Amendment Text: H.Amdt.243 — 113th Congress (2013-2014)

There is one version of the amendment.

Shown Here:
Amendment as Modified (06/28/2013)

This Amendment appears on page H4152 in the following article from the Congressional Record.



[Pages H4149-H4160]
From the Congressional Record Online through the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]




                      OFFSHORE ENERGY AND JOBS ACT


                             General Leave

  Mr. HASTINGS of Washington. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that 
all Members may have 5 legislative days in which to revise and extend 
their remarks and include extraneous material on the bill, H.R. 2231.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. McClintock). Is there objection to the 
request of the gentleman from Washington?
  There was no objection.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to House Resolution 274 and rule 
XVIII, the Chair declares the House in the Committee of the Whole House 
on the state of the Union for the further consideration of the bill, 
H.R. 2231.
  Will the gentleman from Kansas (Mr. Yoder) kindly take the chair.

                              {time}  0917


                     In the Committee of the Whole

  Accordingly, the House resolved itself into the Committee of the 
Whole House on the state of the Union for the further consideration of 
the bill (H.R. 2231) to amend the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act to 
increase energy exploration and production on the Outer Continental 
Shelf, provide for equitable revenue sharing for all coastal States, 
implement the reorganization of the functions of the former Minerals 
Management Service into distinct and separate agencies, and for other 
purposes, with Mr. Yoder (Acting Chair) in the chair.
  The Clerk read the title of the bill.
  The Acting CHAIR. When the Committee of the Whole rose on Thursday, 
June 27, 2013, amendment No. 7, printed in part B of House Report 113-
131, offered by the gentleman from Virginia (Mr. Rigell), had been 
disposed of.


                 Amendment No. 8 Offered by Mr. DeFazio

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 8 
printed in part B of House Report 113-131.
  Mr. DeFAZIO. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Add at the end the following:

                   TITLE __--MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS

     SEC. _01. PROHIBITION ON LEASING IN BRISTOL BAY OFF THE COAST 
                   OF ALASKA.

       (a) In General.--Notwithstanding any other provision of 
     this Act or any other law, the Secretary of the Interior may 
     not issue any oil and gas lease for any area of the outer 
     Continental Shelf (as that term is defined in the Outer 
     Continental Shelf Lands Act (43 U.S.C. 1331 et seq.)) in 
     Bristol Bay off the coast of Alaska.
       (b) Offset.--Notwithstanding any other provision of this 
     Act, title III of this Act shall have no force or effect.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 274, the gentleman 
from Oregon (Mr. DeFazio) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Oregon.
  Mr. DeFAZIO. Mr. Chairman, this amendment is to remove from the bill 
provisions that would mandate leasing off of the fabulous Bristol Bay 
area of Alaska.
  Now, I've said this bill is a little bit like Groundhog Day because 
we have passed it before, and we talked about that yesterday, but this 
is about a bizarre version of Groundhog Day and why I am forced to 
offer this amendment.

                              {time}  0920

  Actually, after the Exxon Valdez oil spill, I traveled up to the 
spill with then-Subcommittee Chairman George Miller and saw what an 
extraordinary mess had been created, something that in those cold 
waters is very difficult to deal with and very persistent and caused 
tremendous damage to the fisheries. Congress chose then, in 1989, under 
President George H.W. Bush, to revoke the leases in the Bristol Bay 
area in order to protect this $2 billion a year fishery.
  In fact, the American people, the taxpayers of the United States of 
America, paid $100 million to buy back those leases that had been sold 
in the 1980s. That moratorium remained in place until then-President 
George W. Bush lifted the moratorium.
  The Obama administration has done the right thing and reversed George 
W. Bush's decision and excluded Bristol Bay from drilling in the 2012-
2017 OCS leasing program. So we had the first President Bush agree that 
a permanent protection of that area was warranted because of the $2-
billion-a-year renewable fishery and other precious resources, the cold 
water, the difficult conditions. George W. Bush then reversed that, and 
President Obama has reinstated a moratorium.

[[Page H4150]]

  Now this bill would mandate leasing off of Bristol Bay. Obviously, 
there's always division over these issues, but there is strong public 
opposition to drilling in Bristol Bay--55 tribes, Native Alaskan 
associations, and fishing organizations are opposed to the drilling in 
that area. National environmental groups like Trout Unlimited, Wild 
Salmon Center, and Natural Resources Defense Council also support this 
amendment.
  This is a precious and irreplaceable area. One major spill in that 
area would devastate the environment, the fishery that supports 
thousands of jobs in Alaska. Actually jobs all up and down the west 
coast of the United States are dependent upon the fabulous fishery of 
Bristol Bay, both the commercial and the sport fishing. I have guides 
in Oregon who spend their summers in Alaska guiding in the Bristol Bay 
area. It attracts people from around the world.
  We should not put this extraordinary resource at risk in this bill 
for some possible, potential future oil revenues in a State which is 
already quite rich in oil, where the former Naval Petroleum Reserve has 
been leased but, as in the case of many leases that the oil industry 
holds, is not developed. That is why it was the Naval Petroleum 
Reserve. There are known and large resources under that area of Alaska. 
The balance is clearly in favor of protecting this area, not another 
area to drill given the resources already available in Alaska.
  I had to do a so-called ``pay-for.'' Last night we passed the Cassidy 
amendment, which increases the Federal deficit by $15 billion--excuse 
me, $14,999,999,970--over 30 years by lifting the cap on revenue 
sharing with the Gulf States. That's costing, they say, $1 less than 
$500 million a year. That didn't have to be paid for. They waived the 
rules. But because I want to protect this fabulous resource, they're 
saying you're forgoing potential possible future revenues for the 
government, you must pay for it. So unfortunately, given that, I had to 
move to strike title III so we could protect this resource.
  With that, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. HASTINGS of Washington. Mr. Chairman, I rise to claim time in 
opposition to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. HASTINGS of Washington. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself such time as 
I may consume.
  My good friend from Oregon talked about Groundhog Day as to the 
nature of this bill. I can say, ``Well, here we go again.''
  Instead of debating ways to create jobs, to enhance revenues, and to 
secure our Nation from a national security standpoint, we are back to 
debating a moratorium on offshore drilling that will lock away 
America's energy resources. Specifically, this amendment would close a 
wide area of Federal waters from drilling off the State of Alaska. But 
this amendment doesn't just lock away America's resources, it also 
eliminates State revenue-sharing provisions in the bill.
  President Obama has already closed the North Aleutian Basin through 
Presidential moratorium, closing off jobs and economic diversity to the 
people of Alaska through 2017. The underlying legislation does not in 
any way modify this unscientific Presidential closure or modify the 
existing Presidential authority. It does, however--and this is 
important, Mr. Chairman--provide that if this region contains some of 
our Nation's greatest potential for energy, that we should open that 
area for the future. I know that logic is sometimes lost in this town, 
but in all honesty, Mr. Chairman, we should be drilling offshore in 
those areas where we know the most resources are located or potentially 
located.
  The Natural Resources Committee has heard testimony time and time 
again about young people leaving Alaska to chase jobs elsewhere. We 
have also heard from the Aleutians, such as the Aleutians East Borough 
mayor Stanley Mack, who spoke of how the opportunity for drilling in 
the southern portion of the North Aleutian Basin could be a real 
economic benefit for their communities.
  This economic diversification is even more important when you 
consider the petitions of extreme environmental groups proposing 
massive fishery closures across Bristol Bay and the region, or the 
potential for the declaration of a no-fishing national monument in 
those areas, or the grave threat posed to fishing in Alaska in the 
north Pacific by President Obama's executive order on ocean zoning, 
where bureaucrats in Washington, D.C., will decide what happens and 
what doesn't happen in ocean areas off Alaska and other States.
  Finally, this amendment also eliminates revenue sharing for all 
coastal States, preventing Alaska, Virginia, South Carolina, 
California, and others from receiving a share of any energy development 
off their shores.
  This important provision is about bringing fairness to the Outer 
Continental Shelf revenue sharing instead of limiting it to only four 
States. Right now, only the Gulf States have that privilege.
  When gas prices climbed to $4 a gallon in 2008, the American people 
strongly supported lifting the Nation's offshore drilling bans, and 
that support ran across the political spectrum, from Independents, to 
Republicans, to Democrats. And that broad support for expanding 
offshore drilling, frankly, continues to this day in this country.
  This amendment would start us down the road of imposing new 
moratoriums on America's offshore, which is the opposite of what 
Americans want. And let me make this point, Mr. Chairman, and I said 
this several times in the committee. If there is a poster child of a 
State that was promised something when they got statehood and the 
reverse is being done, it's got to be Alaska.
  I know there's controversy surrounding the potential in the Bristol 
Bay, but it's not unanimous on either side. But those in Alaska 
certainly should be the ones that are integrally involved in that 
decisionmaking process. But, no, here we have today an amendment from a 
Member of Congress, who has every right to do it, but from the Lower 
48, dictating what's going to go on in Alaska. Again, that to me 
solidifies the poster child of a State really not getting what it 
should be getting from its resources after statehood.
  I urge my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to defeat this 
amendment. And as I understand the gentleman from Oregon has yielded 
back his time, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Oregon (Mr. DeFazio).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. DeFAZIO. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Oregon will 
be postponed.

