is simply no rationale for an indefinite extension of the 
problem at Guantanamo. For reasons of security, for reasons of law, for 
reasons of cost, for reasons of strategic advantage, we should close 
Guantanamo Bay. That's why I support the Smith amendment.
  Mr. McKEON. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1 minute to my friend and 
colleague, the gentleman from Arkansas (Mr. Cotton).
  Mr. COTTON. I oppose this amendment. I oppose the closure of 
Guantanamo and the transfer of detainees to the United States.
  Guantanamo is a state-of-the-art detention facility in which we've 
invested millions of dollars in which our troops handle themselves with 
utmost professionalism.
  The detainees there have access to military tribunals and habeas 
corpus proceedings here in Washington, D.C.
  Who are these detainees? They're not innocent goat herders swept up 
by a marauding United States military of which I was a part in which I 
detained numerous potential terrorists. They are people like Khalid 
Sheikh Mohammed, the mastermind of 9/11; Mohammed al-Qahtani, one of 
the would-be participants in 9/11; terrorists who are closely 
associated with Osama bin Laden who have received explosives training, 
who are recruiters, who are poison experts, who are suicide bombers or 
who are commanders of al Qaeda training camps. I do not think we should 
bring them to the United States, give them their Miranda warnings, give 
them an attorney at taxpayer-provided expense and if acquitted and not 
accepted by their home countries be released back onto the streets of 
the United States.
  If that is what the advocates of this amendment would like, I suggest 
they should write their amendment in a fashion that would bring these 
detainees to their own congressional districts.
  Mr. SMITH of Washington. I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from 
Virginia (Mr. Moran).
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Chairman, you can pretty much win any battle you want 
to fight with superior military might. But for wars of consequence, you 
have to be fighting from the high ground consistently. That's what this 
amendment is all about.
  We will win this war against violent extremism; but in order to do 
so, we have to win over the hearts and the minds of hundreds of 
millions of Muslims around the world who want what we have. They want 
equal justice under the law. They want fairness and truth and 
transparency and democracy.
  The vast majority are young, idealistic, and very impressionable; 
and, unfortunately, too many of them are misled and manipulated.

                              {time}  0940

  We have a superior set of values and principles. It's what defines us 
as a Nation. But we have to hold steadfast to those values and 
principles. We have to show that even when we are challenged, even when 
it's politically difficult, we believe in equal justice under the law. 
We believe that people are innocent until proven guilty. We believe 
that every life matters. We believe in human rights, we don't believe 
in torture. But we do believe in our justice system. It's not our 
justice system that's operational at Guantanamo. It was set up there to 
be outside our justice system so we could detain people indefinitely.
  The Acting CHAIR. The time of the gentleman has expired.
  Mr. SMITH of Washington. I yield an additional 30 seconds to the 
gentleman.
  Mr. MORAN. At this time in our history when we're furloughing 650,000 
Department of Defense employees, how can we justify spending $1.5 
million per detainee at Guantanamo when half of them have been cleared 
for release? It doesn't make sense. And now in this bill we're 
authorizing another quarter of a billion dollars to be spent at 
Guantanamo. Those are misguided priorities. It costs $34,000 to jail 
very dangerous terrorists in this country, but in this country, we can 
convict them.

[[Page H3599]]

  Mr. McKEON. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1 minute to my friend and 
colleague, the gentleman from Kansas (Mr. Pompeo).
  Mr. POMPEO. Mr. Chairman, I thank you.
  There are a few facts that I think are appropriate to bring to this 
debate. I oppose this amendment vigorously. Just 2 weeks ago I was down 
at Guantanamo Bay on a trip that was part of the House Select Committee 
on Intelligence. I will tell you that the soldiers and marines and 
airmen of Joint Task Force Gitmo are taking tremendous care of the 
facilities, our assets and the detainees.
  Those who suggest that this facility should go away will create a 
problem that is worse than the one that we have today. This amendment 
is simply a pattern of appeasement that does not comport with the fact 
that radical Islamic terrorists will not cease to attack us simply 
because we wish they would go away.
  A few more facts. If we close Guantanamo Bay, we try to release them 
to countries that will accept them, we know that at least a quarter of 
them will return to the battlefield. We could bring them back to the 
United States, where they'd go to civilian courts, and undoubtedly some 
of them would end up walking the streets of the United States.
  One of the final facts, and one that I've heard said in support of 
this amendment, is that if we simply close this facility that 
recruiting for radical extremists will diminish. This seems illogical. 
There's no support for such a statement. They will continue to attack 
us whether we keep this open or closed. This facility is legal, it's 
just, and it is an important national asset.
  Mr. SMITH of Washington. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself the balance of 
my time.
  A whole bunch of false arguments are being laid out here. As has been 
clear, no greater constitutional rights come to people in the United 
States than at Guantanamo. So that's just a phony argument.
  The second phony argument is that somehow they can't be held safely. 
I have a Federal prison in my district. I have an INS detention 
facility in my district. Frankly, if there was a supermax facility in 
my district, I would not have a problem with them coming to that 
district. They should be held. I would hope that all of our supermax 
facilities, which are holding very, very dangerous people, they better 
be holding them securely right now.
  It's $1.5 million a year versus $34,000. It is an absolute 
recruitment tool for al Qaeda. Our military leaders--General Petraeus--
have all said that this is something that is harmful to U.S. security.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. McKEON. I yield 2 minutes to my friend, the gentleman from Texas 
(Mr. Thornberry), the vice chairman of the HASC Committee.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chairman, cost is a red herring argument here. 
Does it cost more to keep a detainee in Guantanamo than a Federal 
prisoner here? Probably, but nothing like the figures that have been 
repeatedly cited on the other side. For example, if you look back at 
the fiscal year '11 Department of Justice budget request for moving the 
detainees to the U.S., it ends up in the first year being about $1.9 
million per detainee, and about $500,000 per detainee in recurring 
costs.
  On the other side of it, even the President, in a speech at the 
National Defense University, said it is less than a million dollars per 
prisoner now on detainee. Is there a difference? Sure. Is it anything 
like what we've been hearing? No.
  And the rest of the story is: under the Geneva Convention, if you're 
holding somebody under the laws of war, you cannot put them with 
Federal prisoners even in a supermax prison. They have to be 
segregated. So those costs of bringing them here are higher.
  But that's not really the issue here. The issue is what is the best 
thing to do to secure the country and to deal with the terrorist 
threat. And I just remind everybody, the ban on closing Guantanamo is 
not permanent. We have to reapprove it every year. So if the President 
actually comes up with a real plan, not just a speech, but a real plan 
to close Guantanamo and then deal with the detainees, then that ban can 
go away. But you can't say okay, we're going to remove all of the 
restrictions and we're going to close Guantanamo, and then we're going 
to figure out what we're going to do with these people, and that's 
exactly what this amendment does. The gentleman from Washington says it 
just asks for a plan. The underlying bill just asks for a plan. His 
amendment, in addition to asking for a plan, removes all of the 
existing restrictions. And on page 4, subsection (D), says 
specifically:
  No funds shall be used there to detain people after December 31, 
2014.
  We've got to get the plan first before it closes. I think this 
amendment should be rejected.
  Mr. McKEON. How much time do I have remaining?
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from California has 2\1/4\ minutes 
remaining.
  Mr. McKEON. I yield myself the balance of my time.
  I strongly oppose this amendment. Two-and-a-half years ago I sent the 
President a letter about these important issues. I said in that letter:

       I fully recognize the importance of crafting a careful and 
     comprehensive framework for the detention of terrorists who 
     wish to harm the United States. I also recognize the 
     challenges and legal complexities related to such an 
     endeavor. This appreciation is why this issue is simply too 
     important for the administration to address on its own.

  The President did not take up my offer at that time. Nearly a year 
later in another unanswered letter, I wrote:

       While I remain open to working together, I am very 
     disappointed that the administration has frequently shown a 
     greater willingness to engage with international 
     institutions, foreign governments, and the media on issues 
     relating to our national security than it has with the U.S. 
     House of Representatives.

  Those are excerpts from two of the five letters that I've written to 
the President on this issue, which he has not answered. Yet, he still 
has not come forward with a proposal of oversight or any plan. What to 
do with Guantanamo is secondary to the President coming forward with a 
comprehensive plan. Such a plan must include what he proposes to do 
with those terrorist detainees who are too dangerous to release but 
cannot be tried.
  Number two, how he will ensure terrorists transferred overseas do not 
return to the fight?
  Three, what he will do with the terrorists we capture in the future; 
specifically, how will he prioritize intelligence questioning?
  Finally, what he will do with the high-value terrorists still held in 
Afghanistan? This is a particularly critical priority for me. There are 
several extremely dangerous individuals still in custody in 
Afghanistan. The only option that I see, as completely unacceptable for 
those detainees, is to allow their release. We've already seen the 
outcome of making this tragic mistake in Iraq.
  While I appreciate the proposed efficiency of my friend and 
colleague, Ranking Member Smith's amendment, we cannot strike all 
prohibitions on transfers of Gitmo detainees, agree to bring them to 
the United States, release them overseas, and end all funding for Gitmo 
with absolutely any confidence that any of this will be handled in a 
way that best protects our national security.
  Lastly, and this is important, I want to say that I'm proud of the 
men and women in uniform who serve our Nation every day at Guantanamo. 
It's not an easy duty. We owed them a debt of gratitude for their 
critical service to this Nation.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Washington (Mr. Smith).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. SMITH of Washington. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Washington 
will be postponed.

                              {time}  0950


                 Amendment No. 14 Offered by Mr. Polis

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to the order of the House of June 13, 
2013, it is now in order to consider amendment No. 14 printed in part B 
of House Report 113-108.
  Mr. POLIS. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.

[[Page H3600]]

  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of subtitle A of title V, add the following new 
     section:

     SEC. 502. EXPANSION OF CHAPLAIN CORPS.

       The Secretary of Defense shall provide for the appointment, 
     as officers in the Chaplain Corps of the Armed Forces, of 
     persons who are certified or ordained by non-theistic 
     organizations and institutions, such as humanist, ethical 
     culturalist, or atheist.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 260, the gentleman 
from Colorado (Mr. Polis) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Colorado.
  Mr. POLIS. Mr. Chairman, it's a very simple amendment. We, through 
our Chaplaincy Corps, need to support, and do support, various faith 
and philosophical beliefs among the men and women who bravely serve our 
country.
  We already support some nontheistic beliefs. For instance, we have 
Buddhist chaplains. Buddhism is a nontheistic faith tradition.
  And what my amendment would simply do is allow chaplains who are 
certified or ordained as secular humanists and ethical culturists or 
atheists to also be able to support the brave American and women who 
serve in our military.
  Roughly 23 percent of the men and women in our Armed Forces either 
have no religion, or are atheists; but there are no chaplains that 
currently are able to represent this important and growing demographic.
  Under current law, the Armed Forces only allow chaplains who are 
granted an endorsement by an approved religious organization and have 
received a graduate degree in theological or religious studies, 
precluding many of the seminaries and other institutions that can 
provide certification to nonreligious chaplains that could provide 
much-needed services, particularly to the roughly quarter of our 
servicemembers who have stated that they have no religious beliefs or 
are atheists.
  There's no reason why the only faith tradition and philosophical 
tradition in our military without chaplains does not have any kind of 
support to address their health concerns.
  Now, I've heard some say that, well, all members of our military, 
even those who are non-observers, are able to see psychiatrists or 
counselors for support. But that's a very different need than the 
spiritual needs and the philosophical needs that people have.
  First of all, when someone sees a psychiatrist or counselor, it has a 
certain stigma that can be attached to it that doesn't exist when 
you're seeing a chaplain. It also doesn't enjoy the same 
confidentiality that a chaplain visit does, and the information 
discussed with a therapist can actually have an impact on the chain of 
command in terms of negatively impacting the servicemember's future 
military career.
  So, again, the groundwork has already been laid with regard to 
nontheistic faiths like Buddhism, where we have active chaplains in our 
military. Many universities already have secular humanist chaplains, 
these including American University here in Washington, D.C. Other 
militaries have this as well. Our allied militaries in Belgium and the 
Netherlands have humanist chaplaincies.
  And, again, it's a very simple concept and, I think, something that 
is long overdue to ensure that all members of the military, regardless 
of their faith background, whether they're believers or not, whatever 
their philosophy is in life, they have access to the chaplaincy to 
support their spiritual needs. And, of course, nonbelievers have 
spiritual needs just as believers do.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. McKEON. Mr. Chairman, I rise to claim the time in opposition to 
the gentleman's amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from California is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. McKEON. At this time, Mr. Chairman, I yield 3 minutes to my 
friend and colleague, the gentleman from Louisiana (Dr. Fleming).
  Mr. FLEMING. I thank the chairman for the opportunity to speak on 
this important issue.
  Mr. Chairman, let's examine what a chaplain really is. A chaplain is 
a person who is a minister of the faith, someone who ministers on the 
basis of a belief in a deity, a higher power, who is associated with or 
attached to a secular organization.
  An example, right here in this House, each morning begins, each 
legislative day, begins with a prayer from our chaplain.
  Back home, the hospital that I'm associated with, Mennen Medical 
Center, my good friend, a Baptist pastor, is chaplain of our hospital. 
And so this goes to the core of the discussion.
  A chaplain is a person who is a man or woman of the faith, of 
conscience, of spirituality, who ministers to those with respect to a 
secular organization.
  I just heard the gentleman say that, well, we need atheist 
chaplains--which, to me, is an oxymoron--we need atheist chaplains to 
minister to the spiritual needs of soldiers.
  Well, by definition, as an atheist, he doesn't or she doesn't believe 
in a spiritual world. Makes no sense whatsoever.
  Mr. Chairman, the courts have affirmed that chaplains are mandated by 
the Constitution to enable military personnel to exercise faith 
according to their conscience. Nontheistic chaplains, by definition, 
cannot assist others in worship.
  For any concerns my colleague from Colorado may have as to the 
nonspiritual needs of servicemen and -women who do not hold any sort of 
faith, I would submit that the military has resources readily 
available. Counselors, psychologists, and social workers are happy to 
meet those needs.
  I would also note that current chaplains will serve with respect to 
any servicemember, religious, nonreligious, nontheistic, atheistic or 
agnostic alike who comes to them, providing these brave men and women 
with any resources they might need in their service to the Nation. So 
we have chaplains and secular advisers who can help anybody who claims 
to be or wants to be an atheist.
  Chaplains come to the military via the Department of Defense-
recognized faith groups, very important. Faith groups. It would be 
impossible for an individual who does not belong to any faith group to 
receive an endorsement, much in the same way that atheists have long 
insisted that they are not, in fact, a faith group and would thus be 
implausible that they would serve as a chaplain in the military.
  Mr. Chairman, General George Washington founded our Chaplain Corps on 
July 29, 1775, to make sure that the Continental Army could have 
worship services.
  The Acting CHAIR. The time of the gentleman has expired.
  Mr. McKEON. I yield the gentleman an additional 15 seconds.
  Mr. FLEMING. Just in summary, I would like to say this, Mr. Chairman. 
The saddest thing I could ever imagine is someone standing over a dying 
man or woman from combat and saying to them, there is no hope. If you 
die, there is no world, there is no life thereafter. That is the 
saddest thing I could ever imagine.
  Mr. POLIS. Before further yielding, I yield myself 15 seconds just to 
say I think we're seeing a double standard here where, if it's a person 
of particular faith, as perhaps the gentleman approves of, then you 
say, oh, you go see a chaplain for your needs. However, if you're of no 
faith, you have to see a psychiatrist.
  All of our men and women who bravely serve us deserve the same 
support.
  I yield the remaining time to the gentleman from New Jersey (Mr. 
Andrews).
  Mr. ANDREWS. I thank my friend for yielding.
  Nothing in this amendment in any way impairs the relationship between 
a Christian or Jewish or other soldier or servicemember and his or her 
faith leader. Nothing. Nothing in this amendment impairs the operation 
of the Chaplain Corps.
  What this amendment does is to show respect for the choices made by 
our servicemembers. My Christianity is an important part of who I am 
and how I see my life. I don't think that that same right should be 
denied to a servicemember who does not share my beliefs.
  What this amendment says is that, for the thousands of servicemembers 
who choose a humanist or atheistic philosophy system of life, that they

[[Page H3601]]

should be able to confide in an adviser who is not a mental health 
professional.
  Going to a mental health professional is a choice that's laden with 
risk and some controversy for a member of the service. Going to a faith 
adviser is not.
  Depriving those who share the views that Mr. Polis outlined of the 
chance to go to such an adviser is unequal treatment. It's unworthy of 
the way we operate.
  Nothing in this amendment disrupts the Chaplain Corps, but everything 
in this amendment respects the rights of our servicemembers. I would 
urge a ``yes'' vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman's time has expired.
  Mr. McKEON. Mr. Chairman, how much time do we have remaining?
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from California has 1\3/4\ minutes 
remaining.
  Mr. McKEON. I yield the balance of my time to the gentleman from 
Kansas (Mr. Huelskamp), my good friend.

                              {time}  1000

  Mr. HUELSKAMP. I thank the chairman. I appreciate the opportunity to 
visit here today.
  First, I'd like to visit about two heroes in the history of our 
country. One would be Father Emil Kapaun. I had the honor of being at 
the White House a couple of months ago where he was awarded the 
Congressional Medal of Honor for his bravery in action of ministering 
to the needs of not only men and women of faith, but those who claim to 
have no faith.
  In addition, I have the honor of being the nephew of a 95-year-old 
Army chaplain who also has been honored for serving, ministering to the 
needs of men and women in uniform.
  One thing I will want to note is, instead of being dismissive of 
those types of sacrifices, I will read a little bit from the duties of 
the Chaplain Corps: ``Each chaplain shall hold appropriate religious 
services at least once on each Sunday.'' Or the Navy and Marines say: 
``An officer in the Chaplain Corps may conduct public worship according 
to the manner and forms of the church of which he is a member'' and 
``shall cause divine service to be performed on Sunday.'' It goes on 
and on. Obviously, that's our understanding of the chaplaincy.
  Madam Chair, how is it that one can hold a religious service for an 
organization, as the amendment puts it, that does not consider itself 
to be a religion? It's completely contrary to the directions, 
instructions, and the very definition of the Chaplain Corps, 
represented by Father Emil Kapaun and numerous others, to extend 
appointments to groups in manners suggested by this amendment.
  When you take away the worship, the prayer, everything that makes a 
religious service religious, you are left with counselors, as has been 
indicated. There are humanist, atheist, and ethical culturalist 
counselors available to folks that serve our country. In addition, I'm 
certain every chaplain that serves our brave men and women are 
available for those who do not share their faith, and that's the case.
  I urge my colleagues to vote against this amendment and be very 
supportive of our current brave men and women who serve alongside our 
members of the Armed Forces.
  Mr. McKEON. I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR (Ms. Foxx). The question is on the amendment offered 
by the gentleman from Colorado (Mr. Polis).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. POLIS. Madam Chair, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Colorado 
will be postponed.


                 Amendment No. 23 Offered by Mr. Polis

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to the order of the House of June 13, 
2013, it is now in order to consider amendment No. 23 printed in part B 
of House Report 113-108.
  Mr. POLIS. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 79, after line 23, insert the following:

     SEC. 241. LIMITATION ON AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS FOR CERTAIN 
                   GROUND-BASED MIDCOURSE DEFENSE SYSTEM PURPOSES.

       (a) Limitation.--
       (1) In general.--None of the funds authorized to be 
     appropriated by this Act or otherwise made available for 
     fiscal year 2014 for the purposes described in paragraph (2) 
     shall be obligated or expended until the Secretary of 
     Defense--
       (A) certifies to the congressional defense committees 
     that--
       (i) the ground-based midcourse defense system has performed 
     at least two successful intercept tests at Vandenberg Air 
     Force Base, California, before October 1, 2014; and
       (ii) the Commander of the United States Northern Command 
     has full confidence in the homeland missile defense system; 
     and
       (B) submits to such committees justification with respect 
     to the national security requirement for expanding the 
     ground-based missile defense site located at Fort Greely, 
     Alaska, from 30 ground-based interceptors to 44 ground-based 
     interceptors.
       (2) Purposes described.--The purposes described in this 
     paragraph are the following:
       (A) Advance procurement of 14 ground-based interceptor 
     rocket motor sets.
       (B) The missile refurbishment project at Missile Field 1 at 
     Fort Greely, Alaska.
       (C) The mechanical-electrical building at such Missile 
     Field.
       (b) Annual Certifications.--The Secretary shall annually 
     submit to the congressional defense committees a 
     certification of whether--
       (1) the ground-based midcourse defense system has performed 
     at least two successful intercept tests at Vandenberg Air 
     Force Base, California; and
       (2) the Commander of the United States Northern Command has 
     full confidence in the homeland missile defense system.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 260, the gentleman 
from Colorado (Mr. Polis) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Colorado.
  Mr. POLIS. Madam Chair, this is a very simple amendment to reduce 
funding for the advanced procurement of 14 Ground-Based Interceptor 
missiles that simply don't work and are inefficient, and for the 
refurbishment of the costly Missile Field 1 at Fort Greely, Alaska, 
until the Department of Defense can certify to Congress that these 
programs have been adequately tested and work. It's simply a question 
of making sure that something works before we spend additional money on 
it.
  The missile defense program was designed to intercept limited 
intermediate and long-range intercontinental ballistic missiles before 
they re-enter the Earth's atmosphere. But Congress needs to ensure that 
these missiles are effective before we continue to provide the 
Department of Defense with a blank check.
  Congress needs to verify every penny of taxpayer money we spend. We 
have a time of tradeoffs, and of course it's nice to be able to support 
every program, but during this time of deficits and sequestration we 
need to make sure we are vigilant to ensure that the money we spend on 
the Pentagon actually results in the maximum amount of heightened 
national security.
  Since 1997, this weapons system has missed its target more than half 
the time. My amendment would limit the funding for the procurement of 
14 Ground-Based Interceptors until the missiles have had two successful 
tests before 2015. Very reasonable. If it doesn't have two successful 
tests, why are we investing enormous amounts of taxpayer money in it?
  So, two successful tests before 2015, certified by the Secretary of 
Defense to Congress as having the full confidence of the Commander of 
the United States Northern Command, and then it is allowed to move 
forward.
  Now, opponents of this amendment--and I saw a Dear Colleague letter 
go out talking about how there are long-range missile threats from 
North Korea and Iran--there's no question, there is complete agreement 
about the dangers to this country, the dangers of a nuclear Iran, the 
dangers of a nuclear North Korea. What we're talking about here is the 
last thing we want to do is trust in an untested and unsuccessful 
missile to deter very real threats. We need a real threat deterrent 
system, not something that doesn't work. And my amendment simply 
requires that this is working.
  My amendment would also limit funds for the missile refurbishment 
project in Missile Field 1 in Alaska. This field was never intended to 
be

[[Page H3602]]

operational. Former Defense Secretary Robert Gates and former Joint 
Chiefs Chairman Mike Mullen in 2011 said:

       Missile Field 1 was originally designed as a test bed, so 
     it lacks required hardening and redundant power, and has 
     significant infrastructure reliability issues.

  There have also been reports of mold and leaks at the facility, and 
refurbishment would come at a tremendous cost to taxpayers without 
significantly improving the security that America has.
  I urge Congress to demand that these programs work, that the programs 
we fund actually keep our families safe and are proven to work by 
certification by the Secretary of Defense.
  We need to get our fiscal house in order, we need to make tough 
choices, and we need to make sure that our expenditures on national 
defense improve national security. And simply demanding that our costly 
missile defense system is actually capable of keeping our homeland safe 
is a very reasonable amendment to the National Defense Authorization 
bill.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. McKEON. Madam Chairman, I rise to claim the time in opposition to 
the gentleman's amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from California is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. McKEON. At this time, Madam Chair, I yield 2 minutes to my friend 
and colleague, the gentleman from Colorado (Mr. Lamborn).
  Mr. LAMBORN. I thank the chairman of the full committee.
  I would urge defeat of this amendment. It would reverse what the 
Obama administration and Secretary of Defense Hagel came forward with 
on March 15 of this year. After seeing the North Korean threat only 
increase, they appropriately came to the decision to add more Ground-
Based Interceptors.
  Now, I believe the administration has been too slow to appropriately 
address the threats we have from in-coming missiles, but this is a good 
step forward, and so I applaud that.
  The Secretary said:

       We will take steps in the United States to stay ahead of 
     the challenge posed by Iran and North Korea's development of 
     longer-range ballistic missile capabilities.

  I have to agree with that. How we came to this point, I know that 
there has been some disagreement in the intelligence community, but the 
Defense Intelligence Agency said that they have moderate confidence 
that the North Koreans can put together long-range ballistic missiles 
and nuclear warheads. That is a threat we should take seriously. This 
amendment, if adopted, would not recognize that threat.
  Also, by doing advanced procurement, we save the taxpayers $200 
million. So this is ill-advised from a financial standpoint.
  The military is adopting a fly-before-you-buy approach. There was one 
successful test a few months ago, another test is scheduled toward the 
end of this year. Those will be the two tests that the author of this 
amendment says that he wants.
  So this amendment is totally unnecessary. It would delay what even 
the administration--which has been a little too slow--has said is 
appropriate. We should not slow things down further. The threats are 
real, they are serious, and we need to fund them appropriately.
  I ask that you defeat this dangerous amendment.
  Mr. McKEON. I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. POLIS. I'd like to inquire of the Chair how much time remains.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Colorado has 1\1/2\ minutes 
remaining.
  Mr. POLIS. I yield myself the balance of my time.
  Again, I think that to have any type of meaningful missile defense 
against potential threats in Korea, Iran, and elsewhere, it needs to 
work. That's simply what this amendment says--two tests that work 
before $107 million in spending goes forth.

                              {time}  1010

  This is the financially responsible thing to do. Why would we want to 
spend first stage 107 million, over 6 years over a billion, on a system 
that doesn't work?
  It's a very reasonable threshold to have a certification by the 
Department of Defense if this works. It provides an additional 
incentive to make sure that America stays safe, demonstrates this 
works, have an incentive to actually make it work before the rest of 
the money is released.
  I think that's common sense. I think it aligns incentives of our 
contractors and our military and the defense of the American people. I 
think it's fiscally prudent. I think it improves our missile defense 
opportunities against threats from North Korea, Iran, and elsewhere; 
and I strongly encourage my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to 
adopt this commonsense amendment that would save over 107 million for 
the ground-based interceptors in the first year, 135 million for the 
refurbishment of Missile Field 1, and also ensure that our missile 
defense system works by having two tests and a certification that it's 
operational by the Secretary of Defense.
  I encourage my colleagues to support the amendment, and I yield back 
the balance of my time.
  Mr. McKEON. Madam Chair, I yield 1 minute to my friend and colleague, 
the gentleman from Texas, the vice chair of our committee, Mr. 
Thornberry.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Madam Chair, I'm convinced that the arguments against 
missile defense are the same today that they were the day that 
President Reagan proposed it: you can't do it, it costs too much, and 
it's provocative to try.
  And it doesn't really matter how the threat evolves, what North Korea 
or Iran do, and it doesn't really matter how the technology evolves. We 
just had a successful test just a few months ago.
  The events and facts don't matter. The arguments are still the same, 
and they will always be the same because some people just don't want to 
defend the country against missile attack.
  This committee pushed in 2010, in 2011, and in 2012 to have more 
interceptors on the west coast. The President opposed it every step of 
the way. It didn't happen. And then, all of a sudden, with North Korea 
this year, the President changes his mind and says, Oh, maybe you all 
were right after all. At least the President changed his mind. 
Unfortunately, it seems like some people cannot even do that.
  A lot of us think the administration is not doing enough, but to do 
less would be negligent, and I think we should reject this amendment.
  Mr. McKEON. Might I inquire how much time we have remaining?
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from California has 2 minutes 
remaining.
  Mr. McKEON. Madam Chair, I yield the balance of my time to the 
gentleman from Arizona, a member of our committee, Mr. Franks.
  Mr. FRANKS of Arizona. Madam Chair, ever since mankind took up arms 
against his fellow human beings, there has always been an offensive 
capability and a defensive capability to try to match it. The spear was 
met with the shield. The bullet was met with armor. And, today, we face 
the most dangerous weapons in the history of humanity in nuclear-armed 
missiles.
  Madam Chair, we should have a capable defense. Our ground-based 
midcourse defense is the only system that we have that protects the 
American homeland from intercontinental ballistic missiles coming into 
this country. And, Madam Chair, it is a limited capability, and we 
should not further limit it in our policies here today.
  As has been so eloquently stated earlier, the President of the United 
States cut our GBI capability in recent years and now has changed his 
mind to where we will go from 30 to 44 interceptors. And with a 3- or 
4-to-1 shot doctrine, that may give us the ability to defend ourselves 
up against as many as a dozen incoming missiles.
  Madam Chair, it's all right if we have a few too many, but if we have 
one too few, it changes everything. Across the world, we've all 
understood that the more we sweat in peace, the less we bleed in war. 
We need desperately to make sure that we do our fundamental job in this 
Congress and in this Federal Government by making sure that we protect 
the citizens against the most dangerous weapons mankind has ever 
devised, and, Madam Chair, this is why we want to reject this 
amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Colorado (Mr. Polis).

