Amendment Text: H.Amdt.4 — 113th Congress (2013-2014)

There is one version of the amendment.

Shown Here:
Amendment as Offered (01/15/2013)

This Amendment appears on page H125 in the following article from the Congressional Record.



[Pages H109-H152]
                DISASTER RELIEF APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2013


                             General Leave

  Mr. ROGERS of Kentucky. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that all 
Members may have 5 legislative days in which to revise and extend their 
remarks and include extraneous material on the consideration of H.R. 
152, and that I may include tabular material on the same.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentleman from Kentucky?
  There was no objection.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to House Resolution 23 and rule 
XVIII, the Chair declares the House in the Committee of the Whole House 
on the state of the Union for the consideration of the bill, H.R. 152.
  The Chair appoints the gentlewoman from West Virginia (Mrs. Capito) 
to preside over the Committee of the Whole.

                              {time}  1429


                     In the Committee of the Whole

  Accordingly, the House resolved itself into the Committee of the 
Whole House on the state of the Union for the consideration of the bill 
(H.R. 152) making supplemental appropriations for the fiscal year 
ending September 30, 2013, and for other purposes, with Mrs. Capito in 
the chair.
  The Clerk read the title of the bill.
  The CHAIR. Pursuant to the rule, the bill is considered read the 
first time.
  The gentleman from Kentucky (Mr. Rogers) and the gentlewoman from New 
York (Mrs. Lowey) each will control 30 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Kentucky.
  Mr. ROGERS of Kentucky. Madam Chairman, I yield myself such time as 
may consume.
  Madam Chairman, I rise to present legislation providing emergency 
supplemental funding for Hurricane Sandy relief and recovery. The base 
bill totals $17 billion in crucial funding to meet immediate needs for 
the victims, businesses, and communities devastated by Hurricane Sandy.
  Since this terrible storm hit, we've come to realize that recovery is 
going to take months and years, not days and weeks. This legislation 
puts the region on the path to recovery by providing the aid needed for 
immediate relief. We are also analyzing the justifications for further 
financial aid for long-term relief that would come in a later 
supplemental or a regular appropriations bill.
  A significant portion of the funding in this bill will go to the most 
direct source of relief and recovery funding available to the victims 
of the storm, the FEMA disaster relief fund, which will provide 
individual and community assistance throughout the affected region. The 
bill also will support critical housing and infrastructure needs, 
ensure repairs to damaged veterans medical facilities, and help keep 
the economy moving by funding necessary transit repairs, small business 
loans, and recovery aid for businesses of all sizes.
  My committee thoroughly examined the emergency request, listened to 
the needs of the people in the region, and assessed the most pressing 
needs to determine the funding levels made in this bill. We crafted 
this legislation responsibly, giving the administration's request and 
the Senate-passed bill a hard scrub to eliminate unnecessary spending. 
We have removed objectionable provisions added by the Senate and have 
adjusted funding levels to make the best use of taxpayer dollars. As we 
know, we face precarious fiscal times, and it is essential that 
Congress make responsible decisions to ensure efficient and effective 
spending.

[[Page H110]]

  Taking cues from previous efforts, we have included important 
oversight measures to prevent abuse and ensure that Federal agencies 
are using these funds effectively and appropriately.
  This is not the first major natural disaster nor unfortunately will 
it be the last. One of the great attributes of the American people has 
been our ability and willingness to come together time and time again 
to help victims of catastrophes recover. We've seen the havoc that 
Sandy has wrought on the residents of our Northeast region, and it is 
once again our duty to help our people get back on their feet.
  I urge our colleagues to support this legislation, and I reserve the 
balance of my time.

                                    DISASTER RELIEF APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2013
                                             (Amounts in thousands)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Budget request          Bill         Bill vs. Request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
                                                     TITLE I
 
                                            DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
 
                Office of the Secretary
Emergency Conservation Program (emergency).............             15,000              - - -            -15,000
                 Domestic Food Programs
Food and Nutrition Services:
    Commodity Assistance Program (emergency)...........              6,000              6,000              - - -
                      Corporations
Commodity Credit Corporation Fund (emergency)..........             23,000              - - -            -23,000
                 Conservation Programs
Natural Resources Conservation Service:
    Watershed and Flood Prevention Operations (emerg.).            180,000              - - -           -180,000
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
        Total, title I.................................            224,000              6,000           -218,000
 
                                                    TITLE __
 
                                             DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
 
    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Operations, Research and Facilities (emergency)........            393,000              - - -           -393,000
Procurement, Acquisition and Construction (emergency)..            100,000              - - -           -100,000
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
        Total, Department of Commerce..................            493,000              - - -           -493,000
 
                                              DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE
 
                 General Administration
Office of Inspector General (emergency)................                 20              - - -                -20
            Federal Bureau of Investigation
Salaries and Expenses (emergency)......................              4,000              - - -             -4,000
            Drug Enforcement Administration
Salaries and Expenses (emergency)......................              1,000              - - -             -1,000
  Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives
Salaries and Expenses (emergency)......................                230              - - -               -230
                 Federal Prison System
Buildings and Facilities (emergency)...................             10,000              - - -            -10,000
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
        Total, Department of Justice...................             15,250              - - -            -15,250
 
                                                     SCIENCE
 
     National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Construction and Environmental Compliance and                        4,000              - - -             -4,000
 Restoration (emergency)...............................
 
                                                RELATED AGENCIES
 
       Payment to the Legal Services Corporation
Payment to the Legal Services Corporation (emergency)..              1,000              - - -             -1,000
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
        Total, title __................................            513,250              - - -           -513,250
 
                                                    TITLE __
 
                                              DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE
 
               Operation and Maintenance
Operation and Maintenance, Army (emergency)............              5,370              - - -             -5,370
Operation and Maintenance, Navy (emergency)............             41,200              - - -            -41,200
Operation and Maintenance, Air Force (emergency).......              8,500              - - -             -8,500
Operation and Maintenance, Army National Guard                       3,165              - - -             -3,165
 (emergency)...........................................
Operation and Maintenance, Air National Guard                        5,775              - - -             -5,775
 (emergency)...........................................
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
        Total, Operation and Maintenance...............             64,010              - - -            -64,010
 
                                                   PROCUREMENT
 
Procurement of Ammunition, Army (emergency)............              1,310              - - -             -1,310
 
                                         REVOLVING AND MANAGEMENT FUNDS
 
Defense Working Capital Funds (emergency)..............             24,200              - - -            -24,200
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
        Total, title __................................             89,520              - - -            -89,520
 
                                                    TITLE II
 
                                             DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY
 
               Corps of Engineers--Civil
Investigations (emergency).............................             30,000             20,000            -10,000
Construction (emergency)...............................          3,829,000              9,000         -3,820,000
Operation and maintenance (emergency)..................            899,000            742,000           -157,000
Flood Control and Coastal Emergencies (emergency)......            592,000            582,000            -10,000
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
        Total, title II................................          5,350,000          1,353,000         -3,997,000
 
                                                    TITLE III
 
                                         GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION
 
                 Federal Buildings Fund
Repairs and Alterations (emergency)....................              7,000              - - -             -7,000
 
                                          SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
 
Salaries and Expenses (emergency)......................             50,000             10,000            -40,000
Office of Inspector General (emergency)................              5,000              1,000             -4,000
Disaster Loans Program Account:
    Direct loan subsidy(emergency).....................            500,000            100,000           -400,000
    Administrative Expenses (emergency)................            250,000             50,000           -200,000
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
        Total, Disaster Loans Program Account..........            750,000            150,000           -600,000
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
        Total, Small Business Administration...........            805,000            161,000           -644,000
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
        Total, title III...............................            812,000            161,000           -651,000
 
                                                    TITLE IV
 
                                         DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY
 
             Customs and Border Protection
Salaries and Expenses (emergency)......................              2,402              - - -             -2,402
          Immigration and Customs Enforcement
Salaries and Expenses (emergency)......................                855              - - -               -855

[[Page H111]]

 
               United States Coast Guard
Operating Expenses (emergency).........................             66,844              - - -            -66,844
Acquisitions, Construction,and Improvements (emergency)            207,389            143,899            -63,490
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
        Total, United States Coast Guard...............            274,233            143,899           -130,334
              United States Secret Service
Salaries and Expenses (emergency)......................                300              - - -               -300
          Federal Emergency Management Agency
Disaster Relief Fund (disaster category)...............          5,379,000          5,379,000              - - -
Disaster Relief Fund (emergency).......................          6,121,000              - - -         -6,121,000
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
        Total, Disaster Relief Fund....................         11,500,000          5,379,000         -6,121,000
National Flood Insurance Fund (emergency)..............          9,700,000              - - -         -9,700,000
Disaster Assistance Direct Loan Program Account:
    Direct loan subsidy (emergency)....................            300,000              - - -           -300,000
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
        Total, Federal Emergency Management Agency.....         21,500,000          5,379,000        -16,121,000
                 Science and Technology
Research, Development, Acquisition and Operations                    3,249                585             -2,664
 (emergency)...........................................
           Domestic Nuclear Detection Office
Systems Acquisition (emergency)........................              3,869              3,869              - - -
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
        Total, title IV................................         21,784,908          5,527,353        -16,257,555
 
                                                     TITLE V
 
                                           DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
 
        United States Fish and Wildlife Service
Construction (emergency)...............................             78,000             49,875            -28,125
Resource Management (emergency)........................            400,000              - - -           -400,000
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
        Total, United States Fish and Wildlife Service.            478,000             49,875           -428,125
                 National Park Service
Construction (emergency)...............................            348,000            234,000           -114,000
     Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement
Oil Spill Research (emergency).........................              3,000              3,000              - - -
 
                                         ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
 
Environmental Programs and Management (emergency)......                725              - - -               -725
Hazardous Substance Superfund (emergency)..............              2,000              - - -             -2,000
Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust Fund (emergency)              5,000              - - -             -5,000
State and Tribal Assistance Grants (emergency).........            610,000              - - -           -610,000
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
        Total, Environmental Protection Agency.........            617,725              - - -           -617,725
 
                                            DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
 
                     Forest Service
Capital Improvement and Maintenance (emergency)........              4,400              - - -             -4,400
 
                                             SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION
 
Salaries and Expenses (emergency)......................              2,000              - - -             -2,000
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
        Total, title V.................................          1,453,125            286,875         -1,166,250
 
                                                    TITLE VI
 
                                     DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
 
                Office of the Secretary
Public Health and Social Services Emergency Fund                   200,000            100,000           -100,000
 (emergency)...........................................
 
                                               DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
 
Training and Employment Services (emergency)...........             50,000              - - -            -50,000
 
                                                RELATED AGENCIES
 
             Social Security Administration
Limitation on Administration Expenses (emergency)......              2,000              - - -             -2,000
Limitation on Administration Expenses (emergency)......              - - -            (2,000)           (+2,000)
        Administration for Children and Families
Social Services Block Grant (emergency)................            500,000              - - -           -500,000
Children and family services programs (emergency)......            100,000              - - -           -100,000
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
        Total, Social Security Administration..........            602,000              - - -           -602,000
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
        Total, title VI................................            852,000            100,000           -752,000
 
                                                    TITLE VII
 
                                              DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE
 
                 Military Construction
Military Construction, Army National Guard (emergency).             24,235             24,235              - - -
 
                                         DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS
 
             Veterans Health Administration
Medical Services (emergency)...........................             21,000             21,000              - - -
Medical Facilities (emergency).........................              6,000              6,000              - - -
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
        Total, Veterans Health Administration..........             27,000             27,000              - - -
              Departmental Administration
National Cemetery Administration (emergency)...........              1,100              1,100              - - -
Information Technology Systems (emergency).............                531                531              - - -
Construction, Major Projects (emergency)...............            207,000            207,000              - - -
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
        Total, Departmental Administration.............            208,631            208,631              - - -
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
        Total, Department of Veterans Affairs..........            235,631            235,631              - - -
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
        Total, title VII...............................            259,866            259,866              - - -
 
                                                   TITLE VIII
 
                                          DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION
 
            Federal Aviation Administration
Facilities and Equipment (emergency)...................             30,000             14,600            -15,400
             Federal Highway Administration
Emergency Relief Program (emergency)...................            308,000              - - -           -308,000
            Federal Railroad Administration
Operating Subsidy Grants to the National Railroad                   32,000             32,000              - - -
 Passenger Corporation (emergency).....................
             Federal Transit Administration
Public Transportation Emergency Relief Program                  11,700,000          5,400,000         -6,300,000
 (emergency)...........................................
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
        Total, Department of Transportation............         12,070,000          5,446,600         -6,623,400
 

[[Page H112]]

 
                                   DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT
 
           Community Planning and Development
Community Development Fund (emergency).................         17,000,000          3,850,000        -13,150,000
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
        Total, title VIII..............................         29,070,000          9,296,600        -19,773,400
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
GRAND TOTAL............................................         60,408,669         16,990,694        -43,417,975
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

  Mrs. LOWEY. Madam Chair, I rise in strong support of this bill, and I 
want to thank Chairman Rogers and Chairman Frelinghuysen for taking the 
lead on this very important legislation.
  I rise in strong support of the underlying bill, with the addition of 
the Frelinghuysen amendment, which will help families, businesses, and 
communities affected by Sandy recover and rebuild.
  In the 79 days that have passed since Superstorm Sandy caused such 
destruction, I have worked with colleagues on both sides of the aisle, 
with Governors Cuomo and Christie, Chairman Rogers, Mr. King of New 
York, Mr. Frelinghuysen, and all of our colleagues from affected States 
to provide long overdue assistance to our region.
  Sandy devastated much of the Northeast and is one of the costliest 
natural disasters in our Nation's history. One hundred ten Americans 
lost their lives, 8.1 million homes were without power, beaches across 
New York and New Jersey were destroyed, and more than 650,000 homes 
were damaged beyond repair.
  Sandy ground regional commerce to a halt by making tunnels and other 
transportation networks impassable. Two hundred sixty-five thousand 
businesses in New York alone were severely affected by Sandy, costing 
jobs, paychecks, and billions lost in economic output.
  There is no excuse for the House not passing the Senate bill last 
Congress, but I am very pleased that the first order of business in the 
113th Congress may be passing this emergency disaster relief package.
  Along with the $9.7 billion flood insurance bill the House passed 2 
weeks ago, the Rogers and Frelinghuysen amendments would provide $60 
billion of the $80 billion in needs identified by our Governors. There 
are a number of provisions I would like to highlight: $16 billion for 
community development block grants to help communities and businesses 
rebuild; $13 billion to repair and harden transportation 
infrastructure; $5.35 billion to repair damages and bolster Army Corps 
projects to protect against costly future disasters; $11.5 billion for 
the FEMA disaster relief fund, which not only helps provide public 
assistance in the Northeast but also allows FEMA to continue helping 
victims of other disasters; $780 million to help businesses open their 
doors through SBA loans; and $800 million for Health and Human Services 
initiatives, including repairing Head Start centers and biomedical 
research facilities.
  While I strongly support it, the package is still not perfect. It 
does not fully fund the administration's request for community 
development block grants, does not include superior Senate language on 
the flexibility and cost share of Army Corps projects, and limits 
funding for health facilities that lost tens of millions of dollars due 
to the storm.
  Finally, opponents of the legislation who claim that the bill is 
riddled with so-called ``pork'' and unnecessary provisions are just 
plain wrong. Frankly, anyone who has really read the bill knows there 
are no earmarks, and those who have toured the damage know that aid is 
desperately needed.
  My colleagues, there were 146 major disaster declarations in the last 
2 years. There isn't a region of the country immune to catastrophe. 
This package was written with the core belief that when one region 
suffers destruction by a natural disaster, Americans are proud to help 
their fellow citizens recover and rebuild. It is imperative that we 
support this package today and reject amendments that weaken the bill 
and prevent the region from recovering as quickly as possible.
  Madam Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. ROGERS of Kentucky. Madam Chairman, I yield 3 minutes to the 
gentleman from New Jersey, a member of our committee who has been 
unceasing in his efforts to aid the people of his home region, Mr. 
Frelinghuysen.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  Madam Chair, at the onset I want to thank the leadership for helping 
to bring this important legislation to the floor. I also want to thank 
Chairman Hal Rogers and the Appropriations Committee for their 
assistance. One of the untold chapters of this post-Sandy story has 
been the hard work of the chairman and his staff in preparing both his 
amendment and mine, which follows. Most importantly, I want to thank 
the chairman for his eloquent statement in the Rules Committee last 
night. His heartfelt recognition of the hardship and misery suffered by 
our constituents in the Northeast meant a great deal to me personally 
and to our New Jersey, New York, and Connecticut delegations.
  I also want to offer some words of appreciation to my colleagues from 
New Jersey and New York. Their bipartisan diligence and dedication and 
that of our staffs over the past several weeks should make all of our 
constituents proud. And then there is Governor Christie, my constituent 
from Morris County, whose tireless work has helped us get to this day 
and will help us get this bill across the finish line.