                              {time}  0930


            Amendment No. 9 Offered by Mr. Broun of Georgia

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 9 
printed in part B of House Report 113-131.
  Mr. BROUN of Georgia. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Add at the end the following:

                       TITLE __--JUDICIAL REVIEW

     SEC. _01. TIME FOR FILING COMPLAINT.

       (a) In General.--Any cause of action that arises from a 
     covered energy decision must be filed not later than the end 
     of the 60-day period beginning on the date of the covered 
     energy decision. Any cause of action not filed within this 
     time period shall be barred.
       (b) Exception.--Subsection (a) shall not apply to a cause 
     of action brought by a party to a covered energy lease.

     SEC. _02. DISTRICT COURT DEADLINE.

       (a) In General.--All proceedings that are subject to 
     section _01--
       (1) shall be brought in the United States district court 
     for the district in which the Federal property for which a 
     covered energy lease is issued is located or the United 
     States District Court of the District of Columbia;
       (2) shall be resolved as expeditiously as possible, and in 
     any event not more than 180 days after such cause or claim is 
     filed; and
       (3) shall take precedence over all other pending matters 
     before the district court.
       (b) Failure to Comply With Deadline.--If an interlocutory 
     or final judgment, decree, or order has not been issued by 
     the district court by the deadline described under this

[[Page H4151]]

     section, the cause or claim shall be dismissed with prejudice 
     and all rights relating to such cause or claim shall be 
     terminated.

     SEC. _03. ABILITY TO SEEK APPELLATE REVIEW.

       An interlocutory or final judgment, decree, or order of the 
     district court in a proceeding that is subject to section _01 
     may be reviewed by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District 
     of Columbia Circuit. The D.C. Circuit shall resolve any such 
     appeal as expeditiously as possible and, in any event, not 
     more than 180 days after such interlocutory or final 
     judgment, decree, or order of the district court was issued.

     SEC. _04. LIMITATION ON SCOPE OF REVIEW AND RELIEF.

       (a) Administrative Findings and Conclusions.--In any 
     judicial review of any Federal action under this title, any 
     administrative findings and conclusions relating to the 
     challenged Federal action shall be presumed to be correct 
     unless shown otherwise by clear and convincing evidence 
     contained in the administrative record.
       (b) Limitation on Prospective Relief.--In any judicial 
     review of any action, or failure to act, under this title, 
     the Court shall not grant or approve any prospective relief 
     unless the Court finds that such relief is narrowly drawn, 
     extends no further than necessary to correct the violation of 
     a Federal law requirement, and is the least intrusive means 
     necessary to correct the violation concerned.

     SEC. 05. LEGAL FEES.

       Any person filing a petition seeking judicial review of any 
     action, or failure to act, under this title who is not a 
     prevailing party shall pay to the prevailing parties 
     (including intervening parties), other than the United 
     States, fees and other expenses incurred by that party in 
     connection with the judicial review, unless the Court finds 
     that the position of the person was substantially justified 
     or that special circumstances make an award unjust.

     SEC. _06. EXCLUSION.

       This title shall not apply with respect to disputes between 
     the parties to a lease issued pursuant to an authorizing 
     leasing statute regarding the obligations of such lease or 
     the alleged breach thereof.

     SEC. _07. DEFINITIONS.