[[Page H3603]]

  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. POLIS. Madam Chair, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Colorado 
will be postponed.


               Amendment No. 39 Offered by Mr. Van Hollen

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 39 
printed in part B of House Report 113-108.
  Mr. VAN HOLLEN. Madam Chairman, I rise to offer the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 563, after line 11, insert the following:

     SEC. 1510. FUNDING LEVELS AS REQUESTED IN PRESIDENT'S BUDGET.

       (a) Reductions.--Notwithstanding the amounts set forth in 
     the funding tables in division D, the amounts authorized to 
     be appropriated in this subtitle, as specified in the 
     corresponding funding tables in sections 4102, 4202, 4302, 
     4402, and 4502, for additional funds for overseas contingency 
     operations are hereby reduced by a total of $5,043,828,000.
       (b) Deficit Reduction.--The amount reduced under subsection 
     (a) shall not be available for any purpose other than deficit 
     reduction.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 260, the gentleman 
from Maryland (Mr. Van Hollen) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Maryland.
  Mr. VAN HOLLEN. Madam Chairman, I yield myself 1 minute.
  I'm very pleased to offer this bipartisan amendment along with my 
colleagues, Mr. Mulvaney, Mr. Moran, and Mr. Woodall. I'm very pleased 
that it has the support of the ranking member of the Armed Services 
Committee, Mr. Smith.
  This amendment is about truth in budgeting and making sure our 
military has the resources it needs to prosecute the war in Afghanistan 
and overseas contingency operations. The Defense Department budget is 
split into two parts: the base budget for ongoing operations and the 
part of the budget for the war and overseas contingency operations.
  What this budget does is provide the military with exactly the 
resources they say they need in fiscal year 2014 for the overseas 
contingency account. In fact, on Wednesday, Secretary of Defense Hagel 
and the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Dempsey, General Dempsey, 
said that what they needed was what would be provided as a result of 
this amendment. The problem is the underlying bill added another $5 
billion, and this is becoming a slush fund, Madam Chairman.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. McKEON. Madam Chair, I rise to claim the time in opposition to 
the gentleman's amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. McKEON. I yield 1 minute at this time to my friend and colleague, 
the chair of the Readiness Subcommittee, the gentleman from Virginia 
(Mr. Wittman).
  Mr. WITTMAN. Madam Chairman, ladies and gentlemen, our most important 
job here, our most sacred duty as outlined in article 1, section 8 of 
the Constitution is to ``raise and support Armies''--to support the men 
and women we ask to fight on behalf of our Nation on the fields of 
battle. This money supports our constitutional duty and, most 
importantly, our warfighters.
  This amendment seriously jeopardizes national security and our 
ability to replenish readiness accounts raided in prior years to fund 
underfunded war costs.
  The majority of our forces still fighting Afghanistan will be there 
at least until December 2014. Remember, the goal is December 2014. The 
war is not over, and these funds are needed to help them do their jobs 
and execute their missions as outlined in the strategic plan.
  Stripping this money from the overseas contingency fund, literally 
from our all-volunteer force that is engaged in combat operations, 
places the plan in jeopardy and makes the December 2014 goal 
irrelevant.
  Mr. VAN HOLLEN. Madam Chairman, I find it interesting that the 
gentleman would suggest that the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff 
and the Secretary of Defense are not asking for the resources needed to 
protect our men and women in battle.
  I now yield 1\1/2\ minutes to Mr. Mulvaney.
  Mr. MULVANEY. Madam Chairwoman, I haven't been here very long, only 3 
years, but I've seen a pattern developing now which is that each year 
the Defense Department, the Pentagon, comes over and asks for a certain 
amount of money, and then we give them more than they ask for.
  What the amendment does today is simply gives the Pentagon what they 
ask for. They asked for $80 billion to run the overseas contingency 
operation. For some reason, we decided to give them 85 billion. They 
come in; they defined a mission and they tell us what it costs to do 
that; and then, for some reason, we decide to give them more. All we're 
doing today is taking the folks who run the military at their word that 
they know what it costs to defend this Nation.
  I think it bears repeating that both Secretary Hagel and the Chairman 
of the Joint Chiefs were here just last week and said that $80 billion 
worth of OCO funding was enough to meet the mission. Simply spending 
more money than the Defense Department asks for does not mean we are 
stronger on defense than anybody else. It's simply foolish to waste 
money. If the Pentagon tells us they need $80 billion, we should look 
seriously at giving them $80 billion.

                              {time}  1020

  I disagree respectfully with my friend from Virginia who says that 
this amendment will hurt national security. If you assume that, then 
you must assume that what the Pentagon asked for in the first place 
would hurt national security.
  I'm simply not willing to agree to that. I'm not willing to believe 
that the Pentagon would come over and ask for an amount of money that 
would be bad for national defense.
  This is a commonsense amendment, it gives the Defense Department 
exactly what they need, and it gets us out of this rut of equating 
higher spending with a stronger nation defense.
  Mr. McKEON. Madam Chair, I might note that the same gentleman last 
year said they haven't had enough money, and they spent $13 billion 
more.
  At this time, I yield 1 minute to my friend and colleague, the 
gentleman from Nevada, Dr. Heck.
  Mr. HECK of Nevada. Madam Chair, I rise in strong opposition to the 
amendment.
  This amendment will severely undermine the operational readiness of 
our Guard and Reserve forces. Over the past decade, we have built 
incredible capability in our Guard and Reserve, and that capability was 
largely paid for by overseas contingency operation funds.
  To mitigate the risk associated with this administration's force 
reductions of 100,000 Active component servicemembers, our Nation will 
have to rely on our Reserve component. In fact, in testimony before the 
House Armed Services Committee, Army Chief of Staff General Odierno 
stated that ``in order to lessen the risk of Active Duty force 
reductions, the Army will continue to rely on Reserve components to 
provide key enablers and operational depth.''
  Decreased funding has already resulted in the cancelation of numerous 
of Guard and Reserve deployments, which substantially undermines the 
capabilities and readiness of these units.
  It is for these reasons that I strongly urge my colleagues to reject 
this amendment.
  Mr. VAN HOLLEN. Madam Chairman, I would just urge all Members to read 
the amendment itself. There is nothing in here that says we will reduce 
one penny from the National Guard and Reserve. This is an across-the-
board provision and it will be disproportionate.
  At this time, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from Virginia (Mr. 
Moran).
  Mr. MORAN. Madam Chairman, I rise in support of this amendment.
  We are about to authorize more than half a trillion dollars for our 
military. The Secretary of Defense and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of 
Staff says ``we don't want or need this extra $5

[[Page H3604]]

billion.'' What's our response? We tell him, No, you have to spend 
that, but you also have to cut $50 billion from our military in the 
most stupid, irresponsible, irrational manner possible. And within that 
$50 billion you have to get $2 billion of savings by furloughing 
650,000 Department of Defense employees.
  So we are going to save $2 billion by furloughing 650,000 people, but 
we are going to force them to spend $5 billion over in Afghanistan 
while we furlough people here.
  What's the rationale? We can't justify that. Of course we should hold 
to what our military says they need in Afghanistan. We ought to also 
give them what they feel they need here in the United States.
  Mr. McKEON. Madam Chair, let me note that the National Guard 
Association, the Reserve Officers Association, and the National 
Governors Association all oppose this amendment.
  At this time, I would like to yield 1 minute to my friend and 
colleague, chair of the Seapower Subcommittee, the gentleman from 
Virginia (Mr. Forbes).
  Mr. FORBES. Madam Chairman, over the last 4 years, the administration 
has told the Pentagon--the Pentagon has come back--and they have cut 
out of national defense $778 billion before they even get to 
sequestration. Each time they acknowledge they increase the risk, and 
their definition of ``risk'' is ``acceptable risk.'' When you ask them 
what that means, it means how many ships we can lose, how many planes 
we can lose, how many men and women we can lose and still have some 
probability that we will win the conflict if every single assumption 
that they make holds true.
  If you support that definition of acceptable risk, you need to vote 
for this amendment. But I believe we need to change the definition of 
acceptable risk and say it means this: when we send one of our men and 
women into conflict we have done everything reasonably possible to make 
sure they have the highest probability possible of returning to the 
home they are defending and to the families that they love.
  If you support that definition of acceptable risk, you need to defeat 
this amendment.
  The ACTING CHAIR. The gentleman from Maryland has 1 minute and 15 
seconds remaining.
  Mr. VAN HOLLEN. Thank you, Madam Chairman.
  At this time, I yield 1 minute to my friend, the gentleman from 
Georgia (Mr. Woodall).
  Mr. WOODALL. Madam Chair, I rise in strong support of this amendment.
  I would say to my friends on the Republican side of the aisle who 
have spoken, I agree with absolutely everything you have said. But as I 
look at the chairman, who I know has more of a love for this Nation and 
our national security than perhaps any other Member of this body, he 
and I both voted in favor of the Budget Control Act in August of 2011. 
Rightly or wrongly, we set the law of the land of how much we were 
going to spend on national defense. Today, we are talking about how 
much we are going to spend in Afghanistan.
  If we need to spend more money to improve National Guard readiness 
here at home, to deal with maintenance accounts here at home, we need 
to come together and change those budget caps; and I support doing 
that. But I am tired of living in a town where when you don't like the 
rules, you find a way around them. When the President doesn't like the 
law of the land, he just ignores it. If we don't like the defense 
budget caps, we just ignore it and fund it through OCO instead.
  We ought to give the Joint Chiefs of Staff every penny they're asking 
for to support our men and women in Afghanistan. If they come back and 
ask for more, we should give them every penny of that as well.
  But the law means something; these caps mean something. We should 
either change it or stick with it, Madam Chair.
  Mr. McKEON. Note that OCO was not included in the Budget Control Act, 
and we are totally within the Budget Control Act on this budget.
  Madam Chairman, at this time, I yield 30 seconds to my friend and 
colleague, the gentleman from Utah (Mr. Bishop).
  Mr. BISHOP of Utah. Madam Chair, as counterintuitive as it may 
appear, when there is a drawdown, there may be a long-term savings, but 
short-term savings are not there. In fact, the cost spikes.
  As all the equipment comes back from the warrior that has to go to 
the depots for resetting, repair, and restoration, that is an extreme 
cost that has to be borne by the depots if it is not in this particular 
bill.
  That is one of the reasons why I support the chair's mark, which is 
supported by the chairman, as well as Chairman Ryan, and as well as the 
original Obama budget when it was sent here before. For whatever 
reason, they decided to pull $5 billion out without giving us a plan 
going forward. This needs to stay.
  The ACTING CHAIR. The gentleman from Maryland has 15 seconds 
remaining.
  Mr. VAN HOLLEN. Thank you, Madam Chairman.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. McKEON. Madam Chairman, might I inquire as to the time we have 
left.
  The ACTING CHAIR. The gentleman from California has 1\1/2\ minutes 
remaining. The gentleman from Maryland has 15 seconds remaining.
  Mr. McKEON. And who will be closing?
  The ACTING CHAIR. The gentleman from California has the right to 
close.
  Mr. McKEON. Thank you, Madam Chairman.
  I yield 1 minute to my friend and colleague, a member of the 
Appropriations Subcommittee, the gentleman from New Jersey (Mr. 
Frelinghuysen).
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. Madam Chairman, I thank the gentleman for 
yielding.
  I rise in opposition to this amendment.
  The rationale we have been talking about here is a human rationale. 
We have, as we speak, over 60,000 military serving doing the work of 
freedom in Afghanistan.
  As they prepare to leave, we should not be cutting funding in these 
very dangerous times. As you are leaving, you are incredibly 
vulnerable. They're still in the fight, they're still working hard, 
they need to protect themselves.
  While the administration hasn't offered any strategic plan, other 
than a date for withdrawal, those who serve there deserve our support 
because they have an important mission to perform. Whether it is in 
Kabul or a forward-operating base, they are in a dangerous situation.
  The reality is that things in Afghanistan are hotter than the 
administration estimated in their budget request. We need this money 
for contingencies. We need this money because of the delay due to 
Pakistan affecting our ground transportation--our exit.
  I strongly oppose this amendment and urge my colleagues to do it as 
well.
  Mr. VAN HOLLEN. Madam Chairman, I continue to reserve the balance of 
my time.
  Mr. McKEON. Madam Chairman, I yield 30 seconds to my friend and 
colleague, the gentlelady from Tennessee (Mrs. Blackburn).

                              {time}  1030

  Mrs. BLACKBURN. Thank you, Madam Chairman.
  Today, I stand to support keeping the money--that $5 billion--that we 
need for readiness, and here is why: I think it is absolutely immoral 
that we would sign up, suit up and ship out men and women in uniform 
and not give them the readiness and the skills and the training that 
they need. The flying hours program is a great example of that. In the 
$5 billion that the gentleman would like to cut is the money for the 
flying hours program--37,000 flying hours. It would equip us with 500 
aviators, whom we need. Let's fund these efforts for the men and women 
in uniform.
  Mr. VAN HOLLEN. Madam Chairman, I find it interesting that the 
gentlelady would suggest that the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of 
Staff, General Dempsey, would ask for an amount of money for our 
warfighters that is immoral. What is cynical is to use the Afghan and 
overseas contingency account as a slush fund to fund operations that 
are part of the base budget.
  This is about truth in budgeting. I urge my colleagues to support 
this bipartisan amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.

[[Page H3605]]

  The Acting CHAIR. The time of the gentleman from California has 
expired.
  The question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman from 
Maryland (Mr. Van Hollen).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. VAN HOLLEN. Madam Chair, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Maryland 
will be postponed.


                  Amendment No. 53 Offered by Mr. Walz

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 53 
printed in part B of House Report 113-108.
  Mr. WALZ. I have an amendment at the desk, Madam Chair.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of subtitle C of title V, add the following new 
     section:

     SEC. 5__. COMPTROLLER GENERAL REPORT ON USE OF DETERMINATION 
                   OF PERSONALITY DISORDER OR ADJUSTMENT DISORDER 
                   AS BASIS TO SEPARATE MEMBERS FROM THE ARMED 
                   FORCES.

       Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of 
     this Act, the Comptroller General of the United States shall 
     submit to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and 
     the House of Representatives a report evaluating--
       (1) the use by the Secretaries of the military departments, 
     since January 1, 2007, of the authority to separate members 
     of the Armed Forces from the Armed Forces due of unfitness 
     for duty because of a mental condition not amounting to 
     disability, including separation on the basis of a 
     personality disorder or adjustment disorder and the total 
     number of members separated on such basis;
       (2) the extent to which the Secretaries failed to comply 
     with regulatory requirements in separating members of the 
     Armed Forces on the basis of a personality or adjustment 
     disorder; and
       (3) the impact of such a separation on the ability of 
     veterans so separated to access service-connected disability 
     compensation, disability severance pay, and disability 
     retirement pay.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 260, the gentleman 
from Minnesota (Mr. Walz) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Minnesota.
  Mr. WALZ. Madam Chair, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Sergeant Chuck Luther joined the Army after the 9/11 attacks. He 
served in Iraq until a mortar round hit near him, knocking him 
unconscious. What followed were classic symptoms of traumatic brain 
injury--blurred vision, chronic pain, and trouble concentrating.
  Liz Luras served this Nation honorably as a soldier in the United 
States Army. She survived a rape at the hands of her fellow 
servicemember. She did her best to continue her military service with 
the dream of attending West Point. She was raped two more times, with 
police reports and hospital visits to prove it.
  I know each of my colleagues here would expect that both of these 
warriors would receive the best care this Nation could provide. Sadly, 
the reality is far from that.
  Along with Liz and Chuck, since 2001, over 31,000 of our warriors 
have been discharged from the military, without benefits, because they 
were determined to have had a personality or an adjustment disorder. 
These are considered preexisting conditions, which means they should 
never have been allowed to enlist in the first place. Even though 
Sergeant Luther had multiple mental health evaluations and served 
honorably for a decade, it was only after the mortar attack that the 
military determined he had a preexisting condition, casually threw him 
away and denied him benefits and health care.
  A 2008 GAO study concluded that at least 40 percent of these 
personality discharges were handed down without going through the 
proper Department of Defense process, which means without the 
servicemember's being diagnosed by a licensed mental health 
professional, without the servicemember's receiving notification of his 
discharge and without the servicemember's receiving any formal 
counseling. Five years after this report, Congress has done nothing to 
ensure that these servicemembers' records are reviewed or corrected, or 
to ensure that they receive the care that they earned serving this 
Nation.
  This week, the gentleman from California (Mr. Denham) and I presented 
an amendment to this bill that would have allowed these warriors the 
basic appeal process to determine if they were improperly discharged. 
This amendment is the same as a bill I have, H.R. 975. This would only 
afford these warriors basic rights and due processes--the same ones 
that they put their lives on the line for that we have. That amendment 
was not allowed to come to this floor for debate or for a vote. Shame 
on us.
  A second amendment I offered would have simply put a moratorium on 
this process until we understood why it was being done and what was 
happening. That amendment was not allowed to come to this floor to be 
debated or voted on. Shame on us.
  Now, I want to be clear: the chairman and the ranking member of this 
committee had nothing to do with those decisions, and I am appreciative 
that they allowed the amendment that I'm debating today to be brought 
here. That's going to allow us to do another GAO study to determine if 
the problem is still there.
  Fine and good, but I'll tell you what: Chuck Luther doesn't want a 
study--he wants justice. Liz Luras doesn't want a study--she wants 
justice. The American people don't want another study--they want 
justice for their warriors.
  I would ask each of my colleagues to go home this weekend and ask 
your constituents if they think this is fair and if they want a study, 
or if they'd rather do what's right and take care of these warriors.
  I'd also challenge my colleagues to ask the questions: Why wasn't the 
amendment made in order? Why couldn't we debate other than have a 
study?
  So I ask my colleagues to support this amendment. It's something. It 
will let us know what the scope of this self-inflicted injury and 
tragedy to our Nation is. It's not enough. It's not nearly enough. We 
should be ashamed that we've not shown Liz and Chuck the same respect 
and courage that they showed us as a Nation to serve in uniform. I, for 
one, am not going to rest until justice is served, our warriors are 
cared for and this wrong is made right.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. McKEON. Madam Chair, I rise to claim the time in opposition, but 
I will not oppose the gentleman's amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman from California is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. McKEON. I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Minnesota has 1 minute 
remaining.
  Mr. WALZ. I rise once again to thank the chairman. I thank him for 
understanding this.
  As I say again very clearly, this was not the chairman's decision. He 
was gracious enough to bring this down, and I appreciate his support--
the same to the ranking member.
  I would just say to my colleagues: don't let this issue drop. Get 
this right. We owe it to our warriors.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Minnesota (Mr. Walz).
  The amendment was agreed to.


             Amendments En Bloc No. 8 Offered by Mr. McKeon

  Mr. McKEON. Madam Chair, pursuant to H. Res. 260, I offer amendments 
en bloc.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendments en bloc.
  Amendments en bloc No. 8 consisting of amendment Nos. 73, 146, 149, 
150, 152, 153, 156, 157, 158, 161, 163, 166, 170, 171, and 172, printed 
in House Report No. 113-108, offered by Mr. McKeon of California:


         amendment no. 73 offered by mr. swalwell of california

       Page 273, after line 10, insert the following:

     SEC. 595. GIFTS MADE FOR THE BENEFIT OF MILITARY MUSICAL 
                   UNITS.

       Section 974 of title 10, United States Code, is amended--
       (1) by redesignating subsections (d) and (e) as subsections 
     (e) and (f), respectively; and
       (2) by inserting after subsection (c) the following:
       ``(d) Performances Funded by Private Donation.--
     Notwithstanding section 2601(c) of this title, any gift made 
     to the Secretary of Defense under section 2601 on the 
     condition that such gift be used for the benefit of

[[Page H3606]]

     a military musical unit shall be credited to the 
     appropriation or account providing the funds for such 
     military musical unit. Any amount so credited shall be merged 
     with amounts in the appropriation or account to which 
     credited, and shall be available for the same purposes, and 
     subject to the same conditions and limitations, as amounts in 
     such appropriation or account.''.


          amendment no. 146 offered by mr. conyers of michigan

       Page 551, line 12, add at the end before the period the 
     following: ``or Iran''.


           amendment no. 149 offered by mr. hanna of new york

       Page 582, insert after line 25 the following:

     SEC. 1607. CREDIT FOR CERTAIN SUBCONTRACTORS .

       (a) In General.--Section 8(d) of the Small Business Act (15 
     U.S.C. 637(d)) is amended by adding at the end the following:
       ``(16) Credit for certain subcontractor.--For purposes of 
     determining whether or not a prime contractor has attained 
     the percentage goals specified in paragraph (6)--
       ``(A) if the subcontracting goals pertain only to a single 
     contract with the executive agency, the prime contractor 
     shall receive credit for small business concerns performing 
     as first tier subcontractors or subcontractors at any tier 
     pursuant to the subcontracting plans required under paragraph 
     (6)(D) in an amount equal to the dollar value of work awarded 
     to such small business concerns; and
       ``(B) if the subcontracting goals pertain to more than one 
     contract with one or more executive agencies, or to one 
     contract with more than one executive agency, the prime 
     contractor may only count first tier subcontractors that are 
     small business concerns.''.
       (b) Definitions Pertaining to Subcontracting.--Section 3 of 
     the Small Business Act (15 U.S.C. 632) is amended by adding 
     at the end the following:
       ``(dd) Definitions Pertaining to Subcontracting.--In this 
     Act:
       ``(1) Subcontract.--The term `subcontract' means a legally 
     binding agreement between a contractor that is already under 
     contract to another party to perform work, and a third party, 
     hereinafter referred to as the subcontractor, for the 
     subcontractor to perform a part, or all, of the work that the 
     contractor has undertaken.
       ``(2) First tier subcontractor.--The term `first tier 
     subcontractor' means a subcontractor who has a subcontract 
     directly with the prime contractor.
       ``(3) At any tier.--The term `at any tier' means any 
     subcontractor other than a subcontractor who is a first tier 
     subcontractor.''.

     SEC. 1608. GAO STUDY ON SUBCONTRACTING REPORTING SYSTEMS.

       Not later than 365 days after the date of enactment of this 
     Act, the Comptroller General of the United States shall 
     submit to the Committee on Small Business of the House of 
     Representatives and to the Committee on Small Business and 
     Entrepreneurship of the Senate a report studying the 
     feasibility of using Federal subcontracting reporting 
     systems, including the Federal subaward reporting system 
     required by section 2 of the Federal Funding Accountability 
     and Transparency Act of 2006 and any electronic 
     subcontracting reporting award system used by the Small 
     Business Administration, to attribute subcontractors to 
     particular contracts in the case of contractors that have 
     subcontracting plans under section 8(d) of the Small Business 
     Act that pertain to multiple contracts with executive 
     agencies.


          amendment no. 150 offered by mr. graves of missouri

       Page 582, insert after line 25 the following:

     SEC. 1607. INAPPLICABILITY OF REQUIREMENT TO REVIEW AND 
                   JUSTIFY CERTAIN CONTRACTS.

       In the case of a contract to which the provisions of 
     section 46 of the Small Business Act (15 U.S.C. 657s) apply, 
     the requirements under section 802 of the National Defense 
     Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2013 do not apply.


          amendment no. 152 offered by mr. collins of georgia

       At the end of title XXI, add the following new section:

     SECTION ____. TRANSFER OF ADMINISTRATIVE JURISDICTION, CAMP 
                   FRANK D. MERRILL, DAHLONEGA, GEORGIA.

       (a) Transfer Required.--Not later than September 30, 2014, 
     the Secretary of Agriculture shall transfer to the 
     administrative jurisdiction of the Secretary of the Army for 
     required Army force protection measures certain Federal land 
     administered as part of the Chattahoochee National Forest, 
     but permitted to the Secretary of the Army for Camp Frank D. 
     Merrill in Dahlonega, Georgia, consisting of approximately 
     282.304 acres identified in the permit numbered 0018-01.
       (b) Use of Transferred Land.--Upon receipt of the land 
     under subsection (a), the Secretary of the Army shall 
     continue to use the land for military purposes.
       (c) Protection of the Etowah Darter and Holiday Darter.--
     Nothing in the transfer required by subsection (a) shall 
     affect the prior designation of lands within the 
     Chattahoochee National Forest as critical habitat for the 
     Etowah darter (Etheostoma etowahae) and the Holiday darter 
     (Etheostoma brevirostrum).
       (d) Legal Description and Map.--
       (1) Preparation and publication.--The Secretary of 
     Agriculture shall publish in the Federal Register a legal 
     description and map of the land to be transferred under 
     subsection (a) not later than 180 days of this Act's 
     enactment.
       (2) Force of law.--The legal description and map filed 
     under paragraph (1) shall have the same force and effect as 
     if included in this Act, except that the Secretary of 
     Agriculture may correct errors in the legal description and 
     map.
       (e) Reimbursements of Costs.--The transfer required by 
     subsection (a) shall be made without reimbursement, except 
     that the Secretary of the Army shall reimburse the Secretary 
     of Agriculture for any costs incurred by the Secretary of 
     Agriculture to prepare the legal description and map under 
     subsection (c).


        amendment no. 153 offered by mr. murphy of pennsylvania

       At the end of title XXVII, add the following new section:

     SEC. 27__. CONSIDERATION OF THE VALUE OF SERVICES PROVIDED BY 
                   A LOCAL COMMUNITY TO THE ARMED FORCES AS PART 
                   OF THE ECONOMIC ANALYSIS IN MAKING BASE 
                   REALIGNMENT OR CLOSURE DECISIONS.

       As part of the economic analysis conducted in making any 
     base realignment or closure decision under section 2687 of 
     title 10, United States Code, or other base realignment or 
     closure authority, or in making any decision under section 
     993 of such title to reduce the number of members of the 
     armed forces assigned at a military installation, the 
     Secretary of Defense shall include an accounting of the value 
     of services, such as schools, libraries, and utilities, as 
     well as land, structures, and access to infrastructure, such 
     as airports and seaports, that are provided by the local 
     community to the military installation and that result in 
     cost savings for the Armed Forces.


         amendment no. 156 offered by mr. blumenauer of oregon

       Page 617, after line 22, insert the following:

     SEC. 2809. DEVELOPMENT OF MASTER PLANS FOR MAJOR MILITARY 
                   INSTALLATIONS.

       Section 2864 of title 10, United States Code, is amended--
       (1) in subsection (a)--
       (A) by striking ``At a time'' and inserting ``(1) At a 
     time''; and
       (B) by adding at the end the following new paragraph:
       ``(2) To address the requirements under paragraph (1), each 
     installation master plan shall include consideration of--
       ``(A) planning for compact and infill development;
       ``(B) horizontal and vertical mixed-use development;
       ``(C) the full lifecycle costs of planning decisions;
       ``(D) healthy communities with a focus on walking, running 
     and biking infrastructure, pedestrian and cycling plans, and 
     community green and garden space; and
       ``(E) capacity planning through the establishment of growth 
     boundaries around cantonment areas to focus development 
     towards the core and preserve range and training space.''.
       (2) in subsection (b)--
       (A) by striking ``The transportation'' and inserting ``(1) 
     The transportation''; and
       (B) by adding at the end the following new paragraph:
       ``(2) To address the requirements under subsection (a) and 
     paragraph (1), each installation master plan shall include 
     consideration of ways to diversify and connect transit 
     systems that do not neglect the pedestrian realm and enable 
     safe walking or biking.'';
       (3) by redesignating subsection (c) as subsection (e); and
       (4) by inserting after subsection (b) the following new 
     subsections:
       ``(c) Vertical Mixed Uses.--A master plan for a major 
     military installation shall be designed to strongly multi-
     story, mixed-use facility solutions that are sited in 
     walkable complexes so as to avoid, when reasonable, single-
     purpose, inflexible facilities that are sited in a sprawling 
     manner. Vertical mixed-use infrastructure can integrate 
     government, non-government, or jointly financed construction 
     within a single unit.
       ``(d) Savings Clause.--Nothing in this section shall 
     supercede the requirements of section 2859(a) of this 
     title.''.


          amendment no. 157 offered by mr. gardner of colorado

       At the end of subtitle B of title XXVIII, add the following 
     new section:

     SEC. 28__. CONDITIONS ON DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE EXPANSION OF 
                   PINON CANYON MANEUVER SITE, FORT CARSON, 
                   COLORADO.

       (a) Findings.--Congress finds the following:
       (1) Following Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor, Fort Carson 
     was established in 1942 and has since been a vital 
     contributor to our Nation's defense and a valued part of the 
     State of Colorado.
       (2) The units at Fort Carson have served with a great honor 
     and distinction in the current War on Terror.
       (3) The current Pinon Canyon Maneuver Site near Fort 
     Carson, Colorado, plays an important role in training our men 
     and women in uniform so they are as prepared and effective as 
     possible before going off to war.

[[Page H3607]]

       (b) Conditions on Expansion.--The Secretary of Defense and 
     the Secretary of the Army may not acquire any land to expand 
     the size of the Pinon Canyon Maneuver Site near Fort Carson, 
     Colorado, unless each of the following occurs:
       (1) The land acquisition is specifically authorized in an 
     Act of Congress enacted after the date of the enactment of 
     this Act.
       (2) Funds are specifically appropriated for the land 
     acquisition.
       (3) The Secretary of Defense or the Secretary of the Army, 
     as the case may be, completes an environmental impact 
     statement with respect to the land acquisition.


         amendment no. 158 offered by mr. hunter of california

       At the end of subtitle F of title XXVIII, add the 
     following:

     SEC. 2866. INCLUSION OF EMBLEMS OF BELIEF AS PART OF MILITARY 
                   MEMORIALS.

