Amendment Text: H.Amdt.228 — 113th Congress (2013-2014)

There is one version of the amendment.

Shown Here:
Amendment as Offered (06/20/2013)

This Amendment appears on page H3947-3949 in the following article from the Congressional Record.


[Pages H3933-H3968]
From the Congressional Record Online through the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]




                              {time}  0920
       FEDERAL AGRICULTURE REFORM AND RISK MANAGEMENT ACT OF 2013

  The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. Cassidy). Pursuant to House Resolution 
271 and rule XVIII, the Chair declares the House in the Committee of 
the Whole House on the state of the Union for the further consideration 
of the bill, H.R. 1947.
  Will the gentlewoman from Florida (Ms. Ros-Lehtinen) kindly resume 
the chair.

                              {time}  0924


                     In the Committee of the Whole

  Accordingly, the House resolved itself into the Committee of the 
Whole House on the state of the Union for the further consideration of 
the bill (H.R. 1947) to provide for the reform and continuation of 
agricultural and other programs of the Department of Agriculture 
through fiscal year 2018, and for other purposes, with Ms. Ros-Lehtinen 
(Acting Chair) in the chair.
  The Clerk read the title of the bill.
  The Acting CHAIR. When the Committee of the Whole rose on Wednesday, 
June 19, 2013, amendment No. 58, printed in part B of House Report 113-
117, offered by the gentlewoman from North Carolina (Ms. Foxx), had 
been disposed of.


                 Amendment No. 98 Offered by Mr. Pitts

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 98 
printed in part B of House Report 113-117.
  Mr. PITTS. Madam Chairman, I rise to offer my amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Strike subtitle C of title I (sugar) and insert the 
     following:

                           Subtitle C--Sugar

     SEC. 1301. SUGAR PROGRAM.

       (a) Sugarcane.--Section 156(a) of the Federal Agriculture 
     Improvement and Reform Act of 1996 (7 U.S.C. 7272(a)) is 
     amended--
       (1) in paragraph (4), by striking ``and'' after the 
     semicolon at the end;
       (2) in paragraph (5), by striking the period at the end and 
     inserting ``; and''; and
       (3) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(6) 18 cents per pound for raw cane sugar for each of the 
     2014 through 2018 crop years.''.
       (b) Sugar Beets.--Section 156(b)(2) of the Federal 
     Agriculture Improvement and Reform Act of 1996 (7 U.S.C. 
     7272(b)(2)) is amended by striking ``2012'' and inserting 
     ``2018''.
       (c) Effective Period.--Section 156(i) of the Federal 
     Agriculture Improvement and Reform Act of 1996 (7 U.S.C. 
     7272(i)) is amended by striking ``2012'' and inserting 
     ``2018''.

     SEC. 1302. FLEXIBLE MARKETING ALLOTMENTS FOR SUGAR.

       (a) In General.--Section 359b of the Agricultural 
     Adjustment Act of 1938 (7 U.S.C. 1359bb) is amended--
       (1) in subsection (a)(1)--
       (A) in the matter before subparagraph (A), by striking 
     ``2012'' and inserting ``2018''; and
       (B) in subparagraph (B), by inserting ``at reasonable 
     prices'' after ``stocks''; and
       (2) in subsection (b)(1)--
       (A) in subparagraph (A), by striking ``but'' after the 
     semicolon at the end and inserting ``and''; and
       (B) by striking subparagraph (B) and inserting the 
     following:
       ``(B) appropriate to maintain adequate domestic supplies at 
     reasonable prices, taking into account all sources of 
     domestic supply, including imports.''.
       (b) Establishment of Flexible Marketing Allotments.--
     Section 359c of the Agricultural Adjustment Act of 1938 (7 
     U.S.C. 1359cc) is amended--
       (1) in subsection (b)--
       (A) in paragraph (1)--
       (i) in subparagraph (A), by striking ``but'' after the 
     semicolon at the end and inserting ``and''; and

[[Page H3934]]

       (ii) by striking subparagraph (B) and inserting the 
     following:
       ``(B) appropriate to maintain adequate supplies at 
     reasonable prices, taking into account all sources of 
     domestic supply, including imports.''; and
       (B) in paragraph (2)(B), by inserting ``at reasonable 
     prices'' after ``market''; and
       (2) in subsection (g)(1)--
       (A) by striking ``Adjustments.--'' and all that follows 
     through ``Subject to subparagraph (B), the'' and inserting 
     ``Adjustments.--The''; and
       (B) by striking subparagraph (B).
       (c) Suspension or Modification of Provisions.--Section 359j 
     of the Agricultural Adjustment Act of 1938 (7 U.S.C. 1359jj) 
     is amended by adding at the end the following:
       ``(c) Suspension or Modification of Provisions.--
     Notwithstanding any other provision of this part, the 
     Secretary may suspend or modify, in whole or in part, the 
     application of any provision of this part if the Secretary 
     determines that the action is appropriate, taking into 
     account--
       ``(1) the interests of consumers, workers in the food 
     industry, businesses (including small businesses), and 
     agricultural producers; and
       ``(2) the relative competitiveness of domestically produced 
     and imported foods containing sugar.''.
       (d) Administration of Tariff Rate Quotas.--Section 359k of 
     the Agricultural Adjustment Act of 1938 (7 U.S.C. 1359kk) is 
     amended to read as follows:

     ``SEC. 359K. ADMINISTRATION OF TARIFF RATE QUOTAS.

       ``(a) Establishment.--Notwithstanding any other provision 
     of law, at the beginning of the quota year, the Secretary 
     shall establish the tariff-rate quotas for raw cane sugar and 
     refined sugar at no less than the minimum level necessary to 
     comply with obligations under international trade agreements 
     that have been approved by Congress.
       ``(b) Adjustment.--
       ``(1) In general.--Subject to subsection (a), the Secretary 
     shall adjust the tariff-rate quotas for raw cane sugar and 
     refined sugar to provide adequate supplies of sugar at 
     reasonable prices in the domestic market.
       ``(2) Ending stocks.--Subject to paragraphs (1) and (3), 
     the Secretary shall establish and adjust tariff-rate quotas 
     in such a manner that the ratio of sugar stocks to total 
     sugar use at the end of the quota year will be approximately 
     15.5 percent.
       ``(3) Maintenance of reasonable prices and avoidance of 
     forfeitures.--
       ``(A) In general.--The Secretary may establish a different 
     target for the ratio of ending stocks to total use if, in the 
     judgment of the Secretary, the different target is necessary 
     to prevent--
       ``(i) unreasonably high prices; or
       ``(ii) forfeitures of sugar pledged as collateral for a 
     loan under section 156 of the Federal Agriculture Improvement 
     and Reform Act of 1996 (7 U.S.C. 7272).
       ``(B) Announcement.--The Secretary shall publicly announce 
     any establishment of a target under this paragraph.
       ``(4) Considerations.--In establishing tariff-rate quotas 
     under subsection (a) and making adjustments under this 
     subsection, the Secretary shall consider the impact of the 
     quotas on consumers, workers, businesses (including small 
     businesses), and agricultural producers.
       ``(c) Temporary Transfer of Quotas.--
       ``(1) In general.--To promote full use of the tariff-rate 
     quotas for raw cane sugar and refined sugar, notwithstanding 
     any other provision of law, the Secretary shall promulgate 
     regulations that provide that any country that has been 
     allocated a share of the quotas may temporarily transfer all 
     or part of the share to any other country that has also been 
     allocated a share of the quotas.
       ``(2) Transfers voluntary.--Any transfer under this 
     subsection shall be valid only on voluntary agreement between 
     the transferor and the transferee, consistent with procedures 
     established by the Secretary.
       ``(3) Transfers temporary.--
       ``(A) In general.--Any transfer under this subsection shall 
     be valid only for the duration of the quota year during which 
     the transfer is made.
       ``(B) Following quota year.--No transfer under this 
     subsection shall affect the share of the quota allocated to 
     the transferor or transferee for the following quota year.''.
       (e) Effective Period.--Section 359l(a) of the Agricultural 
     Adjustment Act of 1938 (7 U.S.C. 1359ll(a)) is amended by 
     striking ``2012'' and inserting ``2018''.

     SEC. 1303. REPEAL OF FEEDSTOCK FLEXIBILITY PROGRAM FOR 
                   BIOENERGY PRODUCERS.

       (a) In General.--Section 9010 of the Farm Security and 
     Rural Investment Act of 2002 (7 U.S.C. 8110) is repealed.
       (b) Conforming Amendments.--
       (1) Section 359a(3)(B) of the Agricultural Adjustment Act 
     of 1938 (7 U.S.C. 1359aa(3)(B)) is amended--
       (A) in clause (i), by inserting ``and'' after the semicolon 
     at the end;
       (B) in clause (ii), by striking ``; and'' at the end and 
     inserting a period; and
       (C) by striking clause (iii).
       (2) Section 359b(c)(2)(C) of the Agricultural Adjustment 
     Act of 1938 (7 U.S.C. 1359bb(c)(2)(C)) is amended by striking 
     ``, except for'' and all that follows through `` of 2002''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 271, the gentleman 
from Pennsylvania (Mr. Pitts) and a Member opposed each will control 10 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Pennsylvania.
  Mr. PITTS. Madam Speaker, for those of us in support of my amendment, 
I will divide 5 minutes under the control of Congressman Danny Davis, 5 
minutes on my side.
  I rise in support of my amendment, one that would reform our 
government's sugar program. For too long, we've seen these subsidies 
and market protections drive up costs on taxpayers, consumers, and 
businesses. Let me highlight some of the costs now:
  Consumers are paying an extra $3.5 billion a year to subsidize this 
policy.
  Taxpayers are set to foot a bill of $239 million over the next 
several years, according to the CBO. The CBO estimated our amendment 
would save $73 million.
  American workers are paying the price in job losses. Nearly 127,000 
jobs were lost by sugar-using industries between 1997 and 2011. At risk 
are an additional 600,000 manufacturing jobs.
  My amendment would help get the price of sugar closer to the world 
price. It does so by reforming the sugar program, not repealing it. 
American sugar is still going to have its support program much the same 
as it did before the 2008 farm bill. We're simply returning to those 
policies in order to get a more competitive price, one that will help 
consumers, manufacturers, and even growers.
  Under the 2008 farm bill, refined sugar prices have averaged 68 
percent more than under the 2002 farm bill. Our detractors are quick to 
point out that sugar prices are falling, but then they neglected to 
tell the taxpayer that they are set to bail out the sugar industry, 
possibly by amounts of $100 million a year in the coming years. So at 
the same time this reckless policy sticks the costs of subsidies to 
consumers, we are set to start spending taxpayer money on supporting 
sugar farmers, even while the price of U.S. sugar was 64 percent higher 
than the world price last year.
  All we are seeking to do is to return the sugar program to what it 
was under the 2002 farm bill policy. I'm not sure about you, but I 
don't remember having any trouble getting sugar into my coffee in 2008. 
But since the last farm bill, companies have been struggling to find 
affordable sugar, so much so that Canada has actively been advertising 
to our manufacturing base that they have access to cheaper sugar. 
Furthermore, the inflated price of sugar has incentivized Mexico to 
dump sugar into our market.
  So, we're losing jobs to the north, and we're getting hit from 
foreign sugar from the south due to this reckless policy. So let's 
reform it. Let's get back into the free market, into the sugar market. 
Let's get American jobs to stay here. Let's save consumers and 
taxpayers money. Let's reform our sugar policy.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. PETERSON. Madam Chair, I'd like to claim the time in opposition.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Minnesota is recognized for 10 
minutes.
  Mr. PETERSON. Madam Chair, I yield 1 minute to the chairman of the 
House Agriculture Committee.
  Mr. LUCAS. Madam Chairman, we hear a lot from the proponents of this 
amendment about moving American companies to Mexico and to Canada. But 
that has nothing to do with the price of sugar. It has everything to do 
with labor costs, health care costs, and trying to get every penny out 
of the American farmer.

                              {time}  0930

  Have any of you seen the price of sugar, cakes or cookies plummet 
over the last few years as sugar prices have decreased by 55 percent? 
No, you haven't.
  You will hear a lot from the proponents of this amendment about the 
high prices of sugar--so high indeed that restaurants give it away and 
that you can buy a five-pound bag of sugar for almost nothing. The idea 
that adopting this amendment is going to somehow create a free market 
for sugar is ludicrous.
  The world sugar market is one of the most distorted markets in the 
world. Adopting this amendment or even repealing sugar policy would do 
nothing but subject the U.S. to that distorted

[[Page H3935]]

market even more than we are today, cost a lot of farmers their 
livelihoods, and cost this country an industry with all the jobs and 
economic activity that go with it. Let's be quite clear, the U.S. is 
already one of the largest sugar importers in the world.
  The Acting CHAIR. The time of the gentleman has expired.
  Mr. PETERSON. I yield the gentleman 1 minute.
  Mr. LUCAS. The second argument is that we are all of a sudden going 
to have cheaper sugar if we adopt this amendment.
  What bothers me the most about this argument is that it was made when 
sugar prices were 55 percent higher, and it is made just the same when 
prices are in the tank. How cheap is cheap enough for those who are 
backing this amendment?
  They claim that consumers are being bilked by the high price of 
sugar, but have any of our colleagues noticed a drop in the price of 
candy bars as manufacturers faithfully pass along to consumers the 
savings from a 55 percent drop in sugar prices? Of course not.
  Sugar policy has operated at zero cost to the taxpayers for 10 years 
now. Our farmers are efficient and competitive. Consumers in this 
country enjoy cheaper sugar than anywhere else in the world, and sugar 
users enjoy a reliable source of safe sugar.
  Candy makers are reporting strong profits as sugar farmers and 
processors struggle. Neither today's climate nor the climate of 55 
percent higher prices was caused by sugar policy. It was caused by 
conditions in a distorted market. All sugar policy does is provide a 
low-level safety net so farmers can repay their loan principal plus 
interest and farm another day.
  I urge my colleagues to reject the amendment.
  Mr. PITTS. Madam Chairman, I yield 5 minutes to the gentleman from 
Illinois (Mr. Danny K. Davis.)
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman from Illinois will 
control 5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. DANNY K. DAVIS of Illinois. Madam Chairman, let's be clear: 
unequivocally, and without a doubt, we know that the sugar subsidy 
raises the price of sugar on the domestic market in this country.
  I know that I have lost out of my congressional district major candy 
makers and food processors who left town--not because of labor costs, 
not because of any rifts, but because they were paying so much for the 
price of sugar that they knew that if they went to Mexico, if they went 
to Canada that they could get sugar at a much lower price.
  I don't know why we help 4,000 sugar growers at the expense of 
600,000 workers in America. I say vote ``yes'' for the Pitts-Davis-
Blumenauer-Goodlatte amendment. When you do that, you are helping the 
guy who gets a cup of coffee and needs to use sugar for the sweetener.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. PETERSON. I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from Michigan (Mr. 
Kildee).
  Mr. KILDEE. Madam Chair, I rise in opposition to this amendment. This 
is nothing but an attack on the thousands of family farms in my 
district and across the country.
  The district I represent is home to Michigan Sugar, a co-op owned by 
900 American family farmers. The idea of Big Sugar is flat-out false. 
To compare a co-op, a growers' co-op such as Michigan Sugar, to a 
large, multinational corporation is fallacy and wrong.
  Back in my district, when I visit these hardworking third- and 
fourth-generation farmers, all they ask for is a fair and even playing 
field. These farmers work hard, they play by the rules, and they 
shouldn't be punished, as this amendment would do. That's why I stand 
with the American family farms and not foreign government-subsidized 
sugar.
  Big corporate food processors are not moving overseas because of 
sugar costs; they are moving overseas to avoid providing health care 
and living wages to their workers. Furthermore, if Big Business is able 
to target one crop at a time, the entire farm bill loses its worth.
  If you support family farms, you will oppose this amendment.
  Mr. PITTS. Madam Chairman, at this time I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the 
distinguished vice chair of the Ag Committee, the gentleman from 
Virginia (Mr. Goodlatte).
  Mr. GOODLATTE. Madam Chairman, this FARRM Bill reforms many commodity 
programs. It makes major policy changes that leave no commodity 
untouched except for one. This bill makes absolutely no change to the 
sugar program. In fact, the sugar program wasn't even given the 
scrutiny of an audit hearing.
  Under this bill, we are being asked to demand sacrifices from farmers 
in our districts. Wheat, corn, soybeans, cotton, peanuts, and rice--
these commodities and more are undergoing major changes and 
contributing to the deficit reduction in this bill. But we're asked to 
believe that the sugar program and the sugar program alone is so 
perfect that it must be left untouched, it cannot be reformed or even 
discussed. I respectfully disagree.
  The sugar program needs to be reformed for many reasons:
  First, all serious studies show that the sugar program increases food 
costs. Economists at Iowa State University put this consumer cost at up 
to $3.5 billion a year for the first 4 years of the 2008 farm bill.
  Second, because it harms the competitiveness of U.S. food 
manufacturing, the sugar program costs jobs. The Iowa State study 
estimated that as many as 20,000 new jobs a year could be created if 
sugar policy were fully reformed. The U.S. Department of Commerce found 
that for every sugar industry job saved by the program, three good 
manufacturing jobs were lost.
  Third, current sugar policy may not have cost taxpayers at the 
moment, but the Congressional Budget Office projects that it will in 
the future. The Feedstock Flexibility Program--which was added to the 
sugar policy in 2008--is forecast to cost $193 million.
  I urge my colleagues to support this amendment.
  Fourth, the sugar program constitutes an almost unbelievable 
government intrusion into private business decisions. Under the 
marketing allotment system, the federal government tells every sugar 
company the exact amount of sugar that it is legal for the company to 
sell, down to the pound. USDA issues press releases every year with 
each private company's exact sales quota listed. Can you imagine what 
my colleagues would call that if we did it in any other industry in 
America? It is a pure command-and-control regime.
  For all these reasons, I believe we need a serious discussion about 
sugar policy. A case could be made to repeal it completely. But that is 
not what I am proposing.
  This amendment does not repeal the sugar program or sugar import 
quotas.
  Instead, the amendment removes several features that were added to 
sugar policy in 2008, and makes some additional program reforms. 
Specifically, it eliminates--new restrictions that prevent Secretary 
Vilsack from increasing import quotas between October 1 and April 1, 
and require that he set the import quota at the bare minimum allowed 
under our international obligations, regardless of market needs; the 
Feedstock Flexibility Program, which requires the government to buy up 
surplus sugar and re-sell it to ethanol plants at a loss to taxpayers; 
a de facto domestic content requirement, which prevents USDA from 
reducing marketing allotments below 85% of the market, even if that 
would save the government money; and price support increases that were 
mandated in 2008. This part of the amendment is scored by CBO as 
contributing to a net savings of $73 million.
  The amendment also makes the sugar program more flexible and 
transparent: first, by permitting developing countries to lease one 
another's sugar quotas temporarily, thus allowing small quota-holding 
countries that no longer produce sugar to derive some benefit from 
their quotas, and ensuring that all quota sugar will actually be 
imported; second, by setting a goal that ending stocks of sugar will be 
approximately 15.5% of total demand, thereby making policies more 
transparent; and third, by restoring Secretary Vilsack's authority to 
suspend marketing allotments in emergency conditions, authority taken 
away in 2008.
  In 2008, Congress went too far in shackling sugar policy with new 
market-shorting provisions. We have seen the results in the four years 
after enactment of the farm bill.
  With USDA unable to increase imports even when supplies were tight, 
both wholesale and retail sugar prices in the United States have set 
all-time records.
  At the same time, the gap between U.S. and world sugar prices widened 
far beyond historic levels.
  Supplies were so tight in the summer of 2010 that the United States 
imported 200,000 tons of ``high-tier'' or ``over-quota'' sugar. This 
means the importer willingly paid a tariff that

[[Page H3936]]

is deliberately set so high as to be prohibitive in normal conditions. 
There was simply no other sugar available from U.S., Mexican or quota 
sources.
  Once again, our amendment does not change the basic tenets of sugar 
policy. A good case can be made to do that, but I fully understand that 
many of my colleagues would not support a repeal. Instead, this 
amendment rolls back counterproductive policies that have distorted 
markets and increased consumer costs since they were enacted in 2008.
  The amendment's scope is modest, but it is genuine reform. I once 
again ask my colleagues: Do you really believe that we should cut 
programs for farmers in your district, but leave sugar policy 
absolutely untouched? If you do not believe that, please vote for the 
sugar reform amendment.
  Mr. PETERSON. Madam Chairman, I am pleased now to yield 1 minute to 
the chairman of the subcommittee that deals with this, the gentleman 
from Texas (Mr. Conaway).
  Mr. CONAWAY. Madam Chairman, I rise in opposition to the gentleman's 
amendment.
  Sugar users and folks who buy it by the ton are not going broke. If 
you look at Hershey, which is one of the main proponents for changing 
this policy, in 2007 they made $217 million--I don't begrudge them 
that; I wish I were a shareholder. In 2012, they made $660 million--a 
threefold increase in their prices. Their own annual report says that 
sugar costs went from 54 cents a pound to 37 cents a pound, and that 
that would not be reflected in their prices because of the way they 
manage the rest of their business. If the sugar buyers were actually 
going broke, then that would be reflected in one of the largest sugar 
users, which is Hershey.
  This is about protecting American producers, men and women who get up 
every morning to fight the fight for American agriculture and grow 
sugar, process sugar, so that you and I can pick it up off a table free 
and walk out of a restaurant with it.
  The current policy works. Often, if it's not broke, don't fix it. 
This also fits in the category that if a fellow is down, you don't kick 
him. The sugar industry is down right now because of a 52 percent 
decrease in the price of sugar. Let's don't kick them while they're 
down.
  This current policy works. Let's don't fix it, because it's not 
broken. And the $38 million pro-rated over 10 years is a bargain.
  Oppose this amendment.
  Mr. DANNY K. DAVIS of Illinois. Madam Chairman, I now yield 1 minute 
to the gentleman from Virginia (Mr. Moran).
  Mr. MORAN. Madam Chairwoman, I don't have any sugar manufacturing 
jobs in my district, let alone any sugar beet farms or sugar cane 
fields, but all of my constituents and all of the constituents of every 
Member of this body pay a share of the $3.5 billion annual hidden food 
tax on consumers. So it seems to me that's what this is about.
  And to go from the personal to the national, according to the U.S. 
Department of Commerce, for each sugar production job saved, this sugar 
program has eliminated three jobs in food manufacturing. Three jobs 
lost for every job saved. So if we're really about creating jobs and 
not losing them, we ought to reform this sugar program.