                              {time}  1440

  As he always does, he put a very human face on the devastation 
suffered by families and communities in New Jersey and our neighbors in 
New York and Connecticut.
  My colleagues, people are hurting this afternoon in New Jersey, New 
York, and Connecticut and other areas of the Northeast. The suffering 
and damage are real and their needs are great. According to many 
estimates, New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, and the rest of the east 
coast sustained nearly $100 billion worth of damage.
  The destruction is staggering. 346,000 household units were damaged 
in New Jersey alone. Tens of thousands of our fellow Americans are 
still displaced from their homes and their apartments. Municipalities 
are struggling to provide services. Many are still under emergency 
declarations, and some municipalities are not habitable. Small 
businesses are decimated. Many small business men and women are trying 
to decide whether they can survive and keep their employees on the 
payroll.
  Madam Chairman, the area damaged by Hurricane Sandy represents 
roughly 10 percent of our Nation's economy. It makes good sense, 
economic and fiscal, to get our region back on its feet as soon as it 
can.
  I urge support of the Rogers amendment and the Frelinghuysen 
amendment. Without these vital measures, our constituents in the 
Northeast face nothing but more delay, more uncertainty, more 
unemployment, and more misery.
  Mrs. LOWEY. I am very pleased to yield 2 minutes to the distinguished 
minority whip, Mr. Hoyer, who was extremely helpful to all of us on 
both sides of the aisle in bringing the bill to the floor today.
  Mr. HOYER. I thank the ranking member, Mrs. Lowey, and I thank Mr. 
Rogers for his work, as well, on bringing this bill to the floor.
  I rise not only in support of the chairman's mark at $17 billion, but 
also for the Frelinghuysen amendment. I think both of these together 
meet our responsibilities in responding to one of the most historic and 
damaging storms to hit the country--not only the Northeast, but the 
country.
  People throughout New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, and the whole

[[Page H113]]

mid-Atlantic region are still struggling to pick up the pieces after 
the most devastating storm in years, and Congress has a duty to help. 
As I've said before, it's never too late to do the right thing. I 
thought we might do this previously, but now is a good time to act, and 
hopefully today we will act.
  Earlier this month, we took action to help ensure that flood 
insurance benefits will be available for those still recovering from 
Sandy. Today, however, we must finish our work and take action on the 
comprehensive aid package that communities in the Northeast need to 
rebuild.
  This is not a moment for partisan difference or gimmicks. Amending 
these relief bills will make it harder to get aid to those who need it 
as soon as possible. The American people, especially those impacted by 
Sandy, will not look kindly on such delay.
  Congress appropriated $62.3 billion in emergency relief less than 2 
weeks after Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans and the gulf coast in 
2005. I voted for that; that was the right thing to do. As it was then, 
it is now the right thing to do. There's no reason why the people of 
New York, New Jersey, and affected areas should have to wait any 
longer.
  This is a bipartisan effort. When Americans are in trouble, in pain, 
at risk, we respond, not as Republicans, not as Democrats, but as 
Americans, to their needs.
  We must pass these relief bills. So I urge my colleagues on both 
sides to oppose any amendments that diminish our ability to provide 
this much-needed assistance. Only by setting party aside and coming 
together as fellow Americans and fellow Representatives can we achieve 
this goal.
  I urge all my colleagues, not only on my side of the aisle, but on 
the other side of the aisle, to join together to make sure that the 
relief necessary is given this day to this region for this storm.
  Mr. ROGERS of Kentucky. Madam Chairman, I yield 2 minutes to the 
distinguished gentleman from Florida (Mr. Young), the chairman of the 
Defense Subcommittee on Appropriations.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Mr. Chairman, thank you very much for yielding 
me the time.
  The emergency funding provided for the Army Corps of Engineers in 
this bill and the amendment that you offer is narrowly drawn to help 
the States that were hardest hit by Hurricane Sandy. Could the 
gentleman from New Jersey (Mr. Frelinghuysen), the very capable and 
effective chairman of the Energy and Water Development Subcommittee, 
clarify something?
  Despite my earlier comments, I'm concerned that the Flood Control and 
Coastal Emergencies funds appropriated by our committee in previous 
acts are still available for other emergency needs that occurred prior 
to Sandy.
  I would appreciate the gentleman's clarification on that.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. Will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. I yield to the gentleman from New Jersey.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. Mr. Young, that is correct. The funds we provide 
in this legislation in my amendment are funds we believe are required 
to respond to emergency needs for the Army Corps of Engineers related 
to Hurricane Sandy. By appropriating these funds for this direct 
purpose, other prior appropriated emergency funds for the Corps should 
be and are to remain available for other emergency needs in accordance 
with the direction provided in those previous acts.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Mr. Chairman, thank you very much for that 
clarification.
  Mr. ROGERS of Kentucky. I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mrs. LOWEY. I am very pleased to yield 2 minutes to the distinguished 
ranking member of the Homeland Security Appropriations Subcommittee, 
the gentleman from North Carolina (Mr. Price).
  Mr. PRICE of North Carolina. Madam Chairman, I thank the ranking 
member, and I rise in support of both amendments before us, amendments 
to assist the communities devastated by Hurricane Sandy.
  We in North Carolina remember Hurricane Fran and Hurricane Floyd, and 
we know how important it is for Congress to extend itself in such an 
hour of need.
  As ranking member of the Homeland Security Appropriations 
Subcommittee, I note that DHS would receive $5.5 billion within the 
base $17 billion provision, accounting for only 54 percent of the 
administration's request for the Department. Also absent are $6.1 
billion in emergency disaster relief and $300 million in disaster 
loans.
  Madam Chairman, without this additional $6.1 billion, FEMA estimates 
that the Disaster Relief Fund will run out of money in May of 2013, 
halting long-term rebuilding in places like Joplin and Tuscaloosa. 
Adopting only the $17 billion proposal does not even fully fund current 
Sandy estimates and, astonishingly, provides no funding for further 
disasters in 2013.
  The $17 billion package also shortchanges the Coast Guard by about 
half the request and doesn't include funding requested for CBP, ICE, or 
the Secret Service.
  Now, my Republican colleagues say that the supplementary $33 billion 
package will address my concerns, but requiring separate votes is 
designed either to doom the second bill or to pass it on the backs of 
Democrats while Tea Partiers are free to vote ``no.'' This is another 
example of Republicans playing politics with disaster aid--thumbing 
their nose at the members of the Coast Guard decimated by Sandy and at 
the firefighters in Breezy Point trying to rebuild their devastated 
community. They're saying to their own constituents, if disaster 
strikes, there is no guarantee Congress will assist you. This is a 
dangerous precedent.

  Madam Chairman, when I was chairman of this subcommittee from 2007 to 
2010, we provided more than $14 billion in emergency disaster relief 
spending following natural disasters. Not once during that process did 
we ask who was affected, Democrats or Republicans, red States or blue 
States?
  The CHAIR. The time of the gentleman has expired.
  Mrs. LOWEY. I yield the gentleman an additional 30 seconds.
  Mr. PRICE of North Carolina. We provided the money based on the 
President's request, without hesitation, because that's what the 
American people expect and deserve from Congress in a time of need.
  So, Madam Chairman, I will support both of these amendments. I urge 
my colleagues to do likewise. The right thing to do, however, would 
have been to hold a vote on the bipartisan Senate package sent to us 
back in December.
  Mr. ROGERS of Kentucky. I yield myself 3 minutes, Madam Chairman, and 
I yield to Mrs. Lowey, the ranking member of the committee--who, by the 
way, this is her first appearance on the floor as the new ranking 
Democrat on the full Appropriations Committee. I want to initially 
congratulate her on that position. I look forward to a good working 
relationship with her.
  I yield to the gentlelady.
  Mrs. LOWEY. Well, first of all, I want to thank the chairman, Mr. 
Rogers, who's been a good friend for so many years. I look forward to 
working together in a bipartisan way so we can work everything out 
before and serve the American people. And I thank you for your kind 
words.

                              {time}  1450

  I rise to engage the gentleman from Kentucky, the chairman of the 
Appropriations Committee, in a colloquy.
  Some questions have been raised about the interpretation of language 
in both of the Rogers substitute and the Frelinghuysen amendment under 
the Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health and Social 
Services Emergency Fund. The language prohibits use of amounts in that 
appropriation for costs that are reimbursed by self-insurance. I would 
like to engage Chairman Rogers in a discussion to help clarify the 
meaning of that provision.
  Am I correct in understanding that the term ``self-insurance'' is 
intended to refer to a formal plan, pursuant to law or regulation, in 
which amounts are set aside in a fund to cover losses of specified 
types and amounts? Am I also correct that without such a formal, funded 
arrangement, a government or organization would not be considered to be 
self-insured for purposes of this language simply because they do not 
have any commercial insurance coverage for the loss in question?

[[Page H114]]

  Mr. ROGERS of Kentucky. Reclaiming my time, yes, the gentlelady's 
understanding is correct, and I further yield to her.
  Mrs. LOWEY. I thank the gentleman. I would also like to confirm my 
understanding that this language would only preclude use of 
appropriated funds if the expenses in question were actually reimbursed 
by the formal self-insurance plan. In other words, merely having a 
self-insurance plan would not bar use of this appropriation for things 
that the plan did not cover or pay for. I ask the gentleman, is my 
understanding correct?
  Mr. ROGERS of Kentucky. The gentlelady's understanding is correct.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mrs. LOWEY. It is a pleasure for me to yield 2 minutes to Ranking 
Member Visclosky of the Defense Appropriations Committee.
  Mr. VISCLOSKY. I thank the gentlewoman for yielding.
  Madam Chair, I rise today to express my support for the underlying 
bill and the Frelinghuysen amendment, which will greatly assist the 
States and communities affected by Hurricane Sandy. In every year since 
1997, with two exceptions, the Congress has recognized the need for 
emergency funds to respond to the impacts of natural disasters on the 
Nation's water resource infrastructure. This year should be no 
different.
  The Frelinghuysen amendment includes a total of $5.35 billion for the 
Army Corps of Engineers. Of that, about $1.8 billion will be used to 
repair existing Federal facilities that were damaged in the storm and 
to restore projects to design standards. The roughly $3.4 billion 
remaining will be used by the Corps for the construction of projects 
intended to reduce future flood risk. Additionally, the Frelinghuysen 
amendment provides $88.3 million to repair facility and equipment 
damage to Department of Defense facilities in several States along the 
eastern seaboard.
  This is what we should be doing as a Nation. It is far less expensive 
to invest in preventing damage than it is to clean it up. We need to 
fund projects that result in the long-term sustainability of the 
impacted communities and reduce the economic costs and risks associated 
with disasters.
  Madam Chair, our country has provided billions of dollars in 
infrastructure funding for dams, schools and roads in Iraq and 
Afghanistan on an emergency basis. We certainly can do no less for our 
own citizens in our own country. I urge passage of the underlying 
legislation and Chairman Frelinghuysen's amendment.
  Mr. ROGERS of Kentucky. Madam Chair, I yield 2 minutes to the 
gentleman from New Jersey (Mr. Runyan).
  Mr. RUNYAN. Madam Chair, I rise in support of H.R. 152, the Disaster 
Relief Appropriations Act of 2013.
  This bill does the minimum necessary to help towns like Brick 
Township rebuild. It does the minimum to help remove mold from their 
living rooms so they can sleep at night without worrying about their 
children getting sick from breathing mold spores.
  Many of my colleagues have asked for disaster funding or declarations 
for their home districts in the past. As one of my New Jersey 
colleagues pointed out earlier today, there are more than 30 of my 
colleagues who have received disaster assistance for their own 
districts in the past who actually plan to oppose this package before 
us.
  Madam Chair, I would say to my friends, why should New Jersey and New 
York be treated any differently? My friends should ask themselves what 
would they do if this were their district that suffered the amount of 
catastrophic loss that many of the families and businesses in my 
district now face.
  Next to me, you can see damage Sandy left behind in Brick Township. 
My constituents in Brick have suffered for almost 3 months without any 
help from this Congress. I want to be able to tell them when I go home 
this weekend that help is heading their way.
  Mrs. LOWEY. Madam Chair, I'm pleased to yield 2 minutes to the 
distinguished ranking member of the Financial Services and General 
Government Subcommittee, Mr. Serrano.
  Mr. SERRANO. I rise in support of both the Rogers amendment and the 
Frelinghuysen amendment, which will finally provide New Jersey, New 
York, Connecticut, and elsewhere with the funding needed to respond to 
Hurricane Sandy. While I'm glad that we're considering this bill today, 
it is a travesty that it has taken this long for the House of 
Representatives to allow a vote on disaster-response funding.
  The money in this bill and the Frelinghuysen amendment is the minimum 
that New York, New Jersey, and elsewhere need for their recovery 
process. I'm very concerned that there are several amendments that will 
be considered today that seek to cut further funding from the bill.
  At least one amendment seeks to offset the cost of this bill. Our 
Nation has never before attempted to offset the cost of disaster 
assistance. The Appropriations Committee and the House have always come 
together to help Americans in times of need without regard to costs. To 
offset costs here would effectively kill this bill in the Senate and 
further delay assistance that is desperately needed to New York City 
and elsewhere. The two-step process is the proper way to go.
  I just may add in closing that we in New York have always seen images 
of disasters in other areas, but we never imagine anything like this 
happening in our area. We understand what other folks have gone 
through, and I hope you understand the need we have to recover. The 
pain, the suffering, and the despair that people in our community feel 
is beyond anything we can imagine or we can imagine in New York. And so 
this aid will, at the minimum, immediately send a message that we care 
and we want something to happen positive and, in fact, people will be 
begin to recover.
  So I thank Mr. Rogers and Mrs. Lowey for bringing the bill to the 
floor, and I will ask folks to vote for both amendments and for the 
bill in general.
  Mr. ROGERS of Kentucky. Madam Chair, I yield 2 minutes to the 
gentleman from Staten Island, New York City, Mr. Grimm.
  Mr. GRIMM. Thank you very much, Chairman. I appreciate you yielding.
  Madam Chair, let me first start by saying thank you to the many, many 
colleagues on both sides of the aisle that have been working 
tirelessly, and a special thank you to their staff, not only the Rules 
Committee, but Appropriations and all those from New York and New 
Jersey. Many, many staffers have stayed up more than 24 hours to make 
this happen. I am indebted to them, and I know that the people of 
Staten Island are very, very grateful.
  This is a time that is unique in our history. We just started tearing 
down the homes in Staten Island. New York is tearing down 200, and they 
started in Staten Island.
  When I was there this past weekend, a mother came up to me. I asked 
her how she was doing. She said, Well, I'm doing okay, but I'm worried 
about my children. I said why. She said, Because they start crying 
hysterically when it rains. They cry when it rains because they think 
there's going to be another flood, and they're scared.
  So at the end of the day when we debate the various amendments in the 
bill and its merits, all I ask is that everyone in this blessed Chamber 
remember that there are real people--human beings--that are behind all 
of this; and at the end of the day, if it were our families, I know 
that they would want them to be safe and healthy with the support of 
the entire country behind them.
  So, with that, I thank, again, my colleagues that have worked 
tirelessly, I thank the staff members, and I thank you for this 
opportunity to speak.