       (a) Inclusion of Emblems of Belief Authorized.--Chapter 21 
     of title 36, United States Code, is amended by adding at the 
     end the following:

     ``Sec. 2115. Inclusion of emblems of belief as part of 
       military memorials

       ``(a) Authorized Inclusion.--For the purpose of honoring 
     the sacrifice of members of the United States Armed Forces, 
     including those members who make the ultimate sacrifice in 
     defense of the United States, emblems of belief may be 
     included as part of--
       ``(1) a military memorial that is established or acquired 
     by the United States Government; or
       ``(2) a military memorial that is not established by the 
     United States Government, but for which the American Battle 
     Monuments Commission cooperated in the establishment of the 
     memorial.
       ``(b) Scope of Inclusion.--When including emblems of belief 
     as part of a military memorial, any approved emblem of belief 
     may be included on such a memorial. The list of approved 
     emblems of belief shall include, at a minimum, all those 
     emblems of belief authorized by the National Cemetery 
     Administration.
       ``(c) Definitions.--In this section:
       ``(1) The terms `emblem of belief' and `emblems of belief' 
     refer to the emblems of belief contained on the list 
     maintained by the National Cemetery Administration for 
     placement on Government-provided headstones and markers.
       ``(2) The term `military memorial' means a memorial or 
     monument commemorating the service of the United States Armed 
     Forces. The term includes works of architecture and art 
     described in section 2105(b) of this title.''.
       (b) Clerical Amendment.--The table of sections at the 
     beginning of such chapter is amended by adding at the end the 
     following:

``2115. Inclusion of emblems of belief as part of military 
              memorials.''.


        amendment no. 161 offered by mr. hastings of washington

       At the end of subtitle D of title XXXI, insert the 
     following:

     SEC. 3145. CONVEYANCE OF LAND AT THE HANFORD SITE.

       (a) Conveyance Required.--
       (1) In general.--Not later than 90 days after the date of 
     the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Energy shall 
     convey, for consideration at the estimated fair market value 
     or, in accordance with paragraph (2), below such value, to 
     the Community Reuse Organization of the Hanford Site (in this 
     section referred to as the ``Organization'') all right, 
     title, and interest of the United States in and to the real 
     property, including any improvements thereon, described in 
     paragraph (3).
       (2) Consideration.--The Secretary may convey real property 
     pursuant to paragraph (1) for consideration below the 
     estimated fair market value of the real property, or without 
     consideration, only if the Organization--
       (A) agrees that the net proceeds from any sale or lease of 
     the real property (or any portion thereof) received by the 
     Organization during at least the seven-year period beginning 
     on the date of such conveyance will be used to support the 
     economic redevelopment of, or related to, the Hanford Site; 
     and
       (B) executes the agreement for such conveyance and accepts 
     control of the real property within a reasonable time.
       (3) Real property described.--The real property described 
     in this paragraph is the real property consisting of two 
     parcels of land of approximately 1,341 acres and 300 acres, 
     respectively, of the Hanford Reservation, as requested by the 
     Community Reuse Organization for the Hanford Site on May 31, 
     2011, and October 13, 2011, and as depicted within the 
     proposed boundaries on the map titled ``Attachment 2--Revised 
     Map'' included in the letter sent by the Community Reuse 
     Organization for the Hanford Site to the Department of Energy 
     on October 13, 2011.
       (b) Priority Consideration.--The Secretary shall actively 
     solicit, and provide priority consideration to, the views of 
     the cities and counties adjacent to the Hanford Site with 
     respect to the development and execution of the Hanford 
     Comprehensive Land Use Plan.


        amendment no. 163 offered by mr. hastings of washington

       At the end of title XXXI, add the following new section:

     SEC. 31__. MANHATTAN PROJECT NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK.

       (a) Purposes.--The purposes of this section are--
       (1) to preserve and protect for the benefit of present and 
     future generations the nationally significant historic 
     resources associated with the Manhattan Project and which are 
     under the jurisdiction of the Department of Energy defense 
     environmental cleanup program under this title;
       (2) to improve public understanding of the Manhattan 
     Project and the legacy of the Manhattan Project through 
     interpretation of the historic resources associated with the 
     Manhattan Project;
       (3) to enhance public access to the Historical Park 
     consistent with protection of public safety, national 
     security, and other aspects of the mission of the Department 
     of Energy; and
       (4) to assist the Department of Energy, Historical Park 
     communities, historical societies, and other interested 
     organizations and individuals in efforts to preserve and 
     protect the historically significant resources associated 
     with the Manhattan Project.
       (b) Definitions.--In this section:
       (1) Historical park.--The term ``Historical Park'' means 
     the Manhattan Project National Historical Park established 
     under subsection (c).
       (2) Manhattan project.--The term ``Manhattan Project'' 
     means the Federal military program to develop an atomic bomb 
     ending on December 31, 1946.
       (3) Secretary.--The term ``Secretary'' means the Secretary 
     of the Interior.
       (c) Establishment of Manhattan Project National Historical 
     Park.--
       (1) Establishment.--
       (A) Date.--Not later than 1 year after the date of 
     enactment of this section, there shall be established as a 
     unit of the National Park System the Manhattan Project 
     National Historical Park.
       (B) Areas included.--The Historical Park shall consist of 
     facilities and areas listed under paragraph (2) as determined 
     by the Secretary, in consultation with the Secretary of 
     Energy. The Secretary shall include the area referred to in 
     paragraph (2)(C)(i), the B Reactor National Historic 
     Landmark, in the Historical Park.
       (2) Eligible areas.--The Historical Park may only be 
     comprised of one or more of the following areas, or portions 
     of the areas, as generally depicted in the map titled 
     ``Manhattan Project National Historical Park Sites'', 
     numbered 540/108,834-C, and dated September 2012:
       (A) Oak ridge, tennessee.--Facilities, land, or interests 
     in land that are--
       (i) at Buildings 9204-3 and 9731 at the Department of 
     Energy Y-12 National Security Complex;
       (ii) at the X-10 Graphite Reactor at the Department of 
     Energy Oak Ridge National Laboratory;
       (iii) at the K-25 Building site at the Department of Energy 
     East Tennessee Technology Park; and
       (iv) at the former Guest House located at 210 East Madison 
     Road.
       (B) Los alamos, new mexico.--Facilities, land, or interests 
     in land that are--
       (i) in the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory National 
     Historic Landmark District, or any addition to the Landmark 
     District proposed in the National Historic Landmark 
     Nomination--Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) NHL 
     District (Working Draft of NHL Revision), Los Alamos National 
     Laboratory document LA-UR 12-00387 (January 26, 2012);
       (ii) at the former East Cafeteria located at 1670 Nectar 
     Street; and
       (iii) at the former dormitory located at 1725 17th Street.
       (C) Hanford, washington.--Facilities, land, or interests in 
     land on the Department of Energy Hanford Nuclear Reservation 
     that are--
       (i) the B Reactor National Historic Landmark;
       (ii) the Hanford High School in the town of Hanford and 
     Hanford Construction Camp Historic District;
       (iii) the White Bluffs Bank building in the White Bluffs 
     Historic District;
       (iv) the warehouse at the Bruggemann's Agricultural 
     Complex;
       (v) the Hanford Irrigation District Pump House; and
       (vi) the T Plant (221-T Process Building).
       (3) Written consent of owner.--No non-Federal property may 
     be included in the Historical Park without the written 
     consent of the owner.
       (d) Agreement.--
       (1) In general.--Not later than 1 year after the date of 
     enactment of this section, the Secretary and the Secretary of 
     Energy (acting through the Oak Ridge, Los Alamos, and 
     Richland site offices) shall enter into an agreement 
     governing the respective roles of the Secretary and the 
     Secretary of Energy in administering the facilities, land, or 
     interests in land under the administrative jurisdiction of 
     the Department of Energy that is to be included in the 
     Historical Park under subsection (c)(2), including provisions 
     for enhanced public access, management, interpretation, and 
     historic preservation.
       (2) Responsibilities of the secretary.--Any agreement under 
     paragraph (1) shall provide that the Secretary shall--
       (A) have decisionmaking authority for the content of 
     historic interpretation of the Manhattan Project for purposes 
     of administering the Historical Park; and
       (B) ensure that the agreement provides an appropriate 
     advisory role for the National Park Service in preserving the 
     historic resources covered by the agreement.

[[Page H3608]]

       (3) Responsibilities of the secretary of energy.--Any 
     agreement under paragraph (1) shall provide that the 
     Secretary of Energy--
       (A) shall ensure that the agreement appropriately protects 
     public safety, national security, and other aspects of the 
     ongoing mission of the Department of Energy at the Oak Ridge 
     Reservation, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Hanford 
     Site;
       (B) may consult with and provide historical information to 
     the Secretary concerning the Manhattan Project;
       (C) shall retain responsibility, in accordance with 
     applicable law, for any environmental remediation that may be 
     necessary in or around the facilities, land, or interests in 
     land governed by the agreement; and
       (D) shall retain authority and legal obligations for 
     historic preservation and general maintenance, including to 
     ensure safe access, in connection with the Department's 
     Manhattan Project resources.
       (4) Amendments.--The agreement under paragraph (1) may be 
     amended, including to add to the Historical Park facilities, 
     land, or interests in land within the eligible areas 
     described in subsection (c)(2) that are under the 
     jurisdiction of the Secretary of Energy.
       (e) Public Participation.--
       (1) In general.--The Secretary shall consult with 
     interested State, county, and local officials, organizations, 
     and interested members of the public--
       (A) before executing any agreement under subsection (d); 
     and
       (B) in the development of the general management plan under 
     subsection (f)(2).
       (2) Notice of determination.--Not later than 30 days after 
     the date on which an agreement under subsection (d) is 
     entered into, the Secretary shall publish in the Federal 
     Register notice of the establishment of the Historical Park, 
     including an official boundary map.
       (3) Availability of map.--The official boundary map 
     published under paragraph (2) shall be on file and available 
     for public inspection in the appropriate offices of the 
     National Park Service. The map shall be updated to reflect 
     any additions to the Historical Park from eligible areas 
     described in subsection (c)(2).
       (4) Additions.--Any land, interest in land, or facility 
     within the eligible areas described in subsection (c)(2) that 
     is acquired by the Secretary or included in an amendment to 
     the agreement under subsection (d)(4) shall be added to the 
     Historical Park.
       (f) Administration.--
       (1) In general.--The Secretary shall administer the 
     Historical Park in accordance with--
       (A) this section; and
       (B) the laws generally applicable to units of the National 
     Park System, including--
       (i) the National Park System Organic Act (16 U.S.C. 1 et 
     seq.); and
       (ii) the Act of August 21, 1935 (16 U.S.C. 461 et seq.).
       (2) General management plan.--Not later than 3 years after 
     the date on which funds are made available to carry out this 
     subsection, the Secretary, with the concurrence of the 
     Secretary of Energy, and in consultation and collaboration 
     with the Oak Ridge, Los Alamos and Richland Department of 
     Energy site offices, shall complete a general management plan 
     for the Historical Park in accordance with section 12(b) of 
     Public Law 91-383 (commonly known as the National Park 
     Service General Authorities Act; 16 U.S.C. 1a-7(b)).
       (3) Interpretive tours.--The Secretary may, subject to 
     applicable law, provide interpretive tours of historically 
     significant Manhattan Project sites and resources in the 
     States of Tennessee, New Mexico, and Washington that are 
     located outside the boundary of the Historical Park.
       (4) Land acquisition.--
       (A) In general.--The Secretary may acquire land and 
     interests in land within the eligible areas described in 
     subsection (c)(2) by--
       (i) transfer of administrative jurisdiction from the 
     Department of Energy by agreement between the Secretary and 
     the Secretary of Energy;
       (ii) donation; or
       (iii) exchange.
       (B) No use of condemnation.--The Secretary may not acquire 
     by condemnation any land or interest in land under this 
     section or for the purposes of this section.
       (5) Donations; cooperative agreements.--
       (A) Federal facilities.--
       (i) In general.--The Secretary may enter into one or more 
     agreements with the head of a Federal agency to provide 
     public access to, and management, interpretation, and 
     historic preservation of, historically significant Manhattan 
     Project resources under the jurisdiction or control of the 
     Federal agency.
       (ii) Donations; cooperative agreements.--The Secretary may 
     accept donations from, and enter into cooperative agreements 
     with, State governments, units of local government, tribal 
     governments, organizations, or individuals to further the 
     purpose of an interagency agreement entered into under clause 
     (i) or to provide visitor services and administrative 
     facilities within reasonable proximity to the Historical 
     Park.
       (B) Technical assistance.--The Secretary may provide 
     technical assistance to State, local, or tribal governments, 
     organizations, or individuals for the management, 
     interpretation, and historic preservation of historically 
     significant Manhattan Project resources not included within 
     the Historical Park.
       (C) Donations to department of energy.--For the purposes of 
     this section, or for the purpose of preserving and providing 
     access to historically significant Manhattan Project 
     resources, the Secretary of Energy may accept, hold, 
     administer, and use gifts, bequests, and devises (including 
     labor and services).
       (g) Clarification.--
       (1) No buffer zone created.--Nothing in this section, the 
     establishment of the Historical Park, or the management plan 
     for the Historical Park shall be construed to create buffer 
     zones outside of the Historical Park. That an activity can be 
     seen and heard from within the Historical Park shall not 
     preclude the conduct of that activity or use outside the 
     Historical Park.
       (2) No cause of action.--Nothing in this section shall 
     constitute a cause of action with respect to activities 
     outside or adjacent to the established boundary of the 
     Historical Park.


          amendment no. 166 offered by mr. issa of california

       At the end of the bill, add the following new division:

   DIVISION E--FEDERAL INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ACQUISITION REFORM ACT

     SEC. 5001. SHORT TITLE.

       This division may be cited as the ``Federal Information 
     Technology Acquisition Reform Act''.

     SEC. 5002. TABLE OF CONTENTS.

       The table of contents for this division is as follows:

Sec. 5001. Short title.
Sec. 5002. Table of contents.
Sec. 5003. Definitions.

     TITLE LI--MANAGEMENT OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY WITHIN FEDERAL 
                               GOVERNMENT

Sec. 5101. Increased authority of agency Chief Information Officers 
              over information technology.
Sec. 5102. Lead coordination role of Chief Information Officers 
              Council.
Sec. 5103. Reports by Government Accountability Office.

                  TITLE LII--DATA CENTER OPTIMIZATION

Sec. 5201. Purpose.
Sec. 5202. Definitions.
Sec. 5203. Federal data center optimization initiative.
Sec. 5204. Performance requirements related to data center 
              consolidation.
Sec. 5205. Cost savings related to data center optimization.
Sec. 5206. Reporting requirements to Congress and the Federal Chief 
              Information Officer.

    TITLE LIII--ELIMINATION OF DUPLICATION AND WASTE IN INFORMATION 
                         TECHNOLOGY ACQUISITION

Sec. 5301. Inventory of information technology assets.
Sec. 5302. Website consolidation and transparency.
Sec. 5303. Transition to the cloud.
Sec. 5304. Elimination of unnecessary duplication of contracts by 
              requiring business case analysis.

   TITLE LIV--STRENGTHENING AND STREAMLINING INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 
                    ACQUISITION MANAGEMENT PRACTICES

   Subtitle A--Strengthening and Streamlining IT Program Management 
                               Practices

Sec. 5401. Establishment of Federal infrastructure and common 
              application collaboration center.
Sec. 5402. Designation of Assisted Acquisition Centers of Excellence.

           Subtitle B--Strengthening IT Acquisition Workforce

Sec. 5411. Expansion of training and use of information technology 
              acquisition cadres.
Sec. 5412. Plan on strengthening program and project management 
              performance.
Sec. 5413. Personnel awards for excellence in the acquisition of 
              information systems and information technology.

                      TITLE LV--ADDITIONAL REFORMS

Sec. 5501. Maximizing the benefit of the Federal Strategic Sourcing 
              Initiative.
Sec. 5502. Promoting transparency of blanket purchase agreements.
Sec. 5503. Additional source selection technique in solicitations.
Sec. 5504. Enhanced transparency in information technology investments.
Sec. 5505. Enhanced communication between Government and industry.
Sec. 5506. Clarification of current law with respect to technology 
              neutrality in acquisition of software.

     SEC. 5003. DEFINITIONS.

       In this division:
       (1) Chief acquisition officers council.--The term ``Chief 
     Acquisition Officers Council'' means the Chief Acquisition 
     Officers Council established by section 1311(a) of title 41, 
     United States Code.
       (2) Chief information officer.--The term ``Chief 
     Information Officer'' means a Chief Information Officer (as 
     designated under section 3506(a)(2) of title 44, United 
     States Code)

[[Page H3609]]

     of an agency listed in section 901(b) of title 31, United 
     States Code.
       (3) Chief information officers council.--The term ``Chief 
     Information Officers Council'' or ``CIO Council'' means the 
     Chief Information Officers Council established by section 
     3603(a) of title 44, United States Code.
       (4) Director.--The term ``Director'' means the Director of 
     the Office of Management and Budget.
       (5) Federal agency.--The term ``Federal agency'' means each 
     agency listed in section 901(b) of title 31, United States 
     Code.
       (6) Federal chief information officer.--The term ``Federal 
     Chief Information Officer'' means the Administrator of the 
     Office of Electronic Government established under section 
     3602 of title 44, United States Code.
       (7) Information technology or it.--The term ``information 
     technology'' or ``IT'' has the meaning provided in section 
     11101(6) of title 40, United States Code.
       (8) Relevant congressional committees.--The term ``relevant 
     congressional committees'' means each of the following:
       (A) The Committee on Oversight and Government Reform and 
     the Committee on Armed Services of the House of 
     Representatives.
       (B) The Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
     Affairs and the Committee on Armed Services of the Senate.

     TITLE LI--MANAGEMENT OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY WITHIN FEDERAL 
                               GOVERNMENT

     SEC. 5101. INCREASED AUTHORITY OF AGENCY CHIEF INFORMATION 
                   OFFICERS OVER INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY.

       (a) Presidential Appointment of CIOs of Certain Agencies.--
       (1) In general.--Section 11315 of title 40, United States 
     Code, is amended--
       (A) by redesignating subsection (a) as subsection (e) and 
     moving such subsection to the end of the section; and
       (B) by inserting before subsection (b) the following new 
     subsection (a):
       ``(a) Presidential Appointment or Designation of Certain 
     Chief Information Officers.--
       ``(1) In general.--There shall be within each agency listed 
     in section 901(b)(1) of title 31, other than the Department 
     of Defense, an agency Chief Information Officer. Each agency 
     Chief Information Officer shall--
       ``(A)(i) be appointed by the President; or
       ``(ii) be designated by the President, in consultation with 
     the head of the agency; and
       ``(B) be appointed or designated, as applicable, from among 
     individuals who possess demonstrated ability in general 
     management of, and knowledge of and extensive practical 
     experience in, information technology management practices in 
     large governmental or business entities.
       ``(2) Responsibilities.--An agency Chief Information 
     Officer appointed or designated under this section shall 
     report directly to the head of the agency and carry out, on a 
     full-time basis, responsibilities as set forth in this 
     section and in section 3506(a) of title 44 for Chief 
     Information Officers designated under paragraph (2) of such 
     section.''.
       (2) Conforming amendment.--Section 3506(a)(2)(A) of title 
     44, United States Code, is amended by inserting after ``each 
     agency'' the following: ``, other than an agency with a 
     Presidentially appointed or designated Chief Information 
     Officer as provided in section 11315(a)(1) of title 40,''.
       (b) Authority Relating to Budget and Personnel.--Section 
     11315 of title 40, United States Code, is further amended by 
     inserting after subsection (c) the following new subsection:
       ``(d) Additional Authorities for Certain CIOs.--
       ``(1) Budget-related authority.--
       ``(A) Planning.--The head of each agency listed in section 
     901(b)(1) or 901(b)(2) of title 31, other than the Department 
     of Defense, shall ensure that the Chief Information Officer 
     of the agency has the authority to participate in decisions 
     regarding the budget planning process related to information 
     technology or programs that include significant information 
     technology components.
       ``(B) Allocation.--Amounts appropriated for any agency 
     listed in section 901(b)(1) or 901(b)(2) of title 31, other 
     than the Department of Defense, for any fiscal year that are 
     available for information technology shall be allocated 
     within the agency, consistent with the provisions of 
     appropriations Acts and budget guidelines and recommendations 
     from the Director of the Office of Management and Budget, in 
     such manner as may be specified by, or approved by, the Chief 
     Information Officer of the agency in consultation with the 
     Chief Financial Officer of the agency and budget officials.
       ``(2) Personnel-related authority.--The head of each agency 
     listed in section 901(b)(1) or 901(b)(2) of title 31, other 
     than the Department of Defense, shall ensure that the Chief 
     Information Officer of the agency has the authority necessary 
     to approve the hiring of personnel who will have information 
     technology responsibilities within the agency and to require 
     that such personnel have the obligation to report to the 
     Chief Information Officer in a manner considered sufficient 
     by the Chief Information Officer.''.
       (c) Single Chief Information Officer in Each Agency.--
       (1) Requirement.--Section 3506(a)(3) of title 44, United 
     States Code, is amended--
       (A) by inserting ``(A)'' after ``(3)''; and
       (B) by adding at the end the following new subparagraph:
       ``(B) Each agency shall have only one individual with the 
     title and designation of `Chief Information Officer'. Any 
     bureau, office, or subordinate organization within the agency 
     may designate one individual with the title `Deputy Chief 
     Information Officer', `Associate Chief Information Officer', 
     or `Assistant Chief Information Officer'.''.
       (2) Effective date.--Section 3506(a)(3)(B) of title 44, 
     United States Code, as added by paragraph (1), shall take 
     effect as of October 1, 2014. Any individual serving in a 
     position affected by such section before such date may 
     continue in that position if the requirements of such section 
     are fulfilled with respect to that individual.

     SEC. 5102. LEAD COORDINATION ROLE OF CHIEF INFORMATION 
                   OFFICERS COUNCIL.

       (a) Lead Coordination Role.--Subsection (d) of section 3603 
     of title 44, United States Code, is amended to read as 
     follows:
       ``(d) Lead Interagency Forum.--
       ``(1) In general.--The Council is designated the lead 
     interagency forum for improving agency coordination of 
     practices related to the design, development, modernization, 
     use, operation, sharing, performance, and review of Federal 
     Government information resources investment. As the lead 
     interagency forum, the Council shall develop cross-agency 
     portfolio management practices to allow and encourage the 
     development of cross-agency shared services and shared 
     platforms. The Council shall also issue guidelines and 
     practices for infrastructure and common information 
     technology applications, including expansion of the Federal 
     Enterprise Architecture process if appropriate. The 
     guidelines and practices may address broader transparency, 
     common inputs, common outputs, and outcomes achieved. The 
     guidelines and practices shall be used as a basis for 
     comparing performance across diverse missions and operations 
     in various agencies.
       ``(2) Report.--Not later than December 1 in each of the 6 
     years following the date of the enactment of this paragraph, 
     the Council shall submit to the relevant congressional 
     committees a report (to be known as the `CIO Council Report') 
     summarizing the Council's activities in the preceding fiscal 
     year and containing such recommendations for further 
     congressional action to fulfill its mission as the Council 
     considers appropriate.
       ``(3) Relevant congressional committees.--For purposes of 
     the report required by paragraph (2), the relevant 
     congressional committees are each of the following:
       ``(A) The Committee on Oversight and Government Reform and 
     the Committee on Armed Services of the House of 
     Representatives.
       ``(B) The Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
     Affairs and the Committee on Armed Services of the Senate.''.
       (b) Additional Function.--Subsection (f) of section 3603 of 
     such title is amended by adding at the end the following new 
     paragraph:
       ``(8) Assist the Administrator in developing and providing 
     guidance for effective operations of the Federal 
     Infrastructure and Common Application Collaboration Center 
     established under section 11501 of title 40.''.
       (c) References to Administrator of E-Government as Federal 
     Chief Information Officer.--
       (1) References.--Section 3602(b) of title 44, United States 
     Code, is amended by adding at the end the following: ``The 
     Administrator may also be referred to as the Federal Chief 
     Information Officer.''.
       (2) Definition.--Section 3601(1) of such title is amended 
     by inserting ``or `Federal Chief Information Officer' '' 
     before ``means''.

     SEC. 5103. REPORTS BY GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE.

       (a) Requirement to Examine Effectiveness.--The Comptroller 
     General of the United States shall examine the effectiveness 
     of the Chief Information Officers Council in meeting its 
     responsibilities under section 3603(d) of title 44, United 
     States Code, as added by section 5102, with particular focus 
     on--
       (1) whether agencies are actively participating in the 
     Council and heeding the Council's advice and guidance; and
       (2) whether the Council is actively using and developing 
     the capabilities of the Federal Infrastructure and Common 
     Application Collaboration Center created under section 11501 
     of title 40, United States Code, as added by section 5401.
       (b) Reports.--Not later than 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years 
     after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Comptroller 
     General shall submit to the relevant congressional committees 
     a report containing the findings and recommendations of the 
     Comptroller General from the examination required by 
     subsection (a).

                  TITLE LII--DATA CENTER OPTIMIZATION

     SEC. 5201. PURPOSE.

       The purpose of this title is to optimize Federal data 
     center usage and efficiency.

     SEC. 5202. DEFINITIONS.

       In this title:
       (1) Federal data center optimization initiative.--The term 
     ``Federal Data Center Optimization Initiative'' or the 
     ``Initiative'' means the initiative developed and implemented 
     by the Director, through the Federal Chief Information 
     Officer, as required under section 5203.
       (2) Covered agency.--The term ``covered agency'' means any 
     agency included in the Federal Data Center Optimization 
     Initiative.
       (3) Data center.--The term ``data center'' means a closet, 
     room, floor, or building for the storage, management, and 
     dissemination

[[Page H3610]]

     of data and information, as defined by the Federal Chief 
     Information Officer under guidance issued pursuant to this 
     section.
       (4) Federal data center.--The term ``Federal data center'' 
     means any data center of a covered agency used or operated by 
     a covered agency, by a contractor of a covered agency, or by 
     another organization on behalf of a covered agency.
       (5) Server utilization.--The term ``server utilization'' 
     refers to the activity level of a server relative to its 
     maximum activity level, expressed as a percentage.
       (6) Power usage effectiveness.--The term ``power usage 
     effectiveness'' means the ratio obtained by dividing the 
     total amount of electricity and other power consumed in 
     running a data center by the power consumed by the 
     information and communications technology in the data center.

     SEC. 5203. FEDERAL DATA CENTER OPTIMIZATION INITIATIVE.

       (a) Requirement for Initiative.--The Federal Chief 
     Information Officer, in consultation with the chief 
     information officers of covered agencies, shall develop and 
     implement an initiative, to be known as the Federal Data 
     Center Optimization Initiative, to optimize the usage and 
     efficiency of Federal data centers by meeting the 
     requirements of this division and taking additional measures, 
     as appropriate.
       (b) Requirement for Plan.--Within 6 months after the date 
     of the enactment of this Act, the Federal Chief Information 
     Officer, in consultation with the chief information officers 
     of covered agencies, shall develop and submit to Congress a 
     plan for implementation of the Initiative required by 
     subsection (a) by each covered agency. In developing the 
     plan, the Federal Chief Information Officer shall take into 
     account the findings and recommendations of the Comptroller 
     General review required by section 5205(e).
       (c) Matters Covered.--The plan shall include--
       (1) descriptions of how covered agencies will use 
     reductions in floor space, energy use, infrastructure, 
     equipment, applications, personnel, increases in 
     multiorganizational use, server virtualization, cloud 
     computing, and other appropriate methods to meet the 
     requirements of the initiative; and
       (2) appropriate consideration of shifting Federally owned 
     data centers to commercially owned data centers.

     SEC. 5204. PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS RELATED TO DATA CENTER 
                   CONSOLIDATION.

       (a) Server Utilization.--Each covered agency may use the 
     following methods to achieve the maximum server utilization 
     possible as determined by the Federal Chief Information 
     Officer.
       (1) The closing of existing data centers that lack adequate 
     server utilization, as determined by the Federal Chief 
     Information Officer. If the agency fails to close such data 
     centers, the agency shall provide a detailed explanation as 
     to why this data center should remain in use as part of the 
     submitted plan. The Federal Chief Information Officer shall 
     include an assessment of the agency explanation in the annual 
     report to Congress.
       (2) The consolidation of services within existing data 
     centers to increase server utilization rates.
       (3) Any other method that the Federal Chief Information 
     Officer, in consultation with the chief information officers 
     of covered agencies, determines necessary to optimize server 
     utilization.
       (b) Power Usage Effectiveness.--Each covered agency may use 
     the following methods to achieve the maximum energy 
     efficiency possible as determined by the Federal Chief 
     Information Officer:
       (1) The use of the measurement of power usage effectiveness 
     to calculate data center energy efficiency.
       (2) The use of power meters in data centers to frequently 
     measure power consumption over time.
       (3) The establishment of power usage effectiveness goals 
     for each data center.
       (4) The adoption of best practices for managing--
       (A) temperature and airflow in data centers; and
       (B) power supply efficiency.
       (5) The implementation of any other method that the Federal 
     Chief Information Officer, in consultation with the Chief 
     Information Officers of covered agencies, determines 
     necessary to optimize data center energy efficiency.