                              {time}  0940

  Current policy keeps sugar prices higher than the world market price 
and that encourages food manufacturing jobs to move offshore. As a 
result, between 1997 and 2011, 127,000 jobs were lost in segments of 
the food and beverage industries that use sugar to make their products.
  I also object, Madam Chairman, to the idea of paying $239 million in 
taxpayer purchases for a sugar-to-ethanol mandate. It ought to be 
eliminated, which this amendment would do.
  Mr. PETERSON. Madam Chair, I am now pleased to yield 1 minute to a 
good friend of the American farmer and agriculture, the gentleman from 
New York (Mr. Engel).
  Mr. ENGEL. Madam Chairman, I rise in opposition to the Pitts 
amendment.
  The proponents of the amendment claim that sugar prices are too high, 
but U.S. raw sugar prices have dropped by more than half just since the 
fall of 2011.
  In 2004, more than 200 people lost their jobs when the Domino sugar 
plant in Brooklyn, New York, closed its doors. That plant predated the 
Brooklyn Bridge, it outlasted the Brooklyn Dodgers, and now it is gone. 
So are the paychecks that its employees used to collect.
  I have a sugar refinery in my district in Yonkers, New York, and I 
don't want the same thing to happen to them. The sugar industry 
supports 142,000 jobs in 22 States, including 300 at this plant in my 
district.
  Our current policy supports this industry at no cost to the 
taxpayers. In fact, the USDA has predicted a zero cost increase over 
the next 10 years.
  I come from the school that ``if it ain't broke, don't fix it.'' 
Until we have a level playing field on the world market, we must 
continue our current sugar policy.
  I urge my colleagues to vote ``no'' on the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Minnesota has 5 minutes 
remaining. The gentleman from Pennsylvania has 30 seconds remaining. 
And the gentleman from Illinois has 2\1/2\ minutes remaining.
  Mr. PITTS. Madam Chairman, I yield the balance of my time to the 
gentleman from Texas (Mr. Hensarling).
  Mr. HENSARLING. Madam Chairman, we have all heard the phrase 
``American as apple pie,'' but it is shameful to think that every 
American pie has baked into it Soviet-style sugar. We have a Byzantine 
array of government production quotas, import quotas, mandatory target 
prices. And what does it do? It destroys three jobs for every one it 
creates and transfers millions of dollars from working Americans to 
6,000 sugar growers.
  It is time for us to put ``American'' back into ``American as apple 
pie.'' Let's support the gentleman from Pennsylvania's amendment.
  Mr. PETERSON. Madam Chairman, I am now pleased to yield 1 minute to 
the gentleman from Texas (Mr. Poe).
  Mr. POE of Texas. Madam Chairman, I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  Food and candy opponents of U.S. sugar policy would like to expose 
American sugar farmers to distorted world market for sugar. But the 
United States sugar growers are already exposed. Mexico has unlimited 
access to the United States market.
  One thing that hasn't been said: 20 percent of the Mexican sugar 
industry is owned by the Mexican Government. Mexico owns and operates 
its sugar industry, which is five times larger than the Texas sugar-
producing industry. As this chart shows, since 2008, Mexico has gotten 
unlimited access to the United States sugar market, and, in fact, the 
prices of sugar are the same prices as they were in the 1980s.
  My friends on both sides that propose this amendment say that we need 
a more free market. The United States cannot unilaterally disarm. That 
jeopardizes 142,000 jobs and leaves us dependent on the Brazilian and 
Mexican food industry that is run by the Mexican Government.
  This amendment does not promote free trade or free market; it 
promotes a government-run industry from Mexico and Brazil.
  Mr. DANNY K. DAVIS of Illinois. Madam Chairman, I keep hearing ``if 
it is not broken, don't fix it.'' Well, I can tell you for the 600,000 
people whose jobs are at risk when their companies move out of the 
country, that seems like broken to me.
  I would now like to yield 1 minute to the gentleman from Oregon (Mr. 
Blumenauer).
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. Madam Chairman, there have been assertions that 
somehow the American sugar industry is down. Because of the changes 
that were made in the last farm bill, prices soared up to 92 percent. 
And so there was a temporary increase in American sugar, which created 
some downward pressure, which in fact is going to require the American 
taxpayer to bail out in the next several years because of the sugar 
program's feedstock flexibility.
  We are talking about returning to the 2002 law. Every independent 
economist agrees that the American consumer is paying from $2 billion 
to $3.5 billion excess.
  The reason jobs are going to Canada is not because their jobs pay 
less, it is because the sugar price is less. There are far more jobs in 
the industries that use sugar than those who produce it.
  We are merely asking to return to the 2002 provisions, which were 
generous enough. Someday--someday--we will deregulate. Someday we will 
truly

[[Page H3937]]

reform. But in the short term this is a reasonable accommodation.
  Mr. DANNY K. DAVIS of Illinois. Madam Chairman, I yield the balance 
of my time, 1\1/2\ minutes, to the gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. 
Pitts).
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman from Pennsylvania 
will control the time.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. PETERSON. Madam Chairman, I am now pleased to yield 1 minute to 
the gentleman from Louisiana (Mr. Cassidy).
  Mr. CASSIDY. Madam Chairman, I oppose this amendment.
  We advocates for American farmers know that we need free world 
markets. The proponents of this amendment ignore that other countries, 
such as Brazil, subsidize their sugar industry as much as $3 billion 
per year.
  This amendment unilaterally disarms our economy. By doing so it 
threatens 142,000 farming jobs and potentially places the U.S. consumer 
at the mercy of market manipulation by foreign governments. At stake is 
our food security, 142,000 jobs, and the American consumer.
  By eliminating this program, which operates at zero cost to the 
American taxpayer, we hamstring the ability of our farmers to provide 
food security for our people.
  I urge my colleagues to reject this amendment.
  Mr. PITTS. Madam Chairman, there is nothing in the amendment that 
will bring an additional ounce of sugar under our shores without 
explicit approval of the Secretary of Agriculture.
  At this time, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from Pennsylvania 
(Mr. Dent).
  Mr. DENT. Madam Chairman, I must take exception to some of the 
remarks I've heard here today. This amendment is absolutely necessary 
for this country, for the consumer. We are talking about saving 
consumers $3.5 billion a year and saving 20,000 manufacturing jobs.
  I must strenuously object to those who say the price of sugar is so 
low. Let me tell you what is going to happen. When the price of sugar 
drops below a certain level, the Federal Government will buy that 
excess sugar, then sell it to ethanol producers at a loss. The taxpayer 
and the consumer is royally abused twice.
  This is protectionism at its worse. We all know it. It is time to 
reform this program.
  This is not a zero-zero policy as the proponents claim. This is going 
to cost taxpayers $239 million over the next several years. That is 
according to CBO. $80 million of taxpayer-funded bailout could come 
later this year.
  This issue is about protecting manufacturing jobs, making sure that 
we have something closer to a market-based price.
  I represent Hershey, Pennsylvania. I just heard a statement saying, 
no sugar packets handed out to restaurants are free. Well, that cost is 
built into the meal that you eat. It is absurd. It is absolutely 
absurd. We are losing jobs to countries that have more market-based 
sugar policies.
  I urge strong support for the Pitts-Goodlatte-Davis-Blumenauer 
amendment.
  Mr. PETERSON. Madam Chairman, I am now pleased to yield 1 minute to 
the gentlelady from Hawaii (Ms. Hanabusa).

                              {time}  0950

  Ms. HANABUSA. Madam Chair, I represent a State that was literally 
built on sugar, and we are now down to one sugar-producing company in 
the whole State. We do not have the sugarcane blowing in the wind as we 
had in the past. What this amendment is going to do is really, when you 
think about it, do away with a program that doesn't cost the taxpayers 
anything. It is an agreement between the USDA and the sugar producers 
to ensure that the agriculture industry remains stable.
  Think about it.
  Why do you want to do away with something that doesn't cost us 
anything at this point in time, that produces jobs and is essential 
and, instead, give away to world markets that are subsidized? What will 
happen when those subsidies are deemed to be no longer necessary 
because of the fact that there is nothing in the United States anymore?
  Think about it.
  We need to keep agriculture strong. That is what this is all about. 
It doesn't cost taxpayers anything. This is a program that clearly 
works and that keeps this industry alive and well, so it makes no 
sense.
  Mr. PITTS. Madam Chair, I yield the balance of my time to the 
gentleman from Tennessee (Mr. Fleischmann).
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman from Tennessee is recognized 
for 30 seconds.
  Mr. FLEISCHMANN. I represent the Third District of Tennessee. We've 
heard a great debate today. Let's be clear. The numbers are self-
evident.
  When the world price of sugar compared to the United States' price of 
sugar is so out of kilter since reform--72, 91, 77, and 63 percent 
since 2008--we cannot compete in America based on the world price. It's 
a commodity. It's an agreement. I urge strong support of this 
amendment. We've got American jobs at stake. We cannot compete if this 
program continues. Jobs will leave America. Let's support this 
amendment.
  Mr. PETERSON. Madam Chair, may I inquire as to how much time I have 
remaining.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman has 2 minutes remaining.
  Mr. PETERSON. I am now pleased to yield 1 minute to my good friend 
from across the border in North Dakota (Mr. Cramer).
  Mr. CRAMER. I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  The idea that somehow this amendment creates free and fair trade is a 
fallacy, and the idea that somehow sugar has not been reformed in 
recent years and decades is also a fallacy.
  The greatest reformation of the sugar program is the North American 
Free Trade Agreement, which gave access to U.S. markets completely, not 
only to the sugar farmers south of us, but to the Governments of Mexico 
and Brazil. The idea that a no-net-cost program like the American sugar 
program is somehow a great advantage over countries like Brazil, which 
is subsidized with tax dollars of $2.5 to $3 billion per year, I think 
is the most distorting fact in this entire debate.
  I rise to oppose this amendment, and I encourage my colleagues to do 
the same.
  Mr. PETERSON. Madam Chair, in closing, I want to thank my colleagues 
for their statements. I represent the biggest sugar-producing area in 
the country, and I agree with what has been said by my colleagues.
  People need to understand that every country that produces sugar in 
the world has some intervention in the sugar market. For us to 
unilaterally disarm, all we are going to do is give away our jobs and 
our industry to other countries. We import sugar from 41 countries, 
sugar that we could make in the United States. Fifteen percent of our 
market we have given to other people. We have opened up the market to 
Mexico, and yet we haven't had a no-net-cost program until this year 
when sugar prices collapsed, which is not our fault. It's what's going 
on in Brazil and other places. So, for people to be complaining that 
sugar prices are too high when, right now, they're about as low as 
they've ever been is kind of crazy.
  I ask my colleagues to reject this amendment and to continue a policy 
that works--that's good for America, that's good for the farmers, 
that's good for the workers, and that's good for the economy.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. YOHO. Madam Chair, I rise today against this job killing 
amendment. Madam Chair, for years people have rallied against our 
domestic sugar program because they felt it artificially increased 
prices here at home. Nothing could be further from the truth. Prices 
have dropped dramatically over the past year, with the culprit being an 
influx of sugar from foreign countries.
  Worldwide agriculture is a distorted market due to foreign price and 
supply control programs, but sugar takes the cake as being the most 
distorted commodity in the world. Each year countries like Brazil and 
Mexico dump millions of tons onto export markets dropping the price of 
sugar below the cost of producing sugar. This is price manipulation at 
its worst. That is why I have joined with many of my colleagues in 
calling for a ``Zero-For-Zero'' policy that would reduce subsidies 
world wide. But until our trading partners agree with this policy, we 
should not place our farmers in direct competition with massive 
government controlled production by changing our already modest 
domestic program.

[[Page H3938]]

  I urge my colleagues to vote for thousands of American jobs by 
defeating this amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Pitts).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. PITTS. Madam Chair, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Pennsylvania 
will be postponed.


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, proceedings 
will now resume on those amendments printed in part B of House Report 
113-117 on which further proceedings were postponed, in the following 
order:
  Amendment No. 18 by Mr. Brooks of Alabama.
  Amendment No. 25 by Mr. Butterfield of North Carolina.
  Amendment No. 26 by Mr. Marino of Pennsylvania.
  Amendment No. 30 by Mr. Schweikert of Arizona.
  Amendment No. 32 by Mr. Tierney of Massachusetts.
  Amendment No. 37 by Mr. Polis of Colorado.
  Amendment No. 38 by Mr. Garamendi of California.
  Amendment No. 41 by Mr. Marino of Pennsylvania.
  Amendment No. 43 by Mr. McClintock of California.
  Amendment No. 44 by Mr. Gibson of New York.
  Amendment No. 45 by Mrs. Walorski of Indiana.
  Amendment No. 46 by Mr. Courtney of Connecticut.
  Amendment No. 47 by Mr. Kind of Wisconsin.
  Amendment No. 48 by Mr. Carney of Delaware.
  The Chair will reduce to 2 minutes the minimum time for any 
electronic vote after the first vote in this series.


           Amendment No. 18 Offered by Mr. Brooks of Alabama

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Alabama 
(Mr. Brooks) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 103, 
noes 322, not voting 9, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 264]

                               AYES--103

     Amash
     Bachmann
     Barr
     Bentivolio
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Broun (GA)
     Burgess
     Campbell
     Cantor
     Capito
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Cook
     Cooper
     Cotton
     Culberson
     Daines
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Fleischmann
     Flores
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Garrett
     Gohmert
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Graves (GA)
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hensarling
     Holding
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kingston
     Kline
     Labrador
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Lankford
     Long
     Lummis
     Marchant
     Massie
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     Meadows
     Messer
     Miller (FL)
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Nugent
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Perry
     Petri
     Pitts
     Polis
     Pompeo
     Price (GA)
     Radel
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roe (TN)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shuster
     Stockman
     Tiberi
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--322

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amodei
     Andrews
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barletta
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Benishek
     Bera (CA)
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Braley (IA)
     Brooks (IN)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coffman
     Cohen
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     Davis, Rodney
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Denham
     Dent
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Duffy
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Ellmers
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farenthold
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleming
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Gardner
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Goodlatte
     Granger
     Graves (MO)
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huffman
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Joyce
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kelly (PA)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     LaMalfa
     Langevin
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     Latta
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Marino
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Meng
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Mullin
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Negrete McLeod
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nolan
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     O'Rourke
     Olson
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pearce
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Pittenger
     Pocan
     Poe (TX)
     Posey
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Richmond
     Roby
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Sires
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Southerland
     Speier
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Terry
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tierney
     Tipton
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walden
     Walorski
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Welch
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (FL)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Yarmuth
     Yoho

                             NOT VOTING--9

     Hastings (FL)
     Herrera Beutler
     Honda
     Larsen (WA)
     Markey
     McCarthy (NY)
     Miller, Gary
     Slaughter
     Young (AK)

                              {time}  1022

  Messrs. GUTIERREZ, KELLY of Pennsylvania, and MEEKS changed their 
vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  Mr. ROONEY, Mrs. CAPITO, Messrs. COOPER, MULVANEY, ROKITA, NUGENT, 
and Mrs. BACHMANN changed their vote from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


              Amendment No. 25 Offered by Mr. Butterfield

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from North 
Carolina (Mr. Butterfield) on which further proceedings were postponed 
and on which the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 123, 
noes 297, not voting 14, as follows:

[[Page H3939]]

                             [Roll No. 265]

                               AYES--123

     Andrews
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Butterfield
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Chu
     Clarke
     Clay
     Clyburn
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeLauro
     Deutch
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Fattah
     Fitzpatrick
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Higgins
     Holt
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Kaptur
     Kelly (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Labrador
     Langevin
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Lewis
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Marchant
     McDermott
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Negrete McLeod
     Noem
     O'Rourke
     Pallone
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Pocan
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Richmond
     Rohrabacher
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Serrano
     Shea-Porter
     Sires
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Takano
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Watt
     Waxman
     Wilson (FL)

                               NOES--297

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amash
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bera (CA)
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Bustos
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Cantor
     Capito
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Castro (TX)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Cicilline
     Coble
     Coffman
     Cohen
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cook
     Cooper
     Costa
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DelBene
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Duckworth
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Farr
     Fincher
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garcia
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Heck (WA)
     Hensarling
     Himes
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Keating
     Kelly (PA)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     Levin
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lummis
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Marino
     Massie
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCollum
     McGovern
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (FL)
     Murphy (PA)
     Neal
     Neugebauer
     Nolan
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pascrell
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Polis
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Radel
     Rahall
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Swalwell (CA)
     Terry
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Welch
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yarmuth
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--14

     Cleaver
     Cole
     Hastings (FL)
     Herrera Beutler
     Hinojosa
     Honda
     Larsen (WA)
     Markey
     McCarthy (NY)
     Miller, Gary
     Scott, David
     Sewell (AL)
     Slaughter
     Young (AK)

                              {time}  1026

  Ms. WATERS changed her vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated against:
  Mrs. NOEM. Madam Chair, on rollcall No. 265, I inadvertently voted 
``yea'' when I intended to oppose the amendment.
  Mr. HINOJOSA. Mr. Chair, on rollcall No. 265, had I been present, I 
would have voted ``no.''


                 Amendment No. 26 Offered by Mr. Marino

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from 
Pennsylvania (Mr. Marino) on which further proceedings were postponed 
and on which the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 79, 
noes 346, not voting 9, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 266]

                                AYES--79

     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Barletta
     Barton
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Brady (TX)
     Buchanan
     Burgess
     Cantor
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coffman
     Cooper
     Cotton
     Culberson
     Daines
     Dent
     DeSantis
     Franks (AZ)
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (MO)
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Hastings (WA)
     Hensarling
     Hunter
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Labrador
     Lamborn
     Lankford
     Marchant
     Marino
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McKeon
     McMorris Rodgers
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Murphy (FL)
     Neugebauer
     Nugent
     Olson
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Petri
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Reed
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Ross
     Royce
     Rush
     Ryan (WI)
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Sensenbrenner
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Thornberry
     Walberg
     Weber (TX)
     Westmoreland
     Wilson (SC)
     Wolf
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--346

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amash
     Andrews
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Benishek
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bucshon
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Capito
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cartwright
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coble
     Cohen
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cook
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     Davis, Rodney
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Denham
     DesJarlais
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Ellmers
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farenthold
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Foxx
     Frankel (FL)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Gardner
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gosar
     Graves (GA)
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Heck (NV)
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holding
     Holt
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huffman
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hurt
     Israel
     Issa
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kelly (PA)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kirkpatrick
     Kline
     Kuster
     LaMalfa
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     Latta
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Long
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lummis
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn

[[Page H3940]]


     Maloney, Sean
     Massie
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKinley
     McNerney
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Negrete McLeod
     Noem
     Nolan
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     O'Rourke
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paulsen
     Payne
     Pearce
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Perry
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Pittenger
     Pocan
     Polis
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Radel
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Richmond
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Rothfus
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Ryan (OH)
     Salmon
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sanford
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sessions
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Sires
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Southerland
     Speier
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Terry
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Tipton
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wagner
     Walden
     Walorski
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Webster (FL)
     Welch
     Wenstrup
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (FL)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yarmuth
     Yoder
     Yoho

                             NOT VOTING--9

     Hastings (FL)
     Herrera Beutler
     Honda
     Larsen (WA)
     Markey
     McCarthy (NY)
     Miller, Gary
     Slaughter
     Young (AK)

                              {time}  1031

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated for:
  Mr. CICILLINE. Madam Chair, during rollcall vote No. 266 on H.R. 
1947, I mistakenly recorded my vote as ``no'' when I should have voted 
``yes.'' I ask unanimous consent that my statement appear in the record 
following rollcall vote No. 266.
  Stated against:
  Mr. POE of Texas. Madam Chair, on rollcall No. 266 I inadvertantly 
voted ``yea'' and I intended to vote ``nay.''


               Amendment No. 30 Offered by Mr. Schweikert

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Arizona 
(Mr. Schweikert) on which further proceedings were postponed and on 
which the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 194, 
noes 232, not voting 8, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 267]

                               AYES--194

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amash
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barr
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cotton
     Crawford
     Culberson
     Daines
     Denham
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Hensarling
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Perry
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Radel
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoho
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--232

     Andrews
     Barber
     Barletta
     Barrow (GA)
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Burgess
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coffman
     Cohen
     Cole
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cramer
     Crenshaw
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     Davis, Rodney
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Dent
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fitzpatrick
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harper
     Heck (NV)
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Negrete McLeod
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pearce
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Richmond
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sessions
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Sinema
     Sires
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stivers
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Wolf
     Yarmuth
     Yoder
     Young (AK)

                             NOT VOTING--8

     Hastings (FL)
     Herrera Beutler
     Honda
     Larsen (WA)
     Markey
     McCarthy (NY)
     Miller, Gary
     Slaughter

                              {time}  1036

  Mr. JOYCE changed his vote from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                Amendment No. 32 Offered by Mr. Tierney

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from 
Massachusetts (Mr. Tierney) on which further proceedings were postponed 
and on which the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 211, 
noes 215, not voting 8, as follows:

[[Page H3941]]

                             [Roll No. 268]

                               AYES--211

     Alexander
     Andrews
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Boustany
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coble
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crenshaw
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fitzpatrick
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Gibson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harris
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Holt
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Joyce
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     King (NY)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Negrete McLeod
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Posey
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Richmond
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roybal-Allard
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Sinema
     Sires
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Southerland
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)

                               NOES--215

     Aderholt
     Amash
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Culberson
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Grayson
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Harper
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Hinojosa
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jordan
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lummis
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Polis
     Pompeo
     Price (GA)
     Radel
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ruiz
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--8

     Hastings (FL)
     Herrera Beutler
     Honda
     Larsen (WA)
     Markey
     McCarthy (NY)
     Miller, Gary
     Slaughter

                              {time}  1041

  Mr. GUTHRIE changed his vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  Messrs. SHERMAN and PALAZZO changed their vote from ``no'' to 
``aye.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                 Amendment No. 37 Offered by Mr. Polis

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Colorado 
(Mr. Polis) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 225, 
noes 200, not voting 9, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 269]

                               AYES--225

     Amash
     Andrews
     Bachus
     Barr
     Bass
     Becerra
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Butterfield
     Campbell
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chaffetz
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Coffman
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cramer
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Cummings
     Daines
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     Davis, Rodney
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     DeSantis
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duffy
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Ellmers
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fortenberry
     Frankel (FL)
     Gabbard
     Garamendi
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gibson
     Gowdy
     Graves (GA)
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Guthrie
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harris
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Holt
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huelskamp
     Huffman
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kline
     Kuster
     Labrador
     Langevin
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lummis
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Massie
     Matsui
     McClintock
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Mulvaney
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Negrete McLeod
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Pallone
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paulsen
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Poe (TX)
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Radel
     Reed
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Salmon
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sanford
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Schweikert
     Scott (VA)
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Sires
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Tierney
     Tipton
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Valadao
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walden
     Walz
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Woodall
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--200

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Barber
     Barletta
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Beatty
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Bustos
     Calvert
     Camp
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Clyburn
     Coble
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cotton
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Denham
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duckworth
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann

[[Page H3942]]


     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Foster
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gallego
     Garcia
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Granger
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Grimm
     Hall
     Harper
     Hartzler
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Hinojosa
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     Levin
     Lewis
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Meeks
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Mullin
     Murphy (FL)
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pascrell
     Pearce
     Perry
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Scalise
     Schock
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Terry
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Turner
     Upton
     Veasey
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walorski
     Wasserman Schultz
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (FL)

                             NOT VOTING--9

     Hastings (FL)
     Herrera Beutler
     Honda
     Larsen (WA)
     Markey
     McCarthy (NY)
     Miller, Gary
     Slaughter
     Waters

                              {time}  1045

  Mrs. BEATTY changed her vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


               Amendment No. 38 Offered by Mr. Garamendi

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from California 
(Mr. Garamendi) on which further proceedings were postponed and on 
which the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 206, 
noes 219, not voting 9, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 270]

                               AYES--206

     Andrews
     Bachus
     Barber
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Benishek
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chabot
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DelBene
     Dent
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fitzpatrick
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Gerlach
     Gibson
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Grijalva
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Holt
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Lance
     Langevin
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lummis
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Massie
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Negrete McLeod
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Pitts
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reed
     Reichert
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sanford
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Sherman
     Sinema
     Sires
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Womack
     Yarmuth
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--219

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amash
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cotton
     Courtney
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     DeLauro
     Denham
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Engel
     Esty
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lankford
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     Latta
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lynch
     Marchant
     Marino
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Radel
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sessions
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Velazquez
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)

                             NOT VOTING--9

     Gutierrez
     Hastings (FL)
     Herrera Beutler
     Honda
     Larsen (WA)
     Markey
     McCarthy (NY)
     Miller, Gary
     Slaughter

                              {time}  1050

  Ms. MOORE changed her vote from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                 Amendment No. 41 Offered by Mr. Marino

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from 
Pennsylvania (Mr. Marino) on which further proceedings were postponed 
and on which the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 194, 
noes 230, not voting 10, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 271]

                               AYES--194

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amash
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Barletta
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell

[[Page H3943]]


     Cantor
     Capito
     Capuano
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Culberson
     Daines
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gabbard
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kelly (PA)
     Kingston
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Lankford
     Latta
     Long
     Lummis
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     Matheson
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (FL)
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Polis
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quigley
     Radel
     Rahall
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shuster
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--230

     Andrews
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barrow (GA)
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crenshaw
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     Davis, Rodney
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Denham
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Harper
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huelskamp
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Joyce
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Negrete McLeod
     Noem
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Price (NC)
     Rangel
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Richmond
     Roby
     Rogers (AL)
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Sires
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stivers
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Terry
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walorski
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Wolf
     Yarmuth

                             NOT VOTING--10

     Barr
     Hastings (FL)
     Herrera Beutler
     Honda
     Larsen (WA)
     Markey
     McCarthy (NY)
     Meeks
     Miller, Gary
     Slaughter

                              {time}  1054

  Mr. FINCHER changed his vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated against:
  Mr. BARR. Madam Chair, on rollcall No. 271, I was unavoidably 
detained with a constituent and unable to vote. Had I been present, I 
would have voted ``no.''