                              {time}  1500

  Mrs. LOWEY. Madam Chair, I'm pleased to yield 2 minutes to the 
distinguished gentleman from California (Mr. George Miller).
  Mr. GEORGE MILLER of California. I thank the gentlewoman for 
yielding.
  I rise to engage the chairman of the Appropriations Committee, the 
gentleman from Kentucky, in a colloquy.
  As the chairman knows, Superstorm Sandy displaced thousands of 
children from their homes, leaving them homeless and struggling to 
regain stability in their lives. Many of these children were forced to 
move out of their school districts, while others could not return to 
their schools because of storm-related damage. These children face the 
prospect of educational disruption, compounding the upheaval and trauma

[[Page H115]]

they've already experienced. Fortunately, under the current law, the 
McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act, homeless students, including 
those displaced by disasters, are entitled to important educational 
protections and services, including transportation to stay in the same 
school.
  Public schools in New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut are working 
tirelessly to support uninterrupted education of displaced children 
through the McKinney-Vento program, yet these schools face significant 
unexpected costs associated with the increased number of homeless 
students. Congress has appropriated supplemental funds, to help defer 
the costs associated with these increases, from past disasters.
  Mr. Chairman, if I might, given that the bill before us today does 
not contain direct funding for McKinney-Vento, is it your understanding 
and intention that the Department of Health and Human Services and that 
the Department of Education work with the States of New York, New 
Jersey, and Connecticut to assist the school districts affected by 
Superstorm Sandy to access funds under the social services block grant 
to support the education of students displaced by the storm, including 
transportation, counseling, and supplies?
  Mr. ROGERS of Kentucky. Will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. GEORGE MILLER of California. I yield to the gentleman.
  Mr. ROGERS of Kentucky. I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  Yes, that is my understanding and intention.
  As you know, Congress has previously recognized the critical role our 
public schools play in creating stability and meeting the educational 
needs of children and youth displaced by disasters.
  The flexibility of the SSBG has proven crucial in responding to the 
many needs that arise in the aftermath of natural disasters.
  The CHAIR. The time of the gentleman has expired.
  Mrs. LOWEY. I yield an additional 30 seconds to the gentleman from 
California.
  Mr. ROGERS of Kentucky. Will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. GEORGE MILLER of California. I yield to the gentleman.
  Mr. ROGERS of Kentucky. Transporting displaced students is an 
allowable purpose under the social services block grant, and I 
encourage HHS and affected States to work with affected school 
districts and promptly provide any reimbursements for these critical 
services.
  Mr. GEORGE MILLER of California. I thank the gentleman very much. I 
also want to thank you and the staff of the majority and the minority 
for helping to work out this solution. Thank you very much.
  Mr. ROGERS of Kentucky. Madam Chair, I yield 3 minutes to the 
gentleman from Mississippi (Mr. Palazzo).
  Mr. PALAZZO. Madam Chair, I rise in favor of the Sandy relief 
packages being considered today.

  I want to thank Chairman Rogers and the Appropriations Committee for 
their work to bring this bill to the floor in a responsible manner and 
address many of the concerns that some in this body have. I also want 
to take this opportunity once more to thank my colleagues for their 
work on yesterday's Sandy Relief Improvement Act that brought much-
needed reforms for our disaster relief systems.
  This bill that passed the House unanimously is a good first step in 
streamlining the disaster relief process and saving the country money 
and lives. These are the kinds of commonsense reforms that must 
continue to be a part of the disaster relief conversation.
  A little over a week ago, I voted against adding more debt to a 
failing system without reforms. Many of my colleagues joined me in that 
vote, and I know some still have reservations about the package before 
the House today. I have spoken to many of these colleagues. I 
understand concerns about the fiscal state of our Nation. I understand 
your position, and I respect your vote.
  But while we continue to do the responsible thing by looking for ways 
to pay for future disaster relief, we must do what is necessary to help 
those in the Northeast, and we must do it now. Let me just say, a vote 
for yesterday's reform package would pass the House unanimously, and a 
vote for today's relief package allows us to move forward in a way that 
begins to address much-needed reforms while at the same time providing 
the immediate relief that Sandy victims so desperately need.
  I saw those needs up close and personal when I visited some of the 
hardest hit areas of New Jersey and New York last week. It brought back 
vivid images of Hurricane Katrina and the destruction that my home 
State of Mississippi experienced 7 years ago. Districts like those of 
my friends Congressman Runyan and Congressman Grimm are similar to 
those along the gulf coast after Katrina. Their constituents 
experienced a terrible natural disaster, and they need our help.
  Today, we consider provisions that provide immediate relief for Sandy 
victims while allowing them to build forward, not just back, and that 
will strengthen these communities in the face of future storms. We 
cannot wait another 7 years, and we cannot wait until the next disaster 
before we take up these reforms.
  Today's vote for immediate relief is about giving the Sandy victims 
the help they need now. It is vital to the recovery efforts of the 
Northeast, it is vital to making our communities more resilient, and it 
is vital to ensuring better preparedness and response to future storms. 
So I urge my colleagues to support the disaster relief package.
  Mrs. LOWEY. Madam Chair, I am delighted to yield 2 minutes to the 
distinguished dean of the New York delegation, Mr. Rangel.
  Mr. RANGEL. Thank you so much, Mrs. Lowey.
  I want to thank Chairman Rogers for the manner in which he has 
handled this crisis and certainly congratulate Mrs. Lowey for the 
leadership that she has provided this House over the years, but 
especially at a time when we needed her the most, that she was there to 
bring the people together, Republicans and Democrats, to do the right 
thing.
  I want to thank, too, and encourage the new Members of Congress to 
take advantage of this great opportunity they have to see what the 
House of Representatives is all about, notwithstanding the bad 
publicity that we get.
  For whatever reasons, the 112th Congress failed to respond to what 
was a part of the feeling and the fabric of this great body where every 
American would know that if ever they were involved in a crisis--
earthquakes, floods, or fires--that they could depend on their 
colleagues in the House of Representatives to respond. It was never a 
question of whether they were Democrats or Republicans, whether they 
came from a red State or a blue State; it was how fast can we help, and 
you can depend on that help.
  For whatever reason, the 112th Congress failed, but now we are asking 
the new Members to join with those that were here before in bringing 
together people in this Congress to once again rebuild that reputation 
that we had so rightly enjoyed, and that is that, if you have any type 
of problem in this great Nation and you need the help of your 
colleagues, you can depend on the House of Representatives, the 
people's House, in coming forward to provide those aids.
  We cannot bring back the lives, the homes, and the hopes that so many 
people have lost, but we can say in the people's House that we respond 
to the problems that people have.
  I thank you again, Mrs. Lowey, for your leadership that you've 
provided, and I look forward to working with you and Chairman Rogers in 
the future.
  Mr. ROGERS of Kentucky. May I inquire, Madam Chair, of the time 
remaining?
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Kentucky has 14 minutes remaining, and 
the gentlewoman from New York has 12\1/2\ minutes remaining.
  Mr. ROGERS of Kentucky. Madam Chairman, I yield 2 minutes to the 
gentleman from Colorado (Mr. Gardner).
  Mr. GARDNER. Thank you, Chairman Rogers.
  Last week, I offered an amendment in the House Rules Committee to add 
additional funding for an Emergency Watershed Protection program to be 
used for any area that had a designated major natural disaster. It's an 
important program that allows for watershed and infrastructure 
restoration.
  Many parts of the western United States were devastated by wildfires 
last summer, including areas in my district, the Hyde Park fire near 
Colorado

[[Page H116]]

Springs and the Waldo Canyon fire. In Colorado alone, there were over 
100,000 acres of land burned on both private and Federal land, as well 
as over 600 homes destroyed in these fires.
  The EWP program will help communities in other areas of the United 
States to rebuild and prevent future damage to people and property. 
Unfortunately, this bipartisan amendment offered with other members of 
the Colorado delegation did not get through the Rules Committee 
process, and so it will not be considered on the House floor today.
  The tragedy caused by Hurricane Sandy necessitates assistance from 
the Federal Government, but it's also important that disaster 
assistance be available to other areas that experience natural 
disasters, particularly those when it comes to Federal lands. I ask the 
chairman to consider working with me and other Members for wildfire 
restoration.

                              {time}  1510

  Mr. ROGERS of Kentucky. Will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. GARDNER. I yield to the gentleman.
  Mr. ROGERS of Kentucky. First, I want to thank the gentleman from 
Colorado for his work on the Emergency Watershed Program. I am aware of 
the need for this assistance not only in Colorado but in other parts of 
the country, and I look forward to working with you and others to 
address this important funding in future legislation.
  Mr. GARDNER. I thank the chairman for his work and his support.
  Mrs. LOWEY. Madam Chair, I am pleased to yield 2 minutes to the 
distinguished gentleman from Virginia (Mr. Moran).
  Mr. MORAN. It's nice to welcome the new ranking member of the full 
Appropriations Committee, Mrs. Lowey who, as good fortune would have 
it, also hails from New York and fully understands what's involved 
here.
  Do unto others as you would have them do unto you. That's what all 
the Members of this body should have in their minds today themselves. 
If they were in the situation of the States that were so severely 
impacted by Hurricane Sandy, how would they vote?
  The fact is that natural disasters are occurring with more frequency 
and with greater severity, so there is a very good chance that in 
nearly every congressional district in this country this may happen to 
you, and of course, when it does, property values will go way down. In 
fact, billions of dollars can be lost. They certainly were with 
Hurricane Sandy. So where does the municipality get the money to 
repair? Likewise with the State. The only place you can turn to is the 
Federal Government. That's why we are here. E pluribus unum. We're in 
this together.
  This is not about the Northeast versus the rest of the country. One 
part of our body, if you will, our body of States, has been severely 
injured. We need to repair that damage. Now, within the Interior and 
Environment appropriations, there is money for safe drinking water and 
sewer treatment projects, things that have to be done. We have to 
provide that money. I think we have about $1.5 billion to do that. We 
should accept the Rogers-Frelinghuysen amendment. This bill is whole 
with that amendment. We should strongly support it. There is an 
amendment to take away Mr. Frelinghuysen's effort to allow a waiver on 
historic preservation. Well, yes, it should be done. These localities 
don't have that kind of money, and a lot of the revenue that has 
traditionally come into these economies has come from tourism. Many 
tourists come to see historic structures. They come to see the way that 
many parts of the Northeast were when we were building the foundation 
of this country. That money should be made available in whole with 
Federal dollars. Mr. Frelinghuysen's amendment is right on point. It 
needs to be included.
  I do have a good speech written by Rick Healy. Thank you, Mr. Healy. 
We've got wonderful staff. But unfortunately I don't have any further 
time.
  The CHAIR. The time of the gentleman has expired.
  Mrs. LOWEY. I yield the gentleman an additional minute.
  Mr. MORAN. My colleagues, this is an opportunity to show what we are 
all about. Do unto others as we would have them do unto us. Let's make 
this money available. Let the Northeast repair itself, heal itself, get 
their economy back on its feet, and start returning revenue to the 
Federal Government. The fact is that these Northeast States contribute 
more to the Federal Treasury than they get out of the Federal Treasury. 
So let's get this done in the national interest.
  I want to recognize Chairman Rogers' leadership, the very good work 
that Mr. Frelinghuysen from New Jersey has done and, of course, the 
work of Mrs. Lowey.
  This is a good bill. It's urgent that we pass it. Let's get this 
done. These negative amendments that try to take away money to make 
ideological points simply are out of order right now. Let's heal this 
wound. Let's let this economy in the Northeast get back on its feet, 
and we'll all be better off as a Nation.
  Mr. ROGERS of Kentucky. I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mrs. LOWEY. Madam Chair, I am very pleased to yield 2 minutes to the 
distinguished gentleman from New Jersey, who has been extraordinarily 
helpful in trying to sort out the challenges in this bill, Mr. Andrews.
  (Mr. ANDREWS asked and was given permission to revise and extend his 
remarks.)
  Mr. ANDREWS. I thank my friend for yielding, and I thank the chairman 
of the Appropriations Committee and my friend for working together to 
bring this product to the floor.
  I've heard two objections to this bill. The first is that money is 
spent in the wrong places, and the second is the amount of money 
altogether is too costly. Let me try to address those objections.
  As to the money being spent in the wrong places, I would respectfully 
request that Members who have that objection read the legislation 
because, throughout the legislation, when it refers to the money to be 
spent, it says that the moneys are to be spent on necessary funds 
related to the consequences of Hurricane Sandy. Now, there is one 
exception to this that I've read, and it is limited to situations in 
which there were prior disasters that are not yet cleaned up. So this 
is a bill that deals almost exclusively with the Sandy disaster, and to 
the extent it does not, it deals with lingering problems in other parts 
of the country from those disasters.
  To those who would argue that the amount of money in the bill is just 
too much to begin with, I would offer you this question: If you were 
running a business and had 100 manufacturing plants and sales offices 
around the country and 15 of them were shut down by a storm--so 15 
percent of your available revenue was no longer available to you--what 
would you do? You'd repair those 15 manufacturing facilities and sales 
offices as quickly as you could in order to restore the health of your 
company and the growth of your revenues. That is exactly what this bill 
does.
  The taxpayers of New York, Connecticut, and New Jersey--three 
States--contribute more than 15 percent of the individual and corporate 
tax revenues collected in the United States of America--15 percent from 
three States. If you shut down that engine of production, the whole 
country suffers. This is an occasion for the House of Representatives 
to rise above normal parochial politics.
  The CHAIR. The time of the gentleman has expired.
  Mrs. LOWEY. I yield the gentleman an additional 1 minute.
  Mr. ANDREWS. When the disaster struck the gulf, we were all 
Mississippians or Louisianans. When tornadoes hit Missouri, we were all 
Missourians. When there have been earthquakes that have hit the west 
coast of our country, we have all been citizens of California.
  We are asking Members from coast to coast and throughout our country 
today to look at themselves and walk in the shoes of New Yorkers and 
the citizens of Connecticut and New Jersey. If we understand that we 
have a common purpose, that this legislation does focus almost 
exclusively on the Sandy disaster, and then focuses what it does not 
focus on Sandy on other disasters, and if we understand that 15 percent 
of the economic engine of this country is at risk of being shut down, 
then we will all be people who cast the same vote and the right vote, 
which is ``yes.''