       In this title, the following definitions apply:
       (1) Covered energy decision.--The term ``covered energy 
     decision'' means any action or decision by a Federal official 
     regarding the issuance of a covered energy lease.
       (2) Covered energy lease.--The term ``covered energy 
     lease'' means any lease under this Act or under an oil and 
     gas leasing program under this Act.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 274, the gentleman 
from Georgia (Mr. Broun) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Georgia.
  Mr. BROUN of Georgia. Mr. Chairman, the bill before us today has 
great potential to create jobs, to boost our economy, and provide our 
country with new, much-needed sources of energy. But as written, it 
also has the potential to invite frivolous, duplicative lawsuits filed 
by outside entities with no real tie to the individual contracts 
stemming from this legislation.
  Mr. Chairman, we have seen it happen time and time again: situations 
in which the community, the developer, and the Federal Government are 
all on the same page, but plans are ultimately ground to a halt by 
activist environmental groups that file lawsuit after lawsuit in order 
to stop the development in its tracks.
  My amendment would stop this cycle as it relates to projects begun 
under this bill. It would allow individuals and groups not party to a 
lease under this bill to file a suit once--only once--within 60 days of 
an official action under the bill. Should a suing entity lose, it would 
be allowed an appeal to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of 
Columbia Circuit, and final resolution would have to be reached within 
180 days.
  Finally, my amendment would also include a ``loser pays'' standard, 
meant to protect taxpayers and discourage the filing of a suit without 
true legal merit.
  Mr. Chairman, the underlying bill would do much to move our country 
ahead, but I fear that we will not reach our full potential unless this 
important language is included.
  Mr. HASTINGS of Washington. Will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. BROUN of Georgia. I yield to the gentleman.
  Mr. HASTINGS of Washington. I thank the gentleman for yielding, and I 
just simply want to say that I think the amendment adds to this 
legislation, and I support the legislation.
  Mr. BROUN of Georgia. Mr. Chairman, I thank the gentleman.
  I urge support of my amendment, and I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. JOHNSON of Georgia. Mr. Chairman, I rise to claim the time in 
opposition to this amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. JOHNSON of Georgia. Mr. Chairman, I rise in strong opposition to 
this amendment.
  To begin with, this amendment creates a major obstacle for parties 
such as States, municipalities, local entities, and nonprofit 
organizations from challenging unsound licensing decisions in the 
courts.
  It does this by requiring the losing side in these disputes to pay 
the legal costs, not just of the prevailing party, but for every 
intervening party as well. Just imagine what this would mean.
  How could a local beach community risk bringing an action knowing 
that it may have to pay for its own legal costs, let alone the legal 
costs of all of the parties in the case, which could include some of 
the Nation's largest oil and gas producers. Without question, this 
draconian cost-shifting regime will have a chilling effect on the right 
of individuals, municipalities, and nonprofit organizations to 
challenge licensing decisions that could have devastating effects on 
their communities.
  Sure, the provision allows the losing party to argue that its 
position was substantially justified or that special circumstances make 
such an award unjust, but even meeting that standard could require 
extensive litigation.
  This savings provision offers the tiniest of fig leafs. It is clear 
that the real intent of this provision is to ensure that only the 
wealthiest members of society will be able to litigate these issues.
  Second, this amendment is not necessary. Current law already 
authorizes a Federal court to sanction a party for filing frivolous 
actions or for engaging in wrongful conduct. Federal rule of Civil 
Procedure 11 deems every pleading, motion, and any other paper filed by 
a party in a Federal proceeding to be a certification by such party: 
that it is not being presented for an improper purpose; that the claims 
and legal contentions asserted in the pleadings are warranted by 
existing law; and that the factual contentions made in the pleading 
have evidentiary support.
  And should the court find that any of those requirements have been 
violated, the court may impose an appropriate sanction, including 
requiring the offending party to pay all of the prevailing party's 
reasonable attorneys' fees and other expenses arising from the 
violation.
  In addition, the court, under certain circumstances, may also impose 
monetary sanctions against a party who violates rule 11. So, in sum, 
this amendment is simply not necessary.
  Third, this amendment is not only an affront to the independence of 
the Federal judiciary, but it could seriously disrupt the ability of 
the courts to meet its obligations to litigants in other pending 
matters. The amendment does this by setting hard-and-fast deadlines 
that ignore the complexities of the individual case or the court's 
schedule. And it requires the court to prioritize these actions over 
all other pending matters before the court.
  Not surprisingly, the Judicial Conference of the U.S. has long 
opposed legislative efforts to impose specific deadlines and mandate 
that certain actions be prioritized over others for some very important 
reasons. By imposing rigid deadlines, measures such as this amendment 
undermine the effective civil case management and unduly hamper the 
court's discretion in managing and prioritizing its case docket. Each 
case should be considered on its own merits without the imposition of 
artificial deadlines.
  Worse yet, this amendment specifically provides that if the district 
court fails to meet this deadline, the case must be dismissed with 
prejudice and terminates all rights relating to cause or claim. Just 
imagine how a defendant could use this provision to its advantage by 
running the clock through delaying tactics such as employing a 
multiplicity of procedures and time-consuming discovery demands. This 
amendment is anti-justice. It must be opposed.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. BROUN of Georgia. Mr. Chairman, I'm not advocating for ``loser 
pays'' in all civil cases. My amendment relates only to these specific 
cases, in

[[Page H4152]]

which an extremist environmental group files suit after suit simply to 
stop the development of natural resources and energy resources on 
American soil. Under my amendment, parties to a lease aren't subject to 
this standard.
  Furthermore, my amendment does not undo the ability for members of 
the community who are concerned about a particular lease to petition 
the government--State or Federal--during the NEPA process.
  Finally, while I understand the concern that ``loser pays'' harms 
complainants with the least amount of disposable income, I would simply 
say that near-record gas prices are harming them and are hurting the 
most vulnerable in our society, poor people and senior citizens on 
limited income. In fact, my colleague from Georgia, my good friend, was 
saying it's unnecessary. But if it's unnecessary, he shouldn't be 
afraid of this amendment. This is a commonsense amendment, and I urge 
its support.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Georgia (Mr. Broun).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. JOHNSON of Georgia. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Georgia will 
be postponed.

                              {time}  0940


         Amendment No. 10, as Modified, Offered by Mr. Grayson

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 10 
printed in part B of House Report 113-131, as modified by the order of 
the House on June 27, 2013.
  Mr. GRAYSON. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment, as modified, is as follows:

       Add at the end the following:

                   TITLE __--MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS

     SEC. __. STATE RIGHTS AND AUTHORITY NOT AFFECTED.

       Nothing in this Act and the amendments made by this Act 
     affects the right and power of each State to prohibit 
     management, leasing, developing, and use of lands beneath 
     navigable waters, and the natural resources within such 
     lands, within its boundaries.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 274, the gentleman 
from Florida (Mr. Grayson) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Florida.
  Mr. GRAYSON. Mr. Chairman, this is a simple savings clause amendment 
of the kind that we include typically, frequently, in almost every bill 
that's a major bill that passes this House. It says as follows:

       Nothing in this Act and the amendments made by this Act 
     affects the right and power of each State to prohibit 
     management, leasing, developing, and use of lands beneath 
     navigable waters, and the natural resources within such 
     lands, within its boundaries.