               Amendment No. 43 Offered by Mr. McClintock

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from California 
(Mr. McClintock) on which further proceedings were postponed and on 
which the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 156, 
noes 269, not voting 9, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 272]

                               AYES--156

     Aderholt
     Amash
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Cantor
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coffman
     Collins (GA)
     Conaway
     Cotton
     Culberson
     Daines
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Hall
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     King (IA)
     Kingston
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lankford
     Latta
     Long
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (MI)
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (FL)
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Petri
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Radel
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shuster
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Stewart
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thornberry
     Tipton
     Upton
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--269

     Alexander
     Andrews
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Buchanan
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capito
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coble
     Cohen
     Cole
     Collins (NY)
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cook
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     Davis, Rodney
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Denham
     Dent
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Ellmers
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fitzpatrick
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Gerlach
     Gibson
     Goodlatte
     Graves (MO)
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harper
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Joyce
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kelly (PA)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn

[[Page H3944]]


     Maloney, Sean
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Mullin
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Negrete McLeod
     Noem
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Pittenger
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Richmond
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Sires
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Southerland
     Speier
     Stivers
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Valadao
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walden
     Walorski
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)

                             NOT VOTING--9

     Hastings (FL)
     Herrera Beutler
     Honda
     Larsen (WA)
     Markey
     McCarthy (NY)
     Miller, Gary
     Ryan (OH)
     Slaughter

                              {time}  1058

  Mr. TIBERI changed his vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated for:
  Mr. PITTENGER. Madam Chair, on rollcall No. 272, McClintock Amendment 
No. 92, I inadvertently voted ``no'' and intended to vote ``yes.'' Had 
I been present, I would have voted ``yes.''


                 Amendment No. 44 Offered by Mr. Gibson

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from New York 
(Mr. Gibson) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 343, 
noes 81, answered ``present'' 1, not voting 9, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 273]

                               AYES--343

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amash
     Amodei
     Andrews
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barton
     Beatty
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Braley (IA)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (FL)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Cantor
     Capito
     Capuano
     Carney
     Carter
     Cartwright
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coble
     Coffman
     Cohen
     Cole
     Collins (NY)
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Cotton
     Courtney
     Cramer
     Crenshaw
     Crowley
     Culberson
     Cummings
     Daines
     Davis, Danny
     Davis, Rodney
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Ellmers
     Engel
     Enyart
     Esty
     Farenthold
     Fattah
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Foxx
     Frankel (FL)
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Gutierrez
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Heck (WA)
     Hensarling
     Higgins
     Himes
     Holding
     Holt
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hurt
     Israel
     Issa
     Jeffries
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kelly (PA)
     Kennedy
     Kilmer
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kline
     Labrador
     Lance
     Langevin
     Lankford
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     Latta
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Long
     Lowey
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     Matheson
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Meng
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Moran
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (FL)
     Murphy (PA)
     Nadler
     Neal
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     O'Rourke
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paulsen
     Payne
     Pearce
     Perlmutter
     Perry
     Peters (CA)
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Pocan
     Poe (TX)
     Polis
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Radel
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanford
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Schakowsky
     Schneider
     Schock
     Schwartz
     Schweikert
     Scott (VA)
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Sires
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (MS)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Tipton
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Upton
     Van Hollen
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Wasserman Schultz
     Watt
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Welch
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (FL)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yarmuth
     Yoder
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                                NOES--81

     Barrow (GA)
     Bass
     Becerra
     Bera (CA)
     Brownley (CA)
     Campbell
     Capps
     Cardenas
     Carson (IN)
     Chu
     Collins (GA)
     Conaway
     Connolly
     Cook
     Costa
     Crawford
     Cuellar
     Davis (CA)
     Denham
     Eshoo
     Farr
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Graves (MO)
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hinojosa
     Hudson
     Huffman
     Hunter
     Jackson Lee
     Johnson (GA)
     Kaptur
     Kildee
     Kuster
     LaMalfa
     Lee (CA)
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lucas
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Napolitano
     Negrete McLeod
     Nolan
     Nugent
     Pelosi
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Rohrabacher
     Ross
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Sessions
     Sherman
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (PA)
     Valadao
     Vargas
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Waters
     Waxman
     Yoho

                        ANSWERED ``PRESENT''--1

       
     Castro (TX)
       

                             NOT VOTING--9

     Hastings (FL)
     Herrera Beutler
     Honda
     Lamborn
     Larsen (WA)
     Markey
     McCarthy (NY)
     Miller, Gary
     Slaughter

                              {time}  1101

  Mr. POE of Texas changed his vote from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


               Amendment No. 45 Offered by Mrs. Walorski

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from Indiana 
(Mrs. Walorski) on which further proceedings were postponed and on 
which the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 197, 
noes 227, not voting 10, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 274]

                               AYES--197

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amash
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Calvert

[[Page H3945]]


     Camp
     Campbell
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Cook
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Culberson
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     Delaney
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Garcia
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Graves (GA)
     Griffin (AR)
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Harris
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Lankford
     Latta
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Maffei
     Maloney, Sean
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (FL)
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Peters (CA)
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Polis
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Radel
     Rahall
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schneider
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walorski
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--227

     Andrews
     Bachus
     Barber
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Conaway
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crenshaw
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Denham
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Duffy
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farenthold
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fincher
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Goodlatte
     Granger
     Graves (MO)
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harper
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Huizenga (MI)
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Joyce
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meadows
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Negrete McLeod
     Noem
     Nolan
     Nunnelee
     O'Rourke
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Reed
     Ribble
     Richmond
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Sires
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stivers
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Upton
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walden
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Weber (TX)
     Welch
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth
     Yoho

                             NOT VOTING--10

     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hastings (FL)
     Herrera Beutler
     Honda
     Larsen (WA)
     Markey
     McCarthy (NY)
     Miller, Gary
     Slaughter

                              {time}  1105

  Mr. WESTMORELAND changed his vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated against:
  Mrs. ROBY. Madam Chair, on rollcall No. 274 I inadvertently voted 
``yes'' when I intended to oppose the amendment. I would have voted 
``no.''


                Amendment No. 46 Offered by Mr. Courtney

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from 
Connecticut (Mr. Courtney) on which further proceedings were postponed 
and on which the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 208, 
noes 218, not voting 8, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 275]

                               AYES--208

     Alexander
     Andrews
     Bachus
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Buchanan
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Cantor
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Courtney
     Crenshaw
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Forbes
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harris
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Hurt
     Israel
     Issa
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Joyce
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kilmer
     Kind
     King (NY)
     Kuster
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lynch
     Maloney, Carolyn
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Negrete McLeod
     Nolan
     Nugent
     O'Rourke
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reed
     Reichert
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Sires
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walorski
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)

                               NOES--218

     Aderholt
     Amash
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Barber
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Capito
     Carter
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cooper
     Costa
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Culberson
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Duckworth
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Harper
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Hinojosa
     Holding
     Holt
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jordan
     Kelly (PA)
     Kildee
     King (IA)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kline

[[Page H3946]]


     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     Lofgren
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lummis
     Maffei
     Maloney, Sean
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (MI)
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Peters (MI)
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Polis
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Radel
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Tonko
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--8

     Hastings (FL)
     Herrera Beutler
     Honda
     Larsen (WA)
     Markey
     McCarthy (NY)
     Miller, Gary
     Slaughter

                              {time}  1109

  Mr. GOODLATTE changed his vote from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                  Amendment No. 47 Offered by Mr. Kind

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Wisconsin 
(Mr. Kind) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which the 
noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 208, 
noes 217, not voting 9, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 276]

                               AYES--208

     Amash
     Andrews
     Bachus
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (NY)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (FL)
     Burgess
     Capps
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Coffman
     Cohen
     Collins (GA)
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     Dent
     DeSantis
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duncan (TN)
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Fattah
     Fleischmann
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Garrett
     Gingrey (GA)
     Graves (GA)
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Harris
     Heck (WA)
     Hensarling
     Higgins
     Himes
     Holding
     Holt
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Hudson
     Huffman
     Hunter
     Israel
     Issa
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kingston
     Kline
     Kuster
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     LoBiondo
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lummis
     Lynch
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Marchant
     Massie
     Matheson
     McClintock
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McKinley
     Meadows
     Meeks
     Meng
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     O'Rourke
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Paulsen
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perry
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (GA)
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Radel
     Rangel
     Rigell
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rothfus
     Roybal-Allard
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanford
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Schweikert
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Sires
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stockman
     Swalwell (CA)
     Terry
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Wilson (FL)
     Wolf
     Woodall
     Yarmuth
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--217

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Barber
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (UT)
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Braley (IA)
     Brooks (IN)
     Brownley (CA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Cantor
     Capito
     Capuano
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Castro (TX)
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coble
     Cole
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Costa
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     DelBene
     Denham
     DesJarlais
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Duckworth
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Ellmers
     Enyart
     Farenthold
     Farr
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Gardner
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Hinojosa
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hurt
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Joyce
     Kelly (PA)
     Kildee
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Maffei
     Maloney, Sean
     Marino
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Messer
     Miller (MI)
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (FL)
     Murphy (PA)
     Neal
     Negrete McLeod
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nolan
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Owens
     Pastor (AZ)
     Pearce
     Perlmutter
     Peterson
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Rahall
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Richmond
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Ruiz
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Schock
     Scott, Austin
     Sessions
     Sewell (AL)
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Veasey
     Vela
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Walz
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Welch
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)

                             NOT VOTING--9

     Hastings (FL)
     Herrera Beutler
     Honda
     Larsen (WA)
     Markey
     McCarthy (NY)
     Miller, Gary
     Slaughter
     Vargas

                              {time}  1114

  Mr. CLEAVER changed his vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                 Amendment No. 48 Offered by Mr. Carney

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Delaware 
(Mr. Carney) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 174, 
noes 252, not voting 8, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 277]

                               AYES--174

     Amash
     Andrews
     Bass
     Becerra
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (NY)
     Bishop (UT)
     Blumenauer
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (FL)
     Cantor
     Capps
     Capuano
     Carney
     Cartwright
     Cassidy
     Castro (TX)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Coffman
     Connolly
     Cook
     Cooper
     Cotton
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Daines
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeLauro
     Dent
     DeSantis
     Dingell
     Doyle
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Eshoo
     Fattah
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Garrett
     Gingrey (GA)
     Goodlatte
     Gowdy

[[Page H3947]]


     Graves (GA)
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Heck (WA)
     Hensarling
     Higgins
     Himes
     Holt
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Hurt
     Israel
     Issa
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kennedy
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kingston
     Kuster
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Lowey
     Lynch
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Massie
     Matheson
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McGovern
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (FL)
     Napolitano
     Neal
     O'Rourke
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Paulsen
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Pitts
     Pocan
     Poe (TX)
     Polis
     Price (GA)
     Quigley
     Radel
     Rangel
     Rigell
     Rohrabacher
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sanford
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schwartz
     Schweikert
     Scott (VA)
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Sires
     Smith (WA)
     Swalwell (CA)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Wagner
     Watt
     Waxman
     Webster (FL)
     Welch
     Westmoreland
     Wilson (FL)
     Woodall
     Young (FL)

                               NOES--252

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Beatty
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (GA)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonamici
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Braley (IA)
     Brooks (IN)
     Brownley (CA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Capito
     Cardenas
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Castor (FL)
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coble
     Cohen
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Conyers
     Costa
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Cummings
     Davis, Rodney
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DelBene
     Denham
     DesJarlais
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Doggett
     Duckworth
     Duffy
     Ellmers
     Engel
     Enyart
     Esty
     Farenthold
     Farr
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Gallego
     Gardner
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gohmert
     Gosar
     Granger
     Graves (MO)
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Hinojosa
     Holding
     Horsford
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Joyce
     Kelly (IL)
     Kelly (PA)
     Kildee
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Long
     Lowenthal
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lummis
     Maffei
     Maloney, Sean
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (MI)
     Mullin
     Murphy (PA)
     Nadler
     Negrete McLeod
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nolan
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pastor (AZ)
     Pearce
     Perry
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Pittenger
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (NC)
     Rahall
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Richmond
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Schock
     Schrader
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Sessions
     Sewell (AL)
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Speier
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Takano
     Terry
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Visclosky
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Weber (TX)
     Wenstrup
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Yarmuth
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--8

     Hastings (FL)
     Herrera Beutler
     Honda
     Larsen (WA)
     Markey
     McCarthy (NY)
     Miller, Gary
     Slaughter

                              {time}  1118

  Mrs. BLACK changed her vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                Amendment No. 23 Offered by Mr. Conaway

  Mr. CONAWAY. Mr. Chairman, I ask unanimous consent to withdraw my 
request for a recorded vote on amendment No. 23 to the end that the 
amendment stand rejected in accordance with the previous voice vote 
thereon.
  The Acting CHAIR (Mr. Simpson). The Clerk will redesignate the 
amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman 
from Texas?
  Without objection, the request for a recorded vote on amendment No. 
23 is withdrawn, and the amendment stands rejected in accordance with 
the previous voice vote thereon.


               Amendment No. 99 Offered by Mr. Goodlatte

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 99 
printed in part B of House Report 113-117.
  Mr. GOODLATTE. Mr. Chairman, I have amendment No. 99 at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Strike part I of subtitle D (Dairy) of title I and insert 
     the following new part:

            PART I--DAIRY PRODUCER MARGIN INSURANCE PROGRAM

     SEC. 1401. DAIRY PRODUCER MARGIN INSURANCE PROGRAM.

       Subtitle E of title I of the Food, Conservation, and Energy 
     Act of 2008 (7 U.S.C. 8771 et seq.) is amended by adding at 
     the end the following new section:

     ``SEC. 1511. DAIRY PRODUCER MARGIN INSURANCE PROGRAM.

       ``(a) Definitions.--In this section:
       ``(1) Actual dairy producer margin.--The term `actual dairy 
     producer margin ' means the difference between the all-milk 
     price and the average feed cost, as calculated under 
     subsection (b)(2).
       ``(2) All-milk price.--The term `all-milk price' means the 
     average price received, per hundredweight of milk, by dairy 
     producers for all milk sold to plants and dealers in the 
     United States, as reported by the National Agricultural 
     Statistics Service.
       ``(3) Average feed cost.--The term `average feed cost' 
     means the average cost of feed used by a dairy operation to 
     produce a hundredweight of milk, determined under subsection 
     (b)(1) using the sum of the following:
       ``(A) The product determined by multiplying--
       ``(i) 1.0728; by
       ``(ii) the price of corn per bushel.
       ``(B) The product determined by multiplying--
       ``(i) 0.00735; by
       ``(ii) the price of soybean meal per ton.
       ``(C) The product determined by multiplying--
       ``(i) 0.0137; by
       ``(ii) the price of alfalfa hay per ton.
       ``(4) Consecutive 2-month period.--The term `consecutive 2-
     month period' refers to the 2-month period consisting of the 
     months of January and February, March and April, May and 
     June, July and August, September and October, or November and 
     December, respectively.
       ``(5) Dairy producer.--The term `dairy producer' means an 
     individual or entity that directly or indirectly (as 
     determined by the Secretary)--
       ``(A) shares in the risk of producing milk; and
       ``(B) makes contributions (including land, labor, 
     management, equipment, or capital) to the dairy operation of 
     the individual or entity that are at least commensurate with 
     the share of the individual or entity of the proceeds of the 
     operation.
       ``(6) Margin insurance program.--The term `margin insurance 
     program' means the dairy producer margin insurance program 
     required by this section.
       ``(7) Participating dairy producer.--The term 
     `participating dairy producer' means a dairy producer that 
     registers under subsection (d)(2) to participate in the 
     margin insurance program.
       ``(8) Production history.--The term `production history' 
     means the quantity of annual milk marketings determined for a 
     dairy producer under subsection (e)(1).
       ``(9) United states.--The term `United States', in a 
     geographical sense, means the 50 States.
       ``(b) Calculation of Average Feed Cost and Actual Dairy 
     Producer Margins.--
       ``(1) Calculation of average feed cost.--The Secretary 
     shall calculate the national average feed cost for each month 
     using the following data:
       ``(A) The price of corn for a month shall be the price 
     received during that month by agricultural producers in the 
     United States for corn, as reported in the monthly 
     Agriculture Prices report by the Secretary.
       ``(B) The price of soybean meal for a month shall be the 
     central Illinois price for soybean meal, as reported in the 
     Market News - Monthly Soybean Meal Price Report by the 
     Secretary.
       ``(C) The price of alfalfa hay for a month shall be the 
     price received during that month by agricultural producers in 
     the United States for alfalfa hay, as reported in the monthly 
     Agriculture Prices report by the Secretary.
       ``(2) Calculation of actual dairy producer margins.--The 
     Secretary shall calculate the actual dairy producer margin 
     for each consecutive 2-month period by subtracting--

[[Page H3948]]

       ``(A) the average feed cost for that consecutive 2-month 
     period, determined in accordance with paragraph (1); from
       ``(B) the all-milk price for that consecutive 2-month 
     period.
       ``(c) Establishment of Dairy Producer Margin Insurance 
     Program.--The Secretary shall establish and administer a 
     dairy producer margin insurance program for the purpose of 
     protecting dairy producer income by paying participating 
     dairy producers margin insurance payments when actual dairy 
     producer margins are less than the threshold levels for the 
     payments.
       ``(d) Eligibility and Registration of Dairy Producers for 
     Margin Insurance Program.--
       ``(1) Eligibility.--All dairy producers in the United 
     States shall be eligible to participate in the margin 
     insurance program.
       ``(2) Registration process.--
       ``(A) Registration.--
       ``(i) Annual registration.--On an annual basis, the 
     Secretary shall register all interested dairy producers in 
     the margin insurance program.
       ``(ii) Manner and form.--The Secretary shall specify the 
     manner and form by which a dairy producer shall register for 
     the margin insurance program.
       ``(B) Treatment of multi-producer operations.--If a dairy 
     operation consists of more than 1 dairy producer, all of the 
     dairy producers of the operation shall be treated as a single 
     dairy producer for purposes of--
       ``(i) purchasing margin insurance; and
       ``(ii) payment of producer premiums under subsection 
     (f)(4).
       ``(C) Treatment of producers with multiple dairy 
     operations.--If a dairy producer operates 2 or more dairy 
     operations, each dairy operation of the producer shall 
     require a separate registration to participate and purchase 
     margin insurance.
       ``(3) Time for registration.--
       ``(A) Existing dairy producers.--During the 1-year period 
     beginning on the date of enactment of this section, and 
     annually thereafter, a dairy producer that is actively 
     engaged in a dairy operation as of that date may register 
     with the Secretary to participate in the margin insurance 
     program.
       ``(B) New entrants.--A dairy producer that has no existing 
     interest in a dairy operation as of the date of enactment of 
     this section, but that, after that date, establishes a new 
     dairy operation, may register with the Secretary during the 
     180-day period beginning on the date on which the dairy 
     operation first markets milk commercially to participate in 
     the margin insurance program.
       ``(4) Retroactivity.--
       ``(A) Notice of availability of retroactive protection.--
     Not later than 30 days after the effective date of this 
     section, the Secretary shall publish a notice in the Federal 
     Register to inform dairy producers of the availability of 
     retroactive margin insurance, subject to the condition that 
     interested producers must file a notice of intent (in such 
     form and manner as the Secretary specifies in the Federal 
     Register notice) to participate in the margin insurance 
     program.
       ``(B) Retroactive margin insurance.--
       ``(i) Availability.--If a dairy producer files a notice of 
     intent under subparagraph (A) to participate in the margin 
     insurance program before the initiation of the sign-up period 
     for the margin insurance program and subsequently signs up 
     for the margin insurance program, the producer shall receive 
     margin insurance retroactive to the effective date of this 
     section.
       ``(ii) Duration.--Retroactive margin insurance under this 
     paragraph for a dairy producer shall apply from the effective 
     date of this section until the date on which the producer 
     signs up for the margin insurance program.
       ``(C) Notice of intent and obligation to participate.--In 
     no way does filing a notice of intent under this paragraph 
     obligate a dairy producer to sign up for the margin insurance 
     program once the program rules are final, but if a producer 
     does file a notice of intent and subsequently signs up for 
     the margin insurance program, that dairy producer is 
     obligated to pay premiums for any retroactive margin 
     insurance selected in the notice of intent.
       ``(5) Reconstitution.--The Secretary shall ensure that a 
     dairy producer does not reconstitute a dairy operation for 
     the sole purpose of purchasing margin insurance.
       ``(e) Production History of Participating Dairy 
     Producers.--
       ``(1) Determination of production history.--
       ``(A) In general.--The Secretary shall determine the 
     production history of the dairy operation of each 
     participating dairy producer in the margin insurance program.
       ``(B) Calculation.--Except as provided in subparagraphs (C) 
     and (D), the production history of a participating dairy 
     producer shall be equal to the highest annual milk marketings 
     of the dairy producer during any 1 of the 3 calendar years 
     immediately preceding the registration of the dairy producer 
     for participation in the margin insurance program.
       ``(C) Updating production history.--So long as 
     participating producer remains registered, the production 
     history of the participating producer shall be annually 
     updated based on the highest annual milk marketings of the 
     dairy producer during any one of the 3 immediately preceding 
     calendar years.
       ``(D) New producers.--If a dairy producer has been in 
     operation for less than 1 year, the Secretary shall determine 
     the initial production history of the dairy producer under 
     subparagraph (B) by extrapolating the actual milk marketings 
     for the months that the dairy producer has been in operation 
     to a yearly amount.
       ``(2) Required information.--A participating dairy producer 
     shall provide all information that the Secretary may require 
     in order to establish the production history of the dairy 
     operation of the dairy producer.
       ``(3) Transfer of production history.--
       ``(A) Transfer by sale.--
       ``(i) Request for transfer.--If an existing dairy producer 
     sells an entire dairy operation to another party, the seller 
     and purchaser may jointly request that the Secretary transfer 
     to the purchaser the interest of the seller in the production 
     history of the dairy operation.
       ``(ii) Transfer.--If the Secretary determines that the 
     seller has sold the entire dairy operation to the purchaser, 
     the Secretary shall approve the transfer and, thereafter, the 
     seller shall have no interest in the production history of 
     the sold dairy operation.
       ``(B) Transfer by lease.--
       ``(i) Request for transfer.--If an existing dairy producer 
     leases an entire dairy operation to another party, the lessor 
     and lessee may jointly request that the Secretary transfer to 
     the lessee for the duration of the term of the lease the 
     interest of the lessor in the production history of the dairy 
     operation.
       ``(ii) Transfer.--If the Secretary determines that the 
     lessor has leased the entire dairy operation to the lessee, 
     the Secretary shall approve the transfer and, thereafter, the 
     lessor shall have no interest for the duration of the term of 
     the lease in the production history of the leased dairy 
     operation.
       ``(C) Coverage level.--A purchaser or lessee to whom the 
     Secretary transfers a production history under this paragraph 
     may not obtain a different level of margin insurance coverage 
     held by the seller or lessor from whom the transfer was 
     obtained.
       ``(D) New entrants.--The Secretary may not transfer the 
     production history determined for a dairy producer described 
     in subsection (d)(3)(B) to another person.
       ``(4) Movement and transfer of production history.--
       ``(A) Movement and transfer authorized.--Subject to 
     subparagraph (B), if a dairy producer moves from 1 location 
     to another location, the dairy producer may maintain the 
     production history associated with the operation.
       ``(B) Notification requirement.--A dairy producer shall 
     notify the Secretary of any move of a dairy operation under 
     subparagraph (A).
       ``(C) Subsequent occupation of vacated location.--A party 
     subsequently occupying a dairy operation location vacated as 
     described in subparagraph (A) shall have no interest in the 
     production history previously associated with the operation 
     at that location.
       ``(f) Margin Insurance.--
       ``(1) In general.--At the time of the registration of a 
     dairy producer in the margin insurance program under 
     subsection (d) and annually thereafter during the duration of 
     the margin insurance program, an eligible dairy producer may 
     purchase margin insurance.
       ``(2) Selection of payment threshold.--A participating 
     dairy producer purchasing margin insurance shall elect a 
     coverage level in any increment of $0.50, with a minimum of 
     $4.00 and a maximum of $8.00.
       ``(3) Selection of coverage percentage.--A participating 
     dairy producer purchasing margin insurance shall elect a 
     percentage of coverage, equal to not more than 80 percent nor 
     less than 25 percent, of the production history of the dairy 
     operation of the participating dairy producer.
       ``(4) Producer premiums.--
       ``(A) Premiums required.--A participating dairy producer 
     that purchases margin insurance shall pay an annual premium 
     equal to the product obtained by multiplying--
       ``(i) the percentage selected by the dairy producer under 
     paragraph (3);
       ``(ii) the production history applicable to the dairy 
     producer; and
       ``(iii) the premium per hundredweight of milk, as specified 
     in the applicable table under paragraph (B) or (C).
       ``(B) Premium per hundredweight for first 4 million pounds 
     of production.--For the first 4,000,000 pounds of milk 
     marketings included in the annual production history of a 
     participating dairy operation, the premium per hundredweight 
     corresponding to each coverage level specified in the 
     following table is as follows:


------------------------------------------------------------------------
          ``Coverage Level                     Premium per Cwt.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                       $4.00                               $0.000
                       $4.50                                $0.01
                       $5.00                                $0.02
                       $5.50                               $0.035
                       $6.00                               $0.045
                       $6.50                                $0.09
                       $7.00                                $0.18
                       $7.50                                $0.60
                       $8.00                                $0.95
------------------------------------------------------------------------

       ``(C) Premium per hundredweight for production in excess of 
     4 million pounds.--For milk marketings in excess of 4,000,000 
     pounds included in the annual production history of a 
     participating dairy operation,

[[Page H3949]]

     the premium per hundredweight corresponding to each coverage 
     level is as follows:


------------------------------------------------------------------------
          ``Coverage Level                     Premium per Cwt.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                       $4.00                               $0.030
                       $4.50                               $0.045
                       $5.00                               $0.066
                       $5.50                                $0.11
                       $6.00                               $0.185
                       $6.50                                $0.29
                       $7.00                                $0.38
                       $7.50                                $0.83
                       $8.00                                $1.06
------------------------------------------------------------------------

       ``(D) Time for payment.--
       ``(i) First year.--As soon as practicable after a dairy 
     producer registers to participate in the margin insurance 
     program and purchases margin insurance, the dairy producer 
     shall pay the premium determined under subparagraph (A) for 
     the dairy producer for the first calendar year of the margin 
     insurance.
       ``(ii) Subsequent years.--

       ``(I) In general.--When the dairy producer first purchases 
     margin insurance, the dairy producer shall also elect the 
     method by which the dairy producer will pay premiums under 
     this subsection for subsequent years in accordance with 1 of 
     the schedules described in subclauses (II) and (III).
       ``(II) Single annual payment.--The participating dairy 
     producer may elect to pay 100 percent of the annual premium 
     determined under subparagraph (A) for the dairy producer for 
     a calendar year by not later than January 15 of the calendar 
     year.
       ``(III) Semi-annual payments.--The participating dairy 
     producer may elect to pay--

       ``(aa) 50 percent of the annual premium determined under 
     subparagraph (A) for the dairy producer for a calendar year 
     by not later than January 15 of the calendar year; and
       ``(bb) the remaining 50 percent of the premium by not later 
     than June 15 of the calendar year.
       ``(5) Producer premium obligations.--
       ``(A) Pro-ration of first year premium.--A participating 
     dairy producer that purchases margin insurance after initial 
     registration in the margin insurance program shall pay a pro-
     rated premium for the first calendar year based on the date 
     on which the producer purchases the coverage.
       ``(B) Subsequent premiums.--Except as provided in 
     subparagraph (A), the annual premium for a participating 
     dairy producer shall be determined under paragraph (4) for 
     each year in which the margin insurance program is in effect.
       ``(C) Legal obligation.--
       ``(i) In general.--Except as provided in clauses (ii) and 
     (iii), a participating dairy producer that purchases margin 
     insurance shall be legally obligated to pay the applicable 
     premiums for the entire period of the margin insurance 
     program (as provided in the payment schedule elected under 
     paragraph (4)(B)), and may not opt out of the margin 
     insurance program.
       ``(ii) Death.--If the dairy producer dies, the estate of 
     the deceased may cancel the margin insurance and shall not be 
     responsible for any further premium payments.
       ``(iii) Retirement.--If the dairy producer retires, the 
     producer may request that Secretary cancel the margin 
     insurance if the producer has terminated the dairy operation 
     entirely and certifies under oath that the producer will not 
     be actively engaged in any dairy operation for at least the 
     next 7 years.
       ``(6)  Payment threshold.--A participating dairy producer 
     with margin insurance shall receive a margin insurance 
     payment whenever the average actual dairy producer margin for 
     a consecutive 2-month period is less than the coverage level 
     threshold selected by the dairy producer under paragraph (2).
       ``(7)  Margin insurance payments.--
       ``(A) In general.--The Secretary shall make a margin 
     insurance protection payment to each participating dairy 
     producer whenever the average actual dairy producer margin 
     for a consecutive 2-month period is less than the coverage 
     level threshold selected by the dairy producer under 
     paragraph (2).
       ``(B) Amount of payment.--The margin insurance payment for 
     the dairy operation of a participating dairy producer shall 
     be determined as follows:
       ``(i) The Secretary shall calculate the difference 
     between--

       ``(I) the coverage level threshold selected by the dairy 
     producer under paragraph (2); and
       ``(II) the average actual dairy producer margin for the 
     consecutive 2-month period.

       ``(ii) The amount determined under clause (i) shall be 
     multiplied by--

       ``(I) the percentage selected by the dairy producer under 
     paragraph (3); and
       ``(II) the lesser of--

       ``(aa) the quotient obtained by dividing--
       ``(AA) the production history applicable to the producer 
     under subsection (e)(1); by
       ``(BB) 6; and
       ``(bb) the actual quantity of milk marketed by the dairy 
     operation of the dairy producer during the consecutive 2-
     month period.
       ``(g) Effect of Failure to Pay Premiums.--
       ``(1) Loss of benefits.--A participating dairy producer 
     that is in arrears on premium payments for margin insurance--
       ``(A) remains legally obligated to pay the premiums; and
       ``(B) may not receive margin insurance until the premiums 
     are fully paid.
       ``(2) Enforcement.--The Secretary may take such action as 
     is necessary to collect premium payments for margin 
     insurance.
       ``(h) Use of Commodity Credit Corporation.--The Secretary 
     shall use the funds, facilities, and the authorities of the 
     Commodity Credit Corporation to carry out this section.
       ``(i) Duration.--The Secretary shall conduct the margin 
     insurance program during the period beginning on October 1, 
     2013, and ending on September 30, 2018.''.

     SEC. 1402. RULEMAKING.

       (a) Procedure.--The promulgation of regulations for the 
     initiation of the margin insurance program, and for 
     administration of the margin insurance program, shall be 
     made--
       (1) without regard to chapter 35 of title 44, United States 
     Code (commonly known as the Paperwork Reduction Act);
       (2) without regard to the Statement of Policy of the 
     Secretary of Agriculture effective July 24, 1971 (36 Fed. 
     Reg. 13804), relating to notices of proposed rulemaking and 
     public participation in rulemaking; and
       (3) subject to subsection (b), pursuant to section 553 of 
     title 5, United States Code.
       (b) Special Rulemaking Requirements.--
       (1) Interim rules authorized.--With respect to the margin 
     insurance program, the Secretary may promulgate interim rules 
     under the authority provided in subparagraph (B) of section 
     553(b) of title 5, United States Code, if the Secretary 
     determines such interim rules to be needed. Any such interim 
     rules for the margin insurance program shall be effective on 
     publication.
       (2) Final rules.--With respect to the margin insurance 
     program, the Secretary shall promulgate final rules, with an 
     opportunity for public notice and comment, no later than 21 
     months after the date of the enactment of this Act.
       (c) Inclusion of Additional Order.--Section 143(a)(2) of 
     the Federal Agriculture Improvement and Reform Act of 1996 (7 
     U.S.C. 7253(a)(2)) is amended by adding at the end the 
     following new sentence: ``Subsection (b)(2) does not apply to 
     the authority of the Secretary under this subsection.''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 271, the gentleman 
from Virginia (Mr. Goodlatte) and a Member opposed each will control 10 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Virginia.
  Mr. GOODLATTE. Mr. Chairman, I ask unanimous consent to yield 5 
minutes of my 10 minutes to the gentleman from Georgia (Mr. David 
Scott) so he may manage that time.
  The Acting CHAIR. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman 
from Virginia?
  There was no objection.
  Mr. GOODLATTE. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1 minute to myself.
  Mr. Chairman, like Ranking Member Peterson, I have been closely 
involved in the debate to modernize our dairy system. In fact, at his 
request, I joined him and other Members to seek a solution to fix our 
dairy safety net after our current programs failed our producers. We 
agree that dairy farmers deserve access to a Dairy Margin Protection 
Program to ensure their production. However, I cannot support a Dairy 
Supply Management Program, and that's why I've joined with Congressman 
Scott, Congressman Collins, Congressman Moran, Congressman Duffy, 
Congressman Polis, Congressman Coffman, Congressman Meeks, Congressman 
Issa, Congresswoman DeGette, Congressman Sessions, and Congresswoman 
Lee to offer this amendment to take out the dairy provision and 
substitute for it what we have in all of our other commodity programs, 
and that is an insurance program that will save the taxpayers money, 
will save the consumers a lot of money, and not have a policy where we 
are actually having the government go to dairy farmers and say, If you 
want to get your check, you have to reduce the size of your herd.
  I urge Members to support this amendment.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  I offer amendment #99 to remove the Dairy Market Stabilization 
Program with a bipartisan group of members--D. Scott/C. Collins/Moran/
Duffy/Polis/Coffman/Meeks/Issa/DeGette/Sessions/B. Lee.
  Like Ranking Member Peterson, I have been closely involved in the 
debate to modernize our dairy system. In fact at his request, I joined 
him and other members to seek a solution to fix our dairy safety net 
after our current programs failed our producers. We agree that dairy 
farmers deserve access to a Dairy Margin Protection Program, to insure 
their production. However, I cannot support a Dairy Supply Management 
Program.
  This highly controversial program would attempt to manage the U.S. 
milk supply, and in the process penalize both consumers of dairy

[[Page H3950]]

products, as well as dairy farmers who want to expand their operations. 
Production controls or quotas, programs like the stabilization program 
are designed to limit milk supply in order to raise milk prices. 
Programs that directly interfere with free and open markets to raise 
prices will hurt exports, encourage imports, increase dairy prices for 
consumers and limit industry growth.
  Our amendment is better for farmers. Our amendment gives farmers the 
tools to manage their risk without requiring them to participate in yet 
another government program. The new Title I programs and our existing 
insurance programs do not require producers to participate in 
government supply management, why is dairy different? A lot has been 
said that supply management has to be included to save the taxpayers' 
money. Frankly, the Congressional Budget Office has proven this 
inaccurate. Our bipartisan amendment without supply management saves 
the taxpayers $15 million dollars. Farmers, consumers and taxpayers are 
better without Supply Management and I ask my colleagues to vote for 
our amendment.
  Mr. PETERSON. Mr. Chairman, I rise to claim the time in opposition.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Minnesota is recognized for 10 
minutes.
  Mr. PETERSON. Mr. Chairman, I yield 2 minutes to Mr. Valadao from 
California, a new Member who's actually been in the dairy business and 
is probably the one guy in this place that understands how this works.
  Mr. VALADAO. Mr. Chairman, this has been a tough one for me because I 
am the only dairy farmer in this room, and it has been a tough issue 
because I've lived it for the last 15 years. I have seen how programs 
created by this body have hurt dairy farmers. There have been a lot of 
programs eliminated in this current farm bill, and that's a good thing. 
It takes us in a more market-oriented direction.
  But what I see here is we're continuing that same path in a small 
way. This margin insurance, by definition, is an insurance when you 
lose money. You lose money because you're producing a product consumers 
aren't buying. If government is going to continue to push money in that 
direction, we have to make sure that they don't continue to produce 
that product consumers don't want.
  The argument that we're going to miss out on an opportunity to 
export, if there's an export market and they're producing for that, 
they will sell that product. But you can't have a subsidized product 
coming into the marketplace and want to grow that export market again 
on a subsidized product because you can't continue to produce that 
product for that price. If we can't compete, we shouldn't be producing 
it. If it's going to require that margin insurance to make sure it's 
produced, it's not a long-term market. It's not a stable market. It's 
not something that we should spend billions of dollars investing in 
infrastructure that will not compete.
  So I think, at the end of the day, that this is probably the best 
program. We've gotten rid of MILC. We got rid of the price support. 
We've gotten rid of a lot of programs that continued production when 
consumers weren't buying that product.
  And with this one, there's a choice. If they choose to take an 
opportunity to protect their margins so they can stay afloat--because 
we have to protect American products and make sure that consumers are 
buying the safest and the greatest product in the world, which I 
believe is American dairy product--you can't have them continue to 
produce that product in the name of exports or in the name of whatever. 
At the end of the day, consumers pay for it because consumers are 
taxpayers. If you're going to give them money on the backside out of 
their back pocket through taxes, you're again paying for that product. 
The product still has to be paid for.
  Dairy farmers have to make a profit, but it has to be the right way. 
And if they're going to get that dollar to continue to produce that 
product that consumers aren't buying, there has to be somewhere along 
the line where they cut back and contract in the market.
  So I rise in opposition. Mr. Goodlatte has been a friend of mine and 
I have watched from afar. I appreciate everything he has done for the 
industry over the years, but I rise in strong opposition to this 
amendment.
  Mr. DAVID SCOTT of Georgia. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1 minute to the 
gentleman from Virginia (Mr. Moran).
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Chairman, I rise in support of this amendment. It is a 
very complicated issue, and I have great respect for our ranking 
member, but it does seem that we ought to be removing government 
production limits from our dairy program. Expanding distribution 
markets throughout the world is one of the best ways to grow American 
business and create jobs, and that should be one of the roles of 
government: to remove barriers to expansion and growth.
  The fact is that the world demand for dairy products is growing at a 
faster rate than milk production increases in those regions that 
produce the most milk, like New Zealand and Australia. The U.S. dairy 
industry is best positioned to benefit from this growing world dairy 
demand, but this export growth is threatened by the proposed Dairy 
Market Stabilization Program in this bill. This provision would give 
USDA the ability to require every dairy producer enrolled in any level 
of margin insurance protection to reduce production to meet supply 
quotas.
  The Acting CHAIR. The time of the gentleman has expired.
  Mr. DAVID SCOTT of Georgia. I yield an additional 15 seconds to the 
gentleman.
  Mr. MORAN. As a result, domestic dairy producers would be constrained 
in their ability to respond to international market opportunities, and 
that results in lower growth and fewer American jobs. It's this type of 
supply management plan that has failed in previous farm bills and would 
have the dangerous effect of stifling export growth. That is why I ask 
support for the Goodlatte-Scott amendment.
  Mr. PETERSON. Mr. Chairman, I am now pleased to yield 2 minutes to 
one of our ranking members, the gentleman from California (Mr. Costa).
  Mr. COSTA. Mr. Chairman, the Dairy Security Act in this bill is as a 
result of 4 years of hard work on a bipartisan basis.

                              {time}  1130

  It's intended to provide a strong, market-based safety net that will 
keep dairy producers afloat while providing stable prices to our 
consumers.
  Simply put, the amendment being offered here, the Goodlatte-Scott 
amendment, is about American taxpayers fully paying the bill for down 
prices that occur in down cycles in the dairy industry.
  The dairy industry, especially producers, have been victims of these 
down cycles and the volatility in recent years because the old programs 
simply don't work and they encourage overproduction.
  At the same time, producers have been forced to deal with increased 
feed costs that have increased from $2 a bushel to $7 a bushel, further 
impacting their bottom line.
  The Goodlatte-Scott amendment will neither provide a safety net for 
producers, nor prevent the volatility in the market because of 
unpredictable swings. And, again, it's important to understand reform 
is in the bill.
  This amendment would put the taxpayers footing the bill for the 
insurance program. This amendment will continue to foster the outdated, 
tired dairy programs that haven't worked.
  In California, my home State, the Nation's leading dairy State in the 
Nation, we've seen over 100 bankruptcies in the last 18 months. The 
current program isn't good for the dairymen and -women, nor is it good 
for American consumers.
  The Dairy Security Act not only provides more stability for the 
producer, but the consumer benefits as well. And you should understand 
this is voluntary. If you want to grow, you can grow. If you don't want 
to enter the program, you don't have to enter the program. It is 
voluntary.
  I strongly urge, as a third-generation dairy family in California, my 
colleagues to oppose this amendment and to bring our Federal dairy 
policies into the 21st century, so dairymen and -women can compete, and 
American consumers can have milk prices at reasonable levels.
  Mr. GOODLATTE. Mr. Chairman, I'm pleased to yield 1 minute to the 
gentleman from Wisconsin (Mr. Ribble), America's dairy land, with more 
dairy farms than any other in the country.
  Mr. RIBBLE. Mr. Chairman, I appreciate the comments from Mr. Valadao, 
my colleague from California, earlier

[[Page H3951]]

when he said that they didn't have enough consumers to buy their milk. 
Well, we've got the opposite problem in Wisconsin.
  People want Wisconsin milk, and they want Wisconsin cheese. And it 
shows the geographical difficulty with this problem and with this 
underlying bill.
  Mr. Goodlatte seeks to correct those geographical differences by 
taking the most controversial piece of it out, and I stand here in 
support of doing that.
  You know, our Founders kind of instructed us and said, if you can 
find agreement in this Chamber, do those things; but if you can't find 
agreement--and we can't find agreement here--don't do those things.
  And so what Mr. Goodlatte is trying to do is go to the place where we 
have the most and most broad agreement, leaving the margin insurance 
element in place for farmers, but stripping out the supply management 
element where some regions of the country would be damaged by it.
  I support the Goodlatte amendment because it's the right type of 
reform for all Wisconsans and all of this country's dairy producers and 
processors, not one or the other, but both.
  Mr. PETERSON. Mr. Chairman, I'm now pleased to yield 1 minute to the 
gentleman from Vermont (Mr. Welch), one of our hard workers on this 
issue.
  Mr. WELCH. The question facing this Congress is, Will we have a farm 
bill that respects farm families?
  This is about individual families that are working hard to try to 
survive, not to get rich.
  Market stabilization is exactly what Apple Computer does. If they 
make and sell more iPods, they produce more. If sales go down, they 
taper off.
  Why not give that market signal to our farmers with second-, third-, 
fourth-generation families in Vermont, the Kennett family, the 
Richardson family, the Rowell family?
  All they want to do is produce good, nutritious milk for the people 
in their community. This market stabilization gets them out of the 
death spiral, where they have absolutely no control over what that 
price is. And when it plunges, the only opportunity they have to try to 
survive is to increase production. The price goes down again.
  This market stabilization is using the market. It's an ally of the 
farmer, as it should be. So this makes sense.
  And what I am so proud of is that America's farmers, from Vermont to 
California, worked together to come up with something that would help 
pass that farm on to the next generation, and it saves money for the 
taxpayers.
  Mr. DAVID SCOTT of Georgia. I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.
  Let me just correct one thing. The Goodlatte-Scott amendment has a 
very robust safety net program in it. As a matter of fact, it's the 
same safety net program that is in the bill itself.
  Let me make one other point right quick, Mr. Chairman. With the 
recent study by Professor Scott Brown, the University of Missouri put 
in a study that showed if this plan in this bill, this management 
supply bill, goes into effect, in the first month alone, school lunch 
program costs will go up $14 million, and the price of a gallon of milk 
will go up 32 cents.
  Mr. Chairman, I yield 1 minute to the gentlewoman from California 
(Ms. Lee).
  Ms. LEE of California. Mr. Chairman, I rise in strong support of this 
bipartisan amendment which I am proud to cosponsor.
  The underlying farm bill is designed to artificially raise the price 
of milk. This will have negative consequences for consumers, and that's 
why the Consumer Federation of America, the National Consumers League, 
the Consumers Union and other consumer groups, also the Teamsters, 
oppose the underlying language in this bill and support this amendment.
  And when milk prices increase, it disproportionately harms America's 
poor, working families.
  Now, there's a lot in this bill that I cannot support, including the 
heartless cuts to SNAP. Without this amendment, this bill adds insult 
to injury. Without this amendment, 246,000 women and children will lose 
access to milk because of the decrease of milk supply, and also prices, 
as the Representative from Georgia has so eloquently laid out, the milk 
prices will rise about 32 cents.
  So this amendment protects families whose budgets are already 
stretched to the limit and they're already being cut in this bill.
  So I hope that people understand this bill. There's been a lot of 
confusion, but this is a good bill that consumers support, that 
teamsters support; and I urge an ``aye'' vote on the amendment, not the 
bill, but the amendment.
  Mr. PETERSON. Mr. Chairman, I'm going to take 30 seconds right now, 
and then I'm going to reserve because I'm ahead.
  But I just need to stand up and say that this is not true. Scott 
Brown put out a study on this bill, and they said the effect of this 
was going to be a half a cent a gallon, maybe a couple of cents a 
gallon. So where they're coming up with this 30 cents or 50 cents, I 
have no idea. This is complete fabrication that's made up out of 
something that I don't know where it comes from.
  So people need to understand that. Scott Brown is probably the most 
respected economist in dairy in the country, and he did not say it was 
30 cents or 50 cents.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. GOODLATTE. Mr. Speaker, what Mr. Brown said was up to 32 cents a 
gallon.
  At this time I am happy to yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Kansas (Mr. Huelskamp).
  Mr. HUELSKAMP. Mr. Chairman, I appreciate the opportunity to visit on 
this. I do believe in an individual's right to earn a living, to start 
a business, to earn a profit, to grow that business, and to expand to 
meet new market opportunities without government interference.
  And I also believe that should be specifically available to dairy 
farmers as well.
  But in the dairy program before us today, that flies in the face of 
this right. Government should not have the power to tell dairy farmers 
that they won't be paid for the milk they produce.
  I think it's completely hypocritical for Members of this body to come 
to the floor and rail against market manipulation by Big Business, then 
turn around and say Washington should do the same thing.
  We should support the Goodlatte-Scott amendment. We should oppose 
government control and interference in the marketplace, and we should 
support dairy freedom, growth, and opportunity.
  There are numerous dairy families across this country, but one in 
particular in my district, the McCarty family, please let them have the 
opportunity to grow their business. Give them that chance. If we adopt 
the language as is, it will restrict their ability to grow their 
business.
  Mr. PETERSON. I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. DAVID SCOTT of Georgia. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1 minute to the 
distinguished gentlewoman from Colorado (Ms. DeGette).
  Ms. DeGETTE. Mr. Chairman, haven't we done enough already in this 
bill to impact low-income families' access to food?
  The U.S. Government purchases 20 percent of domestic milk production 
for use in anti-hunger programs. So if the price of milk goes up, so 
does the cost of our nutrition programs like the Supplemental 
Assistance Nutrition Program; Special Supplemental Nutrition Program 
for Women, Infants and Children, or the WIC program; and the National 
School Lunch program.
  Everybody admits that the effect of the underlying language in the 
bill will be to raise milk prices.

                              {time}  1140

  This is a burden that our low-income families simply cannot afford. 
We need a balance. We need a balance that will give a safety net to our 
dairy families but won't take it off of the backs of our low-income 
folks.
  So I would urge a ``yes'' vote on this amendment. Just like the 
Consumer Federation of America and so many other groups that Ms. Lee 
talked about, this is a good thing for consumers, it's a good thing for 
Americans, and we should have that balance. Vote ``yes.''
  Mr. PETERSON. I'm now pleased to yield 1 minute to the gentlewoman 
from Washington (Ms. DelBene).
  Ms. DelBENE. Thank you, Mr. Peterson.