[[Page H117]]

  Mr. ROGERS of Kentucky. I continue to reserve the balance of my time.
  Mrs. LOWEY. Madam Chair, I am delighted to yield 1 minute to our 
distinguished leader, who has been such an advocate for the assistance 
to New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, and Pennsylvania, who understands 
that every part of the country has catastrophes and that we as 
Americans have a responsibility. I thank her for her leadership, the 
gentlewoman from California (Ms. Pelosi).
  Ms. PELOSI. I thank the gentlelady for yielding. I congratulate her 
on assuming the ranking position on the Appropriations Committee and 
how good it is for our country and for the people affected by 
Superstorm Sandy that Congresswoman Lowey, now Ranking Member Lowey, is 
in the position she is to fight for their needs as the senior Democrat 
on the Appropriations Committee.
  Thank you for your leadership, and thank you, Mr. Rogers, for yours 
as well.
  This should be a day that we shed all of our disagreement about 
political differences and the rest and come together to prayerfully 
meet the needs of the people of our country.

                              {time}  1520

  Whether it's California with the earthquakes, drought, fire, floods, 
whatever; whether it's Iowa with the floods; Joplin, Missouri, was so 
affected; of course the challenge of Katrina is emblazoned in our mind; 
and Hurricane Ike on the heels of that, all across our country we have 
experienced natural disasters which have had a direct impact on the 
lives of the American people.
  I really do believe that for all of the purposes that people send us 
to Congress or elect us to public office, whether it is a county 
executive or a Member of Congress, they expect us to do what is right 
for them when they are most in need of our help. Many things we can do 
for ourselves; but some things are just beyond the most determined, 
resourceful operational person to do, and that is when a natural 
disaster strikes.
  So while we have had our conversations about what should be in the 
bill and how the bill should be bifurcated, or in this case trifurcated 
and the rest of it, let us hope when we have this bill today, it will 
sweep away some of the concerns that people have about whether this 
assistance is going to actually show up. Seventy-nine days. It's been 
79 days since Hurricane Sandy struck the region. It's been a one-two 
punch. Last year it was Irene that struck much of the same area, and 
some of the people haven't really fully recovered from that, whether it 
was a small business owner or homeowner, whatever. And now Sandy hit 
with just tremendous force.
  Others have talked about how do you mitigate for such a thing; how do 
we address issues that relate to climate change. We'll save that 
conversation for another day, but recognize it is important in this 
discussion. How do you mitigate for rebuilding, and that's important in 
terms of the resources that we're putting to bear on this problem.
  So let us today try to extract from the minds and the hearts and 
souls of the people who are affected any thought that the assistance 
will not be there. They know there's a lot of making up they have to do 
to restore the lives and businesses and homes that they had before. 
They should also know that when we say let us pray for the victims of 
Hurricane Sandy, we're not just saying a prayer and saying that should 
be a substitute for us honoring our commitment as a country to our 
people, but that our prayers are accompanied by our best intentions and 
our best actions--actions, not just words--for them.
  This is one of the longest delays in congressional action in response 
to a major natural disaster in recent history. For many of us who have 
seen or can confirm the aftermath of a hurricane, tornado, earthquake, 
whatever, we know that every single day is too long to wait. Hope can 
never come fast enough. We cannot let another moment, hour, day go by 
without giving the biggest possible vote of confidence and hope to the 
people of New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, and some, I understand, in 
Pennsylvania.
  So we've had our say. We've made our points known. The justification 
has been established. The documentation of need is clear. The 
bipartisan support of the Governor of New Jersey, the Governor of New 
York, the Governor of Connecticut and others stand ready to implement 
these resources with the most integrity, the most effectiveness, 
certainly the most speed. Witness the actions of the mayor of New York. 
I smile when I say that because mayors just like to get a job done, and 
Governors, too.
  So let us, as these executives and county executives and the rest 
weigh in, let us do our part to honor the social compact that we have 
with the American people that the Federal Government will be there in 
time of natural disasters, that this is an emergency and we recognize 
it as such, and that we honor the hopes, dreams, and aspirations of the 
people affected by it.
  I hope that we can have an overwhelming bipartisan vote, because from 
a practical standpoint, I think ideally, our sense of idealism, that 
would be the right thing to do. But as a practical matter, you just 
never know what Mother Nature may have in store for you in your region, 
and you would certainly want the embrace of the entire Nation around 
you and your area for your constituents, for your communities, for our 
country.
  So I urge a very strong bipartisan vote. I thank our colleagues on 
both sides of the aisle for making this vote today possible. Again, I 
urge an ``aye'' vote.
  Mr. ROGERS of Kentucky. I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mrs. LOWEY. I am very pleased to yield 3 minutes to the gentleman 
from New York (Mr. Crowley) whose district has really seen incredible 
damage. He understands the impact of Hurricane Sandy on the people and 
community and the businesses.
  Mr. CROWLEY. I thank the gentlelady for yielding me this time.
  In the days following Superstorm Sandy, many of my colleagues from 
both sides of the aisle reached out to me, and I think they did the 
same to others throughout the quad-State region, expressing their 
sympathies and their concern. While they weren't able to see firsthand 
the devastation, everyone had a sense, I think, of that devastation by 
the footage they all saw on television and over the Internet. It was 
pretty powerful in itself.
  Everyone, I think, was astonished at the magnitude. We're not used to 
having such disasters in New York City; and everyone was shocked to see 
the extent of the damage, homes literally wiped away, businesses 
destroyed, flood waters consuming people's living rooms and completely 
overturning their lives. And the damage wasn't just in one city or one 
town or, for that matter, one State. From Breezy Point, Queens, to 
Edgewater in my district in the Bronx, from Manhattan to Brooklyn to 
Staten Island to Westchester to Long Island, from the coasts of 
Pennsylvania, New Jersey, all of the way over to Connecticut, so many 
people's lives were wrecked by this powerful storm.
  While words are kind and they are very much appreciated, action 
behind those words is even more appreciated. Today, finally, I believe 
we'll have the opportunity to see action. Seventy-nine days later, and 
far too much politics in between, this Congress is doing what the 
people of these communities need and what the American people demand--
taking action.
  I'm thankful to this Congress. I'm thankful that it's finally taking 
action to help the people of my district and the millions of other 
people hit hard by this enormous storm. I want to thank all of my 
colleagues from New York, New Jersey, Connecticut and Pennsylvania for 
our shared commitment to getting this done and never letting 
partisanship surrounding this debate divide us. I want to say a special 
thanks to Democratic Whip Steny Hoyer and Ranking Member Nita Lowey, 
along with their staffs, who have driven this process from day one. I 
want to thank you both.
  This bill will provide direct assistance to communities devastated by 
Superstorm Sandy. It will help restore and replace damaged or destroyed 
infrastructure, and it'll put in place cost-saving measures to prevent 
further damage when--when, and not if--future storms occur.
  I would just urge any of my colleagues, Democrat or Republican, who

[[Page H118]]

are considering voting against either the Frelinghuysen amendment or 
the overall bill to just for a moment put yourself in one of your 
colleague's shoes. I don't wish Superstorm Sandy or anything like it on 
any of my colleagues anywhere in the United States; but the one thing 
you need to know is that if this happens that your country will be 
there for you. There's the physical damage, but also the mental damage 
that people are experiencing because they think the country has 
forgotten them. Don't forget these people. Do the right thing. Vote for 
this bill.
  In the days after Hurricane Sandy, I was moved by the words of 
sympathy and concern I received from my colleagues on both sides of the 
aisle.
  While many were not able to see the destruction firsthand, everyone 
could see the devastating images and footage on TV, in newspapers, and 
over the Internet.
  Everyone was astonished by the magnitude of the damage.
  Everyone was shocked to see the extensive damage to--homes wiped 
away, businesses destroyed, flood waters consuming people's living 
rooms, and lives completely overturned.
  And the damage wasn't just in one town or one state. From Breezy 
Point, Queens to Edgewater in the Bronx; from Manhattan, Brooklyn to 
Staten Island, Westchester to Long Island; from the coasts of New 
Jersey to Connecticut; so many people's lives were wrecked by this 
powerful storm.
  While kind words are one thing, actions backing up those words are 
another.
  And today, finally, we have the opportunity to act.
  79 days later, and after far too much politics, Congress is doing 
what the people of these communities need--and what the American people 
demand: taking action.
  I am thankful this Congress is finally taking action to help the 
people of my district and all the millions of people hit hard by this 
hurricane.
  I want to thank all of my colleagues from New York, New Jersey, 
Connecticut, and Pennsylvania for our shared commitment to getting this 
done and never letting partisanship surrounding this debate divide us. 
A special thanks to Democratic Whip Steny Hoyer and Ranking Member Nita 
Lowey, along with their staff, who have driven this process from Day 
One.
  This bill will provide direct assistance to the communities 
devastated by Hurricane Sandy. It will help restore and replace damaged 
or destroyed infrastructure; and it will put in place cost-saving 
measures to prevent further damage when, not if, future storms occur.
  This is a good bill, and it deserves full bipartisan support of the 
entire House.
  I would urge any Democrat or Republican who is thinking about voting 
against any portion of this aid package to reconsider. For a moment, 
please put yourself in our shoes--the shoes of every family, every 
American who lost or suffered as a result of Hurricane Sandy.
  I do not wish what happened in my State on anyone, but the reality is 
the devastation that occurred in my backyard, throughout my district, 
across my State and to my constituents could happen anywhere at any 
time. If it does, you will want us, as a Congress, to stand together, 
to put aside politics and help your constituents, hard-working 
Americans, get back on their feet.
  Today, let's stand with our fellow Americans who are rebuilding by 
voting for the underlying bill and the Frelinghuysen amendment. 
Together, the passage of these two measures will ensure the U.S. 
Congress is providing real help--and not just lip service--to all those 
hurt by this devastating hurricane.

                              {time}  1530

  Mr. ROGERS of Kentucky. Madam Chair, I reserve the balance of my 
time.
  Mrs. LOWEY. Madam Chair, I'm very pleased to yield 2 minutes to the 
distinguished gentleman from a neighboring district in New York (Mr. 
Engel), who suffered a great deal. He saw the pain and the loss of 
property and homes all throughout the region.
  Mr. ENGEL. I thank my dear friend, Congresswoman Lowey, for yielding 
to me.
  I urge all of our colleagues to support the aid for the Hurricane 
Sandy victims. You know, we have a lot of disagreements in this 
Congress. We talk about issues, about spending, about taxing offsets 
and whatever, but those are issues. Those fights on those issues should 
be left for another day. It shouldn't be intermixed with the fight to 
get aid to the Superstorm Sandy victims. They should not be innocent 
pawns in this fight that we have in Congress.
  I've been in this Congress for a while now, and I have voted for aid 
for all regions of our country, be it Katrina, be it floods and 
tornados. We didn't even think twice because that is what Americans do. 
We help our communities, help other Americans when there are natural 
disasters.
  New York is a donor State. We actually send more money to the Federal 
Government than we get back, and we do it because it's the thing that 
we have to do. But now it's our turn. Now we need help, and so now we 
say to the rest of America, please help us the way we helped you in 
your hour of need.
  The constituents in my district, in West Chester and the Bronx, and 
my former district in Rockland County are hurting very, very much. 
These are real people with real lives and real difficulties. So I beg 
my colleagues, please, don't vote for any poison pills that will kill 
this legislation.
  One of the things that's really irksome is when some of my colleagues 
who stood up and when they had natural disasters in their district 
begged us for help and we gave it to them now are voting against giving 
help to the people of New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, and 
Pennsylvania. It's just not right.
  We can argue what role the Federal Government should play, whether 
it's too big or too small or whatever, but no one should argue against 
the fact that, when Americans are in need, the Federal Government has a 
role in stepping in and helping them and providing for their needs. 
That's all we're asking for today.
  I urge my colleagues to support all the aid for Hurricane Sandy and 
to reject any of the amendments that would take it away.
  Mr. ROGERS of Kentucky. Madam Chairman, I have no further requests 
for time. I'm prepared to close if the gentlelady is prepared.
  Mrs. LOWEY. Mr. Chairman, I'll respond in 30 seconds, and then I'd be 
delighted if you closed.
  Mr. Chairman, I'd like to again thank you and Chairman Frelinghuysen 
for your hard work on this bill.
  I would like to address all those who are not sure about how they're 
going to vote on this bill, and I would like to clarify the way this 
appropriation works.
  When you have huge disasters, transit systems, tunnels, thousands of 
homes that have to be repaired, you need that money committed before 
you can engage any contractor, any builder in a contract.
  Now, as you and I know, Mr. Chairman, we've worked a long time on 
that committee, and before a dollar goes out, the person has to be 
responsible for every dollar that is committed that they've spent and 
that they're going to spend. So we're not just writing an open check. 
We're just not opening our checkbook. We're responding to these 
tremendous needs, and I do hope we can get a bipartisan vote for this 
effort.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. ROGERS of Kentucky. Madam Chairman, I urge adoption of the Rogers 
amendment, and I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. VAN HOLLEN. Madam Chair, today we meet to consider the second and 
third tranches of disaster assistance for the families suffering from 
the effects of Hurricane Sandy. In the dying days of the 112th 
Congress, we passed legislation granting FEMA the authority to increase 
by up to $9.7 billion its borrowing so that the agency could continue 
paying homeowners insurance claims associated with the hurricane. Then, 
rather than address the remaining pressing concerns of the families 
suffering because of Sandy, the Republican Leadership gaveled the House 
into adjournment.
  We return today, months after Sandy struck to finish the job. Today 
the House considers two pieces of legislation that when combined will 
provide more than $50 billion in assistance to those areas hit by 
Sandy. I stand in support of H.R. 152 and the amendment offered by Rep. 
Frelinghuysen.
  H.R. 152 provides $17 billion in assistance to the lead agencies 
responsible for reconstruction efforts including the Department of 
Health and Human Services, the Army Corps of Engineers, the Department 
of Agriculture and the Department of Transportation. The bill also 
increases the role of the Government Accountability Office in 
monitoring the assistance in the bill. Representative Frelinghuysen's 
amendment covers the same areas as H.R. 152 while increasing the time 
lines associated with funding to provide for longer-term support. These 
measures, together with the bill