     SEC. 5205. COST SAVINGS RELATED TO DATA CENTER OPTIMIZATION.

       (a) Requirement to Track Costs.--
       (1) In general.--Each covered agency shall track costs 
     resulting from implementation of the Federal Data Center 
     Optimization Initiative within the agency and submit a report 
     on those costs annually to the Federal Chief Information 
     Officer. Covered agencies shall determine the net costs from 
     data consolidation on an annual basis.
       (2) Factors.--In calculating net costs each year under 
     paragraph (1), a covered agency shall use the following 
     factors:
       (A) Energy costs.
       (B) Personnel costs.
       (C) Real estate costs.
       (D) Capital expense costs.
       (E) Maintenance and support costs such as operating 
     subsystem, database, hardware, and software license expense 
     costs.
       (F) Other appropriate costs, as determined by the agency in 
     consultation with the Federal Chief Information Officer.
       (b) Requirement to Track Savings.--
       (1) In general.--Each covered agency shall track savings 
     resulting from implementation of the Federal Data Center 
     Optimization Initiative within the agency and submit a report 
     on those savings annually to the Federal Chief Information 
     Officer. Covered agencies shall determine the net savings 
     from data consolidation on an annual basis.
       (2) Factors.--In calculating net savings each year under 
     paragraph (1), a covered agency shall use the following 
     factors:
       (A) Energy savings.
       (B) Personnel savings.
       (C) Real estate savings.
       (D) Capital expense savings.
       (E) Maintenance and support savings such as operating 
     subsystem, database, hardware, and software license expense 
     savings.
       (F) Other appropriate savings, as determined by the agency 
     in consultation with the Federal Chief Information Officer.
       (c) Requirement to Use Cost-effective Measures.--Covered 
     agencies shall use the most cost-effective measures to 
     implement the Federal Data Center Optimization Initiative.
       (d) Use of Savings.--Subject to appropriations, any savings 
     resulting from implementation of the Federal Data Center 
     Optimization Initiative within a covered agency shall be used 
     for the following purposes:
       (1) To offset the costs of implementing the Initiative 
     within the agency.
       (2) To further enhance information technology capabilities 
     and services within the agency.
       (e) Government Accountability Office Review.--Not later 
     than 3 months after the date of the enactment of this Act, 
     the Comptroller General of the United States shall examine 
     methods for calculating savings from the Initiative and using 
     them for the purposes identified in subsection (d), including 
     establishment and use of a special revolving fund that 
     supports data centers and server optimization, and shall 
     submit to the Federal Chief Information Officer and Congress 
     a report on the Comptroller General's findings and 
     recommendations.

     SEC. 5206. REPORTING REQUIREMENTS TO CONGRESS AND THE FEDERAL 
                   CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER.

       (a) Agency Requirement to Report to CIO.--Each year, each 
     covered agency shall submit to the Federal Chief Information 
     Officer a report on the implementation of the Federal Data 
     Center Optimization Initiative, including savings resulting 
     from such implementation. The report shall include an update 
     of the agency's plan for implementing the Initiative.
       (b) Federal Chief Information Officer Requirement to Report 
     to Congress.--Each year, the Federal Chief Information 
     Officer shall submit to the relevant congressional committees 
     a report that assesses agency progress in carrying out the 
     Federal Data Center Optimization Initiative and updates the 
     plan under section 5203. The report may be included as part 
     of the annual report required under section 3606 of title 44, 
     United States Code.

    TITLE LIII--ELIMINATION OF DUPLICATION AND WASTE IN INFORMATION 
                         TECHNOLOGY ACQUISITION

     SEC. 5301. INVENTORY OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ASSETS.

       (a) Plan.--The Director shall develop a plan for conducting 
     a Governmentwide inventory of information technology assets.
       (b) Matters Covered.--The plan required by subsection (a) 
     shall cover the following:
       (1) The manner in which Federal agencies can achieve the 
     greatest possible economies of scale and cost savings in the 
     procurement of information technology assets, through 
     measures such as reducing hardware or software products or 
     services that are duplicative or overlapping and reducing the 
     procurement of new software licenses until such time as 
     agency needs exceed the number of existing and unused 
     licenses.
       (2) The capability to conduct ongoing Governmentwide 
     inventories of all existing software licenses on an 
     application-by-application basis, including duplicative, 
     unused, overused, and underused licenses, and to assess the 
     need of agencies for software licenses.
       (3) A Governmentwide spending analysis to provide knowledge 
     about how much is being spent for software products or 
     services to support decisions for strategic sourcing under 
     the Federal strategic sourcing program managed by the Office 
     of Federal Procurement Policy.
       (c) Other Inventories.--In developing the plan required by 
     subsection (a), the Director shall review the inventory of 
     information systems maintained by each agency under section 
     3505(c) of title 44, United States Code, and the inventory of 
     information resources maintained by each agency under section 
     3506(b)(4) of such title.
       (d) Availability.--The inventory of information technology 
     assets shall be available to Chief Information Officers and 
     such other Federal officials as the Chief Information 
     Officers may, in consultation with the Chief Information 
     Officers Council, designate.
       (e) Deadline and Submission to Congress.--Not later than 
     180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the 
     Director shall complete and submit to Congress the plan 
     required by subsection (a).
       (f) Implementation.--Not later than two years after the 
     date of the enactment of this Act, the Director shall 
     complete implementation of the plan required by subsection 
     (a).
       (g) Review by Comptroller General.--Not later than two 
     years after the date of

[[Page H3611]]

     the enactment of this Act, the Comptroller General of the 
     United States shall review the plan required by subsection 
     (a) and submit to the relevant congressional committees a 
     report on the review.

     SEC. 5302. WEBSITE CONSOLIDATION AND TRANSPARENCY.

       (a) Website Consolidation.--The Director shall--
       (1) in consultation with Federal agencies, and after 
     reviewing the directory of public Federal Government websites 
     of each agency (as required to be established and updated 
     under section 207(f)(3) of the E-Government Act of 2002 
     (Public Law 107-347; 44 U.S.C. 3501 note)), assess all the 
     publicly available websites of Federal agencies to determine 
     whether there are duplicative or overlapping websites; and
       (2) require Federal agencies to eliminate or consolidate 
     those websites that are duplicative or overlapping.
       (b) Website Transparency.--The Director shall issue 
     guidance to Federal agencies to ensure that the data on 
     publicly available websites of the agencies are open and 
     accessible to the public.
       (c) Matters Covered.--In preparing the guidance required by 
     subsection (b), the Director shall--
       (1) develop guidelines, standards, and best practices for 
     interoperability and transparency;
       (2) identify interfaces that provide for shared, open 
     solutions on the publicly available websites of the agencies; 
     and
       (3) ensure that Federal agency Internet home pages, web-
     based forms, and web-based applications are accessible to 
     individuals with disabilities in conformance with section 508 
     of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 U.S.C. 794d).
       (d) Deadline for Guidance.--The guidance required by 
     subsection (b) shall be issued not later than 180 days after 
     the date of the enactment of this Act.

     SEC. 5303. TRANSITION TO THE CLOUD.

       (a) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that 
     transition to cloud computing offers significant potential 
     benefits for the implementation of Federal information 
     technology projects in terms of flexibility, cost, and 
     operational benefits.
       (b) Governmentwide Application.--In assessing cloud 
     computing opportunities, the Chief Information Officers 
     Council shall define policies and guidelines for the adoption 
     of Governmentwide programs providing for a standardized 
     approach to security assessment and operational authorization 
     for cloud products and services.
       (c) Additional Budget Authorities for Transition.--In 
     transitioning to the cloud, a Chief Information Officer of an 
     agency listed in section 901(b) of title 31, United States 
     Code, may establish such cloud service Working Capital Funds, 
     in consultation with the Chief Financial Officer of the 
     agency, as may be necessary to transition to cloud-based 
     solutions. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, such 
     cloud service Working Capital Funds may preserve funding for 
     cloud service transitions for a period not to exceed 5 years 
     per appropriation. Any establishment of a new Working Capital 
     Fund under this subsection shall be reported to the 
     Committees on Appropriations of the House of Representatives 
     and the Senate and relevant Congressional committees.

     SEC. 5304. ELIMINATION OF UNNECESSARY DUPLICATION OF 
                   CONTRACTS BY REQUIRING BUSINESS CASE ANALYSIS.

       (a) Purpose.--The purpose of this section is to leverage 
     the Government's buying power and achieve administrative 
     efficiencies and cost savings by eliminating unnecessary 
     duplication of contracts.
       (b) Requirement for Business Case Approval.--
       (1) In general.--Effective on and after 180 days after the 
     date of the enactment of this Act, an executive agency may 
     not issue a solicitation for a covered contract vehicle 
     unless the agency performs a business case analysis for the 
     contract vehicle and obtains an approval of the business case 
     analysis from the Administrator for Federal Procurement 
     Policy.
       (2) Review of business case analysis.--
       (A) In general.--With respect to any covered contract 
     vehicle, the Administrator for Federal Procurement Policy 
     shall review the business case analysis submitted for the 
     contract vehicle and provide an approval or disapproval 
     within 60 days after the date of submission. Any business 
     case analysis not disapproved within such 60-day period is 
     deemed to be approved.
       (B) Basis for approval of business case.--The Administrator 
     for Federal Procurement Policy shall approve or disapprove a 
     business case analysis based on the adequacy of the analysis 
     submitted. The Administrator shall give primary consideration 
     to whether an agency has demonstrated a compelling need that 
     cannot be satisfied by existing Governmentwide contract 
     vehicles in a timely and cost-effective manner.
       (3) Content of business case analysis.--The Administrator 
     for Federal Procurement Policy shall issue guidance 
     specifying the content for a business case analysis submitted 
     pursuant to this section. At a minimum, the business case 
     analysis shall include details on the administrative 
     resources needed for such contract vehicle, including an 
     analysis of all direct and indirect costs to the Federal 
     Government of awarding and administering such contract 
     vehicle and the impact such contract vehicle will have on the 
     ability of the Federal Government to leverage its purchasing 
     power.
       (c) Definitions.--
       (1) Covered contract vehicle.--The term ``covered contract 
     vehicle'' has the meaning provided by the Administrator for 
     Federal Procurement Policy in guidance issued pursuant to 
     this section and includes, at a minimum, any Governmentwide 
     contract vehicle, whether for acquisition of information 
     technology or other goods or services, in an amount greater 
     than $50,000,000 (or $10,000,000, determined on an average 
     annual basis, in the case of such a contract vehicle 
     performed over more than one year). The term does not include 
     a multiple award schedule contract awarded by the General 
     Services Administration, a Governmentwide acquisition 
     contract for information technology awarded pursuant to 
     sections 11302(e) and 11314(a)(2) of title 40, United States 
     Code, or orders against existing Governmentwide contract 
     vehicles.
       (2) Governmentwide contract vehicle and executive agency.--
     The terms ``Governmentwide contract vehicle'' and ``executive 
     agency'' have the meanings provided in section 11501 of title 
     40, United States Code, as added by section 5401.
       (d) Report.--Not later than June 1 in each of the next 6 
     years following the date of the enactment of this Act, the 
     Administrator for Federal Procurement Policy shall submit to 
     the relevant congressional committees a report on the 
     implementation of this section, including a summary of the 
     submissions, reviews, approvals, and disapprovals of business 
     case analyses pursuant to this section.
       (e) Guidance.--The Administrator for Federal Procurement 
     Policy shall issue guidance for implementing this section.
       (f) Revision of Far.--Not later than 180 days after the 
     date of the enactment of this Act, the Federal Acquisition 
     Regulation shall be amended to implement this section.

   TITLE LIV--STRENGTHENING AND STREAMLINING INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 
                    ACQUISITION MANAGEMENT PRACTICES

   Subtitle A--Strengthening and Streamlining IT Program Management 
                               Practices

     SEC. 5401. ESTABLISHMENT OF FEDERAL INFRASTRUCTURE AND COMMON 
                   APPLICATION COLLABORATION CENTER.

       (a) Establishment.--
       (1) In general.--Chapter 115 of title 40, United States 
     Code, is amended to read as follows:

 ``CHAPTER 115--INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ACQUISITION MANAGEMENT PRACTICES

``Sec.
``11501. Federal infrastructure and common application collaboration 
              center.

     ``Sec. 11501. Federal infrastructure and common application 
       collaboration center

       ``(a) Establishment and Purposes.--The Director of the 
     Office of Management and Budget shall establish a Federal 
     Infrastructure and Common Application Collaboration Center 
     (hereafter in this section referred to as the `Collaboration 
     Center') within the Office of Electronic Government 
     established under section 3602 of title 44 in accordance with 
     this section. The purposes of the Collaboration Center are to 
     serve as a focal point for coordinated program management 
     practices and to develop and maintain requirements for the 
     acquisition of IT infrastructure and common applications 
     commonly used by various Federal agencies.
       ``(b) Organization of Center.--
       ``(1) Membership.--The Center shall consist of the 
     following members:
       ``(A) An appropriate number, as determined by the CIO 
     Council, but not less than 12, full-time program managers or 
     cost specialists, all of whom have appropriate experience in 
     the private or Government sector in managing or overseeing 
     acquisitions of IT infrastructure and common applications.
       ``(B) At least 1 full-time detailee from each of the 
     Federal agencies listed in section 901(b) of title 31, 
     nominated by the respective agency chief information officer 
     for a detail period of not less than 2 years.
       ``(2) Working groups.--The Collaboration Center shall have 
     working groups that specialize in IT infrastructure and 
     common applications identified by the CIO Council. Each 
     working group shall be headed by a separate dedicated program 
     manager appointed by the Federal Chief Information Officer.
       ``(c) Capabilities and Functions of the Collaboration 
     Center.--For each of the IT infrastructure and common 
     application areas identified by the CIO Council, the 
     Collaboration Center shall perform the following roles, and 
     any other functions as directed by the Federal Chief 
     Information Officer:
       ``(1) Develop, maintain, and disseminate requirements 
     suitable to establish contracts that will meet the common and 
     general needs of various Federal agencies as determined by 
     the Center. In doing so, the Center shall give maximum 
     consideration to the adoption of commercial standards and 
     industry acquisition best practices, including opportunities 
     for shared services, consideration of total cost of 
     ownership, preference for industry-neutral functional 
     specifications leveraging open industry standards and 
     competition, and use of long-term contracts, as appropriate.
       ``(2) Develop, maintain, and disseminate reliable cost 
     estimates that are accurate, comprehensive, well-documented, 
     and credible.
       ``(3) Lead the review of significant or troubled IT 
     investments or acquisitions as identified by the CIO Council.

[[Page H3612]]

       ``(4) Provide expert aid to troubled IT investments or 
     acquisitions.
       ``(d) Guidance.--The Director, in consultation with the 
     Chief Information Officers Council, shall issue guidance 
     addressing the scope and operation of the Collaboration 
     Center. The guidance shall require that the Collaboration 
     Center report to the Federal Chief Information Officer.
       ``(e) Report to Congress.--
       ``(1) In general.--The Director shall annually submit to 
     the relevant congressional committees a report detailing the 
     organization, staff, and activities of the Collaboration 
     Center, including--
       ``(A) a list of IT infrastructure and common applications 
     the Center assisted;
       ``(B) an assessment of the Center's achievement in 
     promoting efficiency, shared services, and elimination of 
     unnecessary Government requirements that are contrary to 
     commercial best practices; and
       ``(C) the use and expenditure of amounts in the Fund 
     established under subsection (i).
       ``(2) Inclusion in other report.--The report may be 
     included as part of the annual E-Government status report 
     required under section 3606 of title 44.
       ``(f) Improvement of the Governmentwide Software Purchasing 
     Program.--
       ``(1) In general.--The Collaboration Center, in 
     collaboration with the Office of Federal Procurement Policy, 
     the Department of Defense, and the General Services 
     Administration, shall identify and develop a strategic 
     sourcing initiative to enhance Governmentwide acquisition, 
     shared use, and dissemination of software, as well as 
     compliance with end user license agreements.
       ``(2) Examination of methods.--In developing the initiative 
     under paragraph (1), the Collaboration Center shall examine 
     the use of realistic and effective demand aggregation models 
     supported by actual agency commitment to use the models, and 
     supplier relationship management practices, to more 
     effectively govern the Government's acquisition of 
     information technology.
       ``(3) Governmentwide user license agreement.--The 
     Collaboration Center, in developing the initiative under 
     paragraph (1), shall allow for the purchase of a license 
     agreement that is available for use by all executive agencies 
     as one user to the maximum extent practicable and as 
     appropriate.
       ``(g) Guidelines for Acquisition of It Infrastructure and 
     Common Applications.--
       ``(1) Guidelines.--The Collaboration Center shall establish 
     guidelines that, to the maximum extent possible, eliminate 
     inconsistent practices among executive agencies and ensure 
     uniformity and consistency in acquisition processes for IT 
     infrastructure and common applications across the Federal 
     Government.
       ``(2) Central website.--In preparing the guidelines, the 
     Collaboration Center, in consultation with the Chief 
     Acquisition Officers Council, shall offer executive agencies 
     the option of accessing a central website for best practices, 
     templates, and other relevant information.
       ``(h) Pricing Transparency.--The Collaboration Center, in 
     collaboration with the Office of Federal Procurement Policy, 
     the Chief Acquisition Officers Council, the General Services 
     Administration, and the Assisted Acquisition Centers of 
     Excellence, shall compile a price list and catalogue 
     containing current pricing information by vendor for each of 
     its IT infrastructure and common applications categories. The 
     price catalogue shall contain any price provided by a vendor 
     for the same or similar good or service to any executive 
     agency. The catalogue shall be developed in a fashion 
     ensuring that it may be used for pricing comparisons and 
     pricing analysis using standard data formats. The price 
     catalogue shall not be made public, but shall be accessible 
     to executive agencies.
       ``(i) Federal It Acquisition Management Improvement Fund.--
       ``(1) Establishment and management of fund.--There is a 
     Federal IT Acquisition Management Improvement Fund (in this 
     subsection referred to as the `Fund'). The Administrator of 
     General Services shall manage the Fund through the 
     Collaboration Center to support the activities of the 
     Collaboration Center carried out pursuant to this section. 
     The Administrator of General Services shall consult with the 
     Director in managing the Fund.
       ``(2) Credits to fund.--Five percent of the fees collected 
     by executive agencies under the following contracts shall be 
     credited to the Fund:
       ``(A) Governmentwide task and delivery order contracts 
     entered into under sections 4103 and 4105 of title 41.
       ``(B) Governmentwide contracts for the acquisition of 
     information technology and multiagency acquisition contracts 
     for that technology authorized by section 11314 of this 
     title.
       ``(C) Multiple-award schedule contracts entered into by the 
     Administrator of General Services.
       ``(3) Remittance by head of executive agency.--The head of 
     an executive agency that administers a contract described in 
     paragraph (2) shall remit to the General Services 
     Administration the amount required to be credited to the Fund 
     with respect to the contract at the end of each quarter of 
     the fiscal year.
       ``(4) Amounts not to be used for other purposes.--The 
     Administrator of General Services, through the Office of 
     Management and Budget, shall ensure that amounts collected 
     under this subsection are not used for a purpose other than 
     the activities of the Collaboration Center carried out 
     pursuant to this section.
       ``(5) Availability of amounts.--Amounts credited to the 
     Fund remain available to be expended only in the fiscal year 
     for which they are credited and the 4 succeeding fiscal 
     years.
       ``(j) Definitions.--In this section:
       ``(1) Executive agency.--The term `executive agency' has 
     the meaning provided that term by section 105 of title 5.
       ``(2) Federal chief information officer.--The term `Federal 
     Chief Information Officer' means the Administrator of the 
     Office of Electronic Government established under section 
     3602 of title 44.
       ``(3) Governmentwide contract vehicle.--The term 
     `Governmentwide contract vehicle' means any contract, blanket 
     purchase agreement, or other contractual instrument that 
     allows for an indefinite number of orders to be placed within 
     the contract, agreement, or instrument, and that is 
     established by one executive agency for use by multiple 
     executive agencies to obtain supplies and services.
       ``(4) Relevant congressional committees.--The term 
     `relevant congressional committees' means each of the 
     following:
       ``(A) The Committee on Oversight and Government Reform and 
     the Committee on Armed Services of the House of 
     Representatives.
       ``(B) The Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
     Affairs and the Committee on Armed Services of the Senate.
       ``(k) Revision of Far.--The Federal Acquisition Regulation 
     shall be amended to implement this section.''.
       (2) Clerical amendment.--The item relating to chapter 115 
     in the table of chapters at the beginning of subtitle III of 
     title 40, United States Code, is amended to read as follows:

``115. Information Technology Acquisition Management Practi11501''.....

       (b) Deadlines.--
       (1) Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment 
     of this Act, the Director shall issue guidance under section 
     11501(d) of title 40, United States Code, as added by 
     subsection (a).
       (2) Not later than 1 year after the date of the enactment 
     of this Act, the Director shall establish the Federal 
     Infrastructure and Common Application Collaboration Center, 
     in accordance with section 11501(a) of such title, as so 
     added.
       (3) Not later than 2 years after the date of the enactment 
     of this Act, the Federal Infrastructure and Common 
     Application Collaboration Center shall--
       (A) identify and develop a strategic sourcing initiative in 
     accordance with section 11501(f) of such title, as so added; 
     and
       (B) establish guidelines in accordance with section 
     11501(g) of such title, as so added.
       (c) Conforming Amendment.--Section 3602(c) of title 44, 
     United States Code, is amended--
       (1) by striking ``and'' at the end of paragraph (2);
       (2) by redesignating paragraph (3) as paragraph (4); and
       (3) by inserting after paragraph (2) the following new 
     paragraph (3):
       ``(3) all of the functions of the Federal Infrastructure 
     and Common Application Collaboration Center, as required 
     under section 11501 of title 40; and''.

     SEC. 5402. DESIGNATION OF ASSISTED ACQUISITION CENTERS OF 
                   EXCELLENCE.

       (a) Designation.--Chapter 115 of title 40, United States 
     Code, as amended by section 5401, is further amended by 
     adding at the end the following new section:

     ``Sec. 11502. Assisted Acquisition Centers of Excellence

       ``(a) Purpose.--The purpose of this section is to develop 
     specialized assisted acquisition centers of excellence within 
     the Federal Government to promote--
       ``(1) the effective use of best acquisition practices;
       ``(2) the development of specialized expertise in the 
     acquisition of information technology; and
       ``(3) Governmentwide sharing of acquisition capability to 
     augment any shortage in the information technology 
     acquisition workforce.
       ``(b) Designation of AACEs.--Not later than 1 year after 
     the date of the enactment of this section, and every 3 years 
     thereafter, the Director of the Office of Management and 
     Budget, in consultation with the Chief Acquisition Officers 
     Council and the Chief Information Officers Council, shall 
     designate, redesignate, or withdraw the designation of 
     acquisition centers of excellence within various executive 
     agencies to carry out the functions set forth in subsection 
     (c) in an area of specialized acquisition expertise as 
     determined by the Director. Each such center of excellence 
     shall be known as an `Assisted Acquisition Center of 
     Excellence' or an `AACE'.
       ``(c) Functions.--The functions of each AACE are as 
     follows:
       ``(1) Best practices.--To promote, develop, and implement 
     the use of best acquisition practices in the area of 
     specialized acquisition expertise that the AACE is designated 
     to carry out by the Director under subsection (b).
       ``(2) Assisted acquisitions.--To assist all Government 
     agencies in the expedient and low-cost acquisition of the 
     information technology goods or services covered by such area 
     of specialized acquisition expertise by

[[Page H3613]]

     engaging in repeated and frequent acquisition of similar 
     information technology requirements.
       ``(3) Development and training of it acquisition 
     workforce.--To assist in recruiting and training IT 
     acquisition cadres (referred to in section 1704(j) of title 
     41).
       ``(d) Criteria.--In designating, redesignating, or 
     withdrawing the designation of an AACE, the Director shall 
     consider, at a minimum, the following matters:
       ``(1) The subject matter expertise of the host agency in a 
     specific area of information technology acquisition.
       ``(2) For acquisitions of IT infrastructure and common 
     applications covered by the Federal Infrastructure and Common 
     Application Collaboration Center established under section 
     11501 of this title, the ability and willingness to 
     collaborate with the Collaboration Center and adhere to the 
     requirements standards established by the Collaboration 
     Center.
       ``(3) The ability of an AACE to develop customized 
     requirements documents that meet the needs of executive 
     agencies as well as the current industry standards and 
     commercial best practices.
       ``(4) The ability of an AACE to consistently award and 
     manage various contracts, task or delivery orders, and other 
     acquisition arrangements in a timely, cost-effective, and 
     compliant manner.
       ``(5) The ability of an AACE to aggregate demands from 
     multiple executive agencies for similar information 
     technology goods or services and fulfill those demands in one 
     acquisition.
       ``(6) The ability of an AACE to acquire innovative or 
     emerging commercial and noncommercial technologies using 
     various contracting methods, including ways to lower the 
     entry barriers for small businesses with limited Government 
     contracting experiences.
       ``(7) The ability of an AACE to maximize commercial item 
     acquisition, effectively manage high-risk contract types, 
     increase competition, promote small business participation, 
     and maximize use of available Governmentwide contract 
     vehicles.
       ``(8) The existence of an in-house cost estimating group 
     with expertise to consistently develop reliable cost 
     estimates that are accurate, comprehensive, well-documented, 
     and credible.
       ``(9) The ability of an AACE to employ best practices and 
     educate requesting agencies, to the maximum extent 
     practicable, regarding critical factors underlying successful 
     major IT acquisitions, including the following factors:
       ``(A) Active engagement by program officials with 
     stakeholders.
       ``(B) Possession by program staff of the necessary 
     knowledge and skills.
       ``(C) Support of the programs by senior department and 
     agency executives.
       ``(D) Involvement by end users and stakeholders in the 
     development of requirements.
       ``(E) Participation by end users in testing of system 
     functionality prior to formal end user acceptance testing.
       ``(F) Stability and consistency of Government and 
     contractor staff.
       ``(G) Prioritization of requirements by program staff.
       ``(H) Maintenance of regular communication with the prime 
     contractor by program officials.
       ``(I) Receipt of sufficient funding by programs.
       ``(10) The ability of an AACE to run an effective 
     acquisition intern program in collaboration with the Federal 
     Acquisition Institute or the Defense Acquisition University.
       ``(11) The ability of an AACE to effectively and properly 
     manage fees received for assisted acquisitions pursuant to 
     this section.
       ``(e) Funds Received by AACEs.--
       ``(1) Availability.--Notwithstanding any other provision of 
     law or regulation, funds obligated and transferred from an 
     executive agency in a fiscal year to an AACE for the 
     acquisition of goods or services covered by an area of 
     specialized acquisition expertise of an AACE, regardless of 
     whether the requirements are severable or non-severable, 
     shall remain available for awards of contracts by the AACE 
     for the same general requirements for the next 5 fiscal years 
     following the fiscal year in which the funds were 
     transferred.
       ``(2) Transition to new aace.--If the AACE to which the 
     funds are provided under paragraph (1) becomes unable to 
     fulfill the requirements of the executive agency from which 
     the funds were provided, the funds may be provided to a 
     different AACE to fulfill such requirements. The funds so 
     provided shall be used for the same purpose and remain 
     available for the same period of time as applied when 
     provided to the original AACE.
       ``(3) Relationship to existing authorities.--This 
     subsection does not limit any existing authorities an AACE 
     may have under its revolving or working capital funds 
     authorities.
       ``(f) Government Accountability Office Review of AACE.--
       ``(1) Review.--The Comptroller General of the United States 
     shall review and assess--
       ``(A) the use and management of fees received by the AACEs 
     pursuant to this section to ensure that an appropriate fee 
     structure is established and enforced to cover activities 
     addressed in this section and that no excess fees are charged 
     or retained; and
       ``(B) the effectiveness of the AACEs in achieving the 
     purpose described in subsection (a), including review of 
     contracts.
       ``(2) Reports.--Not later than 1 year after the designation 
     or redesignation of AACES under subsection (b), the 
     Comptroller General shall submit to the relevant 
     congressional committees a report containing the findings and 
     assessment under paragraph (1).
       ``(g) Definitions.--In this section:
       ``(1) Assisted acquisition.--The term `assisted 
     acquisition' means a type of interagency acquisition in which 
     the parties enter into an interagency agreement pursuant to 
     which--
       ``(A) the servicing agency performs acquisition activities 
     on the requesting agency's behalf, such as awarding, 
     administering, or closing out a contract, task order, 
     delivery order, or blanket purchase agreement; and
       ``(B) funding is provided through a franchise fund, the 
     Acquisition Services Fund in section 321 of this title, 
     sections 1535 and 1536 of title 31, or other available 
     methods.
       ``(2) Executive agency.--The term `executive agency' has 
     the meaning provided that term by section 133 of title 41.
       ``(3) Relevant congressional committees.--The term 
     `relevant congressional committees' has the meaning provided 
     that term by section 11501 of this title.
       ``(h) Revision of Far.--The Federal Acquisition Regulation 
     shall be amended to implement this section.''.
       (b) Clerical Amendment.--The table of sections at the 
     beginning of chapter 115 of title 40, United States Code, as 
     amended by section 5401, is further amended by adding at the 
     end the following new item:

``11502. Assisted Acquisition Centers of Excellence.''.