  The simple purpose of this is to avoid any implication by this 
statute that it is taking away any rights of any State, including my 
State of Florida, where drilling rights are a matter of extreme 
controversy.
  Now, why do we do this? Because of the Constitution, because the 
supremacy clause in the Constitution says the Federal law is the 
highest law of the land. And whenever we're dealing with any area, any 
area at all of the law, where there are states' rights and there are 
Federal rights, it's incumbent upon us to explain that we are 
preserving those State rights, not just in this bill but in every bill.
  In fact, we are shoring up the provision that exists already in 43 
U.S.C. 1311, entitled ``Rights of States.''
  And why do we need to do that?
  Because this is a comprehensive scheme to regulate offshore drilling 
in this country, and when you establish any comprehensive scheme, you 
run the risk that a court will determine that you have obliterated, you 
have annihilated, you have eliminated states' rights. That is what 
happens when you pass a law that is a comprehensive Federal scheme.
  Now, yesterday, we had a similar amendment come up. In that case the 
vote was a very exciting 213-213 tie vote. And the arguments that were 
made against the amendment yesterday today simply do not apply.
  Yesterday, if you may recall, Mr. Chairman, a map was provided by the 
opposition to that amendment. The map pointed out that the drilling in 
that area was limited to offshore drilling on the U.S.-Mexico border.
  Well, today, we're dealing with drilling from sea to shining sea, 
dealing with all of our shores. So that limitation that was promoted 
yesterday doesn't apply.
  Yesterday, there was an argument made at the last minute that, 
somehow or other, the definition of States in this amendment applied to 
Mexican states, which was absurd and ridiculous, and yet, it was made 
against that amendment. All you had to do is look at the definition, 
not just in the title, but in the chapter and the subchapter of the 
word ``States,'' and you would see that the word ``States'' is defined 
as limited to the United States of America.
  Now, today's bill provides a much greater threat to Federal 
preemption of State law than yesterday's bill did. In fact, this bill 
explicitly entangles Federal and State law together in this area under 
section 1344(a)(2)(F) of this bill. This actually establishes a 
consultation regarding the States which could be construed as being in 
lieu of and extinguishing states' rights.
  It's a clear error in the drafting of this bill, and my amendment is 
necessary to protect it. My amendment is necessary to prevent a 
preemption, through this bill, of states' rights.
  This bill clearly, as drafted, conflates Federal and states' rights 
and would lead to a disastrous preemption of states' rights based upon 
section 1344(a)(2)(F) alone.
  Now, today we have new arguments that have been made against this 
simple savings provision, and neither one of those arguments carries 
any weight. One argument that we've already heard is that this bill 
couldn't possibly preempt states' rights.
  Well, in fact, it could possibly preempt states' rights. I've 
explained to you how that could happen. Any Federal court could look at 
this bill, reach the conclusion, particularly with regard to the 
presence of 1344(a)(2)(F), that this is a comprehensive Federal scheme, 
and it preempts states' rights.
  We've never heard any explanation from anyone opposing this amendment 
as to how it could not preempt states' rights.
  Secondly, we've heard an argument which, respectfully, verges on the 
specious, that this amendment somehow would negate individual rights, 
and that is completely false, completely without any merit.
  In fact, I would venture to say that there has never been a case 
where a statute or an amendment or a bill that contains the phrase 
``Nothing in this Act affects the right and power of each State''--I 
don't know how that could ever be construed as somehow negating 
individual rights.
  Clearly, on its own terms, explicitly, this amendment simply 
preserves states' rights.
  We are in a fundamentally different situation today than we were 
yesterday because of the presence of section 1344(a)(2)(F) in this 
bill. There is a far greater need today than there was yesterday with 
the tie vote to have this amendment here as a savings clause.
  I would call, respectfully, upon the chairman of the committee to 
agree to this amendment today and let us move on.
  The Acting CHAIR. The time of the gentleman has expired.
  Mr. HASTINGS of Washington. I rise to claim time in opposition to the 
amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. HASTINGS of Washington. I yield myself as much time as I may 
consume.
  Mr. Chairman, here we go again with unnecessary amendments designed 
to delay the work of Congress in enacting important legislation that 
would expand U.S. offshore energy production in order to create, once 
again, millions of new American jobs, to lower energy prices, to grow 
our economy, and strengthen our national security.
  H.R. 2231 is similar to legislation passed last Congress and fully 
upholds existing states' rights within their boundaries and offshore 
areas. Nothing

[[Page H4153]]

in this bill changes the fundamental 60-year-old relationship between 
States and the Federal Government enshrined in the Submerged Lands Act 
or the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act.
  This bill is focused on activity in Federal waters and respects 
States' abilities to control and govern their waters. States' authority 
is in no way limited or affected by this bill. Existing Federal law 
protects states' rights over their waters, and boundaries are not 
changed or amended in this bill. I've now repeated that three times.
  The gentleman's amendment is asserted as a simple restatement of 
these states' rights, though its sponsor admits the principle is not a 
restatement of existing law, but of the principle--big difference in 
that, Mr. Chairman, which is where the amendment then raises several 
serious questions that leads me to oppose its adoption in the form that 
it is written.
  As drafted, the amendment purportedly reflects current law with 
regards to management of natural resources, but it could effectively 
usurp the individual private property rights of individuals in favor of 
State control.
  The amendment reads that it is the right and power of each State to 
prohibit management, leasing, developing the natural resources within 
such lands within its boundaries.
  States have the right to regulate natural resources, but not outright 
prohibit development of private property. That's the point here, Mr. 
Chairman.
  In the United States, unlike much of the remainder of the world, 
natural resources are owned both by the government and private 
individuals. The right to private property is one of the foundations of 
our Constitution. Natural resources property rights include the right 
to own minerals, timber rights, water rights, and those are just a few 
examples.
  Congress should not be endorsing a policy that gives the States sole 
power to prohibit the development of these rights, and that's what this 
amendment could do. Such an action, like that embodied in this 
amendment, could be construed as a massive taking, in violation of the 
Constitution.
  The government can't take property without compensation. The courts 
have held, including this week, in the gentleman's State of Florida, a 
Florida case at the Supreme Court that the State taking property or 
impinging on its fair use requires fair compensation.
  Even if a State may not be inclined to fully exercise such authority 
granted by this amendment, should it become law, simple passage could 
open the door to lawsuits challenging private property rights. It's for 
these reasons that I urge a ``no'' vote on the Grayson amendment.
  And Mr. Chairman, at a time when our Nation's economy continues to 
struggle, we should avoid erecting new barriers to economic activity 
and private freedoms.
  Again, this amendment is unnecessary, as H.R. 2231 fully upholds and 
it does not change or diminish or impinge existing states' rights.
  How much time do I have left, Mr. Chairman?
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman has 1 minute remaining.
  Mr. HASTINGS of Washington. I'd like to yield 45 seconds to the 
gentleman from Colorado (Mr. Lamborn).
  Mr. LAMBORN. I thank the chairman of the full committee, 
Representative Hastings. And I'll just reinforce the last point he was 
making.
  And I don't believe that the gentleman from Florida intended his 
language to do this. But it says it is the right and power of each 
State to prohibit management, leasing, developing of the natural 
resources within such lands within its boundaries.
  I don't believe it was intended, but this could have the dangerous 
consequence of trampling on private property rights.

                              {time}  0950

  It's been tried in the Fifth Amendment, and that is a vital core 
principle in our Bill of Rights. And I know that you didn't intend 
that, but this language could lead to that. For that reason alone, we 
should reject this amendment. This could have dangerous consequences.
  So I agree with the full chairman, the gentleman from Washington. 
Let's reject this amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Washington has 15 seconds 
remaining.
  Mr. HASTINGS of Washington. I just want to make this point in the 15 
seconds I have left.
  The gentleman from Florida referenced 1334(a)2(f). That is not 
amended or referenced in this bill. So the gentleman's argument that 
that could somehow play a part in that is simply not true because it's 
not referenced; it is not amended.
  I urge rejection of the amendment, and I yield back the balance of my 
time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment, as modified, 
offered by the gentleman from Florida (Mr. Grayson).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. GRAYSON. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Florida will 
be postponed.


                 Amendment No. 11 Offered by Mrs. Capps

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 11 
printed in part B of House Report 113-131.
  Mrs. CAPPS. Mr. Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Add at the end the following:

                   TITLE __--MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS

     SEC. __. PROVISIONS NOT EFFECTIVE.