[[Page H119]]

passed last Congress to increase FEMA borrowing authority and the Sandy 
disaster assistance streamlining bill passed by the House yesterday 
finally finishes the work Congress should have completed months ago.
  With the passage of H.R. 152 and the Frelinghuysen amendment, the 
families whose lives were turned upside down by the destruction caused 
by Hurricane Sandy will finally have access to the resources they will 
need to rebuild.
  Mr. HENSARLING. Madam Chair, there is no doubt that Hurricane Sandy 
rendered unspeakable damage to lives and property on our East Coast. It 
truly represents one of the great natural disasters of recent history. 
For millions of our fellow citizens, the devastation has been 
unfathomable. We are a compassionate nation, and that is why the House 
of Representatives is taking up its second Hurricane Sandy relief bill.
  Sadly, Hurricane Sandy isn't the only disaster we face as a nation. 
The tragic reality is that our nation is broke. We have amassed more 
debt in the last four years than was accumulated from President George 
Washington through President Bill Clinton. Our spending trajectory is 
unsustainable by any account. Our swelling $16.4 trillion debt 
threatens our national security, our economic well-being and our 
children's very future. If we don't quit spending money we don't have, 
it is they who will become the next victims--think Greece. It is past 
time to re-examine the proper role of the federal government in 
providing disaster relief and how that relief is financed.
  In the wake of a tragedy like Hurricane Sandy, all agree, no matter 
what, that disaster victims must receive basic necessities like food, 
water, power, medicine and law enforcement. This is undebatable. Yet as 
we continue to borrow more than 30 cents on the dollar, much of it from 
the Chinese, can and should the federal government continue to fund the 
restoration of private homes, businesses and automobiles? When wealthy 
states like New York and Connecticut spent $4.7 million on streetscapes 
and $30 million a year in taxpayer funds to rent new office space while 
state-rented office space stood vacant, can and should the federal 
government continue to pay to rebuild their infrastructure?
  According to a recent report by the Heritage Foundation, the yearly 
average for disaster declarations has grown from 28 during the Reagan 
administration to 90 during the Clinton administration, 130 during the 
George W. Bush administration, and 153 during the Obama administration. 
This isn't just nature at work. This is a move toward ``nationalizing'' 
disaster, consequently lowering the threshold of what is considered 
truly disastrous. This has allowed states and localities to abdicate 
more and more of their responsibilities to a federal government that 
owns a printing press for money and has no balanced budget 
requirements. Also, spending restraint is usually the first thing to go 
in the heat of a crisis--especially when someone else is picking up the 
tab.
  Case in point: The Sandy relief bill passed by the Democratic-
controlled Senate in the 112th Congress--the same Senate that has 
refused to pass a budget in the last three years--includes $150 million 
for fisheries as far away as Alaska, $8 million to purchase cars for 
the Homeland Security and Justice Departments, $58.8 million to replant 
trees that were damaged on private land, $135 million to improve 
weather forecasting, and $10.78 billion largely for future construction 
improvements to public transportation not even related to Hurricane 
Sandy. In fact, 64 percent of the so-called ``emergency'' funding in 
this bill will not be spent until 2015 or later. We must always be 
vigilant to ensure the Obama administration's cynical motto, ``never 
let a serious crisis go to waste,'' is not allowed to rule the day.
  Given our spending-driven debt crisis, changes must be made. Like 
many members of Congress, when disaster has befallen my district or 
state, I have worked to help ensure funding was provided through the 
Federal Emergency Management Agency. However, I have consistently 
fought for disaster funds to either be in the budget or offset through 
the rescission of lower-priority spending. A nation on the road to 
bankruptcy must prioritize its spending. There should be no more 
``emergency'' disaster funding without offsetting cuts to lower 
priority spending.
  Next, the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) must be 
functionally and significantly reformed. I have long been critical of 
this ineffective, inefficient and indisputably costly experiment in 
government-provided flood insurance. The program operates with non-
actuarial rates, encouraging unsustainable development and running up 
$21 billion in debt with zero hope of repayment. A reauthorization bill 
passed last year began eliminating outdated subsidies, but Sandy hit 
before many of these provisions could take effect. Certainly, we have a 
contractual obligation to pay the NFIP claims of people whose lives 
were turned upside down by this terrible storm. Yet we also have an 
obligation to ensure hard-working taxpayers aren't always stuck bailing 
out failed government programs. The Financial Services Committee, which 
I chair, will take up legislation to get the government out of the 
subsidized insurance business and transition us to a private, stable 
insurance system that can keep the promises it makes without borrowing 
tens of billions of dollars that we do not have.
  America is not just operating on borrowed money--we're operating on 
borrowed time. Today, it is not a question of if bond markets will turn 
on us, but when. Unless we change our out-of-control spending ways, we 
will be the first generation in American history to leave the next 
generation with less freedom, fewer opportunities and a lower standard 
of living. We have no greater moral responsibility than to preserve the 
blessings of liberty and opportunity for future generations. A 
compassionate nation will not allow a great physical tragedy of today 
to ever become an even greater fiscal tragedy for our children 
tomorrow.
  Mr. BARR. Madam Chair, I strongly support the provision of immediate 
federal relief to the victims of Hurricane Sandy and other disasters. 
We absolutely have a responsibility to provide targeted resources to 
help communities meet their true emergency needs following a natural 
disaster. But I remain convinced that we can, and should, put in the 
tough work to do this in a fiscally responsible manner. This means 
finding a way to pay for what we spend.
  Our national debt currently exceeds $16.4 trillion--and grows by 
billions of dollars each day. This is a symptom of Washington's 
inability to live within its means, and unless we reform the way 
Washington has traditionally gone about its business, this debt is 
going to dramatically limit the potential of our children and 
grandchildren. We must do better.
  As I have traveled throughout Kentucky's Sixth District, people have 
asked me repeatedly to stand firm for common sense and fiscal 
responsibility. This is what families and small businesses in my 
district do every day, and this is the mentality that we need to start 
bringing to Washington. The Federal Government spent a massive $3.6 
trillion in fiscal year 2012, so there are clearly savings that we can 
find. I am willing to do that work, and I encourage my colleagues to do 
so as well. Congress should not use the urgency of disaster relief as 
its excuse for continuing to run up our $16.4 trillion national debt.
  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Madam Chair, I rise today to support H.R. 152 ``the 
Disaster Relief Appropriations Act of 2013,'' which will provide relief 
to citizens devastated by the impact of Superstorm Sandy.
  Last month, the Administration requested $60.4 billion in federal aid 
to provide financial assistance to homeowners and businesses affected 
by Hurricane Sandy. Back on December 28, 2012, the Senate passed a $61 
billion comprehensive aid package for the victims and communities by a 
vote of 62-32.
  I am pleased that this body was able to pass H.R. 41, a $9.7 billion 
dollar bill which temporarily increased the borrowing authority of the 
Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for carrying out the 
National Flood Insurance Program.
  Now that the President has signed H.R. 41, victims of Superstorm 
Sandy are finally able to receive some much-needed relief from the 
federal government. The issue before us is that in no other time in the 
last 2 decades have victims had to wait this long for relief.


                             hurricane ike

  Right after Hurricane Ike devastated Texas in September 2008, I 
worked hard with the Members of the Texas Congressional delegation to 
ensure that Texas was appropriated the recovery funds it so desperately 
needed. In early 2009, the State of Texas received part of these 
recovery funds, namely $219 million under the Social Services Block 
Grant (SSBG) program from the Department of Health and Human Services 
(HHS).
  Overall, the Federal Government provided over $1 billion of federal 
aid for hurricane Ike relief by June 2009 including: $103 million to 
the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston for debris removal, 
$35 million to the Sam Houston Electric Cooperative for restoration 
work and $10 million to the Trinity Bay Conservation District for 
debris removal. I understand the plight of the New York Delegation.
  Hurricane Ike wreaked havoc on Texas, particularly in Galveston and 
Houston. As we move forward with recovery efforts, it became clear that 
the impact of the storm had been widespread and many people were still 
in need of assistance. I suspect that these are the same circumstances 
under which the survivors of Hurricane Sandy find themselves. I want to 
remind everyone in this Chamber that during Hurricane Ike, more than 60 
Americans and over 26 Texans died. Moreover, it resulted in the 
evacuation of over 1 million residents and caused over $11 billion 
worth of damage.
  Hurricanes of the magnitude that we have faced over the last decade 
require a federal

[[Page H120]]

response. We have a duty and an obligation to help our neighbors. I am 
surprised by those who are quick to say that this situation is 
different that the Hurricanes that came before. Hurricane Sandy like 
Ike and Katrina took lives, destroyed homes, and devastated 
communities. Again, Hurricane Ike caused millions of dollars in damage 
throughout Houston and Galveston. The local agencies processing the 
people impacted by Hurricane Ike for which these funds were utilized, 
received these funds from the state and federal agencies six months 
late, but they did receive funds because the funds were available. The 
victims of Sandy are still waiting for a federal response.
  The road to recovery and reconstruction was not easy after hurricane 
Ike, but with the cooperation of the United States government, those 
states affected were able to recover. I saw the destruction that 
hurricane Ike caused to the city of Houston's infrastructure and I have 
also seen how the city of Houston was able to rebuild damaged roadways 
and bridges. Galveston was able to rebuild its shoreline, which has 
recently experienced its most lucrative tourist season since Hurricane 
Ike. With the necessary federal assistance, communities can recover 
from disaster.


                           Hurricane Katrina

  Hurricane Katrina took the lives of 1,833 men, women, and children, 
while leaving roughly 400,000 people without jobs. Close to 275,000 
homes were lost as a result of the record-breaking storm surge that 
developed and the dozens of levees that couldn't withstand the rage of 
Katrina. Hurricane Katrina caused an estimated $108 billion in damage, 
becoming America's costliest hurricane.
  I would like to take a moment to paint a picture for Members of this 
body about the differences in response to this Hurricane and that of 
Hurricane Katrina, just in terms of funding. On the morning of August 
29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast of the United States 
ravaging Americans from Texas to Florida, and even as far inland as the 
Ohio valley. In 5 days, on September 2, 2005, President George W. Bush 
signed into law a bill to provide $10.5 billion in emergency funding 
for disaster relief related to Hurricane Katrina. Six days later, 
Congress passed another bill for $51.8 billion in emergency 
appropriations. It took a total of 10 days for Congress to approve 
$62.3 billion in emergency funding for Hurricane Katrina relief. Here 
we are today, nearly 2 months after Sandy, still debating Hurricane 
Sandy funding.
  Over 7 years ago, I sat down with NPR's Ed Gordon as a part of a 
special roundtable to discuss the impact of Hurricane Katrina and 
Washington's tremendously slow response time to disaster relief 
efforts. I recall the anger and frustration in the hearts and minds of 
Americans across the country at the Bush Administration's seemingly 
lack of urgency in dealing with the disaster.
  At the time, Congress was able to pass an initial emergency relief 
bill worth $10 billion 4 days after Katrina made landfall, and then 
pass an additional $52 billion in funding 6 days after that. It took 10 
days for congress to pass a Katrina relief bill worth $62.3 billion, 
and yet a comprehensive relief bill for Sandy has not yet been 
approved.
  We now stand 78 days after the hurricane, which is appalling when you 
consider the fact we are dealing with Americans' humanity and 
livelihoods. We forecast these disasters; 10 days was too long for 
Katrina, and 78 days after Sandy is simply unacceptable.
  After Hurricane Katrina devastated the Gulf Coast of the United 
States I, along with several other Members of Congress, introduced 
legislation to protect the families and businesses financially 
overwhelmed by the disaster.
  When the Judiciary Committee considered the Bankruptcy Abuse and 
Consumer Protection Act at the beginning of 2005, I offered an 
amendment to protect the victims of natural disasters like those who 
were unfortunately, eventually, devastated by Hurricane Katrina later 
that year.
  Immediately after Hurricane Katrina, Members of Congress and I 
continued to fight for financial relief for those affected by natural 
disasters because that is the American way; we take care of our 
nation's most vulnerable citizens regardless of race, religion, 
socioeconomic status or unfortunate circumstance. I'd like to think 
that 7 years after the passage of federal funds for the most expensive 
hurricane in our nation's history, that when the next massive storm 
arrives, law makers would be able to approve emergency relief bills in 
less than 10 days. Sadly, with Sandy, it seems as though we are moving 
in the opposite direction.
  Since this historic storm devastated the east coast in late October, 
the people impacted by the storm, particularly those in the Tri-State 
area of New Jersey, New York, and Connecticut, have been waiting 
patiently for the federal government to act as they continue to engage 
in efforts to rebuild their communities.
  However, the time for patience has long since expired, and these 
Americans can no longer wait for Congress to act to provide 
comprehensive relief.
  For families without a home, and for businesses without a storefront 
or customers, this situation has been an ongoing nightmare. These 
families and businesses have been waiting for Congress to join them in 
their struggle to pick up the pieces and put their communities back 
together.
  The proposal before us is our opportunity to step up and help to 
restore these suffering communities; that is the role of the federal 
government. Every state in this country is, at any given moment in 
time, at risk for experiencing a devastating and costly natural or 
manmade disaster.
  When state and local governments face overwhelming challenges that 
are too big and too expensive to ever hope to resolve in isolation, the 
federal government should be there to quickly assist them in their 
recovery. That is what makes us strong as a nation; that we can come 
together when necessary to prevent the pieces of our country from 
crumbling individually.


                    SELECTED PROVISIONS OF H.R. 152

  The funds in H.R. 152 will go to help restore both calm and stability 
to the affected communities by providing relief and rebuilding 
infrastructure, as well as to help the local economies to recover from 
stagnation.
  Small Business Administration--
  This funding will provide for the immediate needs of the SBA Disaster 
Loan Program to provide timely, low-interest financing for the repair 
and rebuilding of disaster-damaged private property for homeowners, 
renters, and businesses.
  This funding would also provide grants to assist small businesses 
affected by Hurricane Sandy with disaster recovery and response 
problems.


 Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Disaster Relief Fund (DRF)

  This funding will fulfill near-term needs for the DRF, the most 
immediate source of relief and recovery funds available to individuals, 
families, and communities to support ongoing recovery through affected 
areas.
  This includes providing individual assistance such as temporary 
housing, crisis counseling, and disaster unemployment assistance.
  It also provides funding for public assistance to local communities 
and certain nonprofits for debris removal, emergency protective 
measures, and repair, replacement, and restoration of disaster-damaged, 
publicly owned facilities and the facilities of certain nonprofit 
organizations.
  Department of Transportation--
  This funding will provide reasonable assistance and recovery to the 
four major affected transit agencies--New York's MTA, the Port 
Authority of NY/NJ, New Jersey Transit, and the City of New York DOT 
Ferries.
  Language is included in the legislation to provide stringent 
oversight on the use of funding and the administration of grants.


           Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)

  This funding through HUD's Community Development Fund will support 
critical and immediate community needs. This includes repairs to damage 
sustained by publicly owned hospitals, local roads and utilities, and 
small businesses.
  Funding through HUD's Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) 
program to support community needs, such as repairs to damage caused to 
publicly owned hospitals, local roads and utilities and small 
businesses.
  Army Corps of Engineers--
  The bill fully funds the Administration's updated estimates for Army 
Corps of Engineers projects for response and recovery to Superstorm 
Sandy.
  As was done after previous disasters, these funds will help restore 
navigation channels, beaches, and other damaged infrastructure to pre-
storm conditions. Moreover, the bill will provide funds to continue 
response and recovery activities for flood control, coastal emergency 
projects, and emergency dredging.
  Department of Veterans Affairs--
  This funding will go to repairs and reconstruction at the Manhattan 
VA hospital and other VA medical facilities, which sustained 
significant flood damage during the storm. These repairs are urgently 
needed to provide adequate medical services and care to veterans in the 
Northeast region, many of whom have had to move to other VA facilities 
following the storm.


        PREVIOUS FEDERAL GOVERNMENT RESPONSES TO DISASTER RELIEF

  As the representative for the 18th District in Texas, I know the 
massive and protracted destruction that storms like this can cause both 
to property and, more importantly, to the lives of citizens who are 
left to rebuild their lives and restore all that they have lost.
  After the initial disaster response and search and rescue phases, we 
must begin to rebuild, a process that calls for a longterm commitment 
from officials in state, local, and federal government.
  As I stated above, we can all recall Hurricane Ike in 2008, which 
heavily impacted

[[Page H121]]

many constituents in my district. At least 74 people lost their lives 
in the State of Texas, with 28 in Harris County and 17 in Galveston. 
Over 200,000 homes in the Houston-Galveston region were left damaged or 
destroyed as a result of Ike.
  Congress appropriated $3 billion to Texas to help finance the 
infrastructure and housing recovery, which included individual and 
household assistance, disaster unemployment assistance, public 
assistance grants to state and local government and nonprofit 
organizations to pay for debris removal, emergency protective measures 
and road repairs, and low-interest disaster loans provided by the Small 
Business Administration.
  My visits to the affected areas fundamentally evidenced the need for 
long-term recovery and to get people back on their feet. My 
constituents and others in the affected areas needed and greatly 
appreciated the federal assistance they received, and so now that 
Americans in other parts of our nation need our help, we must move in a 
bipartisan fashion to provide it.


                    EXTENT OF DAMAGE CAUSED BY SANDY

  As a nation, we continue to mourn the loss of at least 132 people in 
the United States due to Superstorm Sandy (60 in New York, 48 New York 
City; 34 in New Jersey; 16 in Pennsylvania, 7 in West Virginia). Many 
more were lost to Sandy in the Caribbean.
  As devastating as Hurricane Ike was, the damage to property it caused 
(an estimated $29.5 billion) the costs associated with Superstorm Sandy 
are expected to be significantly higher. While we do not yet know the 
final numbers, the total amount of property damage resulting from 
Superstorm Sandy exceeds $62 billion.
  In terms of dollars of property destruction, this ranks Superstorm 
Sandy second only to Hurricane Katrina ($128 billion, adjusted for 
inflation)(note: Hurricane Ike ranks 3rd).
  Most gas stations in New York City and New Jersey were closed because 
of power shortages and depleted fuel supplies. Long lines formed at gas 
stations that were expected to be open.
  Food, shelter and clothing are basic necessities, and right now far 
too many people are without access to them during these holidays and in 
brutally cold weather. With more cold weather in sight, things are not 
going to get any easier for residents of those communities.
  Economic conditions in many affected communities are stagnant; 
stalled because the federal government has yet to provide funding. It 
took 10 days for Congress to approve comprehensive aid for Katrina, but 
Congress has yet to provide a comprehensive aid package for those 
affected by Sandy for more than two months.


                               CONCLUSION

  Today, the $9.7 billion in relief granted by H.R. 41 granted is 
limited in scope and insufficient to address the entirety of the 
situation faced by residents of the affected areas. Here in the House, 
we must finish the job and pass H.R. 251. We need to restore a sense of 
calm and stability in the lives of people affected by Superstorm Sandy. 
We need to ensure that small businesses in the affected areas are able 
to rebound as expeditiously as possible so that they can get the local 
economies moving again.
  I am encouraged that with bipartisan support, we were able to pass 
H.R. 41 relief for Superstorm Sandy; however, we must now follow up and 
finish the job by passing H.R. 251. We know that disasters affect all 
of us at one point or another, and we must come together as one nation 
to give people access to relief that, realistically, only the federal 
government can provide.

  The CHAIR. All time for general debate has expired.
  Pursuant to the rule, the bill shall be considered for amendment 
under the 5-minute rule. It shall be in order to consider as an 
original bill for the purpose of amendment under the 5-minute rule the 
amendment in the nature of a substitute printed in part A of House 
Report 113-1. That amendment in the nature of a substitute shall be 
considered as read.
  The text of the amendment in the nature of a substitute is as 
follows:

                                H.R. 152

       Be in enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of 
     the United States of America in Congress assembled.

                                TITLE I

                       DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

                         DOMESTIC FOOD PROGRAMS

                       Food and Nutrition Service

                      commodity assistance program

       For an additional amount for ``Commodity Assistance 
     Program'' for the emergency food assistance program as 
     authorized by section 27(a) of the Food and Nutrition Act of 
     2008 (7 U.S.C. 2036(a)) and section 204(a)(1) of the 
     Emergency Food Assistance Act of 1983 (7 U.S.C. 7508(a)(1)), 
     $6,000,000: Provided, That notwithstanding any other 
     provisions of the Emergency Food Assistance Act of 1983, the 
     Secretary of Agriculture may allocate additional foods and 
     funds for administrative expenses from resources specifically 
     appropriated, transferred, or reprogrammed to restore to 
     States resources used to assist families and individuals 
     displaced by Hurricane Sandy among the States without regard 
     to sections 204 and 214 of such Act (7 U.S.C. 7508, 7515): 
     Provided further, That such amount is designated by the 
     Congress as being for an emergency requirement pursuant to 
     section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
     Deficit Control Act of 1985.

                                TITLE II

                         DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY

                       Corps of Engineers--Civil

                             investigations

       For an additional amount for ``Investigations'' for 
     necessary expenses related to the consequences of Hurricane 
     Sandy, $20,000,000, to remain available until expended to 
     conduct studies of flood and storm damage reduction related 
     to natural disasters: Provided, That using $19,500,000 of the 
     funds provided herein, the Secretary of the Army shall 
     conduct, at full Federal expense, a comprehensive study to 
     address the flood risks of vulnerable coastal populations in 
     areas impacted by Hurricane Sandy within the boundaries of 
     the North Atlantic Division of the United States Army Corps 
     of Engineers: Provided further, That an interim report with 
     an assessment of authorized Corps projects for reducing 
     flooding and storm risks in the affected area that have been 
     constructed or are under construction, including construction 
     cost estimates, shall be submitted to the Committees on 
     Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Senate 
     not later than March 1, 2013: Provided further, That an 
     interim report identifying any previously authorized but 
     unconstructed Corps project and any project under study by 
     the Corps for reducing flooding and storm damage risks in the 
     affected area, including updated construction cost estimates, 
     that are, or would be, consistent with the comprehensive 
     study shall be submitted to the appropriate congressional 
     committees not later than May 1, 2013: Provided further, That 
     a final report shall be submitted to the appropriate 
     congressional committees not later than 24 months after the 
     date of enactment of this Act: Provided further, That as a 
     part of the study, the Secretary shall identify those 
     activities that warrant additional analysis by the Corps, as 
     well as institutional and other barriers to providing 
     protection to the affected coastal areas: Provided further, 
     That the Secretary shall conduct the study in coordination 
     with other Federal agencies, and State, local, and Tribal 
     officials to ensure consistency with other plans to be 
     developed, as appropriate: Provided further, That using 
     $500,000 of the funds provided herein, the Secretary shall 
     conduct, at full Federal expense, an evaluation of the 
     performance of existing projects constructed by the Corps and 
     damaged as a consequence of Hurricane Sandy for the purposes 
     of determining their effectiveness and making recommendations 
     for improvements to such projects: Provided further, That the 
     amounts in this paragraph are designated by the Congress as 
     being for an emergency requirement pursuant to section 
     251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
     Control Act of 1985: Provided further, That the Assistant 
     Secretary of the Army for Civil Works shall provide a monthly 
     report to the Committees on Appropriations of the House of 
     Representatives and the Senate detailing the allocation and 
     obligation of these funds, beginning not later than 60 days 
     after the date of enactment of this Act.

                              construction

       For an additional amount for ``Construction'' for necessary 
     expenses related to the consequences of Hurricane Sandy, 
     $9,000,000, to remain available until expended for repairs to 
     projects that were under construction and damaged as a 
     consequence of Hurricane Sandy: Provided, That such amount is 
     designated by the Congress as being for an emergency 
     requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the 
     Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985: 
     Provided further, That the Assistant Secretary of the Army 
     for Civil Works shall provide a monthly report to the 
     Committees on Appropriations of the House of Representatives 
     and the Senate detailing the allocation and obligation of 
     these funds, beginning not later than 60 days after enactment 
     of this Act.

                       operation and maintenance

       For an additional amount for ``Operation and Maintenance'' 
     for necessary expenses related to the consequences of 
     Hurricane Sandy, $742,000,000, to remain available until 
     expended to dredge Federal navigation channels, and repair 
     damage to Corps projects: Provided, That such amount is 
     designated by the Congress as being for an emergency 
     requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the 
     Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985: 
     Provided further, That the Assistant Secretary of the Army 
     for Civil Works shall provide a monthly report to the 
     Committees on Appropriations of the House of Representatives 
     and the Senate detailing the allocation and obligation of 
     these funds, beginning not later than 60 days after enactment 
     of this Act.

                 flood control and coastal emergencies

       For an additional amount for ``Flood Control and Coastal 
     Emergencies'' for necessary expenses related to the 
     consequences of Hurricane Sandy, $582,000,000, to remain 
     available until expended to support emergency operations, 
     repairs, and other activities, as authorized by law: 
     Provided, That such amount is designated by the Congress as 
     being for an emergency requirement pursuant to section 
     251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
     Control Act of 1985: Provided further, That the Assistant 
     Secretary of the Army for Civil Works

[[Page H122]]

     shall provide a monthly report to the Committees on 
     Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Senate 
     detailing the allocation and obligation of these funds, 
     beginning not later than 60 days after enactment of this Act.

                               TITLE III

                     Small Business Administration

                         salaries and expenses

       For an additional amount for ``Salaries and Expenses'', 
     $10,000,000 for grants to or cooperative agreements with 
     organizations to provide technical assistance related to 
     disaster recovery, response, and long term resiliency to 
     small businesses that are recovering from Hurricane Sandy: 
     Provided, That the Small Business Administration shall 
     expedite the delivery of assistance in disaster-affected 
     areas: Provided further, That the Administrator of the Small 
     Business Administration may waive the matching requirements 
     under section 21(a)(4)(A) and 29(c) of the Small Business Act 
     for any grant made using funds made available under this 
     heading: Provided further, That no later than 30 days after 
     the date of enactment of this Act, or no less than 7 days 
     prior to obligation of funds, whichever occurs earlier, the 
     Administrator of the Small Business Administration shall 
     submit to the Committees on Appropriations of the House of 
     Representatives and the Senate a detailed expenditure plan 
     for funds provided under this heading: Provided further, That 
     such amount is designated by the Congress as being for an 
     emergency requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of 
     the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
     1985.

                      office of inspector general

       For an additional amount for ``Office of Inspector 
     General'' for necessary expenses related to the consequences 
     of Hurricane Sandy, $1,000,000, to remain available until 
     September 30, 2014: Provided, That such amount is designated 
     by the Congress as being for an emergency requirement 
     pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget 
     and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.

                     disaster loans program account

                     (including transfer of funds)

       For an additional amount for ``Disaster Loans Program 
     Account'' for the cost of direct loans authorized by section 
     7(b) of the Small Business Act, for necessary expenses 
     related to the consequences of Hurricane Sandy, $100,000,000, 
     to remain available until expended: Provided, That such 
     costs, including the cost of modifying such loans, shall be 
     as defined in section 502 of the Congressional Budget Act of 
     1974: Provided further, That in addition, for direct 
     administrative expenses of loan making and servicing to carry 
     out the direct loan program authorized by section 7(b) of the 
     Small Business Act in response to Hurricane Sandy, an 
     additional $50,000,000, to remain available until expended, 
     which may be transferred to and merged with the 
     appropriations for Salaries and Expenses: Provided further, 
     That such amounts are designated by the Congress as being for 
     an emergency requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) 
     of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
     1985.

                                TITLE IV

                    DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY

                              Coast Guard

              acquisition, construction, and improvements

                      (including transfer of funds)

       For an additional amount for ``Acquisition, Construction, 
     and Improvements'' for necessary expenses related to the 
     consequences of Hurricane Sandy, $143,899,000, to remain 
     available until September 30, 2014: Provided, That such 
     amount is designated by the Congress as being for an 
     emergency requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of 
     the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
     1985: Provided further, That notwithstanding the transfer 
     limitation contained in section 503 of division D of Public 
     Law 112-74, such funding may be transferred to other Coast 
     Guard appropriations after notification as required in 
     accordance with such section: Provided further, That a 
     description of all facilities and property to be 
     reconstructed and restored, with associated costs and time 
     lines, shall be submitted to the Committees on Appropriations 
     of the House of Representatives and the Senate no later than 
     90 days after the date of enactment of this Act.

                  Federal Emergency Management Agency

                          disaster relief fund

                      (including transfer of funds)

       For an additional amount for the ``Disaster Relief Fund'' 
     for major disasters declared pursuant to the Robert T. 
     Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (42 
     U.S.C. 5121 et seq.), $5,379,000,000, to remain available 
     until expended, of which $3,000,000 shall be transferred to 
     the Department of Homeland Security Office of Inspector 
     General for audits and investigations related to disasters: 
     Provided, That such amount is designated by the Congress as 
     being for disaster relief pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(D) of 
     the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
     1985: Provided further, That the Administrator of the Federal 
     Emergency Management Agency shall publish on the Agency's 
     website not later than 24 hours after an award of a public 
     assistance grant under section 406 of the Robert T. Stafford 
     Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5172) 
     that is in excess of $1,000,000, the specifics of each such 
     grant award: Provided further, That for any mission 
     assignment or mission assignment task order to another 
     Federal department or agency regarding a major disaster, not 
     later than 24 hours after the issuance of a mission 
     assignment or task order in excess of $1,000,000, the 
     Administrator shall publish on the Agency's website the 
     following: the name of the impacted State and the disaster 
     declaration for such State, the assigned agency, the 
     assistance requested, a description of the disaster, the 
     total cost estimate, and the amount obligated: Provided 
     further, That not later than 10 days after the last day of 
     each month until the mission assignment or task order is 
     completed and closed out, the Administrator shall update any 
     changes to the total cost estimate and the amount obligated: 
     Provided further, That for a disaster declaration related to 
     Hurricane Sandy, the Administrator shall submit to the 
     Committees on Appropriations of the House of Representatives 
     and the Senate, not later than 5 days after the first day of 
     each month beginning after the date of enactment of this Act, 
     and shall publish on the Agency's website not later than 10 
     days after the first day of each such month, an estimate or 
     actual amount, if available, for the current fiscal year of 
     the cost of the following categories of spending: public 
     assistance, individual assistance, operations, mitigation, 
     administrative, and any other relevant category (including 
     emergency measures and disaster resources): Provided further, 
     That not later than 10 days after the first day of each month 
     beginning after the date of enactment of this Act, the 
     Administrator shall publish on the Agency's website the 
     report (referred to as the Disaster Relief Monthly Report) as 
     required by Public Law 112-74.