           Subtitle B--Strengthening IT Acquisition Workforce

     SEC. 5411. EXPANSION OF TRAINING AND USE OF INFORMATION 
                   TECHNOLOGY ACQUISITION CADRES.

       (a) Purpose.--The purpose of this section is to ensure 
     timely progress by Federal agencies toward developing, 
     strengthening, and deploying personnel with highly 
     specialized skills in information technology acquisition, 
     including program and project managers, to be known as 
     information technology acquisition cadres.
       (b) Report to Congress.--Section 1704 of title 41, United 
     States Code, is amended by adding at the end the following 
     new subsection:
       ``(j) Strategic Plan on Information Technology Acquisition 
     Cadres.--
       ``(1) Five-year strategic plan to congress.--Not later than 
     June 1 following the date of the enactment of this 
     subsection, the Director shall submit to the relevant 
     congressional committees a 5-year strategic plan (to be known 
     as the `IT Acquisition Cadres Strategic Plan') to develop, 
     strengthen, and solidify information technology acquisition 
     cadres. The plan shall include a timeline for implementation 
     of the plan and identification of individuals responsible for 
     specific elements of the plan during the 5-year period 
     covered by the plan.
       ``(2) Matters covered.--The plan shall address, at a 
     minimum, the following matters:
       ``(A) Current information technology acquisition staffing 
     challenges in Federal agencies, by previous year's 
     information technology acquisition value, and by the Federal 
     Government as a whole.
       ``(B) The variety and complexity of information technology 
     acquisitions conducted by each Federal agency covered by the 
     plan, and the specialized information technology acquisition 
     workforce needed to effectively carry out such acquisitions.
       ``(C) The development of a sustainable funding model to 
     support efforts to hire, retain, and train an information 
     technology acquisition cadre of appropriate size and skill to 
     effectively carry out the acquisition programs of the Federal 
     agencies covered by the plan, including an examination of 
     interagency funding methods and a discussion of how the model 
     of the Defense Acquisition Workforce Development Fund could 
     be applied to civilian agencies.
       ``(D) Any strategic human capital planning necessary to 
     hire, retain, and train an information acquisition cadre of 
     appropriate size and skill at each Federal agency covered by 
     the plan.
       ``(E) Governmentwide training standards and certification 
     requirements necessary to enhance the mobility and career 
     opportunities of the Federal information technology 
     acquisition cadre within the Federal agencies covered by the 
     plan.
       ``(F) New and innovative approaches to workforce 
     development and training, including cross-functional 
     training, rotational development, and assignments both within 
     and outside the Government.
       ``(G) Appropriate consideration and alignment with the 
     needs and priorities of the Infrastructure and Common 
     Application Collaboration Center, Assisted Acquisition 
     Centers of Excellence, and acquisition intern programs.
       ``(H) Assessment of the current workforce competency and 
     usage trends in evaluation technique to obtain best value, 
     including proper handling of tradeoffs between price and 
     nonprice factors.
       ``(I) Assessment of the current workforce competency in 
     designing and aligning performance goals, life cycle costs, 
     and contract incentives.

[[Page H3614]]

       ``(J) Assessment of the current workforce competency in 
     avoiding brand-name preference and using industry-neutral 
     functional specifications to leverage open industry standards 
     and competition.
       ``(K) Use of integrated program teams, including fully 
     dedicated program managers, for each complex information 
     technology investment.
       ``(L) Proper assignment of recognition or accountability to 
     the members of an integrated program team for both individual 
     functional goals and overall program success or failure.
       ``(M) The development of a technology fellows program that 
     includes provisions for recruiting, for rotation of 
     assignments, and for partnering directly with universities 
     with well-recognized information technology programs.
       ``(N) The capability to properly manage other transaction 
     authority (where such authority is granted), including 
     ensuring that the use of the authority is warranted due to 
     unique technical challenges, rapid adoption of innovative or 
     emerging commercial or noncommercial technologies, or other 
     circumstances that cannot readily be satisfied using a 
     contract, grant, or cooperative agreement in accordance with 
     applicable law and the Federal Acquisition Regulation.
       ``(O) The use of student internship and scholarship 
     programs as a talent pool for permanent hires and the use and 
     impact of special hiring authorities and flexibilities to 
     recruit diverse candidates.
       ``(P) The assessment of hiring manager satisfaction with 
     the hiring process and hiring outcomes, including 
     satisfaction with the quality of applicants interviewed and 
     hires made.
       ``(Q) The assessment of applicant satisfaction with the 
     hiring process, including the clarity of the hiring 
     announcement, the user-friendliness of the application 
     process, communication from the hiring manager or agency 
     regarding application status, and timeliness of the hiring 
     decision.
       ``(R) The assessment of new hire satisfaction with the 
     onboarding process, including the orientation process, and 
     investment in training and development for employees during 
     their first year of employment.
       ``(S) Any other matters the Director considers appropriate.
       ``(3) Annual report.--Not later than June 1 in each of the 
     5 years following the year of submission of the plan required 
     by paragraph (1), the Director shall submit to the relevant 
     congressional committees an annual report outlining the 
     progress made pursuant to the plan.
       ``(4) Government accountability office review of the plan 
     and annual report.--
       ``(A) Not later than 1 year after the submission of the 
     plan required by paragraph (1), the Comptroller General of 
     the United States shall review the plan and submit to the 
     relevant congressional committees a report on the review.
       ``(B) Not later than 6 months after the submission of the 
     first, third, and fifth annual report required under 
     paragraph (3), the Comptroller General shall independently 
     assess the findings of the annual report and brief the 
     relevant congressional committees on the Comptroller 
     General's findings and recommendations to ensure the 
     objectives of the plan are accomplished.
       ``(5) Definitions.--In this subsection:
       ``(A) The term `Federal agency' means each agency listed in 
     section 901(b) of title 31.
       ``(B) The term `relevant congressional committees' means 
     each of the following:
       ``(i) The Committee on Oversight and Government Reform and 
     the Committee on Armed Services of the House of 
     Representatives.
       ``(ii) The Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
     Affairs and the Committee on Armed Services of the Senate.''.

     SEC. 5412. PLAN ON STRENGTHENING PROGRAM AND PROJECT 
                   MANAGEMENT PERFORMANCE.

       (a) Plan on Strengthening Program and Project Management 
     Performance.--Not later than June 1 following the date of the 
     enactment of this Act, the Director, in consultation with the 
     Director of the Office of Personnel Management, shall submit 
     to the relevant congressional committees a plan for improving 
     management of IT programs and projects.
       (b) Matters Covered.--The plan required by subsection (a) 
     shall include, at a minimum, the following:
       (1) Creation of a specialized career path for program 
     management.
       (2) The development of a competency model for program 
     management consistent with the IT project manager model.
       (3) A career advancement model that requires appropriate 
     expertise and experience for advancement.
       (4) A career advancement model that is more competitive 
     with the private sector and that recognizes both Government 
     and private sector experience.
       (5) Appropriate consideration and alignment with the needs 
     and priorities of the Infrastructure and Common Application 
     Collaboration Center, the Assisted Acquisition Centers of 
     Excellence, and acquisition intern programs.
       (c) Combination With Other Cadres Plan.--The Director may 
     combine the plan required by subsection (a) with the IT 
     Acquisition Cadres Strategic Plan required under section 
     1704(j) of title 41, United States Code, as added by section 
     411.

     SEC. 5413. PERSONNEL AWARDS FOR EXCELLENCE IN THE ACQUISITION 
                   OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND INFORMATION 
                   TECHNOLOGY.

       (a) In General.--Not later than 180 days after the date of 
     the enactment of this Act, the Director of the Office of 
     Personnel Management shall develop policy and guidance for 
     agencies to develop a program to recognize excellent 
     performance by Federal Government employees and teams of such 
     employees in the acquisition of information systems and 
     information technology for the agency.
       (b) Elements.--The program referred to in subsection (a) 
     shall, to the extent practicable--
       (1) obtain objective outcome measures; and
       (2) include procedures for--
       (A) the nomination of Federal Government employees and 
     teams of such employees for eligibility for recognition under 
     the program; and
       (B) the evaluation of nominations for recognition under the 
     program by 1 or more agency panels of individuals from 
     Government, academia, and the private sector who have such 
     expertise, and are appointed in such a manner, as the 
     Director of the Office of Personal Management shall establish 
     for purposes of the program.
       (c) Award of Cash Bonuses and Other Incentives.--In 
     carrying out the program referred to in subsection (a), the 
     Director of the Office of Personnel Management, in 
     consultation with the Director of the Office of Management 
     and Budget, shall establish policies and guidance for 
     agencies to reward any Federal Government employee or teams 
     of such employees recognized pursuant to the program--
       (1) with a cash bonus, to the extent that the performance 
     of such individual or team warrants the award of such bonus 
     and is authorized by any provision of law;
       (2) through promotions and other nonmonetary awards;
       (3) by publicizing--
       (A) acquisition accomplishments by individual employees; 
     and
       (B) the tangible end benefits that resulted from such 
     accomplishments, as appropriate; and
       (4) through other awards, incentives, or bonuses that the 
     head of the agency considers appropriate.

                      TITLE LV--ADDITIONAL REFORMS

     SEC. 5501. MAXIMIZING THE BENEFIT OF THE FEDERAL STRATEGIC 
                   SOURCING INITIATIVE.

       Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of 
     this Act, the Administrator for Federal Procurement Policy 
     shall prescribe regulations providing that when the Federal 
     Government makes a purchase of services and supplies offered 
     under the Federal Strategic Sourcing Initiative (managed by 
     the Office of Federal Procurement Policy) but such Initiative 
     is not used, the contract file for the purchase shall include 
     a brief analysis of the comparative value, including price 
     and nonprice factors, between the services and supplies 
     offered under such Initiative and services and supplies 
     offered under the source or sources used for the purchase.

     SEC. 5502. PROMOTING TRANSPARENCY OF BLANKET PURCHASE 
                   AGREEMENTS.

       (a) Price Information to Be Treated as Public 
     Information.--The final negotiated price offered by an 
     awardee of a blanket purchase agreement shall be treated as 
     public information.
       (b) Publication of Blanket Purchase Agreement 
     Information.--Not later than 180 days after the date of the 
     enactment of this Act, the Administrator of General Services 
     shall make available to the public a list of all blanket 
     purchase agreements entered into by Federal agencies under 
     its Federal Supply Schedules contracts and the prices 
     associated with those blanket purchase agreements. The list 
     and price information shall be updated at least once every 6 
     months.

     SEC. 5503. ADDITIONAL SOURCE SELECTION TECHNIQUE IN 
                   SOLICITATIONS.

       Section 3306(d) of title 41, United States Code, is 
     amended--
       (1) by striking ``or'' at the end of paragraph (1);
       (2) by striking the period and inserting ``; or'' at the 
     end of paragraph (2); and
       (3) by adding at the end the following new paragraph:
       ``(3) stating in the solicitation that the award will be 
     made using a fixed price technical competition, under which 
     all offerors compete solely on nonprice factors and the fixed 
     award price is pre-announced in the solicitation.''.

     SEC. 5504. ENHANCED TRANSPARENCY IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 
                   INVESTMENTS.

       (a) Public Availability of Information About It 
     Investments.--Section 11302(c) of title 40, United States 
     Code, is amended--
       (1) by redesignating paragraph (2) as paragraph (3); and
       (2) by inserting after paragraph (1) the following new 
     paragraph:
       ``(2) Public availability.--
       ``(A) In general.--The Director shall make available to the 
     public the cost, schedule, and performance data for at least 
     80 percent (by dollar value) of all information technology 
     investments Governmentwide, and 60 percent (by dollar value) 
     of all information technology investments in each Federal 
     agency listed in section 901(b) of title 31, notwithstanding 
     whether the investments are for new IT acquisitions or for 
     operations and maintenance of existing IT. The Director shall 
     ensure that the information is current, accurate, and 
     reflects the risks associated

[[Page H3615]]

     with each covered information technology investment.
       ``(B) Waiver or limitation authority.--The applicability of 
     subparagraph (A) may be waived or the extent of the 
     information may be limited--
       ``(i) by the Director, with respect to IT investments 
     Governmentwide; and
       ``(ii) by the Chief Information Officer of a Federal 
     agency, with respect to IT investments in that agency;

     if the Director or the Chief Information Officer, as the case 
     may be, determines that such a waiver or limitation is in the 
     national security interests of the United States.''.
       (b) Additional Report Requirements.--Paragraph (3) of 
     section 11302(c) of such title, as redesignated by subsection 
     (a), is amended by adding at the end the following: ``The 
     report shall include an analysis of agency trends reflected 
     in the performance risk information required in paragraph 
     (2).''.

     SEC. 5505. ENHANCED COMMUNICATION BETWEEN GOVERNMENT AND 
                   INDUSTRY.

       Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of 
     this Act, the Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council shall 
     prescribe a regulation making clear that agency acquisition 
     personnel are permitted and encouraged to engage in 
     responsible and constructive exchanges with industry, so long 
     as those exchanges are consistent with existing law and 
     regulation and do not promote an unfair competitive advantage 
     to particular firms.

     SEC. 5506. CLARIFICATION OF CURRENT LAW WITH RESPECT TO 
                   TECHNOLOGY NEUTRALITY IN ACQUISITION OF 
                   SOFTWARE.

       (a) Purpose.--The purpose of this section is to establish 
     guidance and processes to clarify that software acquisitions 
     by the Federal Government are to be made using merit-based 
     requirements development and evaluation processes that 
     promote procurement choices--
       (1) based on performance and value, including the long-term 
     value proposition to the Federal Government;
       (2) free of preconceived preferences based on how 
     technology is developed, licensed, or distributed; and
       (3) generally including the consideration of proprietary, 
     open source, and mixed source software technologies.
       (b) Technology Neutrality.--Nothing in this section shall 
     be construed to modify the Federal Government's long-standing 
     policy of following technology-neutral principles and 
     practices when selecting and acquiring information technology 
     that best fits the needs of the Federal Government.
       (c) Guidance.--Not later than 180 days after the date of 
     the enactment of this Act, the Director, in consultation with 
     the Chief Information Officers Council, shall issue guidance 
     concerning the technology-neutral procurement and use of 
     software within the Federal Government.
       (d) Matters Covered.--In issuing guidance under subsection 
     (c), the Director shall include, at a minimum, the following:
       (1) Guidance to clarify that the preference for commercial 
     items in section 3307 of title 41, United States Code, 
     includes proprietary, open source, and mixed source software 
     that meets the definition of the term ``commercial item'' in 
     section 103 of title 41, United States Code, including all 
     such software that is used for non-Government purposes and is 
     licensed to the public.
       (2) Guidance regarding the conduct of market research to 
     ensure the inclusion of proprietary, open source, and mixed 
     source software options.
       (3) Guidance to define Governmentwide standards for 
     security, redistribution, indemnity, and copyright in the 
     acquisition, use, release, and collaborative development of 
     proprietary, open source, and mixed source software.
       (4) Guidance for the adoption of available commercial 
     practices to acquire proprietary, open source, and mixed 
     source software for widespread Government use, including 
     issues such as security and redistribution rights.
       (5) Guidance to establish standard service level agreements 
     for maintenance and support for proprietary, open source, and 
     mixed source software products widely adopted by the 
     Government, as well as the development of Governmentwide 
     agreements that contain standard and widely applicable 
     contract provisions for ongoing maintenance and development 
     of software.
       (6) Guidance on the role and use of the Federal 
     Infrastructure and Common Application Collaboration Center, 
     established pursuant to section 11501 of title 40, United 
     States Code (as added by section 5401), for acquisition of 
     proprietary, open source, and mixed source software.
       (e) Report to Congress.--Not later than 2 years after the 
     issuance of the guidance required by subsection (b), the 
     Comptroller General of the United States shall submit to the 
     relevant congressional committees a report containing--
       (1) an assessment of the effectiveness of the guidance;
       (2) an identification of barriers to widespread use by the 
     Federal Government of specific software technologies; and
       (3) such legislative recommendations as the Comptroller 
     General considers appropriate to further the purposes of this 
     section.


        amendment no. 170 offered by mr. garamendi of california

       At the end of subtitle C of title XV, add the following new 
     section:

     SEC. 15_. LIMITATION ON FUNDS FOR THE AFGHANISTAN SECURITY 
                   FORCES FUND TO ACQUIRE CERTAIN AIRCRAFT, 
                   VEHICLES, AND EQUIPMENT.

       (a) Limitation.--Of the funds authorized to be appropriated 
     by this Act to the Department of Defense for the Afghanistan 
     Security Forces Fund (ASFF), $2,600,000,000 shall be withheld 
     from obligation and expenditure until the Secretary of 
     Defense submits to the Committee on Armed Services of the 
     House of Representatives and the Committee on Armed Services 
     of the Senate a report as described in subsection (b).
       (b) Report.--The report referred to in subsection (a) is a 
     report that includes the following information:
       (1) A list of all covered aircraft, vehicles, and equipment 
     to be purchased with funds authorized to be appropriated by 
     this Act to the Department of Defense for the ASFF.
       (2) The expected date on which such covered aircraft, 
     vehicles, and equipment would be delivered and operable in 
     Afghanistan.
       (3) The full requirements for operating such covered 
     aircraft, vehicles, and equipment.
       (4) The plan for maintenance of such covered aircraft, 
     vehicles, and equipment and estimated costs of such covered 
     aircraft, vehicles, and equipment by year, through 2020.
       (5) The expected date that ASFF personnel would be fully 
     capable of operating and maintaining such covered aircraft, 
     vehicles, and equipment without support from United States 
     personnel.
       (6) An explanation of the extent to which the acquisition 
     of such covered aircraft, vehicles, and equipment will impact 
     the longer-term United States costs of supporting the ASFF.
       (c) Covered Aircraft, Vehicles, and Equipment.--In this 
     section, the term ``covered aircraft, vehicles, and 
     equipment'' means helicopters, systems for close air support, 
     air mobility systems, and armored vehicles.


          amendment no. 171 offered by mr. gingrey of georgia

       At the end of subtitle I of title X of division A, add the 
     following:

     SEC. 1090. SENSE OF CONGRESS REGARDING PRESERVATION OF SECOND 
                   AMENDMENT RIGHTS OF ACTIVE DUTY MILITARY 
                   PERSONNEL STATIONED OR RESIDING IN THE DISTRICT 
                   OF COLUMBIA.

       (a) Findings.--Congress finds the following:
       (1) The Second Amendment to the United States Constitution 
     provides that the right of the people to keep and bear arms 
     shall not be infringed.
       (2) Approximately 40,000 servicemen and women across all 
     branches of the Armed Forces either live in or are stationed 
     on active duty within the Washington, D.C., metropolitan 
     area. Unless these individuals are granted a waiver as 
     serving in a law enforcement role, they are subject to the 
     District of Columbia's onerous and highly restrictive laws on 
     the possession of firearms.
       (3) Military personnel, despite being extensively trained 
     in the proper and safe use of firearms, are therefore 
     deprived by the laws of the District of Columbia of handguns, 
     rifles, and shotguns that are commonly kept by law-abiding 
     persons throughout the United States for sporting use and for 
     lawful defense of their persons, homes, businesses, and 
     families.
       (4) The District of Columbia has one of the highest per 
     capita murder rates in the Nation, which may be attributed in 
     part to previous local laws prohibiting possession of 
     firearms by law-abiding persons who would have otherwise been 
     able to defend themselves and their loved ones in their own 
     homes and businesses.
       (5) The Gun Control Act of 1968 (as amended by the Firearms 
     Owners' Protection Act) and the Brady Handgun Violence 
     Prevention Act provide comprehensive Federal regulations 
     applicable in the District of Columbia as elsewhere. In 
     addition, existing District of Columbia criminal laws punish 
     possession and illegal use of firearms by violent criminals 
     and felons. Consequently, there is no need for local laws 
     that only affect and disarm law-abiding citizens.
       (6) On June 26, 2008, the Supreme Court of the United 
     States in the case of District of Columbia v. Heller held 
     that the Second Amendment protects an individual's right to 
     possess a firearm for traditionally lawful purposes, and thus 
     ruled that the District of Columbia's handgun ban and 
     requirements that rifles and shotguns in the home be kept 
     unloaded and disassembled or outfitted with a trigger lock to 
     be unconstitutional.
       (7) On July 16, 2008, the District of Columbia enacted the 
     Firearms Control Emergency Amendment Act of 2008 (D.C. Act 
     17-422; 55 DCR 8237), which places onerous restrictions on 
     the ability of law-abiding citizens from possessing firearms, 
     thus violating the spirit by which the Supreme Court of the 
     United States ruled in District of Columbia v. Heller.
       (8) On February 26, 2009, the United States Senate adopted 
     an amendment on a bipartisan vote of 62-36 by Senator John 
     Ensign to S. 160, the District of Columbia House Voting 
     Rights Act of 2009, which would fully restore Second 
     Amendment rights to the citizens of the District of Columbia.
       (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that 
     active duty military personnel who are stationed or residing 
     in the District of Columbia should be permitted to exercise 
     fully their rights under the Second Amendment to the 
     Constitution of the United States and therefore should be 
     exempt from

[[Page H3616]]

     the District of Columbia's restrictions on the possession of 
     firearms.


         amendment no. 172 offered by mrs. davis of california

       At the end of subtitle A of title VI, add the following new 
     section:

     SEC. 6__. RECOGNITION OF ADDITIONAL MEANS BY WHICH MEMBERS OF 
                   THE NATIONAL GUARD CALLED INTO FEDERAL SERVICE 
                   FOR A PERIOD OF 30 DAYS OR LESS MAY INITIALLY 
                   REPORT FOR DUTY FOR ENTITLEMENT TO BASIC PAY.

       Section 204(c) of title 37, United States Code, is 
     amended--
       (1) in the first sentence, by striking ``date when he 
     appears at the place of company rendezvous'' and inserting 
     ``date on which the member, in person or by authorized 
     telephonic or electronic means, contacts the member's unit''; 
     and
       (2) by striking the second sentence and inserting the 
     following new sentence: ``However, this subsection does not 
     authorize any expenditure before the member makes authorized 
     contact that is not authorized by law to be paid after such 
     authorized contact.''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 260, the gentleman 
from California (Mr. McKeon) and the gentleman from Washington (Mr. 
Smith) each will control 10 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from California.
  Mr. McKEON. Madam Chair, I urge the committee to adopt the amendments 
en bloc, all of which have been examined by both the majority and the 
minority.
  At this time, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from California (Mr. 
Issa).
  Mr. ISSA. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
  My amendment is not controversial, but it's critical. At a time when 
over $80 billion is spent and over 10 percent of it goes completely 
wasted on information technology purchases by the government, there has 
never been a more important time to update the legendary, historic 
Clinger-Cohen Act. That Act in 1996 was attached to the NDAA, exactly 
as this one is, and it created the positions of Chief Information 
Officers to oversee IT management.

                              {time}  1040

  1996 was a time in which you could still have an IBM AT 286 computer 
on your desk. The idea of cloud servers didn't exist, and the size and 
scope and dependency on the cyber environment was never even 
anticipated.
  So as we modernize this act, I would ask to both have it considered 
as important, but also have it recognized as critically necessary.
  One of the most important things and something that makes common 
sense to the people who may hear this today or read it in the 
transcript is that we have more chief information officers today than 
we have departments, and all but one have no budget authority.
  This legislation, when enacted, will eliminate that. It will 
eliminate duplicative IT purchases that give us overruns of as much as 
20 percent in our purchasing of licenses, but it also will put real 
meaning behind the term ``chief information officer.'' Never again will 
someone have that title and have no budget authority or responsibility. 
When a program goes right, the chief information officer is 
responsible; when a program goes awry, it's his or her job to make it 
right.
  Once again, I urge support for a bill that was considered, numerous 
hearings were held, and it was passed unanimously out of my committee.


      FEDERAL IT ACQUISITION REFORM ACT (FITARA) AMENDMENT TO NDAA

  My amendment is a modified version of a bill reported from my 
committee unanimously in March. It reforms--Government-wide--the 
process by which federal information technology is acquired.
  It is particularly fitting that this reform be included in the 
defense authorization bill. First, because majority of the Government's 
annual $80 billion in federal IT purchases is defense-related. Second, 
because this reform is a major update to a federal IT law originally 
enacted as part of a defense authorization bill--the Fiscal Year 1996 
National Defense Authorization Act.
  The 1996 NDAA included the Information Technology Management Reform 
Act--popularly known as Clinger-Cohen Act. It changed the way the 
federal government managed its IT resources--for instance by creating 
agency Chief Information Officers to oversee IT management.
  Upon the introduction of this historic legislation, Chairman Clinger 
said,

       ``From the time the Second Continental Congress established 
     a Commissary General in 1775, the procurement system has 
     commanded the attention of both public officials and the 
     American taxpayer. Unfortunately and all too often, the 
     attention has focused on individual abuses rather than the 
     overall system. Over the years, in response to these horror 
     stories, Congress passed many laws--long and short, 
     significant and trivial, new and old which standing alone 
     were not overly harmful, but when added together created an 
     increasingly overburdened mass of statutory requirements.
       In December 1994, a report prepared for the Secretary of 
     Defense found that, on average, the Government pays an 
     additional 18 percent on what it buys solely because of the 
     requirements it imposes on its contractors. This confirmed 
     the average estimate by major contractors surveyed by GAO 
     that the additional costs incurred in selling to the 
     Government are about 19 percent. While some of the 
     Government's unique requirements certainly are needed, we 
     clearly are paying an enormous premium for them--billions of 
     dollars annually.
       And this is only part of the Government's inflated cost of 
     doing business--for it includes only what is paid to 
     contractors, not the cost of the Government's own 
     administrative system. The Government's contracting officials 
     are confronted with numerous mandates of their own, often 
     amounting to step-by-step prescriptions that increase staff 
     and equipment needs, and leave little room for the exercise 
     of business judgment, initiative, and creativity.''

  Many of his sentiments are still applicable today. Since the mid-
Nineties, technology has leaped forward, and the federal government's 
spending on IT procurement has tripled. So my amendment--the 
Information Technology Acquisition Reform Act--updates Clinger-Cohen, 
with an emphasis on reforming the way the federal government purchases 
IT products and services.
  GAO has identified duplicative IT investment as a problem in its 
annual reports to Congress on duplication. IT acquisition program 
failure rates and cost overruns are between 72 and 80%. Some estimate 
as much as $20 billion is wasted annually in this area.
  We need to enhance the best value to the taxpayer by aligning the 
cumbersome federal acquisition process to major trends in the IT 
industry.
  This amendment accomplishes this by empowering agency CIO's with 
budget authority over IT programs. It establishes centers of excellence 
in specific areas of IT procurement to develop expertise and leverage 
the Government's economy of scale in purchasing commonly-used IT 
products and services, so that agencies buy cheaper, faster and 
smarter. It accelerates consolidation and optimization of the Federal 
Government's proliferating data centers. And it ensures procurement 
decisions give due consideration to all technologies--including open 
source--and that contracts are awarded based on best long-term value 
proposition.
  A discussion draft of the FITARA bill was posted last September. I 
held two full committee hearings on the bill, and the language has 
evolved through the course of several rewrites and extensive feedback 
from contracting and technology experts from inside and outside 
Government.
  This is a significant and timely reform that will enhance both 
defense and non-defense procurement. I urge all members to support this 
amendment.
  Mr. SMITH of Washington. I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the gentleman from 
Oregon (Mr. Blumenauer).
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. I appreciate the gentleman's courtesy, and I 
appreciate the leadership for including this amendment in the en bloc 
amendment.
  It is important that we deal with improving the quality of life for 
our servicemembers and their families.
  In a situation all too familiar for our military families, every few 
years they find themselves living in a new military base with their 
children having to start a new school and having to adapt to a new 
environment. Making this transition even more difficult, their loved 
ones could be serving in Iraq or Afghanistan in constant danger.
  This is an effort to make sure that we help our military 
installations include things that enhance the livability of that 
environment, to help with green space, public gardens, sidewalks, bike 
and running trails, things that are recognized in urban development as 
important amenities that add value and quality of life, while also 
helping the Department of Defense adapt best practices to build 
military bases to promote close-knit communities that work for 
families, which is critical.
  I appreciate the progress that's been made and the committee working 
with us to make sure that this is enhanced as we move forward.
  Mr. McKEON. Madam Chair, at this time I yield 3 minutes to the 
gentleman from Georgia (Mr. Kingston) for the purpose of a colloquy.