        Notwithstanding any other provision of this Act, section 
     203 and title III shall have no force or effect.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 274, the gentlewoman 
from California (Mrs. Capps) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from California.
  Mrs. CAPPS. I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Mr. Chairman, this is a straightforward amendment that is 
overwhelmingly supported by my constituents, and I hope we can all 
agree to it. The amendment strikes a harmful and unnecessary provision 
in the bill that actually mandates new drilling in the sensitive waters 
off Santa Barbara and Ventura Counties in my district. Whatever the 
reasons behind this provision, the fact remains that the people most 
affected--my constituents--don't want new drilling.
  My colleagues have heard me before invoke Santa Barbara's devastating 
1969 oil spill, and that's because it galvanized central coast 
residents and actually the entire State of California against more 
offshore drilling. We were outraged by the damage to the environment, 
wildlife, and our economy.
  We understood the havoc that similar blowouts could wreak on our 
economy, especially our tourism and our fishing industries. That's why 
California permanently banned new oil and gas leasing in State waters 
in 1994. It's why some 24 city and county governments, including both 
Santa Barbara and Ventura Counties, have passed measures banning or 
requiring voter approval before any new onshore facilities to support 
offshore drilling can be built. And it's why in 2008, then-Republican 
Governor Schwarzenegger told President Bush and Congress to oppose new 
drilling off the west coast. Even the Pentagon has expressed concerns 
with new drilling in the area.
  Mr. Chair, Californians have spoken loud and clear. We do not want 
more drilling off our shores. I urge my colleagues to join us in 
striking these harmful and unnecessary provisions from the bill and 
support the Capps-Brownley-Lowenthal amendment.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. HASTINGS of Washington. Mr. Chairman, I rise to claim time in 
opposition.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. HASTINGS of Washington. I yield 3 minutes to the gentleman from 
California (Mr. McClintock).
  Mr. McCLINTOCK. I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  Mr. Chairman, when Juan Cabrillo first sailed up the Santa Barbara 
Channel in 1542, he noted a massive natural oil slick. That's how vast 
California's petroleum resources are.
  Today, we hear much about the Bakken shale oil formation that has

[[Page H4154]]

produced unparalleled prosperity for North Dakota. Yet California's 
Monterey oil deposit is nearly five times the size of the Bakken field 
in North Dakota. California also has 1.6 billion barrels of untapped 
offshore oil in unleased acreage right now that can be reached with 
slant drilling from onshore. But California's resources are placed off 
limits by the ideological extremism that is now on full display 
courtesy of the amendment offered by my colleagues from California. 
They have had their way in California for a full generation, and I've 
watched their folly take what once could boast of being America's 
Golden State and turn it into an economic basket case and a national 
laughingstock.
  California's unemployment rate is the second highest in the Nation at 
8.6 percent. North Dakota's is the lowest at 3.2 percent. Yesterday, 
the average price per gallon of gas in California was $4.03. In North 
Dakota, it was $3.69. Since 2000, California's reliance on foreign oil 
imports has literally doubled as a percentage and tripled as a volume. 
They're not helping the environment.
  When I grew up in Ventura County 50 years ago, everyone on the coast 
kept pans of turpentine in their garages to wash off the globs of 
natural tar that you couldn't avoid as you walked on the beach. The 
offshore oil development of that era relieved the natural pressure that 
had polluted the waters of Santa Barbara Channel for centuries, and 
over several decades the tar disappeared and the beaches have never 
been cleaner.
  Those were also the days when California literally led our Nation's 
economy. People had high-paying jobs, low energy bills, and families 
from across America seeking a better future for their children flocked 
to California. Now those same families flee from California.
  Mr. Chairman, if I sound a little bitter, it's because I am. I have 
watched their policies destroy the promise and prosperity of my Golden 
State for my children. For God's sake, don't let them destroy our 
country.
  Mrs. CAPPS. I'll just make the quick comment that the suggestion that 
oil seeps are good for the environment or that more oil drilling would 
reduce oil seeps is simply bad science. Even the authors of the one 
study that suggested this might be possible have repudiated its use 
before Congress.
  I am pleased now to yield 2 minutes to my colleague, the gentleman 
from coastal California (Mr. Lowenthal).
  Mr. LOWENTHAL. I thank the gentlewoman from California, who has been 
an outstanding champion of ocean protection.
  Mr. Chairman, I rise in support of this amendment. It would not only 
honor the wishes of the Governor of California, but also the vast 
majority of the Federal and State representatives, especially all those 
that are closest to where this misguided bill would not only authorize, 
but would force the sale of offshore oil and gas leases. These are the 
people who would bear the greatest risk of any oil spill, which, as we 
all know, has already occurred in the past in these waters.
  As I just said, the underlying bill we are considering today not only 
just authorizes, but it mandates lease sales in vast portions of the 
Outer Continental Shelf, including southern California, forcing the 
Interior Department and the States to accept leases in their backyards, 
regardless of the opposition from potential impacts. And it not only 
does that, it bars citizens from properly participating in the process.
  What do I mean? This bill lacks meaningful environmental review and a 
chance for Americans to voice their informed consent by not allowing 
any consideration of any nonleasing alternative in the NEPA process.
  Instead, what does the bill do? It dictates to the public, it 
dictates to the States, it dictates to the Interior Department, without 
any of their input, where oil and gas leases will be held. This would 
occur regardless of whether the public has legitimate concerns or not. 
Too bad. They're going to drill in our backyard.
  Mr. Chair, instead of focusing on dead-end legislation, this body 
should be preparing for our energy future, which I believe the public 
will demand more and more.
  I urge a ``yes'' vote on the amendment.
  Mr. HASTINGS of Washington. I reserve the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentlewoman from California has 1 minute 
remaining.
  Mrs. CAPPS. I yield myself the balance of my time.
  Mr. Chair, this amendment simply ensures that the express will of my 
constituents and the people of California is respected. I find it 
ironic that some of the same people in this body who decry the 
overarching Federal Government seem to have no qualms about forcing new 
drilling upon a local population directly against its wishes.