                         Science and Technology

           research, development, acquisition, and operations

       For an additional amount for ``Research, Development, 
     Acquisition, and Operations'', for necessary expenses related 
     to the consequences of Hurricane Sandy, $585,000, to remain 
     available until September 30, 2013: Provided, That such 
     amount is designated by the Congress as being for an 
     emergency requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of 
     the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
     1985.

                   Domestic Nuclear Detection Office

                          systems acquisition

       For an additional amount for ``Systems Acquisition'', for 
     necessary expenses related to the consequences of Hurricane 
     Sandy, $3,869,000, to remain available until September 30, 
     2014: Provided, That such amount is designated by the 
     Congress as being for an emergency requirement pursuant to 
     section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
     Deficit Control Act of 1985.

                     General Provision--This Title

       Sec. 401.  Funds made available by Public Law 109-88 for 
     carrying out activities authorized under section 417 of the 
     Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance 
     Act (42 U.S.C. 5184) may be used until expended to provide 
     assistance under section 417 of that Act to local governments 
     in areas eligible to receive such assistance pursuant to a 
     major disaster declaration by the President for Hurricane 
     Sandy.

                                TITLE V

                       DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

                       Fish and Wildlife Service

                              construction

       For an additional amount for ``Construction'' for necessary 
     expenses related to the consequences of Hurricane Sandy, 
     $49,875,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, 
     That such amount is designated by the Congress as being for 
     an emergency requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) 
     of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
     1985.

                         National Park Service

                              construction

       For an additional amount for ``Construction'' for necessary 
     expenses related to the consequences of Hurricane Sandy, 
     $234,000,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, 
     That such amount is designated by the Congress as being for 
     an emergency requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) 
     of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
     1985.

             Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement

                           oil spill research

       For an additional amount for ``Oil Spill Research'' for 
     necessary expenses related to the consequences of Hurricane 
     Sandy, $3,000,000, to remain available until expended: 
     Provided, That such amount is designated by the Congress as 
     being for an emergency requirement pursuant to section 
     251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
     Control Act of 1985.

                                TITLE VI

                DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

                        Office of the Secretary

            public health and social services emergency fund

                     (including transfers of funds)

       For an additional amount for ``Public Health and Social 
     Services Emergency Fund'' for disaster response and recovery, 
     and other expenses directly related to Hurricane Sandy, 
     including making payments under the Head Start Act and 
     additional payments for distribution as provided for under 
     the ``Social Services Block Grant Program'', $100,000,000, to 
     remain available until September 30, 2014: Provided, That not 
     less than $25,000,000 shall be transferred to ``Children and 
     Families Services Programs'' for the Head Start program for 
     the purposes provided herein: Provided further, That not less 
     than $25,000,000 shall be transferred to ``Social Services 
     Block Grant'' for the purposes provided herein: Provided 
     further, That not less than $2,000,000 shall be transferred 
     to the Department of Health and Human Services (``HHS'') 
     ``Office of Inspector General'' to perform oversight, 
     accountability, and evaluation of programs, projects, or 
     activities supported with the funds provided for the

[[Page H123]]

     purposes provided herein: Provided further, That 
     notwithstanding any other provision of law, the distribution 
     of any amount shall be limited to the States of New York and 
     New Jersey, except that funds provided to ``Substance Abuse 
     and Mental Health Services Administration'' may be 
     distributed to other States, but only if such funds are for 
     grants, contracts, and cooperative agreements for behavioral 
     health treatment, crisis counseling, and other related 
     helplines, and for other similar programs to provide support 
     to dislocated residents of New York and New Jersey: Provided 
     further, That none of the funds appropriated in this 
     paragraph shall be included in the calculation of the ``base 
     grant'' in subsequent fiscal years, as such term is defined 
     in sections 640(a)(7)(A), 641A(h)(1)(B), or 644(d)(3) of the 
     Head Start Act: Provided further, That funds appropriated in 
     this paragraph are not subject to the allocation requirements 
     of section 640(a) of the Head Start Act: Provided further, 
     That funds appropriated in this paragraph are in addition to 
     the entitlement grants authorized by section 2002(a)(1) of 
     the Social Security Act and shall not be available for such 
     entitlement grants: Provided further, That funds appropriated 
     in this paragraph may be transferred by the Secretary of HHS 
     (``Secretary'') to accounts within HHS, and shall be 
     available only for the purposes provided in this paragraph: 
     Provided further, That the transfer authority provided in 
     this paragraph is in addition to any other transfer authority 
     available in this or any other Act for fiscal year 2013: 
     Provided further, That 15 days prior to the transfer of funds 
     appropriated in this paragraph, the Secretary shall notify 
     the Committees on Appropriations of the House of 
     Representatives and the Senate of any such transfer and the 
     planned uses of the funds: Provided further, That obligations 
     incurred for the purposes provided herein prior to the date 
     of enactment of this Act may be charged to funds appropriated 
     by this paragraph: Provided further, That funds appropriated 
     in this paragraph and transferred to the National Institutes 
     of Health for the purpose of supporting the repair or 
     rebuilding of non-Federal biomedical or behavioral research 
     facilities damaged as a result of Hurricane Sandy shall be 
     used to award grants or contracts for such purpose under 
     section 404I of the Public Health Service Act: Provided 
     further, That section 481A(c)(2) of such Act does not apply 
     to the use of funds described in the preceding proviso: 
     Provided further, That funds appropriated in this paragraph 
     shall not be available for costs that are reimbursed by the 
     Federal Emergency Management Agency, under a contract for 
     insurance, or by self-insurance: Provided further, That such 
     amounts are designated by the Congress as being for an 
     emergency requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of 
     the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
     1985.

                            RELATED AGENCIES

                     Social Security Administration

                 limitation on administrative expenses

                     (including transfer of funds)

       For an additional amount for ``Limitation on Administrative 
     Expenses'', $2,000,000, for expenses directly related to 
     Hurricane Sandy, which shall be derived from the unobligated 
     balances that remain available under such heading for the 
     Social Security Administration for information technology and 
     telecommunications hardware and software infrastructure: 
     Provided, That such amounts are designated by the Congress as 
     being for an emergency requirement pursuant to section 
     251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
     Control Act of 1985.

                               TITLE VII

                         DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE

                         MILITARY CONSTRUCTION

               Military Construction, Army National Guard

       For an additional amount for ``Military Construction, Army 
     National Guard'' for necessary expenses related to the 
     consequences of Hurricane Sandy, $24,235,000, to remain 
     available until September 30, 2017: Provided, That none of 
     the funds made available to the Army National Guard for 
     recovery efforts related to Hurricane Sandy in this Act shall 
     be available for obligation until the Committees on 
     Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Senate 
     receive form 1391 for each specific request: Provided 
     further, That notwithstanding any other provision of law, 
     such funds may be obligated to carry out military 
     construction projects not otherwise authorized by law: 
     Provided further, That such amount is designated by the 
     Congress as being for an emergency requirement pursuant to 
     section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
     Deficit Control Act of 1985.

                     DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS

                     Veterans Health Administration

                            medical services

       For an additional amount for ``Medical Services'' for 
     necessary expenses related to the consequences of Hurricane 
     Sandy, $21,000,000, to remain available until September 30, 
     2014: Provided, That such amount is designated by the 
     Congress as being for an emergency requirement pursuant to 
     section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
     Deficit Control Act of 1985.

                           medical facilities

        For an additional amount for ``Medical Facilities'' for 
     necessary expenses related to the consequences of Hurricane 
     Sandy, $6,000,000, to remain available until September 30, 
     2014: Provided, That such amount is designated by the 
     Congress as being for an emergency requirement pursuant to 
     section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
     Deficit Control Act of 1985.

                    National Cemetery Administration

        For an additional amount for ``National Cemetery 
     Administration'' for necessary expenses related to the 
     consequences of Hurricane Sandy, $1,100,000: Provided, That 
     such amount is designated by the Congress as being for an 
     emergency requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of 
     the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
     1985.

                      Departmental Administration

                     information technology systems

        For an additional amount for ``Information Technology 
     Systems'' for necessary expenses related to the consequences 
     of Hurricane Sandy, $531,000: Provided, That such amount is 
     designated by the Congress as being for an emergency 
     requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the 
     Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.

                      construction, major projects

       For an additional amount for ``Construction, Major 
     Projects'', $207,000,000, to remain available until September 
     30, 2017, for renovations and repairs as a consequence of 
     damage caused by Hurricane Sandy: Provided, That none of 
     these funds shall be available for obligation until the 
     Secretary of Veterans Affairs submits to the Committees on 
     Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Senate 
     a detailed expenditure plan for funds provided under this 
     heading: Provided further, That notwithstanding any other 
     provision of law, such funds may be obligated and expended to 
     carry out planning and design and major medical facility 
     construction not otherwise authorized by law: Provided 
     further, That such amount is designated by the Congress as 
     being for an emergency requirement pursuant to section 
     251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
     Control Act of 1985.

                               TITLE VIII

                      DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

                    Federal Aviation Administration

                        facilities and equipment

                    (airport and airway trust fund)

       For an additional amount for ``Facilities and Equipment'', 
     $14,600,000, to be derived from the Airport and Airway Trust 
     Fund and to remain available until September 30, 2013, for 
     necessary expenses related to the consequences of Hurricane 
     Sandy: Provided, That such amount is designated by the 
     Congress as being for an emergency requirement pursuant to 
     section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
     Deficit Control Act of 1985.

                    Federal Railroad Administration

operating subsidy grants to the national railroad passenger corporation

       For an additional amount for ``Operating Subsidy Grants to 
     the National Railroad Passenger Corporation'' for the 
     Secretary of Transportation to make grants to the National 
     Railroad Passenger Corporation for necessary expenses related 
     to the consequences of Hurricane Sandy, $32,000,000, to 
     remain available until expended: Provided, That such amount 
     is designated by the Congress as being for an emergency 
     requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the 
     Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.

                     Federal Transit Administration

             public transportation emergency relief program

                     (including transfer of funds)

       For the ``Public Transportation Emergency Relief Program'' 
     as authorized under section 5324 of title 49, United States 
     Code, $5,400,000,000, to remain available until expended, for 
     transit systems affected by Hurricane Sandy: Provided, That 
     not more than $2,000,000,000 shall be made available not 
     later than 60 days after the date of enactment of this Act: 
     Provided further, That the remainder of the funds shall be 
     made available only after the Federal Transit Administration 
     and the Federal Emergency Management Agency sign the 
     memorandum of agreement required by section 20017(b) of the 
     Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act (Public Law 
     112-141) and the Federal Transit Administration publishes 
     interim regulations for the Public Transportation Emergency 
     Relief Program: Provided further, That not more than three-
     quarters of 1 percent of the funds for public transportation 
     emergency relief shall be available for administrative 
     expenses and ongoing program management oversight as 
     authorized under 49 U.S.C. 5334 and 5338(i)(2) and shall be 
     in addition to any other appropriations for such purpose: 
     Provided further, That of the funds made available under this 
     heading, $3,000,000 shall be transferred to the Office of 
     Inspector General to support the oversight of activities 
     under this heading: Provided further, That such amounts are 
     designated by the Congress as being for an emergency 
     requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the 
     Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.

              DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT

                   Community Planning and Development

                       community development fund

                     (including transfer of funds)

       For an additional amount for ``Community Development 
     Fund'', $3,850,000,000, to remain available until September 
     30, 2017, for necessary expenses related to disaster relief, 
     long-term recovery, restoration of infrastructure and 
     housing, and economic revitalization in the most impacted and 
     distressed areas resulting from a

[[Page H124]]

     major disaster declared pursuant to the Robert T. Stafford 
     Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5121 
     et seq.) due to Hurricane Sandy, for activities authorized 
     under title I of the Housing and Community Development Act of 
     1974 (42 U.S.C. 5301 et seq.): Provided, That funds shall be 
     allocated directly to States and units of general local 
     government at the discretion of the Secretary of Housing and 
     Urban Development: Provided further, That within 60 days 
     after the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall allocate 
     to grantees all funds provided under this heading based on 
     the best available data: Provided further, That as a 
     condition of eligibility for receipt of such funds, a grantee 
     shall submit a plan to the Secretary detailing the proposed 
     use of all funds, including criteria for eligibility and how 
     the use of such funds will address long-term recovery, 
     restoration of infrastructure and housing, and economic 
     revitalization in the most impacted and distressed areas: 
     Provided further, That the Secretary shall, by notice issued 
     within 45 days of enactment of this Act, specify criteria for 
     approval of plans, and, if the Secretary determines that a 
     plan does not meet such criteria, the Secretary shall 
     disapprove the plan: Provided further, That as a condition of 
     making any grant, the Secretary shall certify in advance that 
     such grantee has in place proficient financial controls and 
     procurement processes and has established adequate procedures 
     to prevent any duplication of benefits as defined by section 
     312 of the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency 
     Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5155), to ensure timely expenditure 
     of funds, to maintain comprehensive websites regarding all 
     disaster recovery activities assisted with these funds, and 
     to detect and prevent waste, fraud, and abuse of funds: 
     Provided further, That funds provided under this heading may 
     not be used for activities reimbursable by or for which funds 
     are made available by the Federal Emergency Management Agency 
     or the Army Corps of Engineers: Provided further, That funds 
     allocated under this heading shall not be considered relevant 
     to the non-disaster formula allocations made pursuant to 
     section 106 of the Housing and Community Development Act of 
     1974 (42 U.S.C. 5306): Provided further, That a grantee may 
     use up to 5 percent of its overall allocation for 
     administrative costs: Provided further, That a grantee shall 
     administer grant funds provided under this heading in 
     accordance with all applicable laws and regulations and may 
     not delegate, by contract or otherwise, the responsibility 
     for administering such grant funds: Provided further, That 
     the Secretary shall provide grantees with technical 
     assistance on contracting and procurement processes and shall 
     require grantees, in contracting or procuring these funds, to 
     incorporate performance requirements and penalties into any 
     such contracts or agreements: Provided further, That the 
     Secretary shall require grantees to maintain on a public 
     website information accounting for how all grant funds are 
     used, including details of all contracts and ongoing 
     procurement processes: Provided further, That, in 
     administering the funds under this heading, the Secretary may 
     waive, or specify alternative requirements for, any provision 
     of any statute or regulation that the Secretary administers 
     in connection with the obligation by the Secretary or the use 
     of these funds by a grantee (except for requirements related 
     to fair housing, nondiscrimination, labor standards, and the 
     environment) upon a request by a grantee explaining why such 
     waiver is required to facilitate the use of such funds and 
     pursuant to a determination by the Secretary that good cause 
     exists for the waiver or alternative requirement and that 
     such action is not inconsistent with the overall purposes of 
     title I of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974 
     (42 U.S.C. 5301 et seq.) or this heading: Provided further, 
     That, notwithstanding the preceding proviso, recipients of 
     funds provided under this heading that use such funds to 
     supplement Federal assistance provided under sections 402, 
     403, 404, 406, 407, or 502 of the Robert T. Stafford Disaster 
     Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5121 et seq.) 
     may adopt, without review or public comment, any 
     environmental review, approval, or permit performed by a 
     Federal agency, and such adoption shall satisfy the 
     responsibilities of the recipient with respect to such 
     environmental review, approval or permit under section 
     104(g)(1) of the Housing and Community Development Act of 
     1974 (42 U.S.C. 5304(g)(1)): Provided further, That, 
     notwithstanding section 104(g)(2) of such Act (42 U.S.C. 
     5304(g)(2)), the Secretary may, upon receipt of a request for 
     release of funds and certification, immediately approve the 
     release of funds for an activity or project assisted under 
     this heading if the recipient has adopted an environmental 
     review, approval or permit under the preceding proviso or the 
     activity or project is categorically excluded from review 
     under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (42 
     U.S.C. 4321 et seq.): Provided further, That a waiver granted 
     by the Secretary may not reduce the percentage of funds that 
     must be used for activities that benefit persons of low and 
     moderate income to less than 50 percent, unless the Secretary 
     specifically finds that there is compelling need to further 
     reduce the percentage requirement: Provided further, That the 
     Secretary shall publish in the Federal Register any waiver or 
     alternative requirement made by the Secretary with respect to 
     any statute or regulation no later than 5 days before the 
     effective date of such waiver or alternative requirement: 
     Provided further, That, of the funds made available under 
     this heading, up to $4,000,000 may be transferred to Program 
     Office Salaries and Expenses, Community Planning and 
     Development for necessary costs, including information 
     technology costs, of administering and overseeing funds made 
     available under this heading: Provided further, That, of the 
     funds made available under this heading, $4,000,000 shall be 
     transferred to Office of the Inspector General for necessary 
     costs of overseeing and auditing funds made available under 
     this heading: Provided further, That funds provided under 
     this heading are designated by the Congress as being for an 
     emergency requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of 
     the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
     1985.