[[Page H3617]]

  Mr. KINGSTON. I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  Madam Chair, I rise today to engage my friend, Chairman McKeon, in a 
colloquy regarding the Defense Contract Audit Agency, or DCAA, and 
express concerns about the potential overreach of its authority.
  The DCAA plays a critical role in our contracting system. As such, in 
recent years, Congress has provided substantial human and financial 
resources to address its well-documented workload backlog and other 
challenges. I am in favor of such resources and encourage DCAA to focus 
on eliminating the backlog. However, it appears that DCAA may be 
broadly accessing a myriad of contractor documents that have little or 
no impact on determining the effectiveness of contractor business 
systems.
  The FY13 National Defense Authorization Act contained a provision, 
section 832, which set parameters for DCAA's access to the internal 
audits of companies that provide goods and services to the Department 
of Defense. Specifically, it is my understanding the committee was 
focused on contractors' business systems and ensuring robust and 
independent internal audit controls to those systems. However, it 
appears DCAA is broadly interpreting section 832 as providing DCAA with 
the authority to access all contractor internal audits and supporting 
documents. This is concerning on many levels.
  I would ask the chairman if he has considered the potentially 
chilling effect on a company's desire to maintain a robust internal 
audit program if the government is demanding unfettered access to 
information they may not need or may potentially misuse. This is 
especially worrisome when this overreach extends to the very 
proprietary data that makes these companies competitive in the 
marketplace.
  I thank the chairman for his leadership and ask if he shares my 
concerns regarding the potential overreach of DCAA in this area.
  Mr. McKEON. Will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. KINGSTON. I yield to the gentleman from California.
  Mr. McKEON. I thank my friend for bringing up this important issue.
  As you are aware, we did not reopen the issue in the current bill. 
However, I share your concerns and would hope that DCAA is not 
overreaching on its authority. The potential for DCAA to misuse 
corporate internal audits or to go fishing through these audits without 
understanding their context or purpose is very concerning. The 
committee is continuing to monitor their implementation of access to 
company internal audits and is willing to take additional action if we 
determine DCAA is acting beyond the limited grant of authority that 
Congress provided.
  Again, thank you for raising this important issue.
  Mr. SMITH of Washington. I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from 
California (Mr. Swalwell).
  Mr. SWALWELL of California. I thank the gentleman from Washington.
  First, I also want to thank my friend, Congressman Pat Meehan, for 
cosponsoring my amendment.
  Due to sequestration, the Department of Defense has not been allowing 
military bands to perform at community events, even when the sponsoring 
community organization pays for all associated expenses, because the 
Department of Defense is saying that the reimbursement is never 
credited to the proper account.
  Well, this is hard to believe. First, because it's been going on 
before, where community events have reimbursed the Department of 
Defense and there have not been any problems that we've been aware of. 
But since sequestration, they're now saying it cannot be done. Well, 
this is a civilian force of over 700,000 people. I'm sure that we can 
find a way to make this work and support our community events.
  My amendment is simple. It will allow military bands to perform at 
community events when the hosting organization fully funds the band's 
expenditures by ensuring that the money from the hosting organization 
is returned to the relevant department's accounts.
  This issue came to my attention when a Marine Corps veteran from my 
district in Pleasanton, California, Brooks Wilson, informed me that at 
this year's 148th Scottish Gathering and Games in Pleasanton, the 
Marine Corps band wouldn't be able to perform, even though his 
organization would fully fund the band's expenditure just as they have 
always done previously.
  Public performances by military bands like the Marine Corps band 
bring a sense of patriotism and community to our cities and towns. They 
also help enliven events like the Scottish Games, increasing attendance 
and helping boost and lift economic activity.
  I ask my colleagues to join Congressman Meehan and I in supporting 
our military bands and our amendment.
  Mr. McKEON. I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. SMITH of Washington. I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
California (Mr. Garamendi).
  Mr. GARAMENDI. Madam Chair, I want to thank the ranking member and 
the chair for making my amendment an en bloc amendment.
  This amendment deals with the 50-plus billion dollars that we have 
spent on the Afghan National Security Forces. An additional $7.7 
billion is to be added this year. That is a 50 percent increase over 
last year.
  The $2.6 billion addition is for equipment with absolutely no 
justification, no idea what the equipment is--airplanes, related. There 
is no knowledge of whether the Afghan National Security Force can use 
it or not. The amendment simply says that money will not be available 
until and unless there is clarity as to where the money is going to be 
spent, how it's going to be spent, how the equipment will be purchased. 
We don't want to write a $2.6 billion blank check for additional graft 
and corruption in Afghanistan.
  This amendment will be in the en bloc amendment, and I thank the 
committee for making it possible.
  Mr. McKEON. I continue to reserve the balance of my time.

                              {time}  1050

  Mr. SMITH of Washington. I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from 
Virginia (Mr. Connolly).
  Mr. CONNOLLY. I thank my colleague, and I thank the distinguished 
chairman of the committee as well.
  I want to talk about the FITARA bill, the Federal Information 
Technology Acquisition Reform Act, that I am a coauthor of with the 
distinguished chairman of the Oversight and Government Reform 
Committee, Mr. Issa. This is the most sweeping reform legislation since 
Clinger-Cohen.
  Today, Federal IT acquisition is a cumbersome, bureaucratic, and 
wasteful exercise. In recent decades, taxpayers have been forced to 
foot the bill for massive IT failures that ring up staggeringly high 
costs and exhibit astonishingly poor performance. Program failures and 
cost overruns plague the vast majority of major Federal IT investments, 
while Federal managers report that 47 percent of the budget is spent on 
maintaining antiquated and inadequate IT platforms even today. The 
annual pricetag of this wasteful spending is estimated at $20 billion a 
year.
  The Air Force, for example, invested 6 years in a modernization 
effort that cost more than $1 billion but failed to deliver a usable 
product, promptly its Assistant Secretary to state:
  I'm personally appalled at the limited capabilities that program has 
produced relative to that amount of investment.
  Mission-critical IT investment failures not only waste taxpayer 
dollars, but they jeopardize our Nation's safety.
  Our bill would modernize, streamline, and make more transparent by 
actually posting 80 percent of all acquisitions on the Web site. It 
would streamline the decisionmaking process. Right now, the 26 major 
Federal agencies, Madam Chairwoman, have over 250 people called CIO, 
chief information officers. We would designate one per agency who is 
responsible primarily and accountable primarily for IT acquisitions.
  I urge my colleagues to support this legislation. I again thank the 
distinguished chairman and the distinguished ranking member of the 
Armed Services Committee and their very

[[Page H3618]]

able staff for cooperating with Chairman Issa and myself on this very 
important reform legislation, and I certainly hope when we get to 
conference with the Senate it will persevere.
  Madam Chair, today, Federal IT acquisition is a cumbersome, 
bureaucratic, and wasteful exercise. In recent decades, taxpayers have 
been forced to foot the bill for massive IT program failures that ring 
up staggeringly high costs, but exhibit astonishingly poor performance. 
Program failure and cost overruns still plague the vast majority of 
major Federal IT investments, while Federal managers' report that 47 
percent of their budget is spent on maintaining antiquated and 
inadequate IT platforms. The annual price tag of this wasteful spending 
on Federal IT programs is estimated to add up to approximately $20 
billion.
  The Air Force invested six years in a modernization effort that cost 
more than $1 billion, but failed to deliver a usable product, prompting 
its Assistant Secretary to state, ``I am personally appalled at the 
limited capabilities that program has produced relative to that amount 
of investment.''
  Mission-critical IT investment failures not only waste taxpayer 
dollars, but they jeopardize our Nation's safety, security, and 
economy. From malfunctioning Census handheld computers that threatened 
to undermine a critical constitutional responsibility, to a promised 
electronic border fence that never materialized, time and time again, 
agency missions have been sabotaged by failed IT acquisitions.
  This status quo is unacceptable and unsustainable.
  I want to thank Chairman Issa for working with me in a productive and 
bipartisan manner to develop Amendment 117, a modified version of H.R. 
1232, the Federal Information Technology Acquisition Reform Act, which 
was favorably reported by the Committee on Oversight and Government 
Reform with unanimous support in March 2013.
  Our comprehensive proposal seeks to streamline and strengthen the 
Federal IT acquisition process and promote the adoption of best 
practices from the technology community. We have solicited extensive 
input from all stakeholders to refine and improve our amendment in an 
open and transparent manner.
  The resulting bipartisan amendment would elevate and empower agency 
CIOs with authority over, and accountability for, effectively managing 
the IT portfolio. It would also enhance OMB's role, tasking it with 
leading enterprise-wide portfolio management, and coordinating shared 
services and shared platforms across government.
  This bipartisan amendment would also empower agencies to eliminate 
duplicative and wasteful IT contracts that have proliferated for 
commonly-used, IT Commodity-like investments, such as e-mail. In this 
era of austerity, agencies cannot afford to spend precious dollars and 
time creating duplicative, wasteful contracts for products and licenses 
they already own.
  In addition to improving how the government procures IT, this 
amendment would also enhance how the government deploys these tools. It 
would accelerate data center optimization to achieve greater operating 
efficiency and cost-savings, as recommended by the U.S. Government 
Accountability Office; provide agencies with flexibility to leverage 
efficient cloud services; and strengthen the accountability and 
transparency of Federal IT programs. If enacted, 80 percent of the 
approximately $80 billion annual Federal IT investment would be 
required to be posted on the public IT Dashboard, compared to the 50 
percent coverage that exists today.
  Consistent with the principle that public contracts are public 
documents, our amendment also strengthens transparency in regard to the 
final negotiated price a company charges a Federal agency for a good or 
service. Today, far too many agencies negotiate blanket purchase 
agreements in silos, without any knowledge that another agency has 
already negotiated a BPA with the same exact vendor, for the same exact 
product, but at a different price.
  Nearly two decades after the Information Technology Management Reform 
Act and the Federal Acquisition Reform Act were enacted as Division E 
and Division D of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 1996--reforms that are better known today as the foundational 
``Clinger-Cohen Act''--a bipartisan consensus is finally forming around 
the urgent need to further streamline and strengthen how the Federal 
Government acquires and deploys IT.
  The bipartisan Issa-Connolly Amendment 117 will enhance the statutory 
framework established by Clinger-Cohen to create an efficient and 
effective Federal IT procurement system that best serves agencies, 
industry, and most importantly, the American taxpayer. I urge all my 
colleagues to join me in supporting this important bipartisan reform 
measure.
  Mr. McKEON. I continue to reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. SMITH of Washington. We have no further speakers, and I yield 
back the balance of my time.
  Mr. McKEON. How much time do I have remaining?
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from California has 5\1/4\ minutes 
remaining.
  Mr. McKEON. Thank you very much, Madam Chair. I'm going to use that 
time to make up for the time that I lost earlier.
  What I would like to do is read the letter from the National Guard 
Association of the United States. This is a letter to Chairman McKeon 
and Ranking Member Smith, and he says:

       As you are aware, there is an amendment sponsored by Reps. 
     Van Hollen, Moran, Mulvaney, and Woodall that would strip $5 
     billion out of the Overseas Contingency Operation funding and 
     the underlying readiness and modernization plus-ups supported 
     in the bill, which includes $400 million for the National 
     Guard and Reserve Equipment Account (NGREA). This would have 
     a significant impact on National Guard equipment, as this 
     funding is critical for new equipment purchases not planned 
     for or funded by the active components in the President's 
     budget. We urge you to oppose amendment 39.

  Then he goes into some details about what that would mean.
  Finally he ends with:

       For these reasons, we urge you to oppose amendment 39 to 
     remove the $5 billion in OCO funds, where National Guard's 
     NGREA funds are included. Thank you for your attention to 
     this critical matter.

  It is signed Gus Hargett, Major General, U.S. Army, Retired, National 
Guard Association.
  I think it is very important that we understand fully what we're 
talking about in these funds. Congressman Van Hollen referred to 
General Dempsey saying this was all the money we needed. Let me just 
read to you from the transcript that he was talking to General Dempsey 
about in their hearing:

       Congressman Van Hollen: General Dempsey, does the OCO 
     request that was made, in your judgment, satisfy our military 
     requirement for OCO?
       General Dempsey: Yeah, it does. But this year's request 
     proved inadequate to the task. We have to have some 
     understanding of trying to predict the future 2 years out.

  Let me just go back a couple years. They asked for a certain amount 
of money in last year's budget, but they actually spent $10 billion 
over that. So they're over-budget coming into this year, and we know, 
based on past experience, that they're going to spend more than that. 
And then to try to have an amendment to take $5 billion out of that 
when we're trying to compensate for the shortfall they had from last 
year, and then going into this year, is just irresponsible.
  When I was in Afghanistan a couple of months ago, I was meeting with 
a commander there, General Dunford, and he said the thing that people 
need to understand, as we're winding down this war effort in 
Afghanistan, and we have to have the troops out of there by the end of 
2014, it's going to cost us more because we're closing down the bigger 
bases, and we have to accomplish that this year.
  So we've got the commander saying it's going to cost us more, and we 
have an amendment saying we should cut $5 billion out. I think it's 
important that we really put this all in context and understand how 
those troops who are out there today, fighting, going outside the wire 
and having attacks on their compounds, are going to be short $5 billion 
if this amendment is passed.
  There exists a nearly $7 billion shortfall in funding to meet just 
the current readiness requirements. The Army alone needs an additional 
$3.2 billion beyond what's requested in the President's budget. This is 
testimony from the chiefs of these different services. The Marine Corps 
needs another $321.6 million. The Navy is funded $1.62 billion below 
required levels, and the Air Force $1.3 billion short of needed 
funding.
  So I needed that time, Madam Chair, those 15 seconds that I thought I 
lost earlier.
  But I think it's very important that people understand, this will be 
one of the most important votes coming up in this next series. We 
cannot afford to cut money out for warfighters who are over there 
putting their life on the line for us today.
  With that, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. GARDNER. Madam Chair, today I rise in support of my amendment to

[[Page H3619]]

H.R. 1960, the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2014. 
This amendment gives the land owners and ranchers in the Pinon Canyon 
community of Southeast Colorado peace of mind and economic certainty by 
requiring Congressional approval in order for the Department of Defense 
to expand Pinon Canyon Maneuver Site (PCMS) near Fort Carson, Colorado. 
It also requires specific appropriation approval for PCMS expansion.
  The passage of this amendment would represent a major step forward in 
providing assurance for the people of Southeast Colorado, who for the 
last several years have been subjected to a constant state of 
uncertainty over possible PCMS expansion into their lands. Despite an 
annual funding ban placed on the Department of the Army that 
effectively prohibits the expansion of the boundaries of PCMS, my 
constituents wonder every year whether the rules will change and the 
rug will be swept from under their feet. Today I ask my colleagues to 
come together to create a permanent fix. With the passage of this 
amendment, there would be stringent guidelines that restrict the 
expansion of PCMS, fully codifying that Congress must vote on PCMS land 
acquisition, that the appropriation must be authorized, and that the 
appropriation must be made.
  Make no mistake, the soldiers at Fort Carson exemplify the finest and 
bravest our nation has to offer. By removing the uncertainty 
surrounding expansion plans for the PCMS, we believe relations with 
surrounding communities will stabilize and greatly improve. Our armed 
forces are focused on defending freedom, and the specter of PCMS 
expansion has served only as a distraction to those on base and those 
in neighboring communities.
  Few other places in the U.S. have this level of statutory protection. 
In fact, a Congressional authorization for a specific land acquisition 
is unique to this amendment. I am pleased to help provide assurance to 
the farmers, ranchers, and families of Southeast Colorado that there 
will be no expansion of Pinon Canyon without the deliberation and 
explicit approval of Congress.
  Mr. HASTINGS of Washington. Madam Chair, included in this en bloc 
amendment is amendment #163 to H.R. 1960, made in order by H. Res. 260. 
This amendment is bipartisan and submitted by myself, Mr. Fleischmann 
of Tennessee and Mr. Lujan of New Mexico. It will protect and provide 
public access to Manhattan Project facilities at three Department of 
Energy former defense sites through the establishment of an historical 
park. This is essentially the text of H.R. 1208, reported favorably by 
the Committee on Natural Resources by unanimous consent in May 2013.
  These three locations that the park will encompass were integral to 
the tremendous engineering and human achievements of the Manhattan 
Project launched during World War II. The three locations are the 
Hanford site in my home State of Washington, Los Alamos in New Mexico, 
and Oak Ridge in Tennessee.
  The vast majority of the facilities that are eligible to be included 
in this park are already owned by the federal government, and they are 
located on former defense lands owned and controlled by the Department 
of Energy.
  As our nation already possesses these pieces of history, the real 
purpose of this amendment is to officially declare the importance of 
preserving the history, providing access to the public, and include the 
unique abilities of the National Park Service to help tell this story.
  Currently, some of these facilities slated for inclusion in this park 
are scheduled to be destroyed at considerable taxpayer expense. A great 
many local community leaders in all three states and interested 
citizens have worked to coordinate a commitment to preserving this 
piece of our history. Additionally, the government will save tens of 
millions of dollars from foregone destruction, as opposed to the 
minimal cost of providing public access and park administration.
  Under this amendment, not only will history be protected, but so will 
taxpayer dollars.
  Let me describe one example of the savings. The B Reactor at the 
Hanford site in Washington state is the first full-scale nuclear 
reactor ever constructed. Walking into its control room and viewing the 
reactor itself are like walking back in time. The federal government 
has a legal obligation to clean up the B Reactor that involves partial 
demolition, then cocooning the building in concrete for 75 years with 
continual monitoring, before final removal and demolition at a total 
cost in today's dollars of $90-100 million. With the amendment, this 
$100 million will not be spent and this piece of history will not be 
demolished.
  This matter has been carefully studied by both the Department of the 
Interior and the Department of Energy. Both Departments and the 
National Park Service support this action. On behalf of the Obama 
Administration, Interior Secretary Salazar has repeatedly expressed 
support for the park, as have Department of Energy officials of both 
the Obama and Bush Administrations.
  In recognition of the important contributions to the Manhattan 
Project by the men and women at sites across the country, the amendment 
contains a provision allowing communities like Dayton, Ohio, for 
example, outside the historical park, to receive technical assistance 
and support from the Department of the Interior as they seek to 
preserve and manage their own Manhattan Project park resources.
  Many, many individuals and organizations have dedicated countless 
hours towards this effort to preserve and tell this piece of history, 
and to ensure current and future generations not only will learn this 
story, but be able to visit and see it themselves. Among those 
endorsing this effort are the Atomic Heritage Foundation, the National 
Parks Conservation Association, the National Trust for Historic 
Preservation, the Energy Communities Alliance, the City of Richland 
Washington, the City of Oak Ridge Tennessee, the Tri-City Development 
Council, and many more in Los Alamos and other areas across the nation. 
Additionally, this effort has received strong endorsements from 
newspapers from one side of our nation to the other, including the 
Washington Post, the Boston Globe, and the Los Angeles Times.
  This is a good amendment that preserves and shares our nation's 
history.
  Madam Chair, I urge my colleagues to support this amendment.
  Mr. CONYERS. Madam Chair, I rise to discuss of my amendment, number 
146, to H.R. 1960, the ``National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2014.'' My amendment simply states that nothing in the bill should 
be construed as an authorization for the use of military force against 
Iran. I would like to thank the cosponsors of my amendment: Mr. Jones 
of North Carolina, Mr. Johnson of Georgia, Mr. Ellison of Minnesota, 
and Ms. Lee of California. I would also like to thank Chairman McKeon 
and Ranking Member Smith for accepting this amendment in en bloc 
amendment number eight. By adopting this amendment, the House of 
Representatives is making it clear, for the second straight year, that 
none of the provisions in this bill should be interpreted as a war 
authorization against Iran.
  In recent months, the possibility of a preemptive military strike 
against Iran has been openly discussed as a policy option of last 
resort as our country and our allies determine how to best confront the 
challenge posed by Iran's nuclear program.
  At the same time, this national discussion has prompted a large 
number of current and former military and intelligence officials to 
come forward to encourage the Congress and the Administration to 
consider the possible consequences, both intended and unintended, of 
such a strike.
  These include high-level former U.S. and Israeli national security 
officials, including a Bush administration National Intelligence 
Council chairman, a former national intelligence officer for the Near 
East and South Asia, Colin Powell's chief of staff, five retired 
generals, the former Director of the Israeli Mossad, and a former Chief 
of Staff of the Israeli Defense Forces.
  These experts have raised concerns that an attack on Iran could 
possibly result in serious harm to the world economy, potentially 
ignite a regional war, and even push Iran into building a nuclear 
weapon.
  With consequences as serious as these being raised by outside and 
former national security experts, it is critical that any decision to 
initiate military action against Iran be rigorously debated and, if 
necessary, be backed by a separate war authorization.
  Again, I thank my colleagues for supporting my amendment.
  Ms. NORTON. Madam Chair, I rise to strongly oppose Amendment #171 to 
H.R. 1960, the National Defense Authorization Act

[[Page H3620]]

for Fiscal Year 2014. This amendment is part of what for many of our 
Republican colleagues is an obsession with singling out the District of 
Columbia for anti-democratic bullying. There is no federal law that 
exempts active duty military personnel in their personal capacities 
from otherwise applicable federal firearms laws, except for residency 
requirements, or from any state or local firearms laws. Yet this 
amendment expresses the sense of Congress that active duty military 
personnel should be exempt from the gun laws of only one local 
jurisdiction, the District of Columbia. If the sponsor of this 
amendment believes that active duty military personnel should be exempt 
from federal, state or local firearms laws, why did he not offer an 
amendment that would apply nationwide instead of only to the District 
of Columbia? Republicans, who profess to support a limited federal 
government and local control of local matters, pick on the District of 
Columbia because they think they can. They are wrong.
  The sponsor of this amendment lives in the past, acting as if the 
changes D.C. made to its gun laws after the Supreme Court's Heller 
decision in 2008 had never happened and as if a federal district court 
and a federal appeals court have not upheld the constitutionality of 
those revised gun laws. The sponsor also acts as if the Supreme Court's 
McDonald decision in 2010 had not happened. In McDonald, the court said 
that the Second Amendment does not confer the ``right to keep and carry 
any weapon whatsoever in any manner whatsoever and for whatever 
purpose.''
  This amendment is the second time this year the sponsor has tried to 
interfere in the local affairs of the District of Columbia. Earlier 
this year, the sponsor introduced this amendment as a stand-alone bill. 
Although this amendment is non-binding, we will fight every attack on 
our rights as a local government, just as any member here would. This 
amendment does nothing less than attempt to pave the way for actual 
inroads into the District of Columbia's gun safety laws. The majority 
can expect a fierce fight from us whenever they treat the American 
citizens who live in the District of Columbia as second-class citizens. 
The House adopted this amendment last year, but, working with our 
allies, led by Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman Carl Levin and 
House Armed Services Committee Ranking Member Adam Smith, we were able 
to keep it out of the final bill, and we will fight to do so again this 
year.
  Mr. CONNOLLY. Madam Chair, I am pleased to cosponsor this bipartisan 
amendment, which would prohibit the Defense Department from 
circumventing Congressional intent with regard to Russian state arms 
dealer Rosoboronexport. This amendment prohibits the Department of 
Defense from purchasing military helicopters from Rosoboronexport--a 
company that has been supplying weapons to Syrian President Bashar al-
Assad's regime in its ``campaign of terror against its own people,'' as 
characterized by Secretary of State Kerry.
  The civil unrest and violence that has engulfed Syria and fueled 
instability across the region just entered its third year. This week, 
the United Nations reported that 93,000 people have been killed in this 
conflict. In addition, more than 1.6 million Syrian refugees are now 
displaced across five countries, and it is estimated that half of the 
population of Syria will be in need of aid by the end of this year.
  Russia has been the Assad regime's main arms supplier, recently 
announcing that it would provide Syria with advanced S-300 missile 
defense batteries. The Syrian Army also requested 20,000 Kalashnikov 
assault rifles, 20 million rounds of ammunition, machine guns, grenade 
launchers, grenades, and sniper rifles with night-vision sights from 
Rosoboronexport.
  The bipartisan amendment before us today, which I am pleased to 
cosponsor with Representatives DeLauro, Granger, Moran, Kingston, 
Ellison, and Wolf, would simply clarify the restrictions outlined in 
last year's defense authorization bill, which prohibited the Pentagon 
from using FY13 funds to enter into any contract with the Russian state 
arms dealer. Unfortunately, the Defense Department ignored that 
Congressional direction and found a way to maneuver around the law. 
Defense officials announced in April that they would use FY12 
Afghanistan Security Forces Funds to purchase 30 more Mi-17 helicopters 
from Rosoboronexport. The signing of this contract is imminent.
  Our amendment would ensure that no funding is used to purchase 
equipment from this Russian arms dealer unless it cooperates with a 
pending Defense Contract Audit Agency review of another contract in 
which Rosoboronexport is suspected of overcharging the U.S. Navy. 
Moreover, the amendment would also ensure that future helicopter 
purchases for the Afghan National Security Force will be competitively 
bid.
  I urge my colleagues to support our bipartisan amendment, which will 
hold this Russian arms dealer accountable for its reprehensible role in 
the Syrian conflict, as well as ensure that the Pentagon complies with 
Congressional intent.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendments en bloc offered 
by the gentleman from California (Mr. McKeon).
  The en bloc amendments were agreed to.


              Amendment No. 123 Offered by Mr. Blumenauer

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 123 
printed in part B of House Report 113-108.
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 496, insert after line 24 the following (and conform 
     the table of contents accordingly):

     SEC. 1218. IMPROVEMENT OF THE IRAQI SPECIAL IMMIGRANT VISA 
                   PROGRAM.

       The Refugee Crisis in Iraq Act of 2007 (8 U.S.C. 1157 note) 
     is amended--
       (1) in section 1242, by amending subsection (c) to read as 
     follows:
       ``(c) Improved Application Process.--Not later than 120 
     days after the date of the enactment of the National Defense 
     Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2014,'';
       (2) in section 1244, as amended by this Act, is further 
     amended--
       (A) by amending subsection (a) to read as follows:
       ``(a) In General.--Subject to subsection (c), the Secretary 
     of Homeland Security, or, notwithstanding any other provision 
     of law, the Secretary of State in consultation with the 
     Secretary of Homeland Security, may provide an alien 
     described in subsection (b) with the status of a special 
     immigrant under section 101(a)(27) of the Immigration and 
     Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1101 (a)(27)), and shall, in 
     consultation with the Secretary of Defense, ensure efficiency 
     by which applications for special immigrant visas under 
     section 1244(a) are processed so that all steps incidental to 
     the issuance of such visas, including required screenings and 
     background checks, are completed not later than 9 months 
     after the date on which an eligible alien applies for such 
     visa, if the alien--''.
       (B) in subsection (b)--
       (i) in paragraph (4) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(A) Review process for denial by chief of mission.--
       ``(i) In general.--An applicant who has been denied Chief 
     of Mission approval required by subparagraph (A) shall--

       ``(I) receive a written decision; and
       ``(II) be provided 120 days from the date of the decision 
     to request reopening of the decision to provide additional 
     information, clarify existing information, or explain any 
     unfavorable information.

       ``(ii) Senior coordinator.--The Secretary of State shall 
     designate, in the Embassy of the United States in Baghdad, 
     Iraq, a senior coordinator responsible for overseeing the 
     efficiency and integrity of the processing of special 
     immigrant visas under this section, who shall be given--

       ``(I) sufficiently high security clearance to review Chief 
     of Mission denials in cases that appear to have relied upon 
     insufficient or incorrect information; and
       ``(II) responsibility for ensuring that an applicant 
     described in clause (i) receives the information described in 
     clause (i)(I).''.

       (3) in section 1248, by adding at the end the following:
       ``(f) Report on Improvements.--
       ``(1) In general.--Not later than 120 days after the date 
     of the enactment of the National Defense Authorization Act 
     for Fiscal Year 2014, the Secretary of State and the 
     Secretary of Homeland Security, in consultation with the 
     Secretary of Defense, shall submit a report, with a 
     classified annex, if necessary, to--
       ``(A) the Committee on the Judiciary of the Senate;
       ``(B) the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate;
       ``(C) the Committee on the Judiciary of the House of 
     Representatives; and
       ``(D) the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of 
     Representatives.
       ``(2) Contents.--The report submitted under paragraph (1) 
     shall describe the implementation of improvements to the 
     processing of applications for special immigrant visas under 
     section 1244(a), including information relating to--
       ``(A) enhancing existing systems for conducting background 
     and security checks of persons applying for special immigrant 
     status, which shall--
       ``(i) support immigration security; and
       ``(ii) provide for the orderly processing of such 
     applications without delay;
       ``(B) the financial, security, and personnel considerations 
     and resources necessary to carry out this subtitle;
       ``(C) the number of aliens who have applied for special 
     immigrant visas under section 1244 during each month of the 
     preceding fiscal year;
       ``(D) the reasons for the failure to expeditiously process 
     any applications that have been pending for longer than 9 
     months;
       ``(E) the total number of applications that are pending due 
     to the failure--
       ``(i) to receive approval from the Chief of Mission;

[[Page H3621]]

       ``(ii) for U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services to 
     complete the adjudication of the Form I-360;
       ``(iii) to conduct a visa interview; or
       ``(iv) to issue the visa to an eligible alien;
       ``(F) the average wait times for an applicant at each of 
     the stages described in subparagraph (E);
       ``(G) the number of denials or rejections at each of the 
     stages described in subparagraph (E); and
       ``(H) a breakdown of reasons for denials at by the Chief of 
     Mission based on the categories already made available to 
     denied special immigrant visa applicants in the denial letter 
     sent to them by the Chief of Mission.
       ``(g) Public Quarterly Reports.--Not later than 120 days 
     after the date of the enactment of the National Defense 
     Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2014, and every 3 months 
     thereafter, the Secretary of State and the Secretary of 
     Homeland Security, in consultation with the Secretary of 
     Defense, shall publish a report on the website of the 
     Department of State that describes the efficiency 
     improvements made in the process by which applications for 
     special immigrant visas under section 1244(a) are processed, 
     including information described in subparagraphs (C) through 
     (H) of subsection (f)(2).''.