[[Page H3952]]

  I rise in strong opposition to the Goodlatte-Scott amendment which 
would create unnecessary market volatility and uncertainty for our 
farmers. The Dairy Security Act creates a new, voluntary insurance 
program and will help consumers by eliminating the price spikes that 
are common today, ensuring stable milk prices.
  There has been a great deal of misinformation about how the Dairy 
Security Act would affect consumers, but researchers like Dr. Brown at 
the University of Missouri, estimated milk prices will only rise 
between one-half of 1 cent to a few cents per gallon. The current 
volatility in the market is far more harmful to consumers than that 
very slight increase.
  Simply put, it is poor policy to commit funds to a dairy program 
without fixing the underlying problem of oversupply, which is what this 
amendment would do. An insurance-only model poorly addresses the 
symptom of low margins and completely misses the issues of supply and 
demand. The stabilization program also has safeguards that will protect 
the U.S. export market, which is critical for dairy producers.
  In my district, I've had long conversations with local dairy farmers, 
been to their farms, and the sentiment is unanimous: dairy farmers 
oppose this amendment because it will hurt them and consumers. I urge 
my colleagues to follow their advice and vote ``no.''
  Mr. GOODLATTE. At this time, it's my pleasure to yield 1 minute to 
the gentleman from New York (Mr. Grimm).
  Mr. GRIMM. Thank you, chairman.
  Today, I rise in strong support of the Goodlatte-Scott amendment. The 
farm bill, as is, artificially increases the price of milk and cheese. 
And where I come from, this will devastate my local delis, my specialty 
food stores and restaurants throughout Staten Island, Brooklyn and 
throughout our Nation.
  As for oversupply, today, New York is America's yogurt capital. That 
industry accounts for almost $1 billion--with a B--in economic growth, 
revenue and 15,000 jobs.
  Yet while we repeatedly talk about jobs and entrepreneurship, Chobani 
yogurt exemplifies this as a true American success story. Started in 
2005, Chobani has transformed a groundbreaking new industry of Greek 
yogurt in America. But without an adequate milk supply at reasonable 
prices, Chobani, local delis and other companies will have a limited 
ability to grow and keep their products reasonably priced.
  For this reason, I urge my colleagues to support the Goodlatte 
amendment.
  Mr. PETERSON. Mr. Chairman, I'm now pleased to yield 1 minute to the 
gentleman from New York (Mr. Owens), one of our good champions of the 
dairy industry.
  Mr. OWENS. Mr. Chairman, I thank Mr. Grimm for mentioning the yogurt 
industry. That is very prominent in my district, and we supply milk to 
many of the yogurt plants. There is no question that Mr. Goodlatte's 
amendment would negatively impact that, whereas the Dairy Security Act 
would have a positive impact on our ability to supply milk to a growing 
industry that does, in fact, create jobs.
  I rise in support of the Dairy Security Act and opposed to this 
amendment because it represents 4 years of bipartisan compromise worked 
out between Mr. Lucas and Mr. Peterson, and those are the kinds of 
activities we should be doing in this Congress.
  Mr. DAVID SCOTT of Georgia. I now yield 1 minute to the distinguished 
lady from Florida, Ms. Corrine Brown.
  Ms. BROWN of Florida. Mr. Chairman, to the Members of the House, let 
me be clear, I will not be voting for this bill. I will vote for no 
bill that cuts $20.5 billion from the SNAP program, but I will be 
voting for this amendment.
  We had a hideous bill on the floor a couple of days ago. And I want 
to be clear. I support all children, and it does not end at birth. It 
is ludicrous that we're here and the goody goody two shoes are now 
cutting the SNAP program and an attack on children. The families of 
three can earn no modern $24,000 per year in income. Seventy-six 
percent of the SNAP households include a child, an elderly person or a 
disabled person. Because of the insensitivity of this Congress, there 
was an announcement in my paper that Meals on Wheels for seniors are 
being cut.
  I am fighting for babies who need milk and families that cannot 
afford food for their children. Support this amendment and vote against 
this bad bill.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Chair will inform the Members that the 
gentleman from Minnesota has 2\1/2\ minutes remaining. The gentleman 
from Virginia has 1 minute remaining. The gentleman from Georgia's time 
has expired.
  Mr. PETERSON. Mr. Chairman, I now yield 30 seconds to my colleague 
from Minnesota (Mr. Walz).
  Mr. WALZ. Mr. Chairman, dairy farming is risky business. You've heard 
that from them themselves. These are the folks that are up at 4 a.m., 
rain, shine, snow or sleet--doesn't matter--7 days a week, 365 days a 
year milking cows, and then they do it again 12 hours later. They don't 
get rich off this. They don't get sick time, and they don't get paid 
holidays. They get no time off if you want to get to it.
  The one thing we can provide them is certainty and take the 
volatility out of the market to make sure that when they have a bad 
year, we don't end up liquidating these, consolidating into large 
dairies and harming the very people that the people who support this 
amendment claim to support.
  I ask my colleagues to reject this amendment and do the right thing 
for these hardworking Americans.
  Mr. GOODLATTE. Mr. Chairman, I'm pleased to yield 1 minute to the 
gentleman from Ohio, a member of the Agriculture Committee, to close 
our debate.
  Mr. GIBBS. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
  I rise in support of this amendment. This amendment builds on the 
reforms in the underlying bill and scraps the proposed ``supply 
management'' program. Doing so will allow farmers and dairy producers 
to expand and meet the growing global demand for American dairy 
products. It will grow our exports and grow our economy.
  It also will protect families and farmers. Families are already 
having enough trouble making ends meet. This amendment will help bring 
down prices for our constituents by providing more opportunity and 
fairness to dairy farmers across the country.
  It also will save taxpayers dollars. This amendment saves taxpayers 
another $15 million on top of the savings in the underlying bill. Every 
penny counts.
  This amendment will create better and more market-driven policies for 
our farmers. Supply management is not the way to go. I support the 
Goodlatte-Scott amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Minnesota has 2 minutes 
remaining.
  Mr. PETERSON. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself the balance of the time.
  As has been said, we've been working on this for 4 years. Clearly, 
the current policy doesn't work because we've got all this volatility. 
If you adopt this Goodlatte-Scott amendment, you're going to continue 
to have that volatility.
  Now, those people that are concerned about the price of milk, when we 
had high prices, the processors raised the prices. When the prices 
collapse $11, they didn't cut the prices. I've sent out charts to you 
to explain that. So what people need to understand is what we're trying 
to do here is give farmers a way to protect themselves against the feed 
costs and this volatility.
  Now, this program is voluntary. Nobody has to get into this program. 
If they don't like the stabilization fund, they don't have to take the 
insurance and they don't have to be involved in it. But what we're 
saying is, if you're going to have the government subsidize your 
insurance, which is what we're doing, then you're going to have to be 
responsible if this thing gets out of whack. And what the Goodlatte-
Scott amendment does is it puts that responsibility on the taxpayers, 
not on the farmers, which is irresponsible in my opinion.
  The other thing you need to understand is, in regular crop insurance, 
the prices, you can only ensure the price for that year. But in this 
amendment, in the Goodlatte-Scott amendment, you ensure the price not 
based on what the market is, it's based on the feed costs plus the 
margin. So you're going

[[Page H3953]]

to insure milk for $18 per 100 weight, but if the price goes to $11, 
the farmer still can have $18 insurance. He doesn't care if it's $11, 
the government is going to pay for that, not him.
  This is a crazy thing that we're talking about doing here. We're 
putting the responsibility on the taxpayer. We're actually probably 
going to raise costs to consumers. It's the wrong way to go, and I urge 
my colleagues to oppose the Goodlatte-Scott amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Virginia (Mr. Goodlatte).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. GOODLATTE. Mr. Speaker, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Virginia 
will be postponed.

                              {time}  1150


              Amendment No. 100 Offered by Mr. Fortenberry

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 100 
printed in part B of House Report 113-117.
  Mr. FORTENBERRY. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Strike section 1603 and insert the following new sections:

     SEC. 1603. PAYMENT LIMITATIONS.

       (a) In General.--Section 1001 of the Food Security Act of 
     1985 (7 U.S.C. 1308) is amended--
       (1) in subsection (a), by striking paragraph (3) and 
     inserting the following:
       ``(3) Legal entity.--
       ``(A) In general.--The term `legal entity' means--
       ``(i) an organization that (subject to the requirements of 
     this section and section 1001A) is eligible to receive a 
     payment under a provision of law referred to in subsection 
     (b), (c), or (d);
       ``(ii) a corporation, joint stock company, association, 
     limited partnership, limited liability company, limited 
     liability partnership, charitable organization, estate, 
     irrevocable trust, grantor of a revocable trust, or other 
     similar entity (as determined by the Secretary); and
       ``(iii) an organization that is participating in a farming 
     operation as a partner in a general partnership or as a 
     participant in a joint venture.
       ``(B) Exclusion.--The term `legal entity' does not include 
     a general partnership or joint venture.'';
       (2) by striking subsections (b) through (d) and inserting 
     the following:
       ``(b) Limitation on Payments for Covered Commodities and 
     Peanuts.--The total amount of payments received, directly or 
     indirectly, by a person or legal entity for any crop year for 
     1 or more covered commodities and peanuts under title I of 
     the Federal Agriculture Reform and Risk Management Act of 
     2013 may not exceed $125,000, of which--
       ``(1) not more than $75,000 may consist of marketing loan 
     gains and loan deficiency payments under subtitle B of title 
     I of the Federal Agriculture Reform and Risk Management Act 
     of 2013; and
       ``(2) not more than $50,000 may consist of any other 
     payments made for covered commodities and peanuts under title 
     I of the Federal Agriculture Reform and Risk Management Act 
     of 2013.
       ``(c) Spousal Equity.--
       ``(1) In general.--Notwithstanding subsection (b), except 
     as provided in paragraph (2), if a person and the spouse of 
     the person are covered by paragraph (2) and receive, directly 
     or indirectly, any payment or gain covered by this section, 
     the total amount of payments or gains (as applicable) covered 
     by this section that the person and spouse may jointly 
     receive during any crop year may not exceed an amount equal 
     to twice the applicable dollar amounts specified in 
     subsection (b).
       ``(2) Exceptions.--
       ``(A) Separate farming operations.--In the case of a 
     married couple in which each spouse, before the marriage, was 
     separately engaged in an unrelated farming operation, each 
     spouse shall be treated as a separate person with respect to 
     a farming operation brought into the marriage by a spouse, 
     subject to the condition that the farming operation shall 
     remain a separate farming operation, as determined by the 
     Secretary.
       ``(B) Election to receive separate payments.--A married 
     couple may elect to receive payments separately in the name 
     of each spouse if the total amount of payments and benefits 
     described in subsection (b) that the married couple receives, 
     directly or indirectly, does not exceed an amount equal to 
     twice the applicable dollar amounts specified in those 
     subsections.'';
       (3) in paragraph (3)(B) of subsection (f), by adding at the 
     end the following:
       ``(iii) Irrevocable trusts.--In promulgating regulations to 
     define the term `legal entity' as the term applies to 
     irrevocable trusts, the Secretary shall ensure that 
     irrevocable trusts are legitimate entities that have not been 
     created for the purpose of avoiding a payment limitation.''; 
     and
       (4) in subsection (h), in the second sentence, by striking 
     ``or other entity'' and inserting ``or legal entity''.
       (b) Conforming Amendments.--
       (1) Section 1001 of the Food Security Act of 1985 (7 U.S.C. 
     1308) is amended--
       (A) in subsection (e), by striking ``subsections (b) and 
     (c)'' each place it appears in paragraphs (1) and (3)(B) and 
     inserting ``subsection (b)'';
       (B) in subsection (f)--
       (i) in paragraph (2), by striking ``Subsections (b) and 
     (c)'' and inserting ``Subsection (b)'';
       (ii) in paragraph (4)(B), by striking ``subsection (b) or 
     (c)'' and inserting ``subsection (b)'';
       (iii) in paragraph (5)--

       (I) in subparagraph (A), by striking ``subsection (d)''; 
     and
       (II) in subparagraph (B), by striking ``subsection (b), 
     (c), or (d)'' and inserting ``subsection (b)''; and

       (iv) in paragraph (6)--

       (I) in subparagraph (A), by striking ``Notwithstanding 
     subsection (d), except as provided in subsection (g)'' and 
     inserting ``Except as provided in subsection (f)''; and
       (II) in subparagraph (B), by striking ``subsections (b), 
     (c), and (d)'' and inserting ``subsection (b)'';

       (C) in subsection (g)--
       (i) in paragraph (1)--

       (I) by striking ``subsection (f)(6)(A)'' and inserting 
     ``subsection (e)(6)(A)''; and
       (II) by striking ``subsection (b) or (c)'' and inserting 
     ``subsection (b)''; and

       (ii) in paragraph (2)(A), by striking ``subsections (b) and 
     (c)'' and inserting ``subsection (b)''; and
       (D) by redesignating subsections (e) through (h) as 
     subsections (d) through (g), respectively.
       (2) Section 1001A of the Food Security Act of 1985 (7 
     U.S.C. 1308-1) is amended--
       (A) in subsection (a), by striking ``subsections (b) and 
     (c) of section 1001'' and inserting ``section 1001(b)''; and
       (B) in subsection (b)(1), by striking ``subsection (b) or 
     (c) of section 1001'' and inserting ``section 1001(b)''.
       (3) Section 1001B(a) of the Food Security Act of 1985 (7 
     U.S.C. 1308-2(a)) is amended in the matter preceding 
     paragraph (1) by striking ``subsections (b) and (c) of 
     section 1001'' and inserting ``section 1001(b)''.
       (c) Application.--The amendments made by this section shall 
     apply beginning with the 2014 crop year.

     SEC. 1603A. PAYMENTS LIMITED TO ACTIVE FARMERS.

       Section 1001A of the Food Security Act of 1985 (7 U.S.C. 
     1308-1) is amended--
       (1) in subsection (b)(2)--
       (A) by striking ``or active personal management'' each 
     place it appears in subparagraphs (A)(i)(II) and (B)(ii); and
       (B) in subparagraph (C), by striking ``, as applied to the 
     legal entity, are met by the legal entity, the partners or 
     members making a significant contribution of personal labor 
     or active personal management'' and inserting ``are met by 
     partners or members making a significant contribution of 
     personal labor, those partners or members''; and
       (2) in subsection (c)--
       (A) in paragraph (1)--
       (i) by striking subparagraph (A) and inserting the 
     following:
       ``(A) the landowner share-rents the land at a rate that is 
     usual and customary;'';
       (ii) in subparagraph (B), by striking the period at the end 
     and inserting ``; and''; and
       (iii) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(C) the share of the payments received by the landowner 
     is commensurate with the share of the crop or income received 
     as rent.'';
       (B) in paragraph (2)(A), by striking ``active personal 
     management or'';
       (C) in paragraph (5)--
       (i) by striking ``(5)'' and all that follows through ``(A) 
     in general.--A person'' and inserting the following:
       ``(5) Custom farming services.--A person'';
       (ii) by inserting ``under usual and customary terms'' after 
     ``services''; and
       (iii) by striking subparagraph (B); and
       (D) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(7) Farm managers.--A person who otherwise meets the 
     requirements of this subsection other than (b)(2)(A)(i)(II) 
     shall be considered to be actively engaged in farming, as 
     determined by the Secretary, with respect to the farming 
     operation, including a farming operation that is a sole 
     proprietorship, a legal entity such as a joint venture or 
     general partnership, or a legal entity such as a corporation 
     or limited partnership, if the person--
       ``(A) makes a significant contribution of management to the 
     farming operation necessary for the farming operation, taking 
     into account--
       ``(i) the size and complexity of the farming operation; and
       ``(ii) the management requirements normally and customarily 
     required by similar farming operations;
       ``(B)(i) is the only person in the farming operation 
     qualifying as actively engaged in farming by using the farm 
     manager special class designation under this paragraph; and

[[Page H3954]]

       ``(ii) together with any other persons in the farming 
     operation qualifying as actively engaged in farming under 
     subsection (b)(2) or as part of a special class under this 
     subsection, does not collectively receive, directly or 
     indirectly, an amount equal to more than the applicable 
     limits under section 1001(b);
       ``(C) does not use the management contribution under this 
     paragraph to qualify as actively engaged in more than 1 
     farming operation; and
       ``(D) manages a farm operation that does not substantially 
     share equipment, labor, or management with persons or legal 
     entities that with the person collectively receive, directly 
     or indirectly, an amount equal to more than the applicable 
     limits under section 1001(b).''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 271, the gentleman 
from Nebraska (Mr. Fortenberry) and a Member opposed each will control 
5 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Nebraska.
  Mr. FORTENBERRY. Mr. Chairman, first, I would like to begin by 
recognizing the hard work that Chairman Lucas has put into this bill, 
as well as Ranking Member Peterson. A complex bill such as this 
requires time, dedication, and a willingness to work with Members from 
a very diverse range of agricultural communities across this Nation, 
and I appreciate the effort.
  I also recognize that many were here very late last night and there 
is a certain urgency to our deliberations. But I believe it is 
critically important that we also have a meaningful discussion and 
debate on the issue of payment limits.
  The other legislative body has seen fit to include the language in 
this amendment in its version of the farm bill, and this amendment 
gives us the opportunity to send a message that some reform in this 
area is necessary.
  While there is much to commend in this farm bill, Mr. Chairman, I am 
concerned that it falls short of successfully reforming the payment 
limit system. Without a doubt, agricultural payments are lopsided. 
Based on the USDA's annual Agricultural Resource Management Survey, the 
largest 12 percent of farms in terms of gross receipts received more 
than 62 percent of all government payments in 2009. Such a skewed 
system, Mr. Chairman, is simply not sustainable in the long run. It 
leads to the escalation of land prices and accelerates the 
concentration of land and resources into fewer hands. This is not 
healthy for rural America.
  Continuation of the current system will only lead to greater 
concentration in agriculture and fewer opportunities for young and 
beginning farmers. We need a thoughtful and balanced approach here, one 
that encourages young people to take a chance and gives them some 
support when they need it, one that doesn't lend itself to the trend of 
fewer and fewer farms.
  Mr. Chairman, we pride ourselves that agriculture is the main bright 
spot in America's economy. And how did we get here? By ensuring that we 
have a vibrant marketplace which depends upon large numbers of 
producers actively engaged in stewardship of the land.
  The amendment I am offering will help farm supports reach their 
intended recipients as well and close loopholes that benefit investors 
not actively engaged in farming. It levels the playing field for farm 
families facing competition from larger operations that do collect the 
lion's share of government payments.
  The amendment reduces farm payment limits, capping commodity payments 
at $250,000 for any one farm. That's a lot of subsidy. The legislation 
will also close loopholes in current law to ensure payments reach their 
intended recipient, that is, working farmers.
  The savings from reforms established in this legislation help ensure 
that the farm payment system is also set on a more fiscally sustainable 
trajectory. It's fair to farmers, fair to the taxpayer, and fair to 
America because it incorporates good governing principles.
  This amendment has wide support from a diverse range of agricultural 
groups, such as the National Farmers Union, the Center for Rural 
Affairs, National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition, Heritage Action, 
and Citizens Against Government Waste. They recognize the opportunity 
we have for meaningful reform here.
  Now, it is important, Mr. Chairman, to emphasize that this does not 
address crop insurance subsidies. That is a completely separate matter, 
and I recognize the need to differentiate between a program in which 
producers must contribute their own dollars toward the actuarial 
success of the program and one that is directly coming from the 
government.
  Mr. Chairman, I have been through two farm bills now, and I've talked 
to hundreds of farmers in rural America. What they're looking for is 
simply a chance to compete, and compete well, not a guarantee of 
unlimited money from the government. We owe it to our hardworking 
farmers to sustain that fair and robust marketplace.
  With that, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. LUCAS. Mr. Chairman, I rise in opposition to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Oklahoma is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. LUCAS. I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from Texas (Mr. 
Conaway).
  Mr. CONAWAY. Mr. Chairman, I stand in strong opposition to this 
amendment.
  One particular troubling issue is the predefinition of ``actively 
engaged in farming.'' My good colleague should know that this will 
alter, fundamentally, the normal operations on a farm.
  Take two quick examples, a brother and a sister. The sister runs the 
tractors, plants the crops, harvests the crops; the brother, on the 
other hand, does all the bookkeeping, files tax returns, works with 
FSA, arranges the loans at the bank. He would no longer be actively 
engaged in farming. That makes no sense whatsoever.

  The broader spread one, though, is the generational shift in farming 
operations. As parents and grandparents age, they take less of a 
physical role in farming operations and hand that off to the younger 
generation--the folks that my good colleague was speaking to. This 
redefinition would say that as they age out and quit doing the actual 
physical labor, and yet their wisdom and knowledge and vast experience 
has added to the success of those farming operations, they would no 
longer be considered actively engaged in farming and would be excluded 
from the program itself. This is wrongheaded. It adds additional 
regulatory burdens on family farms across this country in an 
unnecessary manner and doesn't get to what my good colleague is trying 
to get to.
  I would strongly urge my colleagues to reject this amendment and vote 
``no'' on the Fortenberry amendment.
  Mr. FORTENBERRY. May I can inquire, Mr. Chairman, as to how much time 
I have remaining.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Nebraska has 1\1/4\ minutes 
remaining.
  Mr. FORTENBERRY. Mr. Chairman, I'm not out to punish anyone's 
success. In fact, I celebrate it.
  A $250,000 subsidy is a lot of money to come directly from the 
government. I think many Americans would agree. We put caps and limits 
on virtually every other program, so why not this one? What I'm saying 
is that amount of money should be sufficient.
  I would like to offer another example regarding direct engagement in 
farming that helps clarify the issue that my colleague just raised.
  A farm in the Deep South recently received $440,000--again, none of 
it to someone actually working the farm, but to six general partners 
and five spouses, all of whom claim to be providing the management 
needed to running the farm.
  What this bill does, in addition to capping payments, it provides a 
more enforceable working definition for those actively engaged in farm 
management, and that's an important reform as well.
  Again, this has been worked out in the other legislative body from 
Members who represent diverse agricultural districts all over this 
country. I think this is a reasonable reform that, again, is fair to 
the taxpayers, fair to the farm family, and consistent with good 
governing principles. It's a balanced, reasonable approach.
  Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. LUCAS. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the subcommittee 
chairman of the Agriculture Committee from Arkansas (Mr. Crawford).
  Mr. CRAWFORD. Mr. Chairman, I respectfully oppose the gentleman's 
amendment.

[[Page H3955]]

  In order for farmers in my district to compete, their operations must 
be economies of scale. This is largely due to the high cost of 
production, expensive machinery, and razor-thin margins.
  In order to remain economically viable, a mid-South farmer must 
produce a high quantity of crops and then sell that crop at an adequate 
price, which doesn't always work out so well. Some years in Arkansas a 
farmer might do very well if conditions are right and the prices don't 
drop too low, but in other years times can be absolutely brutal. This 
amendment takes the wrong approach because it adds even more 
uncertainty to the farmer's operation.
  Most farmers go to the bank for loans to pay production costs and 
purchases of new technology and machinery. Once you introduce a 
restrictive AGI, it becomes much more difficult to obtain the financing 
necessary to sustain an operation and stay in business.
  Through a careful approach, the Ag Committee has already brought 
significant reforms to AGI eligibility, which has already been 
difficult on some of my producers. We certainly don't need to go a step 
further.
  Additionally, requiring active, on-farm labor is counterproductive 
for two reasons: one, it discourages farms from improving and becoming 
more efficient; and, two, it discourages the participation of young 
farmers, and that could mean that they're out of a job. Farm owners and 
operators need to focus their attention on the management of the 
overall farm and key management decisions.
  I strongly urge defeat of this amendment, with all due respect.
  Mr. LUCAS. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Georgia (Mr. Barrow).
  Mr. BARROW of Georgia. I thank the gentleman for the time. I rise in 
opposition to the amendment.
  Farming in 2013 can be a very complicated, high-tech and high-risk 
business. For example, there are many farmers in my district who farm 
thousands of acres that they don't own. They might grow cotton, 
peanuts, grains and specialty crops. They need a whole fleet of 
different equipment for each one of these crops. They're probably 
irrigating a whole lot of their crops. They likely employ dozens of 
people. These might be multimillion-dollar enterprises, and yet they 
still fit in the definition of a family farm. For these kinds of crops, 
it simply takes that kind of scale to be sustainable. Many farmers 
simply cannot afford to farm on that scale unless they have a safety 
net that can cover their risk.
  This bill includes sustainable reforms of our farm safety net to make 
sure it's available to the people who need it most. It's not fair, nor 
in our best interest, to limit the participation of these larger family 
farms by undercutting their safety net, as this amendment would do. We 
need these farmers and they need us.
  I, therefore, urge my colleagues to oppose the amendment.