                              {time}  1000

  The American people are tired of these political games, especially 
those that put our coasts, our communities, and our way of life at 
risk. Instead of expanding oil and gas drilling, we should be working 
together on a responsible, sustainable energy policy for the future.
  We can't end our dependence on oil overnight, but we can certainly do 
more to encourage innovation and clean energy technologies like solar, 
wind, and biofuels. We can enact better efficiency standards to make 
the resources we do have last longer, and we can end the billions of 
dollars in giveaways for Big Oil and finally level the playing field 
for all types of energy technology.
  A clean energy future is good for jobs, it's good for our 
environment, and it's good for the American people. This bill is just 
another recycled bad idea designed to go nowhere.
  Doubling down on oil drilling may be good policy for oil companies, 
but it's terrible policy for the American people. This amendment would 
help stop these games and stop the reckless expansion of oil drilling 
off the southern California coast.
  I urge my colleagues to respect the will of California's voters and 
support this amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The time of the gentlewoman has expired.
  Mr. HASTINGS of Washington. Mr. Chairman, may I inquire as to how 
much time I have remaining?
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman has 2 minutes remaining.
  Mr. HASTINGS of Washington. I yield myself the balance of my time.
  Mr. Chairman, I just want to make this point. The fundamental reason 
for H.R. 2231 is to expand energy production in American waters. This 
amendment would put another moratorium; it goes the opposite direction. 
Furthermore, this amendment would eliminate revenue sharing, which has 
worked so well in the gulf coast.
  But here's the point I want to make specifically about California 
that was not made by my two colleagues on the other side of the aisle 
from California. This legislation directs that any offshore drilling 
should come from existing rigs onshore. That is possible to do, Mr. 
Chairman, because of the new technologies--horizontal drilling--that 
the oil industry has done for several years. It works. As a matter of 
fact, Mr. Chairman, the Governor of the State of California, Jerry 
Brown, has proposed precisely that for State waters.
  Now, my colleagues on the other side of the aisle from California 
didn't mention that--I don't know why they didn't mention it, because 
their Governor is in favor of that process. What this bill does is 
simply mirror that by saying we'll do that in Federal waters.
  I think my colleague from California (Mr. McClintock) put it in a 
very good way: California, like the United States, needs a jump-start 
in the economy. The best way to do that is through energy production, 
providing a certainty of energy for a growing economy in the future.
  With that, I urge rejection of the amendment, and I yield back the 
balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from California (Mrs. Capps).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mrs. CAPPS. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from California 
will be postponed.


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, proceedings 
will

[[Page H4155]]

now resume on those amendments printed in part B of House Report 113-
131 on which further proceedings were postponed, in the following 
order:
  Amendment No. 8 by Mr. DeFazio of Oregon.
  Amendment No. 9 by Mr. Broun of Georgia.
  Amendment No. 10 by Mr. Grayson of Florida.
  Amendment No. 11 by Mrs. Capps of California.
  The Chair will reduce to 2 minutes the minimum time for any 
electronic vote after the first vote in this series.


                 Amendment No. 8 Offered by Mr. DeFazio

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Oregon 
(Mr. DeFazio) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 183, 
noes 235, not voting 16, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 299]

                               AYES--183

     Andrews
     Bachmann
     Barber
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck (WA)
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Himes
     Holt
     Honda
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Markey
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Negrete McLeod
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reichert
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--235

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amash
     Amodei
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Calvert
     Camp
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Costa
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallego
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Hinojosa
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Maloney, Sean
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Radel
     Reed
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Vela
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--16

     Bass
     Bishop (UT)
     Campbell
     Coble
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Kaptur
     Langevin
     McCarthy (NY)
     McMorris Rodgers
     Nunes
     Perlmutter
     Smith (WA)
     Young (FL)

                              {time}  1035

  Mr. MEEHAN changed his vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  Ms. LINDA T. SANCHEZ of California and Ms. HERRERA BEUTLER changed 
their vote from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated for:
  Mr. LANGEVIN. Mr. Chair, on rollcall 299, had I been present, I would 
have voted ``yes.''


            Amendment No. 9 Offered by Mr. Broun of Georgia

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Georgia 
(Mr. Broun) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 217, 
noes 202, not voting 15, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 300]

                               AYES--217

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Calvert
     Camp
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Garamendi
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts

[[Page H4156]]


     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Radel
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--202

     Amash
     Andrews
     Barber
     Barrow (GA)
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Fattah
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garcia
     Gibson
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     King (NY)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Markey
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Negrete McLeod
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Poe (TX)
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Richmond
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (NJ)
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Terry
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                             NOT VOTING--15

     Bass
     Bishop (UT)
     Campbell
     Coble
     Farr
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Goodlatte
     Kaptur
     McCarthy (NY)
     McMorris Rodgers
     Nunes
     Perlmutter
     Smith (WA)
     Young (FL)

                              {time}  1040

  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                          personal explanation

  Mr. GOODLATTE. Mr. Chair, I regret that I was detained at the 
beginning of the vote series on June 28, 2013 during votes on 
amendments to H.R. 2231, the Offshore Energy and Jobs Act. Had I been 
present, my intention was to vote ``no'' on the DeFazio Amendment and 
``yes'' on the Broun amendment.
  Again, I regret that I was detained.


         Amendment No. 10, as Modified, Offered by Mr. Grayson

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Florida 
(Mr. Grayson) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 209, 
noes 210, not voting 15, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 301]

                               AYES--209

     Andrews
     Barber
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera (CA)
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Buchanan
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crenshaw
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Fattah
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Gibson
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Markey
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Neal
     Negrete McLeod
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Polis
     Posey
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Radel
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Rice (SC)
     Richmond
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (NJ)
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth
     Yoho

                               NOES--210

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amash
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Calvert
     Camp
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Culberson
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Price (GA)
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (AK)
     Young (IN)

[[Page H4157]]



                             NOT VOTING--15

     Bass
     Bishop (UT)
     Campbell
     Coble
     Farr
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Kaptur
     McCarthy (NY)
     McMorris Rodgers
     Napolitano
     Nunes
     Perlmutter
     Smith (WA)
     Young (FL)

                              {time}  1046

  Mr. BROOKS of Alabama changed his vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  So the amendment, as modified, was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                          PERSONAL EXPLANATION

  Mr. FARR. Mr. Chair, on rollcall No. 300--Brown (GA) Amendment 301--
Grayson (FL) Amendment. Had I been present, I would have voted ``no'' 
on rollcall No. 300 on Brown; ``yes'' rollcall No. 301 on Grayson.


                 Amendment No. 11 Offered by Mrs. Capps

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from 
California (Mrs. Capps) on which further proceedings were postponed and 
on which the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 176, 
noes 241, not voting 17, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 302]

                               AYES--176

     Andrews
     Barber
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Grayson
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Markey
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Neal
     Negrete McLeod
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--241

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amash
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Calvert
     Camp
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cooper
     Costa
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallego
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Maloney, Sean
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Radel
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Vela
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Waters
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--17

     Bachus
     Bass
     Bishop (UT)
     Campbell
     Coble
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Kaptur
     Levin
     McCarthy (NY)
     McMorris Rodgers
     Napolitano
     Nunes
     Perlmutter
     Sherman
     Smith (WA)
     Young (FL)

                              {time}  1050

  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated for:
  Mr. SHERMAN. Mr. Chair, on rollcall No. 302 Capps Amendment. Had I 
been present, I would have voted ``yes.''
  Mr. LEVIN. Mr. Chair, I was unavoidably absent earlier today during 
rollcall vote 302. Had I been present, I would have voted ``yea'' on 
rollcall vote 302, the Capps amendment to H.R. 2231, the Offshore 
Energy and Jobs Act.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment in the nature of a 
substitute, as amended.
  The amendment was agreed to.
  The Acting CHAIR. Under the rule, the Committee rises.
  Accordingly, the Committee rose; and the Speaker pro tempore (Mr. 
Westmoreland) having assumed the chair, Mr. Yoder, Acting Chair of the 
Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union, reported that 
that Committee, having had under consideration the bill (H.R. 2231) to 
amend the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act to increase energy 
exploration and production on the Outer Continental Shelf, provide for 
equitable revenue sharing for all coastal States, implement the 
reorganization of the functions of the former Minerals Management 
Service into distinct and separate agencies, and for other purposes, 
and, pursuant to House Resolution 274, he reported the bill back to the 
House with an amendment adopted in the Committee of the Whole.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Under the rule, the previous question is 
ordered.
  Is a separate vote demanded on any amendment to the amendment 
reported from the Committee of the Whole?
  If not, the question is on the amendment in the nature of a 
substitute, as amended.
  The amendment was agreed to.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the engrossment and third 
reading of the bill.
  The bill was ordered to be engrossed and read a third time, and was 
read the third time.