     SEC. 1219. IMPROVEMENT OF THE AFGHAN SPECIAL IMMIGRANT VISA 
                   PROGRAM.

       Section 602(b) of the Afghan Allies Protection Act of 2009 
     (8 U.S.C. 1101 note) is amended--
       (1) in paragraph (2)--
       (A) in subparagraph (D)--
       (i) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(ii) Review process for denial by chief of mission.--

       ``(I) In general.--An applicant who has been denied Chief 
     of Mission approval shall--

       ``(aa) receive a written decision; and
       ``(bb) be provided 120 days from the date of receipt of 
     such opinion to request reconsideration of the decision to 
     provide additional information, clarify existing information, 
     or explain any unfavorable information.

       ``(II) Senior coordinator.--The Secretary of State shall 
     designate, in the Embassy of the United States in Kabul, 
     Afghanistan, a senior coordinator responsible for overseeing 
     the efficiency and integrity of the processing of special 
     immigrant visas under this section, who shall be given--

       ``(aa) sufficiently high security clearance to review Chief 
     of Mission denials in cases that appear to have relied upon 
     insufficient or incorrect information; and
       ``(bb) responsibility for ensuring that an applicant 
     described in subclause (I) receives the information described 
     in subclause (I)(aa).'';
       (2) in paragraph (4)--
       (A) in the heading, by striking ``Prohibition on fees'' and 
     inserting ``Application process'';
       (B) by striking ``The Secretary'' and inserting the 
     following:
       ``(A) In general.--Not later than 120 days after the date 
     of enactment of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
     Fiscal Year 2014, the Secretary of State and the Secretary of 
     Homeland Security, in consultation with the Secretary of 
     Defense, shall improve the efficiency by which applications 
     for special immigrant visas under paragraph (1) are processed 
     so that all steps incidental to the issuance of such visas, 
     including required screenings and background checks, are 
     completed not later than 6 months after the date on which an 
     eligible alien applies for such visa.
       ``(B) Prohibition on fees.--The Secretary''; and
       (4) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(12) Report on improvements.--Not later than 120 days 
     after the date of the enactment of the National Defense 
     Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2014, the Secretary of 
     State and the Secretary of Homeland Security, in consultation 
     with the Secretary of Defense, shall submit to the 
     appropriate committees of Congress a report, with a 
     classified annex, if necessary, that describes the 
     implementation of improvements to the processing of 
     applications for special immigrant visas under this 
     subsection, including information relating to--
       ``(A) enhancing existing systems for conducting background 
     and security checks of persons applying for special immigrant 
     status, which shall--
       ``(i) support immigration security; and
       ``(ii) provide for the orderly processing of such 
     applications without delay;
       ``(B) the financial, security, and personnel considerations 
     and resources necessary to carry out this section;
       ``(C) the number of aliens who have applied for special 
     immigrant visas under this subsection during each month of 
     the preceding fiscal year;
       ``(D) the reasons for the failure to expeditiously process 
     any applications that have been pending for longer than 9 
     months;
       ``(E) the total number of applications that are pending due 
     to the failure--
       ``(i) to receive approval from the Chief of Mission;
       ``(ii) for U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services to 
     complete the adjudication of the Form I-360;
       ``(iii) to conduct a visa interview; or
       ``(iv) to issue the visa to an eligible alien;
       ``(F) the average wait times for an applicant at each of 
     the stages described in subparagraph (E);
       ``(G) the number of denials or rejections at each of the 
     stages described in subparagraph (E); and
       ``(H) a breakdown of reasons for denials by the Chief of 
     Mission based on the categories already made available to 
     denied special immigrant visa applicants in the denial letter 
     sent to them by the Chief of Mission.
       ``(13) Public quarterly reports.--Not later than 120 days 
     after the date of the enactment of the National Defense 
     Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2014, and every 3 months 
     thereafter, the Secretary of State and the Secretary of 
     Homeland Security, in consultation with the Secretary of 
     Defense, shall publish a report on the website of the 
     Department of State that describes the efficiency 
     improvements made in the process by which applications for 
     special immigrant visas under this subsection are processed, 
     including information described in subparagraph (C) through 
     (H) of paragraph (12).''.

     SEC. 1219. SENSE OF CONGRESS.

       (b) Purpose.--Expressing the Sense of the House or 
     Representatives that the Special Immigration Visa programs 
     authorized in the National Defense Authorization Act for 
     Fiscal Year 2008 and the Afghan Allies Protection Act of 2009 
     are critical to the U.S. national security, and that these 
     programs must be reformed and extended in order to meet the 
     Congressional intent with which they were created.
       (b) Findings.--Congress finds the following:
       (1) Congress created the Special Immigration Visa program 
     for the purposes of protecting and aiding the many brave 
     Iraqis and Afghans whose lives, and the lives of their 
     families, were endangered as a result of their faithful and 
     valuable service to the United States during Operations 
     Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom.
       (2) The Iraq Special Immigrant Visa program is set to 
     expire at the end of fiscal year 2013.
       (3) The Afghanistan Special Immigrant Visa program is set 
     to expire at the end of fiscal year 2014.
       (4) Despite the pending expiration of the Special Immigrant 
     Visa programs, many brave Iraqis, Afghans, and their 
     families, continue to face ongoing and serious threats as a 
     result of their employment by or on behalf of the U.S. 
     Government.
       (5) Between FY08-FY12, only 22 percent of the available 
     Iraqi SIVs (5,500 visas out of 25,000 visas) have been issued 
     and 12 percent of the available Afghan SIVs (1,051 visas out 
     of 8,500 visas) have been issued.
       (6) As the Washington Post reported in October 2012, over 
     5,000 documentarily complete Afghan SIV applications remained 
     in a backlog.
       (7) The implementation of the Special Immigration Visa 
     programs has been protracted and inefficient.
       (8) The application and approval process for the Special 
     Immigration Visa program is unnecessarily opaque and 
     difficult to navigate.
       (9) Applicants in both Iraq and Afghanistan often have 
     effusive recommendations from numerous military personnel, 
     have served the U.S. war efforts for many years, and have 
     served valiantly, in some instances literally taking a bullet 
     for a U.S. service member, and yet are denied approval for a 
     Special Immigration Visa with little to no transparency.
       (10) Overly narrow provisions contained in the Afghan 
     Allies Protection Act of 2009 leave many deserving Afghans 
     and their families in need of U.S. assistance, but unable to 
     access the Special Immigration Visa program.
       (11) The United States has a responsibility to follow 
     through on its promise to protect those Iraqis and Afghans 
     who have risked their lives to aid our troops and protect 
     America's security.
       (12) The extension and reform of the Iraq and Afghanistan 
     Special Immigrant Visa programs is a matter of national 
     security.
       (13) The extension and reform of the Afghan Special 
     Immigrant Visa program is essential to the U.S. mission in 
     Afghanistan.
       (c) Sense of the House.--It is the sense of the House of 
     Representatives that the Iraq and Afghanistan Special 
     Immigrant Visa programs should be--
       (1) reformed by--
       (A) ensuring applications are processed in a timely, and 
     transparent fashion;
       (B) providing parity between the two Special Immigrant Visa 
     programs so that Afghan principal applicants, like Iraqi 
     principal applicants, are able to include their spouse, 
     children, siblings, and parents; and
       (C) expanding eligibility for the Special Immigrant Visa 
     programs to Afghan or Iraqi men and women employed by, or on 
     behalf of, a media or nongovernmental organization 
     headquartered in the United States, or an organization or 
     entity closely associated with the United States mission in 
     Iraq or Afghanistan that has received U.S. Government funding 
     through an official and documented contract, award, grant, or 
     cooperative agreement; and
       (2) extended in--
       (A) Iraq through the year 2018, without authorizing any 
     additional Special Immigrant Visas as authorized in the 
     original statue; and
       (B) Afghanistan through the year 2018, without authorizing 
     any additional Special Immigrant Visas as authorized in the 
     original statue.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 260, the gentleman 
from Oregon (Mr. Blumenauer) and a

[[Page H3622]]

Member opposed each will control 5 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Oregon.
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. Madam Chair, I yield myself 2\1/2\ minutes.
  Madam Chair, we spend appropriate time on the floor commemorating the 
bravery of our men and women who were in harm's way in Iraq and 
Afghanistan, but there were other brave men and women who worked with 
our soldiers, putting themselves in harm's way, and I'm referring to 
foreign nationals--Iraqis and Afghanistan citizens who were 
interpreters and who were drivers, people working for NGOs, people who 
made it possible for our troops to perform at the highest level. They 
served shoulder to shoulder with our men and women in uniform.
  Now, I am pleased that there is a partial extension in the Special 
Immigrant Visa program in the underlying bill for Iraqis and Afghanis. 
It's important that we have these special visas. I have been pleased to 
have played a small role in helping create the Special Immigrant Visa 
program that enables these people to escape harm's way. Many of them 
are in danger of being killed because people know that they helped our 
forces, and they are left behind.
  I really appreciate the ranking member, the chair, and their staff 
for the work to help partially extend the Special Immigration Visa 
program. But this bipartisan amendment, offered with my colleagues, 
Congresswoman Gabbard and Representatives Kinzinger and Stivers, all 
three of whom served in the field of battle, is an opportunity to help 
ensure these programs finish the job for which they were created.

                              {time}  1100

  These programs expire for Iraq at the end of this fiscal year. That's 
September 30, and the following September 30 for Afghanistan. And while 
they are set to expire, those in Iraq and Afghanistan who made our 
mission possible continue to be plagued by inefficiencies and 
bureaucratic hurdles. Through fiscal year 2012, only 22 percent of the 
available Iraq SIVs have been issued, and only 12 percent for 
Afghanistan.
  The Washington Post reported that over 5,000 documentarily complete 
Afghan applications remain in a backlog. The backlog and delay means 
not just weeks or months, but years for those who risked their lives to 
help the U.S. mission, and means living in constant fear and hiding, 
knowing they or their families could be killed at any moment.
  Our amendment demonstrates a strong commitment from the House for 
comprehensive extension and reform in conference. It enhances the 
programs by providing efficiency, transparency, accuracy, and 
oversight.
  Madam Chair, I yield the remaining time to the gentlewoman from 
Hawaii (Ms. Gabbard).
  Ms. GABBARD. Madam Chair, I rise in strong support of this amendment 
to improve the Special Immigrant Visa programs for local civilians who 
put their lives in danger to aid our troops as they've served in Iraq 
and Afghanistan.
  We see in times of war and in times of conflict that our 
servicemembers are lauded and honored for their service and tremendous 
sacrifice, but there are many stories that remain untold. There are 
many unseen heroes who sacrifice every single day as they serve 
alongside our troops.
  During my first deployment to Iraq, I served in a medical unit, and 
we had two interpreters who worked with us on a daily basis. One was 
named Kaddam. He sat in our clinic, went out on missions with our 
medics. I spoke to him almost every day and learned so much about his 
family, his community, and the challenges that he overcame every day to 
just work with us.
  He drove home every night with a firearm under his driver's seat, in 
fear, not only of his own life, but in fear of the health and safety of 
his family. He had a few young children, and he spoke very strongly 
about his hopes and his dreams for them being able to have a future, to 
have an education, which was a far cry from the life that he was living 
there; and that's why he served with us.
  We had another interpreter who we called, our Hawaii unit called 
Kahuna. And his situation was very different. He lived in secrecy, 
where his neighbors and his friends didn't know that he was working 
with us; and because of that, he stayed in our camp. He lived with us 
and worked with us on a daily basis because he believed in what we were 
doing, and he wouldn't want to risk his family's life.
  The stories go on and on of those who have sacrificed so much, not 
only because they believed in what we were doing, what our mission was, 
what our work was, but in the hopes that they could also live a free 
life for themselves, a life where they were not fraught on a daily 
basis with just getting by.
  And for that, I personally stand in strong support of this.
  Mr. McKEON. Madam Chair, I rise to claim time in opposition to the 
amendment; however, I do not oppose the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman from California is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. McKEON. I yield the balance of my time to the gentleman from 
Illinois (Mr. Kinzinger).
  Mr. KINZINGER of Illinois. Mr. Chairman, I appreciate you yielding.
  And, Mr. Blumenauer, thank you for leading on this, Ms. Gabbard and 
Mr. Stivers as well. This is such an important issue.
  You know, we're a Nation of commitments, and a lot of the times 
Washington gets this reputation of Republicans and Democrats don't 
agree on anything, and we just fight like cats and dogs. I feel like 
some of that is true, but I think this is a great example of where, 
frankly, people are coming together to say as a Nation what's the right 
thing to do here.
  We've made commitments. We've taken ourselves and made promises to 
people, and people have put themselves out on the line for us. What's 
the right thing to do?
  I would even dare to speculate that those of us that are sponsoring 
this amendment probably don't even agree on the future of the Iraq war 
or the Afghanistan war. But we do know that we believe we have to hold 
to this.
  As Ms. Gabbard was talking about, there's a lot of unsung heroes in 
the war in Iraq and Afghanistan. I experienced it as well as a pilot in 
the military as people that were Iraqi nationals, in my case, that 
really stood up and put their lives on the line in order to fight for a 
new Iraq, to fight for a new freedom, to provide for their families, 
and to understand that they want to build an alliance between Iraq and 
the United States.
  And a lot of them went home at night, as was eloquently expressed, 
went home at night in fear that this was going to cost them their 
lives, but knowing that the strength and the power of the United States 
was there with them, and that they could rest easy at night, knowing 
that we could keep to our words.
  Unfortunately, many of these folks have been killed or targeted for 
killing, and do continue to live in fear. And so we created a program 
which would allow a lot of these that have put their lives on the line 
in order to facilitate what our interest is in Afghanistan and Iraq, to 
be able to come to the United States.
  And, unfortunately, this has been bogged down in bureaucracy that 
doesn't make a lot of sense to me. It's been bogged down in the 
definition of whether they worked for the United States or whether they 
actually worked for ISAF. Well, I would tend to say that whether you 
worked for ISAF or the United States, you should probably fall under 
this program.
  I think it's just right that we, as a Nation, figure out what's going 
wrong and do this, and I think this is a great opportunity. This is a 
great opportunity to come together and say, you know, you put your life 
on the line for us; we're going to do everything we can for you.
  I think about all the times when I would be ready to go fly and, you 
know, you talk to folks that are associated with what we're doing; and 
had we not had interpreters there to be able to bring the languages, 
frankly, the United States and Iraq or Afghanistan together, we'd often 
just be staring at each other, not knowing what we're thinking, but 
we're each thinking something.
  But to be able to have these folks that come together and really talk

[[Page H3623]]

about what it is that we need to do is the right thing to do.
  I just, again, want to say that, as Americans, we have to hold to our 
commitments. This program provides lifesaving protection to those that 
served us. It will provide refuge to the countless Iraqis and Afghan 
civilians that have helped us, and it's the right thing to do.
  So, again, I just want to say to Mr. Blumenauer, to Ms. Gabbard, to 
Mr. Stivers and to everybody watching, frankly, and listening to these 
proceedings, thank you for your help.
  Thank you to America for standing up and doing the right thing, and 
to those that continue to defend us day by day.
  Mr. McKEON. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR (Mr. Collins of Georgia). The question is on the 
amendment offered by the gentleman from Oregon (Mr. Blumenauer).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Oregon will 
be postponed.


                Amendment No. 137 Offered by Ms. DeLauro

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 137 
printed in part B of House Report 113-108.
  Ms. DeLAURO. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of subtitle E of title XII of division A, add 
     the following new section:

     SEC. 12_. LIMITATION ON USE OF FUNDS TO PURCHASE EQUIPMENT 
                   FROM ROSOBORONEXPORT.

       (a) Limitation.--No funds authorized to be appropriated for 
     the Department of Defense for any fiscal year after fiscal 
     year 2013 may be used for the purchase of any equipment from 
     Rosoboronexport until the Secretary of Defense certifies in 
     writing to the congressional defense committees that, to the 
     best of the Secretary's knowledge--
       (1) Rosoboronexport is cooperating fully with the Defense 
     Contract Audit Agency;
       (2) Rosoboronexport has not delivered S-300 advanced anti-
     aircraft missiles to Syria; and
       (3) no new contracts have been signed between the Bashar al 
     Assad regime in Syria and Rosoboronexport since January 1, 
     2013.
       (b) National Security Waiver.--
       (1) In general.--The Secretary of Defense may waive the 
     limitation in subsection (a) if the Secretary certifies that 
     the waiver in order to purchase equipment from 
     Rosoboronexport is in national security interest of the 
     United States.
       (2) Report.--If the Secretary waives the limitation in 
     subsection (a) pursuant to paragraph (1), the Secretary shall 
     submit to the congressional defense committees, not later 
     than 30 days before purchasing equipment from Rosoboronexport 
     pursuant to the waiver, a report on the waiver. The report 
     shall be submitted in classified or unclassified form, at the 
     election of the Secretary. The report shall include the 
     following:
       (A) An explanation why it is in the national security 
     interest of the United States to purchase equipment from 
     Rosoboronexport.
       (B) An explanation why comparable equipment cannot be 
     purchased from another corporation.
       (C) An assessment of the cooperation of Rosoboronexport 
     with the Defense Contract Audit Agency.
       (D) An assessment of whether and how many S-300 advanced 
     anti-aircraft missiles have been delivered to the Assad 
     regime by Rosoboronexport.
       (E) A list of the contracts that Rosoboronexport has signed 
     with the Assad regime since January 1, 2013.
       (c) Requirement for Competitively Bid Contracts.--The 
     Secretary of Defense shall award any contract that will use 
     United States funds for the procurement of helicopters for 
     the Afghan Security Forces using competitive procedures based 
     on requirements developed by the Secretary of Defense.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 260, the gentlewoman 
from Connecticut (Ms. DeLauro) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from Connecticut.
  Ms. DeLAURO. Mr. Chairman, my amendment would strengthen a 
prohibition unanimously supported last year to stop the Defense 
Department from purchasing equipment from the Russian arms dealer 
Rosoboronexport.
  As we have debated this bill, estimates of the death toll in Syria 
hit 93,000 and the administration confirmed use of chemical weapons by 
the Assad regime. Yet, remarkably, U.S. taxpayers continue to provide 
subsidies to Russia's arms dealer through no-bid Pentagon purchases of 
Mi-17 helicopters, even as the firm continues to serve as the top 
supplier of the weapons the Syrian regime is using to fuel the tragic 
war.
  In fact, the Russian arms dealer recently took an order from the 
Syrian Army for a wide range of weaponry, and the possibility remains 
that Russia may provide Syria with S-300 air defense systems.

                              {time}  1110

  It is unacceptable that at the same time the Pentagon is purchasing 
Mi-17 helicopters for the Afghan National Security Forces from 
Rosoboronexport through no-bid contracts that do not allow U.S. 
companies to compete.
  Last year, the Army purchased 31 Mi-17s from the Russian arms dealer. 
The President then signed into law last year's defense bill banning the 
Pentagon from using 2013 funds to enter into a contract with the 
Russian arms dealer. Yet, in a clear violation of the spirit of the 
law, DOD announced in April it would use 2012 Afghanistan Security 
Forces funds to purchase 30 more Mi-17s, a contract signing that is 
imminent. Meanwhile, the Defense Contract Audit Agency, or DCAA, 
attempted an audit of Rosoboronexport's pricing of Mi-17 helicopters, 
which the firm refused to cooperate with. This is outrageous.
  My bipartisan amendment prohibits the Pentagon from purchasing 
equipment from the Russian arms maker unless the Secretary certifies 
the firm is cooperating with DCAA, not delivering S-300 missile defense 
batteries to Syria, and has not signed new contracts with Syria since 
the beginning of the year. The amendment also requires that any new 
contract for helicopters for the Afghans be competitively bid.
  The Defense Department should not engage in contracts with companies 
arming the Syrian regime. This can and must stop. Furthermore, if we 
are going to spend U.S. taxpayers' dollars to provide helicopters to 
the Afghan National Security Forces, we should spend those dollars for 
the purchase of U.S.-made helicopters.
  I urge support for my amendment and reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. McKEON. Mr. Chairman, I rise to claim the time in opposition to 
the amendment although I will not oppose the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman from California is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. McKEON. I yield back the balance of my time.
  Ms. DeLAURO. Mr. Chairman, may I inquire as to how much time remains.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentlewoman from Connecticut has 2\1/4\ minutes 
remaining.
  Ms. DeLAURO. I yield the balance of my time to my colleague from 
Virginia (Mr. Moran), who has worked on this issue with me.
  Mr. MORAN. I thank my very good friend from Connecticut--and the 
chairman of the committee because I trust that he will support this as 
well.
  This amendment passed overwhelmingly last year, bipartisan vote. The 
problem is that the Defense Department ignored it. They went ahead, 
continuing to buy weapons from Rosoboronexport, the very same Russian 
arms supplier that is enabling President Assad to kill more than 90,000 
of his own people, who is now, we confirmed, using chemical weapons 
against his people. 1.6 million Syrian refugees are scattered across 
five countries; and within the year, half of the Syrian population is 
going to be in need of aid. So this has to be fixed. This is not a 
sustainable situation.
  The Obama administration says, well, we are going to have to get more 
aggressively involved, supplying more military assistance to the 
insurgents. But think about this: the problem is that Assad is getting 
all the weapons he wants. In fact, he's asked this Russian arms 
exporter, Rosoboronexport, for advanced S-300 missile defense 
batteries, 20,000 Kalashnikov assault rifles, 20 million rounds of 
ammunition, machine guns, grenade launchers, grenade sniper rifles with 
night vision sights. Mi-17 helicopters are also made by 
Rosoboronexport, and we're buying helicopters from them. Can't we 
coordinate the right hand with the left

[[Page H3624]]

hand? We should not be basically subsidizing Rosoboronexport, which is 
a large part of the problem in Syria.
  Some have suggested that without Russia's aid, President Assad cannot 
continue killing his own people. Now, I don't know that we can ever 
convince President Putin to stop this--it's obviously a state-owned 
arms supplier--but surely the Congress can say, no, don't purchase from 
the same person that is supplying the Syrian regime.
  Ms. DeLAURO. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from Connecticut (Ms. DeLauro).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Ms. DeLAURO. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from 
Connecticut will be postponed.


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, proceedings 
will now resume on those amendments printed in part B of House Report 
113-108 on which further proceedings were postponed, in the following 
order:
  Amendment No. 21 by Mr. Turner of Ohio.
  Amendment No. 22 by Mr. Holt of New Jersey.
  Amendment No. 25 by Ms. McCollum of Minnesota.
  Amendment No. 32 by Mr. Nolan of Minnesota.
  Amendment No. 33 by Mr. Larsen of Washington.
  Amendment No. 36 by Mr. Gibson of New York.
  Amendment No. 37 by Mr. Coffman of Colorado.
  Amendment No. 19 by Mrs. Walorski of Indiana.
  Amendment No. 20 by Mr. Smith of Washington.
  Amendment No. 14 by Mr. Polis of Colorado.
  Amendment No. 23 by Mr. Polis of Colorado.
  Amendment No. 39 by Mr. Van Hollen of Maryland.
  Amendment No. 123 by Mr. Blumenauer of Oregon.
  Amendment No. 137 by Ms. DeLauro of Connecticut.
  The Chair will reduce to 2 minutes the minimum time for any 
electronic vote after the first vote in this series.


                 Amendment No. 21 Offered by Mr. Turner

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Ohio (Mr. 
Turner) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which the 
ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 239, 
noes 182, not voting 13, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 229]

                               AYES--239

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amash
     Amodei
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Calvert
     Camp
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lummis
     Maffei
     Maloney, Sean
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (FL)
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Radel
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Walz
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--182

     Andrews
     Barber
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Denham
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Negrete McLeod
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Richmond
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Sherman
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                             NOT VOTING--13

     Bachmann
     Campbell
     Chu
     Edwards
     Fudge
     Johnson (GA)
     Markey
     McCarthy (NY)
     Neal
     Pelosi
     Poe (TX)
     Shea-Porter
     Westmoreland

                              {time}  1142

  Mr. FARR and Ms. BROWNLEY of California changed their vote from 
``aye'' to ``no.''
  Messrs. BARTON, CRAWFORD, DUFFY, and LIPINSKI changed their vote from 
``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  (By unanimous consent, Mr. Barton was allowed to speak out of order.)


                52nd Annual Congressional Baseball Game

  Mr. BARTON. Mr. Chairman, I have my 7-year-old son, Jack, with me 
this week.
  As we walked on the floor, he asked me, ``Daddy, why is that trophy 
on that desk?''
  And I said, ``Well, son, they won the game last night.''
  So I rise in reluctant recognition of the fact that last night, at 
Nationals Park, the Democrats squeaked out a 22-0 victory over the 
stalwart Republican team.

[[Page H3625]]

  Our MVP is Senator Jeff Flake from Arizona, who was a Member of this 
body until last year. We had a number of other Members who played very 
well--John Shimkus, Bill Johnson, Mike Conaway, Rodney Davis, Ron 
DeSantis, and the list goes on and on. The fact remains that the 
Democrats won, and they are entitled to the trophy.
  Our hats are off to you.
  With that, I yield to my good friend, the manager from Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania, Mr. Mike Doyle.
  Mr. DOYLE. First off, I want to thank my good friend Joe Barton--he 
is my good friend--for a good game last night.
  I can't really single out individuals. This was a team effort on the 
Democratic side. Our team had 24 hits and no errors in the field. 
Cedric Richmond normally strikes out a lot of batters, and, last year, 
Cedric had 16 strikeouts. For the first five innings, Cedric didn't 
strike out a single batter. We had 15 putouts in the field. When you 
hit the ball, we fielded it, and we made the throws to first, and we 
made the plays.
  It was the best team effort that I've seen out of the Democratic side 
in the 19 years I've been associated with the game, and I want to 
congratulate my team.
  As my good friend Joe Barton knows, the real winners of this game are 
three charities. We broke a record this year. We raised $300,000 for 
our charities--the Washington Boys & Girls Club, the Washington 
Literacy Council, and the Dream Foundation, which is going to help 
children in the Seventh Ward in Washington, D.C. This is going to be a 
great program for the kids--for boys and girls to learn baseball, but 
also to learn more important things in after-school learning centers 
and the like.
  So, to the charities--the real winners of this game--congratulations.
  This is a great tradition that helps bring us together. I can tell 
you that the members of the Republican baseball team are friends of 
ours, and we enjoy the camaraderie and the game every year, and we look 
forward to it again next year.
  Mr. BARTON. I yield back the balance of my time.