                              {time}  1200

  Mr. LUCAS. Mr. Chairman, might I inquire how much time I have 
remaining.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman has 1\1/4\ minutes remaining.
  Mr. LUCAS. Mr. Chairman, I would like to yield the balance of my time 
to the ranking member of the House Ag Committee, the gentleman from 
Minnesota (Mr. Peterson).
  Mr. PETERSON. Mr. Chairman, I thank the gentleman.
  I rise in opposition to this amendment.
  If you like the Department of Labor's overreach on child labor when 
they prevented 4-H kids from helping mom and dad on the farm, you're 
going to love this amendment. What this amendment does is it puts 
bureaucrats in charge of deciding who is a farmer and who isn't.
  When we put this AGI test on, they developed 430 pages of regulations 
to try to figure out how to implement that. If this amendment passes, I 
would be hard-pressed to figure out how many pages of regulations 
they're going to come up with to try to figure out whether you're 
actually a farmer or not.
  We're changing this ``actively engaged'' definition, which we've been 
struggling with for years, and which I think we did a pretty good job 
with in 2008, putting in new requirements, new tests, stuff that we 
really don't understand how it's going to work. I think it is just 
going to totally screw up the safety net, especially for our friends in 
the South that have a different situation than we do up in my part of 
the world.
  This is an overreach. It's getting into areas that we've never done 
before with payment limitations at a time when we're changing these 
programs. We don't really even understand how this would work, other 
than to know it's going to really screw things up.
  I would strongly urge my colleagues to oppose this amendment.
  Mr. LUCAS. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Nebraska (Mr. Fortenberry).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. FORTENBERRY. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Florida will 
be postponed.


               Amendment No. 101 Offered by Mr. Huelskamp

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 101 
printed in part B of House Report 113-117.
  Mr. HUELSKAMP. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       In subtitle A of title IV, strike section 4007 and insert 
     the following:

     SEC. 4007. ELIMINATING THE LOW-INCOME HOME ENERGY ASSISTANCE 
                   LOOPHOLE.

       (a) In General.--Section 5 of the Food and Nutrition Act of 
     2008 (7 U.S.C. 2014) is amended--
       (1) in subsection (d)(11)(A), by striking ``(other than'' 
     and all that follows through ``et seq.))'' and inserting 
     ``(other than payments or allowances made under part A of 
     title IV of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 601 et seq.) 
     or any payments under any other State program funded with 
     qualified State expenditures (as defined in section 
     409(a)(7)(B)(i) of that Act (42 U.S.C. 609(a)(7)(B)(1))))'';
       (2) in subsection (e)(6)(C), by striking clause (iv); and
       (3) in subsection (k)--
       (A) in paragraph (2)--
       (i) by striking subparagraph (C);
       (ii) by redesignating subparagraphs (D) through (G) as 
     subparagraphs (C) through (F), respectively; and
       (iii) by striking paragraph (4).
       (b) Conforming Amendments.--Section 2605(f) of the Low-
     Income Home Energy Assistance Act of 1981 (42 U.S.C. 8624(f)) 
     is amended--
       (1) in paragraph (1), by striking ``(1)''; and
       (2) by striking paragraph (2).
       At the end of subtitle A of title IV, insert the following:

     SEC. 4033. PROJECTS TO PROMOTE WORK AND INCREASE STATE AGENCY 
                   ACCOUNTABILITY.

       Section 11 of the Food and Nutrition Act of 2008 (7 U.S.C. 
     2020), as amended by section 4015, is amended by adding at 
     the end the following:
       ``(w) Projects to Promote Work and Increase State Agency 
     Accountability.--The State agency shall create a work 
     activation program that operates as follows:
       ``(1) Each able-bodied individual participating in the 
     program--
       ``(A) shall at the time of application for supplemental 
     food and nutrition assistance and every 12 months thereafter, 
     register for employment in a manner prescribed by the chief 
     executive officer of the State;
       ``(B) shall, each month of participation in the program, 
     participate in--
       ``(i) 2 days of supervised job search for 8 hours per day 
     at the program site; and
       ``(ii) 5 days of off-site activity for 8 hours per day;
       ``(C) shall not refuse without good cause to accept an 
     offer of employment, at a site or plant not subject to a 
     strike or lockout at the time of the refusal, at a wage not 
     less than the higher of--
       ``(i) the applicable Federal or State minimum wage; or
       ``(ii) 80 percent of the wage that would have governed had 
     the minimum hourly rate under section 6(a)(1) of the Fair 
     Labor Standards Act of 1938 (29 U.S.C. 206(a)(1)) been 
     applicable to the offer of employment;
       ``(D) shall not refuse without good cause to provide a 
     State agency with sufficient information to allow the State 
     agency to determine the employment status or the job 
     availability of the individual; and
       ``(E) shall not voluntarily--
       ``(i) quit a job; or
       ``(ii) reduce work effort and, after the reduction, the 
     individual is working less than 30 hours per week, unless 
     another adult in the same family unit increases employment at 
     the same time by an amount equal to the reduction in work 
     effort by the first adult.

[[Page H3956]]

       ``(2) An able-bodied individual participating in the work 
     activation program who fails to comply with 1 or more of the 
     requirements described in paragraph(1)--
       ``(A) shall be subject to a sanction period of not less 
     than a 2-month period beginning the day of the individual's 
     first failure to comply with such requirements during which 
     the individual shall not receive any supplemental food and 
     nutrition assistance; and
       ``(B) may receive supplemental food and nutrition 
     assistance after the individual is in compliance with such 
     requirements for not less than a 1-month period beginning 
     after the completion of such sanction period, except that 
     such assistance may not be provided retroactively.''.

     SEC. 4034. REPEAL OF CERTAIN AUTHORITY TO WAIVE WORK 
                   REQUIREMENT.

       The Food and Nutrition Act of 2008 (7 U.S.C. 2011 et seq.) 
     is amended--
       (1) in section 6(o) by striking paragraph (4); and
       (2) in section 16(b)(1)(E)(ii)--
       (A) in subclause (II) by adding ``and'' at the end;'
       (B) by striking subclause (III); and
       (C) by redesignating subclause (IV) as subclause (III).

     SEC. 4035. ELIMINATING DUPLICATIVE EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING.

       (a) Funding of Employment and Training Programs.--Section 
     16 of Food and Nutrition Act of 2008 (7 U.S.C. 2025) is 
     amended by striking subsection (h).
       (b) Administrative Cost-sharing.--
       (1) In general.--Section 16(a) of the Food and Nutrition 
     Act of 2008 (7 U.S.C. 2025(a)) is amended in the first 
     sentence, in the matter preceding paragraph (1), by inserting 
     ``(other than a program carried out under section 6(d)(4))'' 
     after ``supplemental nutrition assistance program''.
       (2) Conforming amendments.--
       (A) Section 17(b)(1)(B)(iv)(III)(hh) of the Food and 
     Nutrition Act of 2008 (7 U.S.C. 2026(b)(1)(B)(iv)(III)(hh)) 
     is amended by striking ``(g), (h)(2), or (h)(3)'' and 
     inserting ``or (g)''.
       (B) Section 22(d)(1)(B)(ii) of the Food and Nutrition Act 
     of 2008 (7 U.S.C. 2031(d)(1)(B)(ii)) is amended by striking 
     ``, (g), (h)(2), and (h)(3)'' and inserting ``and (g)''.
       (c) Workfare.--
       (1) In general.--Section 20 of the Food and Nutrition Act 
     of 2008 (7 U.S.C. 2029) is amended by striking subsection 
     (g).
       (2) Conforming amendment.--Section 17(b)(1)(B)(iv)(III)(jj) 
     of the Food and Nutrition Act of 2008 (7 U.S.C. 
     2026(b)(1)(B)(iv)(III)(jj)) is amended by striking ``or 
     (g)(1)''.

     SEC. 4036. ELIMINATING THE NUTRITION EDUCATION GRANT PROGRAM.

        Section 28 of the Food and Nutrition Act of 2008 (7 U.S.C. 
     2036a) is repealed.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 271, the gentleman 
from Kansas (Mr. Huelskamp) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Kansas.
  Mr. HUELSKAMP. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.
  I rise today along with several of my colleagues to offer what we 
believe should be the first step in serious reform of a SNAP program, 
also known as food stamps.
  It has been said we should judge the success of government programs 
not by the number of people receiving the benefits but by the number of 
people who no longer need them.
  As a result of the bipartisan work reforms in the TANF program in 
1996, after that period we saw a 57 percent reduction in the number of 
people on TANF. This amendment would take the most successful welfare 
reform in the history of this country, signed into law by President 
Bill Clinton and passed by a Republican Congress, and apply it to now 
the largest means-tested assistance program we have. That's what that 
amendment would do.
  In addition to applying that successful work requirement, we would 
have additional reforms in terms of LIHEAP and a few other items that 
would provide additional savings in the food stamp program.
  With that, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. LUCAS. Mr. Chairman, I claim time in opposition to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Oklahoma is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. LUCAS. Mr. Chairman, I would like to yield 2 minutes to the 
gentlelady from Wisconsin (Ms. Moore).
  Ms. MOORE. Mr. Chairman, I speak in opposition to this amendment.
  This is really a very poorly conceived amendment that would require 
all non-disabled individuals to participate in a job search every month 
or immediately lose benefits, even if the individual is already working 
or even if the individual is a child, a minor.
  This amendment would increase the SNAP cuts by 50 percent to $31 
billion, instead of the $21.5 billion. It would immediately subject 2 
million jobless, childless adults to harsh benefit cuts. It would slash 
benefits for 2 million people about $90 a month. It would eliminate all 
the SNAP employment and training funds, eliminate nutrition education, 
impose new job search requirements on all people, even if they're 
working, and it would send people into a deep, deep depression.
  I think that this is an amendment that we should oppose.
  Mr. HUELSKAMP. Mr. Chairman, I would like to yield 1 minute to a 
member of the Ag Committee, the gentleman from Texas (Mr. Neugebauer).
  Mr. NEUGEBAUER. Mr. Chairman, I thank the gentleman.
  I rise in strong support of this amendment. In fact, part of the 
language of a bill that I had introduced is incorporated in this bill, 
and I appreciate the gentleman for including that.
  What is this amendment about? It's about making sure that people that 
are on these programs qualify for them. That they're not automatically 
put on them because they're on some other program. It's also about 
reducing duplicative programs in the government, such as nutrition 
education and job training. We have job training in other programs.
  But more importantly, what the American people understand is that our 
entitlement programs are growing at an unsustainable rate, and so we 
need to make sure that people that are on food stamps are actively 
looking for work. I don't think anybody argues with that.
  The second thing is making sure that people that are on this program 
are the people that need it, and secondly, that qualify for it.
  So this is a commonsense amendment and the American taxpayers deserve 
this kind of accountability. Anything less is unacceptable.
  Mr. LUCAS. Mr. Chairman, I now yield 1 minute to the gentlelady from 
California (Ms. Lee).
  Ms. LEE of California. Mr. Chairman, I want to thank the gentleman 
for yielding.
  I rise in strong opposition to this amendment.
  This is yet another heartless cut on the backs of hungry families all 
across America. How much is enough for those who are relentless--
relentless--in attacking low-income families and hungry children. 
Cutting over $20 billion in SNAP benefits is bad enough, but this 
amendment would add insult to injury. This is mind-boggling.
  Let me tell you, I know from personal experience, no one wants to be 
on food stamps. Many who are on SNAP are hardworking people making 
minimum wage, and others are desperately looking for a job in these 
difficult economic times.
  This amendment demands that hungry families search for a job even 
while it eliminates all employment assistance and job-training funds 
for those very families. Let's not pretend that by making a family 
suffer more hunger and more desperation and more hardship that a job 
will suddenly appear for them.
  I urge my colleagues to vote ``no'' on this very, very heartless, 
cruel, and inhumane amendment.
  Mr. HUELSKAMP. Mr. Chairman, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. LUCAS. Mr. Chairman, I yield 15 seconds to the gentleman from 
Minnesota (Mr. Peterson).
  Mr. PETERSON. Mr. Chairman, I rise in opposition to this amendment.
  We have worked this out between the chairman and myself and this is 
breaking the deal that we had. I would say a vote for this amendment is 
a vote against the farm bill, so oppose it.
  Mr. HUELSKAMP. Mr. Chairman, may I inquire of the balance of the 
time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Kansas has 3 minutes remaining. 
The gentleman from Oklahoma has 2\1/2\ minutes remaining.
  Mr. HUELSKAMP. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I appreciate waiting on a few 
other folks to speak.
  One thing I would like to point out, I appreciate the arguments of my 
colleague from Texas that indicates these are commonsense reforms. I 
think most Americans agree, let's help folks that are in need, but we 
probably shouldn't help those who don't actually

[[Page H3957]]

qualify for food stamps. With the adoption of this amendment, it will 
require folks that would like to receive food stamps--SNAP benefits--to 
actually have to qualify for them instead of being qualified through 
another program.
  It was also noted about the impact of these reforms and their 
potential impact on cuts. Let's look at a little history of this 
particular program. In 2002, in the 2002 farm bill, $270 billion was 
the spending level--$270 billion. In the 2008 farm bill, it was 
approximately $400 billion. If this amendment is adopted, the spending 
level would be $733 billion. Only in Washington could you say going 
from $270 billion to $733 billion is a cut.
  These are commonsense reforms. These a few decades ago were 
considered bipartisan reforms to encourage people to look for work, to 
encourage people to get a job.
  I agree with my colleagues: there isn't a person in America I don't 
think that wouldn't rather have a paycheck rather than a SNAP check or 
a SNAP card, or a Vision card if you're in the State of Kansas.

                              {time}  1210

  These are very commonsense reforms. They will work. They are good for 
Americans. They are good for our taxpayers. They are good for the 
people receiving benefits. We have 47 million Americans receiving food 
stamps today. Please, let's ask them--require them--to actually go out 
and look for jobs. They might actually find them.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Oklahoma has 2\1/2\ minutes 
remaining.
  Mr. LUCAS. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself the balance of my time.
  Colleagues, the process of crafting this farm bill has entailed much 
effort by the committee. We've looked at everything within our 
jurisdictions. We've come up with ways of saving money and reforming 
things and making things more efficient across the board in every 
title. Let me touch, for just a moment, on the nutrition title.
  The committee agreed to $20.5 billion in savings: ending categorical 
eligibility, compelling States to the tune of $8 billion worth of 
savings to make adjustments in how they address LIHEAP. We have gone a 
tremendous distance in a bipartisan way to achieve the first real 
reform since 1996.
  Now, I appreciate my colleagues' efforts to try and increase those 
savings, but I say to you that the number in the bill is workable, that 
it is something that we can achieve, that it is something through which 
I believe--and we don't all necessarily see eye to eye on this--we will 
still allow those folks who are qualified under Federal law to receive 
the help they need, that they deserve.
  Please turn this amendment back. Please move forward with the reforms 
we have. Let's do things that we've not been able to do since 1996. 
Let's not go so far that nothing is the end result. Defeat the 
amendment. Support the bill. Let us move forward.
  With that, Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Kansas (Mr. Huelskamp).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. HUELSKAMP. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Kansas will 
be postponed.


              Amendment No. 102 Offered by Mr. Southerland

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 102 
printed in part B of House Report 113-117.
  Mr. SOUTHERLAND. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 336, line 8, strike ``$375,000,000'' and insert 
     ``$372,000,000''.
       At the end of subtitle A of title IV, insert the following:

     SEC. 4033. PILOT PROJECTS TO PROMOTE WORK AND INCREASE STATE 
                   ACCOUNTABILITY IN THE SUPPLEMENTAL NUTRITION 
                   ASSISTANCE PROGRAM.

       Effective October 1, 2013, section 17 of the Food and 
     Nutrition Act of 2008 (7 U.S.C. 2026), as amended by sections 
     4021 and 4022, is amended by adding at the end the following:
       ``(n) Pilot Projects to Promote Work and Increase State 
     Accountability in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance 
     Program.--
       ``(1) In general.--The Secretary shall carry out pilot 
     projects to develop and test methods allowing States to run a 
     work program with certain features comparable to the State 
     program funded under part A of title IV of the Social 
     Security Act (42 U.S.C. 601 et seq.), with the intent of 
     increasing employment and self-sufficiency through increased 
     State accountability and thereby reducing the need for 
     supplemental nutrition assistance benefits.
       ``(2) Agreements.--
       ``(A) In general.--In carrying out this subsection, the 
     Secretary shall enter into cooperative agreements with States 
     in accordance with pilot projects that meet the criteria 
     required under this subsection.
       ``(B) Application.--To be eligible for a cooperative 
     agreement under this paragraph, a State shall submit to the 
     Secretary a plan that complies with requirements of this 
     subsection beginning in fiscal year 2014. The Secretary may 
     not disapprove applications which meet the requirements of 
     this subsection as described through its amended supplemental 
     nutrition assistance State Plan.
       ``(C) Assurances.--A State shall include in its plan 
     assurances that its pilot project will--
       ``(i) operate for at least three 12-month periods but not 
     more than five 12-month periods;
       ``(ii) have a robust data collection system for program 
     administration that is designed and shared with project 
     evaluators to ensure proper and timely evaluation; and
       ``(iii) intend to offer a work activity described in 
     paragraph (4) to adults assigned and required to participate 
     under paragraph (3)(A) and who are not exempt under paragraph 
     (3)(F).
       ``(D) Number of pilot projects.--Any State may carry out a 
     pilot project that meets the requirements of this subsection.
       ``(E) Extent of pilot projects.--Pilot projects shall cover 
     no less than the entire State.
       ``(F) Other program waivers.--Waivers for able-bodied 
     adults without dependents provided under section 6(o) are 
     void for States covered by a pilot project carried out under 
     paragraph (1).
       ``(3) Work activity.--(A) For purposes of this subsection, 
     the term `work activity' means any of the following:
       ``(i) Employment in the public or private sector that is 
     not subsidized by any public program.
       ``(ii) Employment in the private sector for which the 
     employer receives a subsidy from public funds to offset some 
     or all of the wages and costs of employing an adult.
       ``(iii) Employment in the public sector for which the 
     employer receives a subsidy from public funds to offset some 
     or all of the wages and costs of employing an adult.
       ``(iv) A work activity that--
       ``(I) is performed in return for public benefits;
       ``(II) provides an adult with an opportunity to acquire the 
     general skills, knowledge, and work habits necessary to 
     obtain employment;
       ``(III) is designed to improve the employability of those 
     who cannot find unsubsidized employment; and
       ``(IV) is supervised by an employer, work site sponsor, or 
     other responsible party on an ongoing basis.
       ``(v) Training in the public or private sector that is 
     given to a paid employee while he or she is engaged in 
     productive work and that provides knowledge and skills 
     essential to the full and adequate performance of the job.
       ``(vi) Job search, obtaining employment, or preparation to 
     seek or obtain employment, including--
       ``(I) life skills training;
       ``(II) substance abuse treatment or mental health 
     treatment, determined to be necessary and documented by a 
     qualified medical, substance abuse, or mental health 
     professional; or
       ``(III) rehabilitation activities;
     supervised by a public agency or other responsible party on 
     an ongoing basis.
       ``(vii) Structured programs and embedded activities--
       ``(I) in which adults perform work for the direct benefit 
     of the community under the auspices of public or nonprofit 
     organizations;
       ``(II) that are limited to projects that serve useful 
     community purposes in fields such as health, social service, 
     environmental protection, education, urban and rural 
     redevelopment, welfare, recreation, public facilities, public 
     safety, and child care;
       ``(III) that are designed to improve the employability of 
     adults not otherwise able to obtain unsubsidized employment; 
     and
       ``(IV) that are supervised on an ongoing basis; and
       ``(V) with respect to which a State agency takes into 
     account, to the extent possible, the prior training, 
     experience, and skills of a recipient in making appropriate 
     community service assignments.
       ``(viii) Career and technical training programs (not to 
     exceed 12 months with respect to any adult) that are directly 
     related to the preparation of adults for employment in 
     current or emerging occupations and that are supervised on an 
     ongoing basis.
       ``(ix) Training or education for job skills that are 
     required by an employer to provide

[[Page H3958]]

     an adult with the ability to obtain employment or to advance 
     or adapt to the changing demands of the workplace and that 
     are supervised on an ongoing basis.
       ``(x) Education that is related to a specific occupation, 
     job, or job offer and that is supervised on an ongoing basis.
       ``(xi) In the case of an adult who has not completed 
     secondary school or received such a certificate of general 
     equivalence, regular attendance--
       ``(I) in accordance with the requirements of the secondary 
     school or course of study, at a secondary school or in a 
     course of study leading to such certificate; and
       ``(II) supervised on an ongoing basis.
       ``(xii) Providing child care to enable another recipient of 
     public benefits to participate in a community service program 
     that--
       ``(I) does not provide compensation for such community 
     service;
       ``(II) is a structured program designed to improve the 
     employability of adults who participate in such program; and
       ``(III) is supervised on an ongoing basis.
       ``(B) Protections.--Work activities under this subsection 
     shall be subject to all applicable health and safety 
     standards. Except as described in clauses (i), (ii), and 
     (iii) of subparagraph (A), the term `work activity' shall be 
     considered work preparation and not defined as employment for 
     purposes of other law.
       ``(4) Pilot projects.--Pilot projects carried out under 
     paragraph (1) shall include interventions to which adults are 
     assigned that are designed to reduce unnecessary dependence, 
     promote self sufficiency, increase work levels, increase 
     earned income, and reduce supplemental nutrition assistance 
     benefit expenditures among households eligible for, applying 
     for, or participating in the supplemental nutrition 
     assistance program.
       ``(A) Adults assigned to interventions by the State shall--
       ``(i) be subject to mandatory participation in work 
     activities specified in paragraph (4), except those with 1 or 
     more dependent children under 1 year of age;
       ``(ii) participate in work activities specified in 
     paragraph (4) for a minimum of 20 hours per week per 
     household;
       ``(iii) be a maximum age of not less than 50 and not more 
     than 60, as defined by the State;
       ``(iv) be subject to penalties during a period of 
     nonparticipation without good cause ranging from, at State 
     option, a minimum of the removal of the adults from the 
     household benefit amount, up to a maximum of the 
     discontinuance of the entire household benefit amount; and
       ``(v) not be penalized for nonparticipation if child care 
     is not available for 1 or more children under 6 years of age.
       ``(B) The State shall allow certain individuals to be 
     exempt from work requirements--
       ``(i) those participating in work programs under a State 
     program funded under part A of title IV of the Social 
     Security Act (42 U.S.C. 601 et seq.) for an equal or greater 
     number of hours;
       ``(ii) 1 adult family member per household who is needed in 
     the home to care for a disabled family member;
       ``(iii) a parent who is a recipient of or becomes eligible 
     for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or 
     Supplemental Security Income (SSI); and
       ``(iv) those with a good cause reason for nonparticipation, 
     such as victims of domestic violence, as defined by the 
     State.
       ``(5) Evaluation and reporting.--
       ``(A) Evaluation.--
       ``(i) Independent evaluation.--

       ``(I) In general.--The Secretary shall provide for each 
     State that enters into an agreement under paragraph (2) an 
     independent, longitudinal evaluation of its pilot project 
     under this subsection to determine total program savings over 
     the entire course of the pilot project with results reported 
     in consecutive 12-month increments.
       ``(II) Purpose.--The purpose of the evaluation is to 
     measure the impact of interventions provided by the State 
     under the pilot project on the ability of adults in 
     households eligible for, applying for, or participating in 
     the supplemental nutrition assistance program to find and 
     retain employment that leads to increased household income 
     and reduced dependency.
       ``(III) Requirement.--The independent evaluation under 
     subclause (I) shall use valid statistical methods which can 
     determine the difference between supplemental nutrition 
     assistance benefit expenditures, if any, as a result of the 
     interventions as compared to a control group that--

       ``(aa) is not subject to the interventions provided by the 
     State under the pilot project under this subsection; and
       ``(bb) maintains services provided under 16(h) in the year 
     prior to the start of the pilot project under this 
     subsection.