                           Motion to Recommit

  Mr. SCHNEIDER. Mr. Speaker, I have a motion to recommit at the desk.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is the gentleman opposed to the bill?
  Mr. SCHNEIDER. I am opposed.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The Clerk will report the motion to 
recommit.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       Add at the end the following:

[[Page H4158]]

                   TITLE __--MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS

     SEC. _01. PROHIBITION ON DRILLING FOR OIL OR GAS UNDERNEATH 
                   THE GREAT LAKES.

       Nothing in Act and the amendments made by this Act affects 
     the prohibition on issuance of oil and gas leases for new oil 
     and gas slant, directional, or offshore drilling in or under 
     one or more of the Great Lakes established by section 386 of 
     the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (Public Law 109-58; 42 U.S.C. 
     13368 note).

     SEC. _02. BUY AMERICAN REQUIREMENT AND PROHIBITION ON 
                   OUTSOURCING OF AMERICAN JOBS.

       Each oil and gas leasing program issued pursuant to this 
     Act, and each lease issued pursuant to this Act or such a 
     program, shall encourage each major integrated oil company 
     (as defined in section 167(h)(5)(B) of the Internal Revenue 
     Code of 1986) that obtains such a lease--
       (1) to use only materials made in the United States in 
     drilling operations; and
       (2) to avoid outsourcing American jobs.

  Mr. FLORES (during the reading). Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent 
to dispense with the reading.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentleman from Texas?
  There was no objection.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman from Illinois is recognized 
for 5 minutes.
  Mr. SCHNEIDER. Mr. Speaker, this is the final amendment to the bill, 
which will not kill the bill or send it back to committee. If adopted, 
the bill will immediately proceed to final passage, as amended.
  I rise to offer this motion to recommit to ensure, first, that one of 
our Nation's most important natural resources, our Great Lakes basin, 
is protected from untenable energy exploitation risk; and, second, that 
as we explore additional ways to boost domestic energy production, we 
do so with an appropriate emphasis on creating jobs here in America.
  Our Great Lakes are truly unique. Within these lakes sit 95 percent 
of the United States' surface water and 20 percent of the world's 
surface water. Straddling the United States and Canada, the Great 
Lakes--Superior, Michigan, Huron, Ontario and Erie--have more than 
10,000 miles of coastline, touching eight States: Minnesota, Wisconsin, 
Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Pennsylvania, and New York.
  Not only a critical source of drinking water, the lakes are integral 
to the country for transportation, power generation, and recreational 
opportunity. Over 30 million Americans in cities, towns, and rural 
communities depend on the Great Lakes for their lives and livelihoods.
  In fact, according to the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative Action 
Plan, taken as a whole, the Great Lakes region economy would be the 
second largest economy in the world, second only to that of the United 
States.
  The Great Lakes support an incredible biodiversity, including almost 
200 species of native fish and scores of species found nowhere else in 
the world. In short, as one of our Nation's greatest treasures, we 
cannot put the Great Lakes at risk from oil and gas drilling of any 
kind.
  My amendment is quite simple and straightforward. With it, I only 
seek to ensure that the Great Lakes will remain protected and off-
limits from unjustifiable environmental risk. It safeguards Lake 
Michigan, Lake Huron, Lake Superior, Lake Erie, and Lake Ontario from 
potentially detrimental and irreversible harm and provides necessary 
protections against potentially irresponsible exploitation of our 
natural resources.
  In my own State, the Great Lakes annually contribute over $200 
billion in economic activity for Illinois. Lake Michigan alone provides 
drinking water for 7 million Illinois residents. It brings 20 million 
visitors annually to Illinois, supports 33,000 jobs, and generates $3.2 
billion in economic activity.
  As we explore ways for the United States to become more energy 
independent, we cannot lose sight of the importance of protecting our 
environment and establishing commonsense rules of where and how we can 
effectively, safely utilize our natural resources.
  Preserving the prohibition on drilling the Great Lakes provides 
economic security to thousands of businesses, large and small, that 
depend on the lakes every day for trade, recreation, and tourism. It 
also protects the health of our communities and the health of our 
wildlife.
  Let me be clear: the underlying legislation, while focusing on 
drilling in the Outer Continental Shelf, has other provisions that 
relate to domestic energy production and may, when implemented, have 
implications for the Great Lakes.
  The bill specifically restricts oil and gas leasing in the eastern 
Gulf of Mexico and should also include a restriction on new oil and gas 
leasing in the Great Lakes basin. This clarifying amendment is, 
therefore, necessary to ensure that our energy policy does not 
compromise our Great Lakes ecosystem, does not threaten our single 
greatest fresh water supply, and does not unduly put our Great Lakes 
basin economy at unwarranted risk.
  In addition to protecting the Great Lakes, the amendment I am 
proposing today would also encourage companies seeking leases to drill 
for oil and gas found in America to use materials and products made in 
America.

                              {time}  1100

  This additional provision will ensure that U.S. oil and gas resources 
will benefit American workers, as well as provide new business 
opportunities for American manufacturers. As we pursue a diversified 
energy portfolio, we must continue to ensure that America's natural 
resources benefit the American people and are not unfairly diverted to 
the benefit of foreign suppliers and foreign workers.
  Mr. Speaker, the essential provisions of this amendment will only 
improve the underlying bill, while protecting Americans' jobs and our 
environment. I strongly urge my colleagues to support these commonsense 
changes.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. FLORES. Mr. Speaker, I claim time in opposition to the motion.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman from Texas is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. FLORES. I rise in strong opposition to this motion. This motion 
epitomizes what's wrong with Washington Democrats' energy and economic 
plan.
  Let's start with the obvious: the Great Lakes are not part of the 
Outer Continental Shelf. The second thing is current law already 
provides for offshore drilling to be done, using America's goods and 
service wherever practical. So their empty argument doesn't make any 
sense at all.
  But more importantly, Mr. Speaker, this week offers a true contrast 
between two visions for how to fuel our economy and to build 
manufacturing jobs. One vision was laid out by the President earlier 
this week. While we are currently in the midst of a transformation in 
the way we produce American energy cleanly, affordably, abundantly, and 
responsibly through the use of new and improving technology, how does 
the administration respond? By declaring a war on coal and picking 
winners and losers in energy production, both of which have been an 
assault on job creators, especially for American manufacturing.
  Even as we've been debating this bill, my colleagues on the other 
side of the aisle have responded by attempting to drown offshore 
production with more regulations and declarations that make it more 
difficult to achieve energy independence by 2020, thus, killing tens of 
thousands of American jobs that could be created.
  But, Mr. Speaker, there is another vision of how we can energize 
America through the responsible production of our resources and create 
American jobs. That vision does not include ill-advised regulations 
that ignore the effects on the pocketbooks of hardworking American 
families. It does not include programs where political appointees and 
bureaucrats can decide who can and cannot produce energy at the expense 
of hardworking taxpayer dollars. And, most importantly, it does not 
include administrative attempts to implement a backdoor cap-and-trade 
regime to fulfill the President's original goal, where ``electricity 
rates would necessarily skyrocket.''
  This new vision, our vision, builds off what the private sector has 
done in revolutionizing how oil and can be produced. It takes stock of 
what laws this Congress has passed and the regulations this 
administration has promulgated, and then we ask ourselves? What can we 
do to make America truly energy independent? What can we do to make it 
easier for the job creators to