                  Amendment No. 22 Offered by Mr. Holt

  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, 2-minute voting will continue.
  There was no objection.
  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from New Jersey 
(Mr. Holt) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which the 
noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 61, 
noes 362, not voting 11, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 230]

                                AYES--61

     Bass
     Blumenauer
     Braley (IA)
     Clarke
     Clay
     Conyers
     Crowley
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Ellison
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Foster
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hastings (FL)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Holt
     Honda
     Huffman
     Jeffries
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lofgren
     Lowey
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Matheson
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Nolan
     Pallone
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Roybal-Allard
     Rush
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schrader
     Serrano
     Slaughter
     Speier
     Tierney
     Velazquez
     Waters
     Watt
     Welch

                               NOES--362

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amash
     Amodei
     Andrews
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bera (CA)
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonamici
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Cantor
     Capito
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cartwright
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Cicilline
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coble
     Coffman
     Cohen
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Connolly
     Cook
     Cooper
     Cotton
     Courtney
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Cummings
     Daines
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     Davis, Rodney
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Duckworth
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Engel
     Enyart
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Frankel (FL)
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Hahn
     Hall
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Heck (WA)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Hinojosa
     Holding
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Israel
     Issa
     Jackson Lee
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kelly (PA)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kline
     Kuster
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Langevin
     Lankford
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     Latta
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Long
     Lowenthal
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lummis
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Sean
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Meng
     Messer
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Moran
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (FL)
     Murphy (PA)
     Negrete McLeod
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     O'Rourke
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perlmutter
     Perry
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Polis
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Radel
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schock
     Schwartz
     Schweikert
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Sewell (AL)
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Sires
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Terry
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Visclosky
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waxman
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (FL)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yarmuth
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--11

     Bachmann
     Campbell
     Chu
     Costa
     Edwards
     Fudge
     Markey
     McCarthy (NY)
     Neal
     Poe (TX)
     Shea-Porter

                              {time}  1152

  Ms. LEE of California and Mr. CROWLEY changed their vote from ``no'' 
to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                Amendment No. 25 Offered by Ms. McCollum

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from 
Minnesota (Ms. McCollum) on which further proceedings were postponed 
and on which the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 134, 
noes 290, not voting 10, as follows:

[[Page H3626]]

                             [Roll No. 231]

                               AYES--134

     Alexander
     Andrews
     Barrow (GA)
     Bass
     Becerra
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Braley (IA)
     Brownley (CA)
     Buchanan
     Camp
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Chabot
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cohen
     Conyers
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellison
     Eshoo
     Gardner
     Gosar
     Grayson
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck (WA)
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Himes
     Holt
     Huizenga (MI)
     Israel
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kind
     Kingston
     Kirkpatrick
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lummis
     Lynch
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Matheson
     McClintock
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     Meeks
     Meng
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Noem
     Nolan
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Perlmutter
     Peters (MI)
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Polis
     Quigley
     Reichert
     Richmond
     Roby
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Roybal-Allard
     Royce
     Ruiz
     Rush
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Sensenbrenner
     Sherman
     Sinema
     Slaughter
     Speier
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Tipton
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Waters
     Waxman

                               NOES--290

     Aderholt
     Amash
     Amodei
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barton
     Beatty
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bera (CA)
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (FL)
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Castro (TX)
     Chaffetz
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coble
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Connolly
     Cook
     Cooper
     Costa
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duckworth
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Ellmers
     Engel
     Enyart
     Esty
     Farenthold
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Foxx
     Frankel (FL)
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Hinojosa
     Holding
     Honda
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huffman
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jackson Lee
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kaptur
     Kelly (PA)
     Kilmer
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Kuster
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Maffei
     Maloney, Sean
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Napolitano
     Negrete McLeod
     Neugebauer
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     O'Rourke
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pallone
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pelosi
     Perry
     Peters (CA)
     Peterson
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Price (NC)
     Radel
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reed
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sessions
     Sewell (AL)
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sires
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Terry
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Titus
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Visclosky
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Watt
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Welch
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (FL)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yarmuth
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--10

     Bachmann
     Campbell
     Chu
     Edwards
     Fudge
     Markey
     McCarthy (NY)
     Neal
     Poe (TX)
     Shea-Porter

                              {time}  1156

  Mr. CARDENAS changed his vote from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  Mr. MAFFEI changed his vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                 Amendment No. 32 Offered by Mr. Nolan

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Minnesota 
(Mr. Nolan) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 71, 
noes 353, not voting 10, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 232]

                                AYES--71

     Amash
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Braley (IA)
     Capuano
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cohen
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Cummings
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Doyle
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellison
     Eshoo
     Farr
     Fattah
     Grayson
     Green, Gene
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hastings (FL)
     Higgins
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Huffman
     Jackson Lee
     Lee (CA)
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lummis
     Maffei
     Massie
     Matsui
     McClintock
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Nadler
     Nolan
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Polis
     Quigley
     Rush
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schrader
     Serrano
     Slaughter
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Thompson (CA)
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Velazquez
     Waters
     Welch

                               NOES--353

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amodei
     Andrews
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bera (CA)
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Cantor
     Capito
     Capps
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cartwright
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Cicilline
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coble
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Connolly
     Cook
     Costa
     Cotton
     Courtney
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Daines
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     Davis, Rodney
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Duckworth
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Ellmers
     Engel
     Enyart
     Esty
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Foxx
     Frankel (FL)
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Al
     Griffin (AR)
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Heck (WA)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Himes
     Holding
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Israel
     Issa
     Jeffries
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kelly (PA)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kline
     Kuster
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Langevin
     Lankford
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     Latta
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Long
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon

[[Page H3627]]


     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Meng
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Moran
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (FL)
     Murphy (PA)
     Napolitano
     Negrete McLeod
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     O'Rourke
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Perry
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Price (NC)
     Radel
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Roybal-Allard
     Royce
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schock
     Schwartz
     Schweikert
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Sewell (AL)
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Sires
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Takano
     Terry
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Titus
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Visclosky
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Watt
     Waxman
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (FL)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yarmuth
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--10

     Bachmann
     Campbell
     Chu
     Edwards
     Fudge
     Markey
     McCarthy (NY)
     Neal
     Poe (TX)
     Shea-Porter


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1200

  Mr. ENGEL changed his vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


          Amendment No. 33 Offered by Mr. Larsen of Washington

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Washington 
(Mr. Larsen) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 195, 
noes 229, not voting 10, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 233]

                               AYES--195

     Amash
     Andrews
     Barber
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coffman
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Massie
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Negrete McLeod
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Richmond
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--229

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amodei
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Calvert
     Camp
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Marchant
     Marino
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perlmutter
     Perry
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Radel
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schneider
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--10

     Bachmann
     Campbell
     Chu
     Edwards
     Fudge
     Markey
     McCarthy (NY)
     Neal
     Poe (TX)
     Shea-Porter

                              {time}  1204

  Mr. PERRY changed his vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                 Amendment No. 36 Offered by Mr. Gibson

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from New York 
(Mr. Gibson) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 123, 
noes 301, not voting 10, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 234]

                               AYES--123

     Aderholt
     Amash
     Bilirakis
     Braley (IA)
     Brooks (AL)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Burgess
     Capps

[[Page H3628]]


     Capuano
     Carson (IN)
     Chaffetz
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Coffman
     Conyers
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeLauro
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Fitzpatrick
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Garamendi
     Gibson
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Graves (GA)
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Harris
     Heck (NV)
     Heck (WA)
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Huelskamp
     Huffman
     Huizenga (MI)
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kind
     Labrador
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lowenthal
     Lummis
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Massie
     Matsui
     McClintock
     McGovern
     McHenry
     Meadows
     Michaud
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Mulvaney
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Owens
     Pallone
     Paulsen
     Payne
     Pearce
     Perry
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Pitts
     Pocan
     Polis
     Posey
     Radel
     Reed
     Ribble
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Roe (TN)
     Rohrabacher
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Rothfus
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanford
     Schrader
     Schweikert
     Sensenbrenner
     Shimkus
     Smith (NJ)
     Speier
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (PA)
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Walz
     Webster (FL)
     Welch
     Whitfield
     Yoho

                               NOES--301

     Alexander
     Amodei
     Andrews
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (IN)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bucshon
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Cantor
     Capito
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carter
     Cartwright
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chabot
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coble
     Cohen
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Connolly
     Cook
     Cooper
     Costa
     Cotton
     Courtney
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Cummings
     Daines
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Rodney
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DelBene
     Denham
     Dent
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Duffy
     Ellison
     Ellmers
     Engel
     Esty
     Farenthold
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fincher
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garcia
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Granger
     Graves (MO)
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Hartzler
     Hastings (FL)
     Hastings (WA)
     Hensarling
     Himes
     Holding
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Hudson
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Israel
     Issa
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Joyce
     Kelly (IL)
     Kelly (PA)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kline
     Kuster
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Langevin
     Lankford
     Larsen (WA)
     Latham
     Latta
     Levin
     Lewis
     LoBiondo
     Lofgren
     Long
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Meng
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller, Gary
     Mullin
     Murphy (FL)
     Murphy (PA)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Negrete McLeod
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Pittenger
     Pompeo
     Price (GA)
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Rice (SC)
     Roby
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rokita
     Roskam
     Ross
     Roybal-Allard
     Royce
     Runyan
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schock
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sessions
     Sewell (AL)
     Sherman
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stockman
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Terry
     Thompson (MS)
     Thornberry
     Tipton
     Titus
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Weber (TX)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Williams
     Wilson (FL)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yarmuth
     Yoder
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--10

     Bachmann
     Campbell
     Chu
     Edwards
     Fudge
     Markey
     McCarthy (NY)
     Neal
     Poe (TX)
     Shea-Porter

                              {time}  1209

  Ms. SINEMA changed her vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  Messrs. LABRADOR, McHENRY, GUTIERREZ, and PERRY changed their vote 
from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                Amendment No. 37 Offered by Mr. Coffman

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Colorado 
(Mr. Coffman) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 110, 
noes 313, not voting 11, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 235]

                               AYES--110

     Amash
     Bass
     Becerra
     Benishek
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Boustany
     Braley (IA)
     Brownley (CA)
     Capuano
     Carney
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Cicilline
     Coffman
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Crowley
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     Deutch
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellison
     Eshoo
     Fattah
     Gabbard
     Garrett
     Gibson
     Gohmert
     Green, Gene
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Higgins
     Himes
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Jackson Lee
     Jenkins
     Jones
     Jordan
     Keating
     Kind
     Labrador
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lummis
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Massie
     McClintock
     McCollum
     McGovern
     Meehan
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Mulvaney
     Nadler
     Nolan
     Pallone
     Payne
     Peters (MI)
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Polis
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Ribble
     Rigell
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Ross
     Roybal-Allard
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Schakowsky
     Schrader
     Scott (VA)
     Serrano
     Sherman
     Speier
     Stivers
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (PA)
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Velazquez
     Walz
     Waters
     Waxman
     Woodall
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--313

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amodei
     Andrews
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Beatty
     Bentivolio
     Bera (CA)
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (FL)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Cantor
     Capito
     Capps
     Cardenas
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chaffetz
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coble
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Costa
     Cotton
     Courtney
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Cummings
     Daines
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     Davis, Rodney
     DelBene
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Duckworth
     Duffy
     Ellmers
     Engel
     Enyart
     Esty
     Farenthold
     Farr
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Foxx
     Frankel (FL)
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Gardner
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Griffin (AR)
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (FL)
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Heck (WA)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Hinojosa
     Holding
     Horsford
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Israel
     Issa
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Joyce
     Kaptur
     Kelly (IL)
     Kelly (PA)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kline
     Kuster
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Langevin
     Lankford
     Larsen (WA)
     Latham
     Latta
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lynch
     Maloney, Sean
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McDermott
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meadows
     Meeks
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mullin

[[Page H3629]]


     Murphy (FL)
     Murphy (PA)
     Napolitano
     Negrete McLeod
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     O'Rourke
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Perry
     Peters (CA)
     Peterson
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Price (NC)
     Radel
     Rangel
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Rice (SC)
     Richmond
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sanford
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schock
     Schwartz
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Sewell (AL)
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Titus
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Visclosky
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Wasserman Schultz
     Watt
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Welch
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (FL)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--11

     Bachmann
     Campbell
     Chu
     DeFazio
     Edwards
     Fudge
     Markey
     McCarthy (NY)
     Neal
     Poe (TX)
     Shea-Porter


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1213

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


               Amendment No. 19 Offered by Mrs. Walorski

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from Indiana 
(Mrs. Walorski) on which further proceedings were postponed and on 
which the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 236, 
noes 188, not voting 10, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 236]

                               AYES--236

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amodei
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Calvert
     Camp
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gabbard
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lance
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Maloney, Sean
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Peters (MI)
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Radel
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--188

     Amash
     Andrews
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck (NV)
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Lamborn
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Massie
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Negrete McLeod
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Richmond
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Sherman
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                             NOT VOTING--10

     Bachmann
     Campbell
     Chu
     Edwards
     Fudge
     Markey
     McCarthy (NY)
     Neal
     Poe (TX)
     Shea-Porter

                              {time}  1217

  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated for:
  Mr. LAMBORN. Mr. Chair, on rollcall No. 236 I inadvertently voted 
``nay'' when I intended to Support the Amendment.


          Amendment No. 20 Offered by Mr. Smith of Washington

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Washington 
(Mr. Smith) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 174, 
noes 249, not voting 11, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 237]

                               AYES--174

     Amash
     Andrews
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney

[[Page H3630]]


     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Frankel (FL)
     Gabbard
     Garamendi
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Negrete McLeod
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Richmond
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Sherman
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--249

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amodei
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Calvert
     Camp
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallego
     Garcia
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Maffei
     Maloney, Sean
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (FL)
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Peters (MI)
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Radel
     Rahall
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schneider
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Vela
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--11

     Bachmann
     Campbell
     Chu
     Edwards
     Fudge
     Kuster
     Markey
     McCarthy (NY)
     Neal
     Poe (TX)
     Shea-Porter


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining on 
this vote.

                              {time}  1220

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated for:
  Ms. KUSTER. Mr. Chair, on rollcall No. 237, had I been present, I 
would have voted ``yes.''


                 Amendment No. 14 Offered by Mr. Polis

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Colorado 
(Mr. Polis) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 150, 
noes 274, not voting 10, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 238]

                               AYES--150

     Andrews
     Barber
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera (CA)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Ellison
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Green, Al
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Holt
     Honda
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     Meeks
     Meng
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Negrete McLeod
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Peters (CA)
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Richmond
     Roybal-Allard
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sherman
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--274

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amash
     Amodei
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Calvert
     Camp
     Cantor
     Capito
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cooper
     Costa
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Enyart
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Grayson
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Heck (WA)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Hinojosa
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (PA)
     Kilmer
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mullin

[[Page H3631]]


     Mulvaney
     Murphy (FL)
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perlmutter
     Perry
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Radel
     Rahall
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Sewell (AL)
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Waters
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--10

     Bachmann
     Campbell
     Chu
     Edwards
     Fudge
     Markey
     McCarthy (NY)
     Neal
     Poe (TX)
     Shea-Porter


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining on 
this vote.

                              {time}  1223

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                 Amendment No. 23 Offered by Mr. Polis

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Colorado 
(Mr. Polis) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 146, 
noes 278, not voting 10, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 239]

                               AYES--146

     Amash
     Andrews
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Bustos
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellison
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jeffries
     Johnson, E. B.
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kuster
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Mulvaney
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Negrete McLeod
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Perlmutter
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Roybal-Allard
     Rush
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sanford
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sherman
     Slaughter
     Speier
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Walz
     Watt
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--278

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amodei
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bera (CA)
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cooper
     Costa
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     Delaney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Ellmers
     Enyart
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Holding
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jackson Lee
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kaptur
     Kelly (PA)
     Kildee
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Langevin
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Maffei
     Maloney, Sean
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Meng
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mullin
     Murphy (FL)
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pelosi
     Perry
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Radel
     Rahall
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Scalise
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Sewell (AL)
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Sires
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Swalwell (CA)
     Terry
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Visclosky
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Waxman
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--10

     Bachmann
     Campbell
     Chu
     Edwards
     Fudge
     Markey
     McCarthy (NY)
     Neal
     Poe (TX)
     Shea-Porter

                              {time}  1227

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


               Amendment No. 39 Offered by Mr. Van Hollen

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Maryland 
(Mr. Van Hollen) on which further proceedings were postponed and on 
which the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 191, 
noes 232, not voting 11, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 240]

                               AYES--191

     Amash
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Garrett
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck (WA)
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Himes

[[Page H3632]]


     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huelskamp
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kuster
     Labrador
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Massie
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McClintock
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Negrete McLeod
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Ribble
     Richmond
     Rohrabacher
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sanford
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Sherman
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stutzman
     Swalwell (CA)
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Woodall
     Yarmuth
     Yoho

                               NOES--232

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amodei
     Andrews
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Bustos
     Calvert
     Camp
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cartwright
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Gardner
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Joyce
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kline
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Maloney, Sean
     Marchant
     Marino
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mullin
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Peterson
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Radel
     Rahall
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Scalise
     Schneider
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Takano
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Titus
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Visclosky
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Yoder
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--11

     Bachmann
     Campbell
     Chu
     Edwards
     Fudge
     Markey
     McCarthy (NY)
     Neal
     Poe (TX)
     Shea-Porter
     Vargas

                              {time}  1230

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


              Amendment No. 123 Offered by Mr. Blumenauer

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Oregon 
(Mr. Blumenauer) on which further proceedings were postponed and on 
which the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 420, 
noes 3, not voting 11, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 241]

                               AYES--420

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amash
     Amodei
     Andrews
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bera (CA)
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Braley (IA)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Cantor
     Capito
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cartwright
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coble
     Cohen
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cook
     Cooper
     Costa
     Cotton
     Courtney
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Cummings
     Daines
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     Davis, Rodney
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Ellison
     Ellmers
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farenthold
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Foxx
     Frankel (FL)
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hall
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (FL)
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Heck (WA)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holding
     Holt
     Honda
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huffman
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Israel
     Issa
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kelly (PA)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kline
     Kuster
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Langevin
     Lankford
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     Latta
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Long
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lummis
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Meng
     Messer
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (FL)
     Murphy (PA)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Negrete McLeod
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nolan
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     O'Rourke
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paulsen
     Payne
     Pearce
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Perry
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Pocan
     Polis
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Radel
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Roybal-Allard
     Royce
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sanford
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Schweikert
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sessions
     Sewell (AL)
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Southerland
     Speier
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Terry
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Tipton
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Van Hollen
     Vargas

[[Page H3633]]


     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Welch
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (FL)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yarmuth
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                                NOES--3

     Duncan (TN)
     Peterson
     Price (GA)

                             NOT VOTING--11

     Bachmann
     Campbell
     Chu
     Coffman
     Edwards
     Fudge
     Markey
     McCarthy (NY)
     Neal
     Poe (TX)
     Shea-Porter

                              {time}  1234

  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia changed his vote from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                Amendment No. 137 Offered by Ms. DeLauro

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from 
Connecticut (Ms. DeLauro) on which further proceedings were postponed 
and on which the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 423, 
noes 0, not voting 11, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 242]

                               AYES--423

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amash
     Amodei
     Andrews
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bera (CA)
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Braley (IA)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Cantor
     Capito
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cartwright
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coble
     Cohen
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cook
     Cooper
     Costa
     Cotton
     Courtney
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Cummings
     Daines
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     Davis, Rodney
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellison
     Ellmers
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farenthold
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Foxx
     Frankel (FL)
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hall
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (FL)
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Heck (WA)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holding
     Holt
     Honda
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huffman
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Israel
     Issa
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kelly (PA)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kline
     Kuster
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Langevin
     Lankford
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     Latta
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Long
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lummis
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Meng
     Messer
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (FL)
     Murphy (PA)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Negrete McLeod
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nolan
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     O'Rourke
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paulsen
     Payne
     Pearce
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Perry
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Pocan
     Polis
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Radel
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Roybal-Allard
     Royce
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sanford
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Schweikert
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sessions
     Sewell (AL)
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Southerland
     Speier
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Terry
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Tipton
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Welch
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (FL)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yarmuth
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--11

     Bachmann
     Campbell
     Chu
     Coffman
     Edwards
     Fudge
     Markey
     McCarthy (NY)
     Neal
     Poe (TX)
     Shea-Porter


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1237

  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                          personal explanation

  Mr. COFFMAN. Mr. Chair, on rollcall Nos. 241 and 242, I was 
unavoidably detained.
  Had I been present, I would have voted ``yes.''
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the committee amendment in the 
nature of a substitute, as amended.
  The amendment was agreed to.
  The Acting CHAIR. Under the rule, the Committee rises.
  Accordingly, the Committee rose; and the Speaker pro tempore (Mrs. 
Capito) having assumed the chair, Mr. Collins of Georgia, Acting Chair 
of the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union, reported 
that that Committee, having had under consideration the bill (H.R. 
1960) to authorize appropriations for fiscal year 2014 for military 
activities of the Department of Defense and for military construction, 
to prescribe military personnel strengths for such fiscal year, and for 
other purposes, and, pursuant to House Resolution 260, he reported the 
bill back to the House with an amendment adopted in the Committee of 
the Whole.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Under the rule, the previous question is 
ordered.
  Is a separate vote demanded on any amendment to the amendment 
reported from the Committee of the Whole?
  If not, the question is on the amendment in the nature of a 
substitute, as amended.
  The amendment was agreed to.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the engrossment and third 
reading of the bill.
  The bill was ordered to be engrossed and read a third time, and was 
read the third time.

                              {time}  1240


                           Motion to Recommit

  Ms. DUCKWORTH. Madam Speaker, I have a motion to recommit at the 
desk.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is the gentlewoman opposed to the bill?
  Ms. DUCKWORTH. I am opposed in its current form.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The Clerk will report the motion to 
recommit.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       At the end of subtitle D of title V, add the following new 
     section:

[[Page H3634]]

     SEC. 5__. CONVENING AUTHORITY RELIANCE ON OFFICE OF THE CHIEF 
                   PROSECUTOR RECOMMENDATION TO PROCEED TO TRIAL 
                   OF ANY CHARGE INVOLVING SEXUAL ASSAULT OR OTHER 
                   SEX-RELATED OFFENSE.

       (a) In General.--Section 834 of title 10, United States 
     Code (article 34 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice) is 
     amended--
       (1) by redesignating subsection (c) as subsection (d); and
       (2) by inserting after the subsection (b) the following new 
     subsection (c):
       ``(c)(1) In the case of any charge involving sexual assault 
     or other sex-related offense covered by section 920, 920a, 
     920b, or 920c of this title (article 120, 120a, 120b, or 120c 
     of the Uniform Code of Military Justice), the convening 
     authority shall also refer the charge to the Office of the 
     Chief Prosecutor of the armed force of which the accused is a 
     member for additional consideration and advice unless the 
     victim (or the parent or legal guardian of the victim if the 
     victim is a minor) of such offense elects that such charge 
     only be referred to the staff judge advocate pursuant to 
     subsection (a).
       ``(2) If the Office of the Chief Prosecutor is referred a 
     charge covered by paragraph (1) and recommends that the 
     charge be referred to trial, the recommendation shall be 
     binding on the convening authority and the convening 
     authority shall promptly direct a trial of the charge.''.
       (b) Appointment of Chief Prosecutor.--For any Armed Force 
     for which the position of Chief Prosecutor does not exist 
     before the date of the enactment of this Act, the Judge 
     Advocate General of that Armed Force shall establish the 
     position of Chief Prosecutor and appoint as the Chief 
     Prosecutor a commissioned officer in the grade of O-6 or 
     above who has significant experience prosecuting sexual 
     assault trials by court-martial.

  Mrs. WALORSKI (during the reading). Madam Speaker, I ask unanimous 
consent to dispense with the reading.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentlewoman from Indiana?
  There was no objection.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentlewoman from Illinois is recognized 
for 5 minutes.
  Ms. DUCKWORTH. Madam Speaker, the willingness of our troops to place 
the Nation first is why the scourge of sexual harassment and assault in 
the military is so horrific. Just a single case is unacceptable. This 
is a self-inflicted wound that has no place in the greatest military in 
the world.
  I love the military with every bone in my body. The lessons I learned 
as an army officer, the camaraderie I experienced are at the core of 
who I am, just as it is for my brothers and sisters in arms. That is 
why I am personally devastated to see how many predators continue to 
abuse and attack one of our own.
  The military is a place of great discipline, technical proficiency, 
and personal sacrifice for the greater good. It is a place where young 
men and women grow and thrive, developing as great leaders and team 
members. This is the case for so many of them. However, for some, the 
military has now become a place of fear and intimidation.
  The services have made significant efforts to try to stamp out sexual 
harassment and assault, but there are still unacceptable failures in 
these efforts. With each new piece of data on the rates of sexual 
assault and on the lack of command responsibility by many in dealing 
with military sexual trauma, I have gradually come to the conclusion 
that we need another path to protect the victims.
  This amendment adds a new course of action for victims to pursue 
should they choose it. It empowers them at a time when they feel most 
powerless with a new option that is outside the chain of command with 
an independent investigation and prosecution system.
  I place the highest priority on the importance of a commander's 
authority to lead and discipline the men and women under his or her 
command. However, in the case of sexual crimes, there continues to be 
failures in the existing processes for investigations and punishments 
within that chain. That is why we must empower victims with an 
additional choice so that they can seek justice.
  There are many, many good commanders. My own experience has been a 
positive one with all of my commanders, all of whom were men, being 
protective of all of their soldiers and doing the right thing. Yet the 
data shows that there are enough predators and failed commanders that 
we need to take care of this now. This solution supports command 
authority but also, importantly, empowers victims by giving them one 
more option.
  The men and women in our Armed Forces are why we live freely in the 
greatest country in the world. When our warriors face combat, they must 
be able to focus completely and single-mindedly on the mission at hand. 
They cannot do this if they are threatened with sexual assault.
  When our Nation's parents are approached by their brave young son or 
daughter who is looking to join the military, these moms and dads need 
to know without a doubt that their child will be cared for, that they 
will become disciplined, well-trained leaders. They should not have to 
fear that their child will become a rape victim.
  The military is a place of honor, one where our troops serve with 
great pride. This amendment is a balanced approach that honors our 
military by providing the victim with a choice on how to seek justice.
  Madam Speaker, at this time, I yield the balance of my time to the 
gentlelady from California, who's been a leader in victims' rights, Ms. 
Speier.
  Ms. SPEIER. I thank the heroic lady from Illinois, and I think, for 
all of us, hearing your words are profound.
  What we are seeing here is, not only are there physical wounds, there 
are emotional wounds. So many of my colleagues on both sides of the 
aisle have shared with me the stories of victims who have been raped 
and sexually assaulted--the fear, the pain, the tears--and they all, to 
the woman and to the man, have said how powerless they feel.
  This particular amendment will give them a little leverage. This 
amendment is going to give them a choice. This amendment respects the 
chain of command. This amendment gives them the opportunity to use the 
chain of command or to seek to go to the chief prosecutor in each of 
the services to seek an investigation and an evaluation as to whether 
or not a prosecution should move forward.
  We have an opportunity here to really change the face of this issue, 
and I urge my colleagues to join in supporting this amendment.
  Mrs. WALORSKI. Madam Speaker, I rise in opposition to the motion to 
recommit.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentlewoman from Indiana is recognized 
for 5 minutes.
  Mrs. WALORSKI. Ladies and gentlemen, colleagues, we worked for months 
on bipartisan legislation to confront this problem. The time for this 
Congress to act on this issue is right now. I ask you to support the 
bipartisan solution in this bill, reject the procedural motion to 
recommit, and I yield back the balance of my time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Without objection, the previous question is 
ordered on the motion to recommit.
  There was no objection.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the motion to recommit.
  The question was taken; and the Speaker pro tempore announced that 
the noes appeared to have it.


                             Recorded Vote

  Ms. DUCKWORTH. Madam Speaker, I demand a recorded vote.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to clause 9 of rule XX, this 5-
minute vote on the motion to recommit will be followed by a 5-minute 
vote on passage of the bill, if ordered.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 194, 
noes 225, answered ``present'' 1, not voting 14, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 243]

                               AYES--194

     Andrews
     Barber
     Barrow (GA)
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Kaptur

[[Page H3635]]


     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Negrete McLeod
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Richmond
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Sherman
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--225

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amash
     Amodei
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Calvert
     Camp
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Radel
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                        ANSWERED ``PRESENT''--1

       
     Sanchez, Loretta
       

                             NOT VOTING--14

     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Campbell
     Chu
     Edwards
     Fudge
     Gohmert
     Gutierrez
     Issa
     Markey
     McCarthy (NY)
     Neal
     Poe (TX)
     Shea-Porter

                              {time}  1254

  So the motion to recommit was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the passage of the bill.
  The question was taken; and the Speaker pro tempore announced that 
the ayes appeared to have it.


                             Recorded Vote

  Mr. McKEON. Madam Speaker, I demand a recorded vote.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. This is a 5-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 315, 
noes 108, not voting 11, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 244]

                               AYES--315

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amodei
     Andrews
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Beatty
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bera (CA)
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Braley (IA)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Bustos
     Calvert
     Camp
     Cantor
     Capito
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carter
     Cartwright
     Cassidy
     Castro (TX)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Coble
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Connolly
     Cook
     Costa
     Cotton
     Courtney
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Cummings
     Daines
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Rodney
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Duckworth
     Duffy
     Ellmers
     Enyart
     Esty
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Foxx
     Frankel (FL)
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Goodlatte
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Al
     Griffin (AR)
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Heck (WA)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Himes
     Holding
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Israel
     Issa
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kaptur
     Kelly (IL)
     Kelly (PA)
     Kilmer
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kline
     Kuster
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Langevin
     Lankford
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     Latta
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Long
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McDermott
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mullin
     Murphy (FL)
     Murphy (PA)
     Negrete McLeod
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     O'Rourke
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pascrell
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Price (NC)
     Rahall
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schneider
     Schock
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Sewell (AL)
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Takano
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Titus
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Visclosky
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Walz
     Waters
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--108

     Amash
     Bass
     Becerra
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Carson (IN)
     Castor (FL)
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Crowley
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Deutch
     Doyle
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellison
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Farr
     Fattah
     Gibson
     Gohmert
     Gosar
     Grayson
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hastings (FL)
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Huffman
     Keating
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Labrador
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lummis
     Lynch
     Massie
     Matsui
     McClintock
     McCollum
     McGovern
     Meeks
     Meng
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Mulvaney
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Nolan
     Pallone
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Polis
     Quigley
     Radel
     Rangel
     Richmond
     Rohrabacher
     Roybal-Allard
     Rush
     Salmon
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Schweikert
     Serrano
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Speier
     Stockman
     Swalwell (CA)

[[Page H3636]]


     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Wasserman Schultz
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth
     Yoho

                             NOT VOTING--11

     Bachmann
     Campbell
     Chu
     Edwards
     Fudge
     Green, Gene
     Markey
     McCarthy (NY)
     Neal
     Poe (TX)
     Shea-Porter

                              {time}  1307

  Mrs. LUMMIS changed her vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  So the bill was passed.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  The title of the bill was amended so as to read: ``A bill to 
authorize appropriations for fiscal year 2014 for military activities 
of the Department of Defense, for military construction, and for 
defense activities of the Department of Energy, to prescribe military 
personnel strengths for such fiscal year, and for other purposes.''.
  A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.
  Stated for:
  Mr. GENE GREEN of Texas. Mr. Speaker, on rollcall No. 244 final 
passage, had I been present, I would have voted ``yes.''

                          ____________________