       ``(IV) Option.--States shall have the option to evaluate 
     pilot projects by matched counties or matched geographical 
     areas using a constructed control group design to isolate the 
     effects of the intervention of the pilot project.
       ``(V) Definition.--Constructed control group means there is 
     no random assignment, and instead program participants (those 
     subject to interventions) and non-participants (control) are 
     equated using matching or statistical procedures on 
     characteristics that may be associated with program outcomes.

       ``(B) Reporting.--Not later than 90 days after the end of 
     fiscal year 2014 and of each fiscal year thereafter, until 
     the completion of the last evaluation under subparagraph (A), 
     the Secretary shall submit to the Committee on Agriculture of 
     the House of Representatives and the Committee on 
     Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry of the Senate, a report 
     that includes a description of--
       ``(i) the status of each pilot project carried out under 
     paragraph (1);
       ``(ii) the results of the evaluation completed during the 
     previous fiscal year; and
       ``(iii) to the maximum extent practicable--

       ``(I) baseline information relevant to the stated goals and 
     desired outcomes of the pilot project;
       ``(II) the impact of the interventions on appropriate 
     employment, income, and public benefit receipt outcomes among 
     households participating in the pilot project;
       ``(III) equivalent information about similar or identical 
     measures among control or comparison groups;
       ``(IV) the planned dissemination of the report findings to 
     State agencies; and
       ``(V) the steps and funding necessary to incorporate into 
     State employment and training programs the components of 
     pilot projects that demonstrate increased employment and 
     earnings.

       ``(C) Public dissemination.--In addition to the reporting 
     requirements under subparagraph (B), evaluation results shall 
     be shared broadly to inform policy makers, service providers, 
     other partners, and the public in order to promote wide use 
     of successful strategies, including by posting evaluation 
     results on the Internet website of the Department of 
     Agriculture.
       ``(6) Funding.--
       ``(A) Available funds.--From amounts made available under 
     section 18(a)(1), the Secretary shall make available--
       ``(i) up to $1,000,000 for each of the fiscal years 2014 
     through 2017 for evaluations described in paragraph (5) to 
     carry out this subsection, with such amounts to remain 
     available until expended; and
       ``(ii) amounts equal to one-half of the accumulated 
     supplemental nutrition assistance benefit dollars saved over 
     each consecutive 12-month period according to the evaluation 
     under paragraph (5) for bonus grants to States under 
     paragraph (7)(B).
       ``(B) Limitation.--A State operating a pilot project under 
     this subsection shall not receive more funding under section 
     16(h) than the State received the year prior to commencing a 
     project under this subsection and shall not claim funds under 
     16(a) for expenses that are unique to the pilot project under 
     this subsection.
       ``(C) Other funds.--Any additional funds required by a 
     State to carry out a pilot project under this subsection may 
     be provided by the State from funds made available to the 
     State for such purpose and in accordance with State and other 
     Federal laws, including the following:
       ``(i) Section 403 of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 
     603).
       ``(ii) The Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (29 U.S.C. 9201 
     et seq.).
       ``(iii) The Child Care and Development Block Grant Act of 
     1990 (42 U.S.C 9858 et seq.) and section 418 of the Social 
     Security Act (42 U.S.C. 618).
       ``(iv) The social services block grant under subtitle A of 
     title XX of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 1397 et seq,).
       ``(7) Use of funds.--
       ``(A) Specific uses.--Funds provided under this subsection 
     for evaluation of pilot projects shall be used only for--
       ``(i) pilot projects that comply with this subsection;
       ``(ii) the costs incurred in gathering and providing 
     information and data used to conduct the independent 
     evaluation under paragraph (5); and
       ``(iii) the costs of the evaluation under paragraph (5).
       ``(B) Limitation.--Funds provided for bonus grants to 
     States for pilot projects under this subsection shall be used 
     only for--
       ``(i) pilot projects that comply with this subsection;
       ``(ii) amounts equal to one-half of the accumulated 
     supplemental nutrition assistance benefit dollars saved over 
     each consecutive 12-month period according to the evaluation 
     under paragraph (5); and
       ``(iii) any State purpose, not to be restricted to the 
     supplemental nutrition assistance program or its beneficiary 
     population.''.

     SEC. 4034. IMPROVED WAGE VERIFICATION USING THE NATIONAL 
                   DIRECTORY OF NEW HIRES.

       Effective October 1, 2013, section 11(e) of the Food and 
     Nutrition Act of 2008 (7 U.S.C. 2020(e)) is amended--
       (1) in paragraph (3) by inserting ``and after compliance 
     with the requirement specified in paragraph (24)'' after 
     ``section 16(e) of this Act'',
       (2) in paragraph (22) by striking ``and'' at the end,
       (3) in paragraph (23 by striking the period at the end and 
     inserting ``; and'', and
       (4) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(24) that the State agency shall request wage data 
     directly from the National Directory of New Hires established 
     under section 453(i) of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 
     653(i)) relevant to determining eligibility to receive 
     supplemental nutrition assistance program benefits and 
     determining the correct amount of such benefits.''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 271, the gentleman 
from Florida (Mr. Southerland) and a

[[Page H3959]]

Member opposed each will control 5 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Florida.
  Mr. SOUTHERLAND. Mr. Chairman, the numbers don't lie. America's 
welfare system is broken.
  Food stamp benefits have tripled in the past decade. There are more 
Americans living in poverty today than when the war on poverty was 
launched a half century ago. Instead of incentivizing work, we are 
reinforcing the same government dependency and cyclical poverty that we 
all wish to eliminate. It is clear that an important variable has been 
missing from America's antipoverty equation, and that is the element of 
work.
  History has proven that work is the surest way to empower able-bodied 
Americans to advance from welfare to self-sufficiency. When a 
Republican-controlled Congress and a Democrat President joined together 
to pass welfare reform requiring work, the results were dramatic. 
Nationwide, welfare rolls dropped by 67 percent. In my home State of 
Florida, the number was higher--approximately 85 percent. Work 
participation by never-married single moms and household earnings 
skyrocketed. Child poverty rates plummeted. This true bipartisan 
success story is what my amendment is based upon.
  My amendment empowers the States to require work for Supplemental 
Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, benefits. We apply the same 
sensible work preparation, job training, and community service 
activities that are at the heart of welfare reform. Our plan is 
endorsed by several States' Human Services Secretaries who approached 
us because they understand how important work can be for individuals 
truly in need.
  The simple fact, Mr. Chairman, is that ``work'' works. We must have a 
system in place that provides a helping hand to the most vulnerable 
among us. By requiring work for able-bodied SNAP recipients, we can 
ensure that the resources get to those in need more effectively and 
efficiently.
  I encourage my colleagues to join me in supporting my amendment and 
in renewing the God-given opportunity for earned success in America.
  Mr. Chairman, with that, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Ms. MOORE. I rise to claim the time in opposition to the gentleman's 
amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentlewoman from Wisconsin is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Ms. MOORE. Despite what we have heard from the author of this 
program, there is no work in this bill. This amendment would more 
appropriately be called ``The State Bonuses for Terminating SNAP 
Benefits for People Who Want to Work but Can't Find a Job Because 
They're in a Recession,'' and it ends benefits for children, disabled 
people, yes, and even for disabled veterans.
  I think the most egregious thing about this amendment is that there 
is no funding for worker training programs in this bill at all even 
though we are ordering people to do it, and there is a perverse 
incentive for States to end SNAP benefits for people because, suddenly, 
food stamps, or SNAP benefits, become fungible.
  We just rejected an amendment in our last series of votes that would 
have allowed people to get toothpaste and toothbrushes with SNAP 
benefits; but what this amendment does is allow the States to pocket 
these sanctions and use them for whatever they want to--to balance the 
budget with it or to convert SNAP benefits into tax breaks for 
corporations or for wealthy people.
  With that, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. SOUTHERLAND. Mr. Chairman, I now yield 1 minute to the gentleman 
from Virginia, Majority Leader Cantor, who represents a State in which, 
as a result of the 1996 work requirement, welfare rolls were reduced by 
over 84 percent.
  Mr. CANTOR. I thank the gentleman from Florida.
  Mr. Chairman, I rise today in support of this amendment.
  In 1996, the Congress came together in a bipartisan way to change the 
incentive structure in our basic cash welfare program that helps needy 
families. The results were nothing but a success. Within 5 years, 
welfare caseloads fell by more than 60 percent, and the economic 
prospects of many former welfare families were substantially improved. 
America saw increased earnings by low-income families and significant 
reductions in child poverty. The incentives were right, and even in the 
depths of the worst economic turmoil of a few years ago, the reforms 
were succeeding at moving families from dependency into work.
  Those changes made in welfare reform resulted from a foundation laid 
before 1996 in which States experimented with different approaches to 
determine which ones were the most effective at increasing workforce 
participation and boosting earnings. Prior to enactment of welfare 
reform, States had been given waivers of the old law to become 
laboratories of innovation.
  The amendment by Mr. Southerland before us today builds on that 
successful approach and will give States the opportunity to test 
whether the same successful strategies that were used in cash welfare 
programs in the 1990s will help food stamp recipients gain and retain 
employment and boost their earnings today. Mr. Southerland's amendment 
provides for a pilot program, which will allow States, if they choose, 
to apply the TANF work requirements to their able-bodied working age 
adult food stamp caseload.

                              {time}  1220

  States have come forward asking us for the ability to enter into 
these demonstration projects. But unless we adopt the gentleman's 
amendment, these States won't be able to launch these demonstration 
projects.
  This amendment is well crafted and takes into consideration the 
availability of child care for mothers with young children and hardship 
situations like families facing domestic violence.
  The Southerland amendment also tells States that if they're 
successful at increasing work participation and families' earnings 
among the food stamp caseload, they will share in the savings that 
would otherwise end up in the hands of the Federal Government.
  If enacted, this amendment will help reduce Federal expenditures, 
provide assistance to the States, and most importantly it will help 
struggling families who find themselves relying on public assistance to 
get back on their feet.
  Right now, many American families are struggling, and the SNAP 
program is in place to help these families who find themselves in dire 
economic circumstances. While this program is an important part of our 
safety net, our overriding goal should be to help our citizens with the 
education and skills they need to get back on their feet so that they 
can provide for themselves and their families.
  I'd like to thank the gentleman from Florida (Mr. Southerland) for 
his work on this issue, and I urge my colleagues to support his 
amendment.
  Ms. MOORE. I would like to inquire as to how much time I have 
remaining.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentlewoman from Wisconsin has 3\1/2\ minutes 
remaining, and the gentleman from Florida has 1\1/2\ minutes remaining.
  Ms. MOORE. Just because we keep saying that the 1996 welfare program 
was successful, doesn't make it so. Poverty has increased among women 
and children. A quarter of all children in this country are poor.
  With that, I yield 2 minutes to the gentlelady from Connecticut (Ms. 
DeLauro).
  Ms. DeLAURO. I rise in strong opposition to this amendment, the 
effect of which would be to increase hunger and hardship across 
America. We have experienced the most devastating recession since the 
Great Depression.
  Unemployment is at 7.5 percent. One in seven people today is availing 
himself of food stamps because there is a need to. People are 
struggling in our economy today. They want to work. They cannot find a 
job. Everyone is experiencing that in their own communities.
  This amendment would allow an unlimited number of States to require 
an adult to receive or even apply for food stamps to be working or in 
job training, or else they lose their food stamp benefits. Why would a 
State want to do this? Because the amendment also allows States to keep 
part of the savings from cutting people off the program, use the money 
for whatever purpose the State officials want, instead of feeding 
people with those dollars.

[[Page H3960]]

  States can cut taxes for companies or even maybe support special 
interest subsidies. And as my colleagues said, there is no funding in 
this bill for the creation of jobs; and my colleagues on the other side 
of the aisle, they refuse to deal with the issue of job creation and 
there is no worker-training money in this bill. So there is no funding 
to do what they would like to do.
  Let's take the crop insurance program, my friends. We just voted on 
an amendment that voted down reforming that program. We have 26 
individuals in this Nation. We can't find out who they are. They get at 
least a million dollars in a subsidy. Do you think they're eating well? 
Three squares or better a day. You know what? They have no income 
threshold, no asset test, no cap. They don't even have to farm the 
land, and they don't have to follow conservation practices. Do you want 
to go and find out where we can save money here? Let's find out who 
these 26 people are or those people who are on the crop insurance 
program, and let's make sure that they are working otherwise we will 
cut their benefits.
  I urge my colleagues to vote ``no'' on this unbelievably misguided 
amendment.
  Mr. SOUTHERLAND. Mr. Chairman, I yield 45 seconds to the gentleman 
from Washington (Mr. Reichert), whose welfare rolls were reduced by 
over 55 percent due to the 1996 work requirement.
  Mr. REICHERT. Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of this amendment.
  My colleague was absolutely right, the unemployment rate is 7.5 
percent. People do want to go back to work. This is what this bill 
does: it helps people go back to work. Currently, the government has 83 
programs to help people.
  I'm the chairman of the Subcommittee on Human Resources. We just had 
a hearing last week with Sada Randolph. Sada Randolph testified before 
our committee that she was under a government program. All they did was 
provide benefits to her until she got under TANF. That's where she got 
the help to find a job. We need to help people find jobs, keep jobs, 
support their families and give them hope.
  I support this bill wholeheartedly because it gives the American 
people who are out of work today hope.
  Ms. MOORE. We reduced welfare rolls because we literally threw people 
off. We did not help them find sustainable jobs, which is why poverty 
has increased.
  I yield 30 seconds to the ranking member of the committee, Mr. 
Peterson.
  Mr. PETERSON. I thank the gentlelady, and I strongly oppose this 
amendment.
  This amendment breaks the deal that we had and is offensive in the 
way that it treats the unemployed in this country.
  In short what this proposal does is it takes money from benefits and 
hands it over to the States, and they can do with it what they want, as 
was said earlier in the debate, with no strings attached, no 
accountability.
  This Republican Congress has been vocal in support of block grants, 
and I suppose that's why they're supporting this amendment. But I'd 
like to point out that it was block-granting that is the very reason 
that we got into the LIHEAP situation and the categorical eligibility 
situation that we're trying to attempt in this bill.
  Vote ``no'' on this amendment.
  Mr. SOUTHERLAND. Mr. Chairman, I now yield 45 seconds to the 
gentleman from Georgia (Mr. Kingston), whose welfare rolls were reduced 
by over 85 percent in the 1996 work requirements.
  Mr. KINGSTON. I thank the gentleman for yielding and stand in support 
of the amendment.
  There's two very major points of this. Number one is that we cannot 
continue to deny able-bodied people the dignity of work. There seems to 
be a belief in the nanny state that there's something wrong with 
requiring able-bodied people to work. That's what this amendment does. 
It says to you that if you can work, you ought to be working so that 
other people who are unable to, they can get the needed assistance.
  Number two, it gives States flexibility. I trust the people in 
Florida. I trust the people in Wisconsin. I trust the people in Georgia 
and Florida and all over the country to do what's best for their State. 
That's what we need in America today: less centralized, Washington 
bureaucratic planners and more State flexibility because what might 
work in your State might be different in mine, but this is a 
requirement for able-bodied people to get a job in order to receive 
public assistance benefits.
  It's very common sense, and I yield back the balance of my time.
  Ms. MOORE. Mr. Chairman, I yield the last 30 seconds to our good 
friend and colleague, Mr. Welch.
  Mr. WELCH. I thank the gentlelady.
  This amendment is not on the level. It uses a word that is important 
to all of us: work.
  Of course people want to work, but there is no money for a work 
program. There is an obligation on the person who has no income, who 
has children, to somehow magically create their own work program. Any 
of the work programs have to have some support to get people to be able 
to move from poverty to work.
  This is a political statement. It's not a work program.
  How poor is poor? This is telling folks they're not poor enough. 
Grind them and their children down; 1-year-old children will lose food 
as a result of this.
  Ms. MOORE. With that, Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my 
time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Florida (Mr. Southerland).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. SOUTHERLAND. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Florida will 
be postponed.

                              {time}  1230


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, proceedings 
will now resume on those amendments printed in part B of House Report 
113-117 on which further proceedings were postponed, in the following 
order:
  Amendment No. 99 by Mr. Goodlatte of Virginia.
  Amendment No. 49 by Mr. Radel of Florida.
  Amendment No. 50 by Mr. Walberg of Michigan.
  Amendment No. 98 by Mr. Pitts of Pennsylvania.
  Amendment No. 100 by Mr. Fortenberry of Nebraska.
  Amendment No. 101 by Mr. Huelskamp of Kansas.
  Amendment No. 102 by Mr. Southerland of Florida.
  The Chair will reduce to 2 minutes the minimum time for any 
electronic vote after the first vote in this series.


               Amendment No. 99 Offered by Mr. Goodlatte

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Virginia 
(Mr. Goodlatte) on which further proceedings were postponed and on 
which the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 291, 
noes 135, answered ``present'' 1, not voting 8, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 278]

                               AYES--291

     Alexander
     Amash
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barton
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Blumenauer
     Boehner
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Campbell
     Cantor
     Capito
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Clarke
     Clay
     Clyburn
     Coble
     Coffman
     Cohen
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cook
     Cotton
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Daines
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     Davis, Rodney
     DeGette
     Denham

[[Page H3961]]


     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fattah
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Foxx
     Frankel (FL)
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gabbard
     Garcia
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gowdy
     Graves (GA)
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanna
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Himes
     Holding
     Holt
     Horsford
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kelly (IL)
     Kelly (PA)
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kline
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Lowey
     Luetkemeyer
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McDermott
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Moore
     Moran
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (FL)
     Murphy (PA)
     Napolitano
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     O'Rourke
     Olson
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Paulsen
     Payne
     Perlmutter
     Perry
     Peters (CA)
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Polis
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quigley
     Radel
     Rangel
     Reed
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Roybal-Allard
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schock
     Schwartz
     Schweikert
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shuster
     Sires
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Southerland
     Speier
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Swalwell (CA)
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Titus
     Turner
     Upton
     Van Hollen
     Veasey
     Velazquez
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yarmuth
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--135

     Aderholt
     Andrews
     Barrow (GA)
     Benishek
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Bishop (UT)
     Bonamici
     Braley (IA)
     Bustos
     Camp
     Capps
     Capuano
     Carter
     Cartwright
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Cleaver
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cramer
     Crowley
     Cummings
     DeFazio
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fincher
     Fleming
     Fudge
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Gosar
     Granger
     Graves (MO)
     Hall
     Hanabusa
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (WA)
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Hinojosa
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kuster
     Labrador
     Langevin
     Larson (CT)
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Long
     Lowenthal
     Lucas
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lummis
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, George
     Mullin
     Nadler
     Neal
     Negrete McLeod
     Nolan
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pastor (AZ)
     Pearce
     Pelosi
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Price (NC)
     Rahall
     Reichert
     Rogers (AL)
     Ruiz
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Schrader
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Smith (MO)
     Stewart
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Valadao
     Vargas
     Vela
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Welch
     Williams

                        ANSWERED ``PRESENT''--1

     Nunes
       
       

                             NOT VOTING--8

     Hastings (FL)
     Honda
     Larsen (WA)
     Markey
     McCarthy (NY)
     Miller, Gary
     Nunnelee
     Slaughter

                              {time}  1254

  Mr. HALL changed his vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  Messrs. SIRES, LaMALFA, WAXMAN, LEWIS, GRIJALVA, Ms. CLARKE, Messrs. 
JONES, MEEKS, and Ms. WATERS changed their vote from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated against:
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. Mr. Chair, I support the Dairy Security Act language 
as it was included in the Committee-passed draft of the Federal 
Agriculture Reform and Risk Management Act. Inadvertently, I voted in 
support of Amendment No. 99, sponsored by Rep. Goodlatte to H.R. 1947. 
My intention was to vote against the amendment and to support the dairy 
provisions in the underlying bill.


                 Amendment No. 49 Offered by Mr. Radel

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Florida 
(Mr. Radel) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 235, 
noes 192, not voting 7, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 279]

                               AYES--235

     Amash
     Amodei
     Andrews
     Bachmann
     Barletta
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Beatty
     Bentivolio
     Bera (CA)
     Bilirakis
     Black
     Blackburn
     Blumenauer
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Cantor
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Clarke
     Clay
     Coble
     Coffman
     Cohen
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Connolly
     Cook
     Cooper
     Cotton
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Cummings
     Delaney
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Edwards
     Esty
     Farenthold
     Fattah
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Foxx
     Frankel (FL)
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Garcia
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Guthrie
     Hanna
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Holding
     Holt
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Israel
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Lankford
     Latta
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Lofgren
     Long
     Luetkemeyer
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Sean
     Marchant
     Massie
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Moore
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (FL)
     Neal
     Negrete McLeod
     Neugebauer
     Nugent
     Nunnelee
     O'Rourke
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Paulsen
     Perry
     Peters (CA)
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Polis
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Radel
     Rangel
     Reed
     Reichert
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schneider
     Schock
     Schwartz
     Schweikert
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shuster
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Southerland
     Speier
     Stewart
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Titus
     Upton
     Van Hollen
     Wagner
     Walorski
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--192

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barr
     Bass
     Becerra
     Benishek
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Bishop (UT)
     Bonamici
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Braley (IA)
     Brooks (IN)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capito
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cole
     Conaway
     Conyers
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Daines
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     Davis, Rodney
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Denham
     Dent
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Ellison
     Ellmers
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Farr
     Fincher
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Goodlatte
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hall
     Hanabusa

[[Page H3962]]


     Harper
     Heck (WA)
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Joyce
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kelly (PA)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     LaMalfa
     Langevin
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     Lewis
     Loebsack
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lummis
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Marino
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McNerney
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moran
     Mullin
     Murphy (PA)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Noem
     Nolan
     Nunes
     Owens
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pearce
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Renacci
     Richmond
     Roby
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rooney
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruppersberger
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Scott, Austin
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Sires
     Smith (NE)
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Tipton
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Valadao
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walz
     Waxman
     Welch
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Wolf
     Yarmuth

                             NOT VOTING--7

     Hastings (FL)
     Honda
     Larsen (WA)
     Markey
     McCarthy (NY)
     Miller, Gary
     Slaughter

                              {time}  1303

  Messrs. CASSIDY, JOHNSON of Georgia, MEEKS, Ms. LEE of California, 
Messrs. RANGEL and DOGGETT, Ms. EDWARDS, Ms. CLARKE, Ms. FUDGE, Mrs. 
BEATTY, Ms. WATERS, Mr. LYNCH, Ms. EDDIE BERNICE JOHNSON of Texas, 
Messrs. AL GREEN of Texas and NUNNELEE changed their vote from ``no'' 
to aye.''
  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                Amendment No. 50 Offered by Mr. Walberg

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Michigan 
(Mr. Walberg) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 215, 
noes 211, not voting 8, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 280]

                               AYES--215

     Alexander
     Amash
     Amodei
     Andrews
     Bachmann
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Black
     Blackburn
     Blumenauer
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Cantor
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (NY)
     Cook
     Cotton
     Crawford
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Cummings
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     DeFazio
     Delaney
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Deutch
     Doggett
     Duckworth
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Fincher
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Frelinghuysen
     Gabbard
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Griffin (AR)
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harris
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Himes
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kelly (PA)
     Kilmer
     Kind
     King (IA)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     Lamborn
     Latta
     Lofgren
     Long
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Maloney, Sean
     Marchant
     Massie
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCollum
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Moore
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Nugent
     Nunes
     O'Rourke
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Payne
     Pearce
     Peters (CA)
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Polis
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Radel
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Rush
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Speier
     Stewart
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Titus
     Tonko
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Van Hollen
     Vela
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Williams
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--211