[[Page H4159]]

actually create jobs that grow healthy American families?
  This House is working to achieve this vision now, offering solutions 
to take advantage of the innovative, job-creating, and cost-reducing 
energy resurgence that is going on across America to fuel the next 
generation of American manufacturing. We have passed hydropower bills 
out of this house. We passed the popular Keystone XL pipeline bill. 
Today, we will pass a bill for responsible offshore energy production. 
And this is just the beginning. This House, through the leadership of 
my good friend from Washington, Chairman Doc Hastings, will continue to 
bring bills through committee and to the House floor that will embrace 
American resources and that will get the government out of the way of 
producing them.
  By producing American energy, we are just starting. We must harness 
these same technological advances to achieve even greater economic 
opportunity and job creation through the distribution of this energy 
and, most importantly, creating an environment where we can start 
making things in America again.
  We know that the cost of energy is one of the most important factors 
that determine where plants are built and if jobs are created. So we 
know that cheaper energy means higher-paying American jobs.
  I often see my colleagues on the other side of the aisle on this 
floor with a big sign that says, ``Make It in America.'' We agree. So 
instead of standing next to a slogan or getting behind the same 
rhetoric as the President, I urge my colleagues to work toward a 
vision, a vision of jobs and energy security and a greater standard of 
living that all Americans are desperately seeking. This is how we 
really take action for our kids, as compared to the empty rhetoric of 
the White House.
  The American people want us to create results-oriented solutions of 
what America can do, not the tired liberal rhetoric of what America 
can't do. We will not sit idly by as the President lays down his vision 
of new regulations, producing uncertainty for American energy workers 
and American families that could stamp back our Nation's energy and 
economic revolution.
  Remember the results of the President's last energy plan:
  Number one, greatly reduced access to offshore areas and public 
lands;
  Number two, programs like Solyndra, where he ``invested'' $26 billion 
of money from hardworking taxpayers to produce only 2,300 jobs, at a 
cost of $11.5 million per job;
  Number three, the shutdown of 20 percent of our coal-fired 
electricity generation and the loss of paychecks for thousands of 
American families.
  His latest energy plan is more of the same types of action that he 
wants to do to destroy the futures of our kids and grandkids.
  Mr. Speaker, we will work toward energy security, and I urge a ``no'' 
vote on the motion to recommit and a ``yes'' vote on the underlying 
legislation.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Without objection, the previous question is 
ordered on the motion to recommit.
  There was no objection.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the motion to recommit.
  The question was taken; and the Speaker pro tempore announced that 
the noes appeared to have it.


                             Recorded Vote

  Mr. SCHNEIDER. Mr. Speaker, I demand a recorded vote.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to clause 8 and 9 of rule XX, this 
5-minute vote on the motion to recommit will be followed by 5-minute 
votes on passage of the bill, if ordered, and approval of the Journal, 
if ordered.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 195, 
noes 225, answered ``present'' 1, not voting 13, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 303]

                               AYES--195

     Andrews
     Barber
     Barrow (GA)
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Markey
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Negrete McLeod
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Richmond
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--225

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amash
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barton
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Calvert
     Camp
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Costa
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Radel
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (IN)

                        ANSWERED ``PRESENT''--1

       
     Benishek
       

                             NOT VOTING--13

     Bass
     Bishop (UT)
     Campbell
     Coble
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Kaptur
     McCarthy (NY)
     McMorris Rodgers
     Nunes
     Perlmutter
     Smith (WA)
     Young (FL)

                              {time}  1114

  Mr. PETERSON changed his vote from ``no'' to ``aye.''

[[Page H4160]]

  So the motion to recommit was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the passage of the bill.
  The question was taken; and the Speaker pro tempore announced that 
the ayes appeared to have it.


                             Recorded Vote

  Mr. DeFAZIO. Mr. Speaker, I demand a recorded vote.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. This will be a 5-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 235, 
noes 186, not voting 13, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 304]

                               AYES--235

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amash
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Calvert
     Camp
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cooper
     Costa
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Gallego
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Radel
     Rahall
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Scalise
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Vela
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--186

     Andrews
     Barber
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Grayson
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Markey
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Negrete McLeod
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sanford
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (NJ)
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                             NOT VOTING--13

     Bass
     Bishop (UT)
     Campbell
     Coble
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Kaptur
     McCarthy (NY)
     McMorris Rodgers
     Nunes
     Perlmutter
     Smith (WA)
     Young (FL)

                              {time}  1120

  So the bill was passed.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.


                          personal explanation

  Mrs. McMORRIS RODGERS. Mr. Speaker, on rollcall No. 299 on H.R. 2231, 
on Agreeing to the Amendment offered by Mr. DeFazio of Oregon Amendment 
No. 8, I am not recorded because I was absent due to a death in the 
family. Had I been present, I would have voted ``nay.''
  Mr. Speaker, on rollcall No. 300 on H.R. 2231, on Agreeing to the 
Amendment offered by Mr. Broun of Georgia Amendment No. 9, I am not 
recorded because I was absent due to a death in the family. Had I been 
present, I would have voted ``yea.''
  Mr. Speaker, on rollcall No. 301 on H.R. 2231, on Agreeing to the 
Amendment offered by Mr. Grayson of Florida Amendment No. 10, I am not 
recorded because I was absent due to a death in the family. Had I been 
present, I would have voted ``nay.''
  Mr. Speaker, on rollcall No. 302 on H.R. 2231, on Agreeing to the 
Amendment offered by Ms. Capps of California Amendment No. 11, I am not 
recorded because I was absent due to a death in the family. Had I been 
present, I would have voted ``nay.''
  Mr. Speaker, on rollcall No. 303 on H.R. 2231, on Motion to Recommit 
with Instructions, the Offshore Energy and Jobs Act, I am not recorded 
because I was absent due to a death in the family. Had I been present, 
I would have voted ``nay.''
  Mr. Speaker, on rollcall No. 304 on H.R. 2231, on Passage, the 
Offshore Energy and Jobs Act, I am not recorded because I was absent 
due to a death in the family. Had I been present, I would have voted 
``yea.''

                          ____________________