     Aderholt
     Bachus
     Barber
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Bishop (UT)
     Bonamici
     Bonner
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Capito
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coble
     Cohen
     Collins (GA)
     Conaway
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cramer
     Crenshaw
     Crowley
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Denham
     Dent
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Doyle
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farenthold
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fitzpatrick
     Forbes
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Gerlach
     Granger
     Green, Gene
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hall
     Harper
     Hartzler
     Heck (WA)
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Hinojosa
     Holding
     Holt
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Hudson
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Jenkins
     Joyce
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     King (NY)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     LaMalfa
     Lance
     Langevin
     Lankford
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lummis
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Marino
     Matsui
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moran
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Negrete McLeod
     Noem
     Nolan
     Nunnelee
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Perry
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Poe (TX)
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Richmond
     Roby
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruppersberger
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Sinema
     Sires
     Smith (WA)
     Stivers
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Tsongas
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Waxman
     Welch
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Wilson (SC)
     Yarmuth
     Yoho

                             NOT VOTING--8

     Franks (AZ)
     Hastings (FL)
     Honda
     Larsen (WA)
     Markey
     McCarthy (NY)
     Miller, Gary
     Slaughter

                              {time}  1307

  Mr. POLIS and Ms. WATERS changed their vote from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  Mr. CONNOLLY changed his vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                 Amendment No. 98 Offered by Mr. Pitts

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from 
Pennsylvania (Mr. Pitts) on which further proceedings were postponed 
and on which the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 206, 
noes 221, not voting 7, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 281]

                               AYES--206

     Amash
     Amodei
     Andrews
     Bachmann
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barton
     Beatty
     Bentivolio
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Blumenauer
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Campbell
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carney

[[Page H3963]]


     Cartwright
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Cicilline
     Clay
     Coffman
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Cook
     Cooper
     Cotton
     Davis, Danny
     Delaney
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Doggett
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Esty
     Fattah
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Flores
     Forbes
     Foster
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Graves (GA)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Guthrie
     Gutierrez
     Hanna
     Harris
     Heck (NV)
     Heck (WA)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Himes
     Holding
     Holt
     Horsford
     Huelskamp
     Hultgren
     Hurt
     Israel
     Issa
     Jeffries
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kelly (IL)
     Kelly (PA)
     Kilmer
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kuster
     Lance
     Langevin
     Lankford
     Latta
     Lee (CA)
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lowey
     Marino
     Massie
     Matheson
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     McNerney
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Messer
     Miller (FL)
     Moore
     Moran
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     O'Rourke
     Olson
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Perry
     Peters (CA)
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Polis
     Pompeo
     Price (GA)
     Quigley
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schock
     Schwartz
     Schweikert
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shea-Porter
     Shuster
     Sinema
     Sires
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Swalwell (CA)
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Tiberi
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Upton
     Van Hollen
     Veasey
     Visclosky
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walorski
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--221

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barrow (GA)
     Bass
     Becerra
     Benishek
     Bera (CA)
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Bonamici
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Braley (IA)
     Brooks (AL)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Buchanan
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Clarke
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coble
     Cohen
     Cole
     Conaway
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Cummings
     Daines
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Rodney
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Denham
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Duffy
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Ellmers
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Farenthold
     Farr
     Fincher
     Fleming
     Fortenberry
     Frankel (FL)
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garcia
     Gardner
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Granger
     Graves (MO)
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Hahn
     Hall
     Hanabusa
     Harper
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Hinojosa
     Hoyer
     Hudson
     Huffman
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hunter
     Jackson Lee
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     Levin
     Lewis
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lummis
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Marchant
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meng
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, George
     Mullin
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Negrete McLeod
     Noem
     Nolan
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Poe (TX)
     Posey
     Price (NC)
     Radel
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reed
     Richmond
     Roby
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Schrader
     Scott, Austin
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Southerland
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thornberry
     Tierney
     Tipton
     Valadao
     Vargas
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Walden
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Welch
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth
     Yoho
     Young (AK)

                             NOT VOTING--7

     Hastings (FL)
     Honda
     Larsen (WA)
     Markey
     McCarthy (NY)
     Miller, Gary
     Slaughter

                              {time}  1311

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


              Amendment No. 100 Offered by Mr. Fortenberry

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Nebraska 
(Mr. Fortenberry) on which further proceedings were postponed and on 
which the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 230, 
noes 194, not voting 10, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 282]

                               AYES--230

     Amash
     Andrews
     Barton
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (NY)
     Bishop (UT)
     Blackburn
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Bridenstine
     Broun (GA)
     Brownley (CA)
     Burgess
     Cantor
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Coffman
     Cohen
     Collins (GA)
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cook
     Cooper
     Courtney
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Dent
     DeSantis
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Flores
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Garrett
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Gowdy
     Graves (GA)
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Hahn
     Hanna
     Heck (NV)
     Heck (WA)
     Hensarling
     Higgins
     Himes
     Holding
     Holt
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hunter
     Israel
     Issa
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (PA)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kuster
     Labrador
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Langevin
     Lankford
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lummis
     Lynch
     Maloney, Sean
     Marchant
     Matheson
     McClintock
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McHenry
     McNerney
     Meadows
     Meeks
     Meng
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Moore
     Moran
     Mulvaney
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Noem
     Nolan
     Nunes
     O'Rourke
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Paulsen
     Pelosi
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Pocan
     Polis
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Radel
     Rangel
     Reichert
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Roskam
     Rothfus
     Roybal-Allard
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanford
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schwartz
     Schweikert
     Scott (VA)
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stewart
     Stockman
     Swalwell (CA)
     Terry
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Visclosky
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Westmoreland
     Wilson (FL)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wolf
     Yarmuth
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--194

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Benishek
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (GA)
     Black
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Brown (FL)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Capito
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Castro (TX)
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coble
     Cole
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Costa
     Cotton
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     DesJarlais
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Duckworth
     Ellmers
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fleming
     Forbes
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Gardner
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Granger
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Gutierrez
     Hall
     Hanabusa
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Herrera Beutler
     Hinojosa
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Hultgren
     Hurt
     Jackson Lee
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Joyce
     Kelly (IL)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kline
     LaMalfa
     Latham
     Latta
     Long
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Maffei

[[Page H3964]]


     Maloney, Carolyn
     Marino
     Massie
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meehan
     Messer
     Miller (MI)
     Mullin
     Murphy (FL)
     Murphy (PA)
     Negrete McLeod
     Neugebauer
     Nugent
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pearce
     Perlmutter
     Perry
     Peterson
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Rahall
     Reed
     Renacci
     Richmond
     Roby
     Rogers (AL)
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Ross
     Ruiz
     Rush
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Schock
     Schrader
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Sessions
     Sewell (AL)
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Sires
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)

                             NOT VOTING--10

     Cramer
     Gabbard
     Hastings (FL)
     Honda
     Larsen (WA)
     Markey
     McCarthy (NY)
     Miller, Gary
     Miller, George
     Slaughter

                              {time}  1314

  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


               Amendment No. 101 Offered by Mr. Huelskamp

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Kansas 
(Mr. Huelskamp) on which further proceedings were postponed and on 
which the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 175, 
noes 250, not voting 9, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 283]

                               AYES--175

     Aderholt
     Amash
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barton
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Camp
     Campbell
     Cantor
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman
     Collins (GA)
     Cook
     Cotton
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     King (IA)
     Kingston
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Latta
     Long
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Neugebauer
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Perry
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Radel
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thornberry
     Tipton
     Upton
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Weber (TX)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--250

     Alexander
     Andrews
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barrow (GA)
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Benishek
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Capito
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Cole
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cramer
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Denham
     Dent
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fitzpatrick
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Gerlach
     Gibson
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harper
     Heck (NV)
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Joyce
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kelly (PA)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kline
     Kuster
     Lance
     Langevin
     Lankford
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (FL)
     Murphy (PA)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Negrete McLeod
     Noem
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pearce
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reed
     Reichert
     Richmond
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (MI)
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Sires
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stivers
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Valadao
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walorski
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Webster (FL)
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Wolf
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)

                             NOT VOTING--9

     Gutierrez
     Hastings (FL)
     Honda
     Larsen (WA)
     Markey
     McCarthy (NY)
     Miller, Gary
     Sewell (AL)
     Slaughter

                              {time}  1317

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                          Personal Explanation

  Mr. GUTIERREZ. Mr. Chair, I was inadvertently absent and would like 
to show that, had I been present, I would have voted ``yea'' on 
rollcall vote 270, ``nay'' on rollcall vote 274, and ``nay'' on 
rollcall vote 283.


              Amendment No. 102 Offered by Mr. Southerland

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Florida 
(Mr. Southerland) on which further proceedings were postponed and on 
which the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 227, 
noes 198, not voting 9, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 284]

                               AYES--227

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amash
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cooper
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte

[[Page H3965]]


     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Radel
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--198

     Andrews
     Barber
     Barrow (GA)
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fitzpatrick
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Gibson
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Joyce
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     King (NY)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Negrete McLeod
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Richmond
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Sinema
     Sires
     Smith (WA)
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                             NOT VOTING--9

     Carson (IN)
     Hastings (FL)
     Honda
     Larsen (WA)
     Markey
     McCarthy (NY)
     Miller, Gary
     Slaughter
     Speier

                              {time}  1320

  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated against:
  Ms. SPEIER. Mr. Chair, on rollcall No. 284 the vote was gaveled down 
before I could record my vote. Had I been present, I would have voted 
``no.''


                          Personal Explanation

  Mr. HASTINGS of Florida. Mr. Chair, had I been present for the 
following votes, I would have voted accordingly: roll No. 264 on 
agreeing to the amendment Brooks of Alabama Part B Amendment No. 18--
``no'' vote; roll No. 265 on agreeing to the amendment Butterfield of 
North Carolina Part B Amendment No. 25--``yes'' Vote; roll No. 266 on 
agreeing to the amendment Marino of Pennsylvania Part B Amendment No. 
26--``no'' Vote; roll No. 267 on agreeing to the amendment Schweikert 
of Arizona Part B Amendment No. 30--``no'' Vote roll No. 268 on 
agreeing to the amendment Tierney of Massachusetts Part B Amendment No. 
32--``yes'' Vote; 1,6. Roll No. 269 on agreeing to the amendment Polis 
of Colorado Part B Amendment No. 37--``yes'' Vote; roll No. 270 on 
agreeing to the amendment Garamendi of California Part B Amendment No. 
38--``yes'' Vote; roll No. 271 on agreeing to the amendment Marino of 
Pennsylvania Part B Amendment No. 41--``no'' Vote; roll No. 272 on 
agreeing to the amendment McClintock of California Part B Amendment No. 
43--``no'' Vote; roll No. 273 on agreeing to the amendment Gibson/
Meeks/Sean Maloney of New York Part B Amendment No. 44--``yes'' Vote; 
roll No. 274 on agreeing to the amendment Walorski of Indiana Part B 
Amendment No. 45--``no'' Vote; roll No. 275 on agreeing to the 
amendment Courtney of Connecticut Part B Amendment No. 46--``yes'' 
Vote; roll No. 276 on agreeing to the amendment Kind of Wisconsin Part 
B Amendment No. 47--``no'' Vote; roll No. 277 on agreeing to the 
amendment Carney/Radel of Delaware Part B Amendment No. 48--``no'' 
Vote; roll No. 278 on agreeing to the amendment Goodlatte/Scott (GA)/
Moran/Polis/Meeks/ DeGette/Lee of Virginia Part B Amendment No. 99--
``yes'' Vote; roll No. 279 on agreeing to the amendment Radel of 
Florida Part B Amendment No. 49--``no'' Vote; roll No. 280 on agreeing 
to the amendment Walberg of Michigan Part B Amendment No. 50--``yes'' 
Vote; roll No. 281 on agreeing to the amendment Pitts/Davis (IL) of 
Pennsylvania Part B Amendment No. 98--``no'' Vote; roll No. 282 on 
agreeing to the amendment Fortenberry of Nebraska Part B Amendment No. 
100--``no'' Vote; roll No. 283 on agreeing to the amendment Huelskamp 
of Kansas Part B Amendment No. 101--``no'' Vote; roll No. 284 on 
agreeing to the amendment Southerland of Florida Part B Amendment No. 
102--``no'' Vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment in the nature of a 
substitute, as amended.
  The amendment was agreed to.
  The Acting CHAIR. Under the rule, the Committee rises.
  Accordingly, the Committee rose; and the Speaker pro tempore (Mr. 
Yoder) having assumed the chair, Mr. Simpson, Acting Chair of the 
Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union, reported that 
that Committee, having had under consideration the bill (H.R. 1947) to 
provide for the reform and continuation of agricultural and other 
programs of the Department of Agriculture through fiscal year 2018, and 
for other purposes, and, pursuant to House Resolution 271, he reported 
the bill back to the House with an amendment adopted in the Committee 
of the Whole.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Under the rule, the previous question is 
ordered.
  Is a separate vote demanded on any amendment to the amendment 
reported from the Committee of the Whole?
  If not, the question is on the amendment in the nature of a 
substitute, as amended.
  The amendment was agreed to.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the engrossment and third 
reading of the bill.
  The bill was ordered to be engrossed and read a third time, and was 
read the third time.


                           Motion to Recommit

  Ms. BROWNLEY of California. Mr. Speaker, I have a motion to recommit 
at the desk.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is the gentlewoman opposed to the bill?
  Ms. BROWNLEY of California. I am opposed in its current form.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The Clerk will report the motion to 
recommit.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       Page 496, after line 14, add the following:

     SEC. 8408. PROTECTING HOMEOWNERS FROM THE DEVASTATING EFFECTS 
                   OF WILDFIRES IN THE WILDLAND-URBAN INTERFACE.

       The Act of June 4, 1897 (30 Stat. 11) is amended by adding 
     at the end of the second full paragraph at 30 Stat. 35 (16 
     U.S.C. 551) the following new sentence: ``To ensure there are 
     sufficient funds to provide the most modern equipment 
     available for wildfire suppression and to ensure there are 
     adequate numbers of personnel to manage and suppress 
     wildfires, there is authorized to be appropriated to the 
     Secretary of Agriculture such sums as may be necessary for 
     fire suppression equipment and personnel to conduct forest 
     fire presuppression activities on National Forest System 
     lands and emergency fire suppression on or adjacent to such 
     lands or

[[Page H3966]]

     other lands regarding which the Secretary has entered into a 
     fire protection agreement.''.
       Page 379, strike line 21 and all that follows through page 
     380, line 8.
       Page 384, strike lines 3 through 9.
       Page 391, strike lines 19 through 24 and insert the 
     following:

     SEC. ____. CREATING JOBS AND SMALL BUSINESSES IN RURAL 
                   AMERICA, AND PROTECTING SAFE DRINKING WATER.

       (a) Water, Waste Disposal, and Wastewater Facility 
     Grants.--Section 306(a)(2)(B)(vii) of the Consolidated Farm 
     and Rural Development Act (7 U.S.C. 1926(a)(2)(B)(vii)) is 
     amended by striking ``$30,000,000 for each of fiscal years 
     2008 through 2012'' and inserting ``$40,000,000 for each of 
     fiscal years 2014 through 2018''.
       (b) Rural Business Opportunity Grants.--Section 
     306(a)(11)(D) of such Act (7 U.S.C. 1926(a)(11)(D)) is 
     amended by striking ``$15,000,000 for each of fiscal years 
     2008 through 2012'' and inserting ``$20,000,000 for each of 
     fiscal years 2014 through 2018''.
       (c) Emergency and Imminent Community Water Assistance Grant 
     Program.--Section 306A(i)(2) of such Act (7 U.S.C. 
     1926a(i)(2)) is amended by striking ``2008 through 2012'' and 
     inserting ``fiscal years 2014 through 2018''.

  Ms. BROWNLEY of California (during the reading). I ask unanimous 
consent to dispense with the reading.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentlewoman from California?
  Mr. LUCAS. Mr. Speaker, I object to the dispensing of the reading.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Objection is heard.
  The Clerk will read.
  The Clerk continued to read.
  Mr. LUCAS (during the reading). I ask unanimous consent to dispense 
with the reading.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentleman from Oklahoma?
  There was no objection.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentlewoman from California is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
  Ms. BROWNLEY of California. Mr. Speaker, this is the final amendment 
to H.R. 1947. It will not kill the bill or send it back to committee. 
If adopted, the bill will immediately proceed to final passage, as 
amended.
  My amendment is a straightforward improvement that I believe both 
sides can agree is absolutely necessary.
  First, the amendment would protect homes and businesses nationwide 
from devastating fires by funding wildfire suppression, personnel and 
firefighting equipment. Second, the amendment will help create jobs and 
small businesses throughout rural America and will provide safe 
drinking water to these communities as well.
  Mr. Speaker, I proudly represent Ventura County in California. In 
May, we had a dangerous wildfire that burned over 24,000 acres. It 
threatened homes in Camarillo, surrounded Cal State University at 
Channel Islands, and burned parts of Naval Base Ventura County.
  As the Springs Fire raged, we looked for help from the brave men and 
women serving as firefighters, not only from my district, but 
throughout California and the Western States. Due to their tireless 
efforts, homes and businesses were saved, and not one life was lost.
  Following the Springs Fire, I had the opportunity and occasion to 
thank the firefighters in my county.
  They showed me the real time computer equipment they used to 
successfully fight this fire. With this equipment, firefighters could 
predict the direction of the fire and the terrain they would face next 
in real time. They asked that Congress make this lifesaving 
communications equipment available to firefighters across this great 
Nation.
  This is precisely the type of equipment my amendment would help 
provide along with aerial tankers and other firefighting aircraft.
  So many Americans rely on the selfless help of firefighters across 
the Nation, most recently and courageously in fighting the recent fires 
in Colorado that have caused so much damage and loss of precious lives.

                              {time}  1330

  Our firefighters put their lives on the line, and we owe it to them 
and to our communities to provide adequate resources for fire 
suppression, personnel and state-of-the-art equipment.
  My amendment would also support three critical rural development 
programs: water, waste disposal and wastewater facility grants; 
emergency and imminent water assistance grants; and rural business 
opportunity grants.
  These grants help to provide critical water supplies to rural areas 
experiencing drought or other disasters. They also promote sustainable 
economic development, create jobs and build stronger communities.
  Not only would these programs help in Ventura County, which was 
recently declared a rural disaster area by USDA, they would help in 
districts across the Nation suffering from similar and tragic 
hardships.
  I came to Congress not to engage in partisan bickering but to work 
with my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to solve the many 
critical challenges facing our Nation. Partnering with the States and 
our local communities during natural disasters and with communities 
that lack critical resources in difficult economic times is both a 
moral and economic imperative of this body.
  It is with this in mind that I ask my colleagues to support this 
important amendment to help fight wildfires and to support our 
communities when they need it most.
  Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. LUCAS. Mr. Speaker, I rise in opposition to the motion to 
recommit.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman from Oklahoma is recognized 
for 5 minutes.
  Mr. LUCAS. Mr. Speaker, I will not dwell on the points made by the 
good lady, but I would like to take this time to discuss for just a 
moment the process that we've gone through here and the nature of what 
we are trying to do in crafting another 5-year comprehensive farm bill.
  We have gone through the most amazing open process in the House 
Agriculture Committee 2 years in a row, and we achieved consensus.
  The bill this year might not be quite the same as the bill last year, 
and we have gone through, I think, an open process here on the floor 
where 103 or 104 amendments were considered by this body in open debate 
and open discussion and recorded votes in once again trying to achieve 
a consensus.
  I know that not everyone has in this final bill exactly what they 
want. I know some of my very conservative friends think that it doesn't 
go far enough in the name of reform. I know some of my liberal friends 
think it goes too far in the name of addressing the needs of people.
  But I would say to all of you that ultimately this body has to do its 
work. Ultimately, we have to move a product that we can go to 
conference with. Ultimately, we have to work out a consensus with the 
United States Senate so that we will have a final document that we can 
all consider together that hopefully the President will sign into law.
  Now, I have tried in good faith, working with my ranking member and 
each and every one of you in every facet of these issues, to achieve 
that consensus. I have tried, and I hope that you recognize and 
acknowledge that.
  We're at this critical moment. Whether you believe the bill has too 
much reform or not enough, or you believe it cuts too much or it 
doesn't cut enough, we have to move this document forward to achieve a 
common goal, to meet the needs of our citizens. No matter what part of 
the country, no matter whether they produce the food or consume the 
food, we have to meet those common needs in a responsible fashion.
  I plead to you, I implore you to put aside whatever the latest email 
is or the latest flyer is or whatever comment or rumor you've heard 
from people near you or around you. Assess the situation. Look at the 
bill. Vote with me to move this forward. If you care about the 
consumers, the producers, the citizens of this country, move this bill 
forward. If it fails today, I can't guarantee you that you will see in 
this session of Congress another attempt, but I would assure each and 
every one of you, whether it's the appropriations process or amendments 
to other bills, the struggles will go on, but it won't be done in a 
balanced way.
  If you care about your folks, if you care about this institution, if 
you care about utilizing open order, vote with us, vote with me on 
final. If you don't, when you leave here they'll just say it's a 
dysfunctional body, a broken institution full of dysfunctional people.

[[Page H3967]]

That's not true. You know that's not true.
  Cast your vote in a responsible fashion. That's all I can ask.
  Thank you, my friends. I yield back the balance of my time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Without objection, the previous question is 
ordered on the motion to recommit.
  There was no objection.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the motion to recommit.
  The question was taken; and the Speaker pro tempore announced that 
the noes appeared to have it.


                             Recorded Vote

  Ms. BROWNLEY of California. Madam Speaker, I demand a recorded vote.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to clause 8 and clause 9 of rule 
XX, this 5-minute vote on the motion to recommit will be followed by a 
5-minute vote on passage of the bill, if ordered, and approval of the 
Journal, if ordered.
  This is a 5-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 188, 
noes 232, not voting 14, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 285]

                               AYES--188

     Andrews
     Barber
     Barrow (GA)
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Costa
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Holt
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Negrete McLeod
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Richmond
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Sinema
     Sires
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--232

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amash
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cooper
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Radel
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--14

     Brown (FL)
     Cohen
     Courtney
     Davis (CA)
     Hinojosa
     Honda
     Larsen (WA)
     Markey
     McCarthy (NY)
     Miller, Gary
     Miller, George
     Pelosi
     Slaughter
     Tierney

                              {time}  1341

  So the motion to recommit was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated for:
  Mrs. DAVIS of California. Mr. Speaker, on rollcall No. 285, had I 
been present, I would have voted ``yes.''
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the passage of the bill.
  The question was taken; and the Speaker pro tempore announced that 
the ayes appeared to have it.


                             Recorded Vote

  Mr. TONKO. Mr. Speaker, I demand a recorded vote.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. This will be a 5-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 195, 
noes 234, not voting 6, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 286]

                               AYES--195

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amodei
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Boehner
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Braley (IA)
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Brownley (CA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Bustos
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Cole
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Costa
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Cuellar
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Ellmers
     Enyart
     Farenthold
     Farr
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Frelinghuysen
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Gardner
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gosar
     Granger
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Herrera Beutler
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Joyce
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     LaMalfa
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     Loebsack
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Marchant
     Marino
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meadows
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (MI)
     Mullin
     Murphy (FL)
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Petri
     Poe (TX)
     Rahall
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Runyan
     Schock
     Schrader
     Scott, Austin
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Vela
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Walz
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--234

     Amash
     Andrews
     Bachmann
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra

[[Page H3968]]


     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (FL)
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chabot
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coffman
     Cohen
     Collins (GA)
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cook
     Cooper
     Cotton
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Culberson
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     DeSantis
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Fattah
     Fleming
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Franks (AZ)
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garrett
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gowdy
     Graves (GA)
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck (NV)
     Heck (WA)
     Hensarling
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huelskamp
     Huffman
     Hurt
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Labrador
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Massie
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McClintock
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Mulvaney
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Negrete McLeod
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Perry
     Peters (CA)
     Pingree (ME)
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Pocan
     Polis
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Radel
     Rangel
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Rohrabacher
     Rothfus
     Roybal-Allard
     Royce
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sanford
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schwartz
     Schweikert
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Shuster
     Sires
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wenstrup
     Wilson (FL)
     Wolf
     Yarmuth
     Young (FL)

                             NOT VOTING--6

     Honda
     Larsen (WA)
     Markey
     McCarthy (NY)
     Miller, Gary
     Slaughter

                              {time}  1354

  Messrs. COFFMAN and SHUSTER changed their vote from ``aye'' to 
``no.''
  So the bill was not passed.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

                          ____________________