 Administrative Provision--Department of Housing and Urban Development

       Sec. 801.  For fiscal year 2013, upon request by a public 
     housing agency and supported by documentation as required by 
     the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development that 
     demonstrates that the need for the adjustment is due to the 
     disaster, the Secretary may make temporary adjustments to the 
     Section 8 housing choice voucher annual renewal funding 
     allocations and administrative fee eligibility determinations 
     for public housing agencies in an area for which the 
     President declared a disaster under title IV of the Robert T. 
     Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (42 
     U.S.C. 5170 et seq.), to avoid significant adverse funding 
     impacts that would otherwise result from the disaster.

                                TITLE IX

                      GENERAL PROVISIONS--THIS ACT

       Sec. 901.  Each amount appropriated or made available in 
     this Act is in addition to amounts otherwise appropriated for 
     the fiscal year involved.
       Sec. 902.  Each amount designated in this Act by the 
     Congress as being for an emergency requirement pursuant to 
     section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
     Deficit Control Act of 1985 shall be available only if the 
     President subsequently so designates all such amounts and 
     transmits such designations to the Congress.
       Sec. 903.  No part of any appropriation contained in this 
     Act shall remain available for obligation beyond the current 
     fiscal year unless expressly so provided herein.
       Sec. 904. (a)(1) Not later than March 31, 2013, in 
     accordance with criteria to be established by the Director of 
     the Office of Management and Budget (referred to in this 
     section as ``OMB''), each Federal agency shall submit to OMB, 
     the Government Accountability Office, the respective 
     Inspector General of each agency, and the Committees on 
     Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Senate 
     internal control plans for funds provided by this Act.
       (2) Not later than June 30, 2013, the Government 
     Accountability Office shall review for the Committees on 
     Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Senate 
     the design of the internal control plans required by 
     paragraph (1).
       (b) All programs and activities receiving funds under this 
     Act shall be deemed to be ``susceptible to significant 
     improper payments'' for purposes of the Improper Payments 
     Information Act of 2002 (31 U.S.C. 3321 note), 
     notwithstanding section 2(a) of such Act.
       (c) Funds for grants provided by this Act shall be expended 
     by the grantees within the 24-month period following the 
     agency's obligation of funds for the grant, unless, in 
     accordance with guidance to be issued by the Director of OMB, 
     the Director waives this requirement for a particular grant 
     program and submits a written justification for such waiver 
     to the Committees on Appropriations of the House of 
     Representatives and the Senate. In the case of such grants, 
     the agency shall include a term in the grant that requires 
     the grantee to return to the agency any funds not expended 
     within the 24-month period.
       (d) Through September 30, 2015, the Recovery Accountability 
     and Transparency Board shall develop and use information 
     technology resources and oversight mechanisms to detect and 
     remediate waste, fraud, and abuse in the obligation and 
     expenditure of funds appropriated in this or any other Act 
     for any fiscal year of such period for purposes related to 
     the impact of Hurricane Sandy: Provided, That the Board shall 
     coordinate its oversight efforts with the Director of OMB, 
     the head of each Federal agency receiving appropriations 
     related to the impact of Hurricane Sandy, and the respective 
     Inspector General of each such agency: Provided further, That 
     the Board shall submit quarterly reports to the Committees on 
     Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Senate 
     on its activities related to funds appropriated for the 
     impact of Hurricane Sandy.
        This Act may be cited as the ``Disaster Relief 
     Appropriations Act, 2013''.

  The CHAIR. No amendment to that amendment in the nature of a 
substitute shall be in order except the amendment printed in part B of 
House Report 113-1. After disposition of that amendment, the Chair 
shall put the question on the amendment in the nature of a substitute.
  If the amendment in the nature of a substitute printed in part A of 
House Report 113-1 accompanying House Resolution 23 is not adopted, the 
Committee shall rise and report that it has come to no resolution on 
the bill.
  If the amendment in the nature of a substitute is adopted, the 
amendment in the nature of a substitute shall be considered as the 
original bill for the purpose of further amendment.
  No further amendment shall be in order except the amendments printed 
in part C of House Report 113-1.
  At the conclusion of consideration of the amendments printed in part 
C of House Report 113-1, the Committee

[[Page H125]]

shall rise and report the bill to the House with such amendments as may 
have been adopted. Any Member may demand a separate vote in the House 
on any amendment adopted in the Committee of the Whole to the bill, to 
the amendment in the nature of a substitute printed in part A of House 
Report 113-1, or to amendment No. 1 printed in part C of House Report 
113-1.
  Each amendment printed in part B and part C of House Report 113-1 may 
be offered only in the order printed in the report, may be offered only 
by a Member designated in the report, shall be considered as read, 
shall be debatable for the time specified in the report equally divided 
and controlled by the proponent and an opponent, shall not be subject 
to amendment (except as specified in House Report 113-1), and shall not 
be subject to a demand for division of the question.


                Amendment No. 1 Offered by Mr. Mulvaney

  The CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 1 printed in 
part B of House Report 113-1.
  Mr. MULVANEY. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       After section 904 (but before the short title), insert the 
     following new section:
       Sec. 905. (a) There is hereby rescinded an amount equal to 
     1.63 percent of--
       (1) the budget authority provided (or obligation limitation 
     imposed) for fiscal year 2013 for any discretionary account 
     in any fiscal year 2013 appropriation Act;
       (2) the budget authority provided in any advance 
     appropriation for fiscal year 2013 for any discretionary 
     account in any prior fiscal year appropriation Act; and
       (3) the contract authority provided in fiscal year 2013 for 
     any program that is subject to a limitation contained in any 
     fiscal year 2013 appropriation Act for any discretionary 
     account.
       (b) Any rescission made by subsection (a) shall be applied 
     proportionately--
       (1) to each discretionary account and each item of budget 
     authority described in such subsection; and
       (2) within each such account and item, to each program, 
     project, and activity (with programs, projects, and 
     activities as delineated in the appropriation Act or 
     accompanying reports for the relevant fiscal year covering 
     such account or item, or for accounts and items not included 
     in appropriation Acts, as delineated in the most recently 
     submitted President's budget).
       (c) In the case of any fiscal year 2013 appropriation Act 
     enacted after the date of enactment of this section, any 
     rescission required by subsection (a) shall take effect 
     immediately after the enactment of such Act.
       (d) Within 30 days after the date of enactment of this 
     section (or, if later, 30 days after the enactment of any 
     fiscal year 2013 appropriation Act), the Director of the 
     Office of Management and Budget shall submit to the 
     Committees on Appropriations of the House of Representatives 
     and the Senate a report specifying the account and amount of 
     each rescission made pursuant to subsection (a).

  The CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 23, the gentleman from South 
Carolina (Mr. Mulvaney) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from South Carolina.
  Mr. MULVANEY. Thank you for the opportunity to the chairman and the 
ranking member.
  I want to make it very clear what this amendment is and what this 
amendment is not.
  This amendment is not about delay. This amendment is not about 
offering a poison pill to the underlying bill. This amendment is not 
about preventing money from going where it is very desperately needed. 
I want that to happen. I want these folks who need this money to get 
it.
  I live in an area that is hurricane-prone. I have lived through 
hurricanes myself. I have lived through floods myself. I have waded 
through chest-high water full of snakes and human waste to get into my 
own business. I've been able to take advantage of and to use, to 
rebuild a small business, a small business disaster loan. I want the 
money to go where it needs to go.
  I'm here for one reason and one reason only today, Madam Chair, and 
that is to talk about how we can pay for it. That's it.
  There was a time when we didn't have to have this conversation. There 
was a time back during Hurricane Hugo in the late 1980s where we didn't 
have to talk about how to pay for disaster assistance because the 
deficit was only $3 trillion. But we've so badly mismanaged our money 
after that, that by the time we got to Hurricane Katrina in 2005, that 
we actually did start talking about offsetting and paying for disaster 
relief and paid for and offset about 40 percent of it.
  But we didn't learn. We didn't learn from those mistakes, and we've 
continued to mismanage our money and to run up our deficit to such a 
point now where it's $16 trillion today, and it is incumbent upon us to 
have the discussion about whether or not we have the money to do this 
and whether or not it's important enough to us to pay for it.
  I wish very much that we weren't here today, I wish very much that we 
could pass this and easily borrow the money without any questions 
whatsoever, but we've wasted that opportunity. We've mismanaged our own 
finances to the point where we are now no longer capable of taking care 
of our own.
  Think about that for a second. In the United States of America, we do 
not have enough money to take care of our own citizens who need it. 
There's no rainy day fund. There's no savings. What ability we had to 
borrow money we blew through several years ago with trillion dollar 
deficits. We don't have enough money saved up to take care of our own 
people, and that's wrong. It's absolutely wrong.
  It is important to me that this money goes to the folks who need it 
very badly. It's so important to me that I think we should pay for it. 
I think we should be willing, as a body, to come together and say, 
Look, there are things that we do not need this year, things that we 
can do without this year so that the people in New York and New Jersey 
and Connecticut and the other States who so badly need the money can 
have it, without us having to go hat-in-hand to other nations of this 
world and say, Would you please lend us money so that we can take care 
of our folks who need it so badly?

                              {time}  1540

  I hope the amendment passes. I hope the amendment passes so that I 
can vote for the bill. I want this money to go where it is so 
desperately needed. But the time has come and gone in this Nation when 
we can walk in here one day and spend $9 billion or $17 billion or $60 
billion and not think about who's paying for it.
  This is important money. It's important to you, it's important to me, 
and it's important to everyone in here. But it's important enough for 
us to pay for it ourselves. For that reason, I encourage passage of 
this amendment and passage ultimately of the underlying bill.
  With that, I would yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the gentleman from 
California (Mr. McClintock).
  Mr. McCLINTOCK. Madam Chairman, it seems we've lost the battle over 
all of the non-emergency, non-Sandy spending in this measure. The 
question before us now is whether we're going to spend $17 billion in 
this bill--$50 billion when it's amended--without even pretending that 
we can pay for it.
  The gentleman from South Carolina's amendment proposes that we 
actually recognize that our government is facing a fiscal crisis of 
unprecedented dimensions and at least pay for the $17 billion in the 
Rogers bill.
  I don't like across-the-board cuts, which treat our highest 
priorities the same as our lowest priorities; but the Rules Committee 
disallowed the gentleman from South Carolina's specific offsets like 
repealing remaining TARP funds and ending bonuses to Federal employees 
who take transit to work. And the fact is if Members believe that a 1.6 
percent cut to discretionary spending is draconian, they should be just 
as leery of a 1.6 percent increase in spending to pay for non-
emergency, non-Sandy-related programs in the Rogers bill.
  In the last 10 years, inflation and population have grown 39 percent, 
our revenues have grown 37 percent, but our spending has grown 64 
percent. In light of that, a 1.6 percent cut to pay for this bill, 
which we are assured is our highest priority, seems like a very modest 
measure.
  Mr. MULVANEY. Madam Chair, I would like to yield 45 seconds to the 
gentlelady from Wyoming (Mrs. Lummis).

[[Page H126]]

  Mrs. LUMMIS. Madam Chairman, without question, the victims of Sandy 
deserve relief. They deserve it, and we should give it to them in a way 
that we can afford. If we can't do a 1.6 percent reduction in spending, 
how are we going to deal with a $16 trillion debt?
  My own State of Wyoming is cutting spending 6\1/2\ percent across the 
board right now to balance the budget because revenues didn't 
materialize that have materialized in the past. And it's very doable. 
We in this House cut our own budgets 11.4 percent in the period of 2 
years. This House has not missed a beat. Not a single Member was hurt 
by that. A 1.6 percent reduction in Federal spending to pay for these 
victims' benefits that deserve this money is the right thing to do.
  I rise in support of the Mulvaney amendment.
  Mr. MULVANEY. Madam Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. ROGERS of Kentucky. Madam Chairman, I claim the time in 
opposition.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. ROGERS of Kentucky. Madam Chair, I yield myself 3 minutes.
  Our people in the Northeast are facing a struggle of historic 
proportions. Many have seen their homes, their livelihoods, and their 
communities decimated beyond belief. It is the Federal responsibility--
and in fact our responsibility as human beings--to help those victims 
in this unexpected catastrophe.
  In doing so, we must expend some Federal dollars. I don't take 
spending this money lightly. Our country faces a deficit crisis, as the 
gentleman from South Carolina has said, a deficit crisis of huge 
proportions, with an economy that's fighting to recover; and any 
expenditure must be weighed against all other needs facing our Nation.
  Now, I don't take a back seat to anyone when it comes to cutting 
spending. Since I've chaired this committee the last 2 years, we've cut 
$100 billion off of discretionary spending, 2 years in a row, going on 
a third. That's not happened since World War II. So I know whereof I 
speak.
  In this case, Madam Chair, the needs are very desperately clear. We 
must provide this emergency funding, as we are allowed by law, without 
the devastating slash-and-burn cuts elsewhere that this amendment would 
cause. The amendment before us would slash nearly $20 billion from 
discretionary spending this year alone, totally indiscriminate, 
unspecific, cutting the good and the bad, completely abdicating the 
responsibility of Congress to determine where spending should or should 
not occur.
  To put this in perspective, this amendment contains a cut to regular 
discretionary spending that is about the size of the entire agriculture 
discretionary budget for the year. It is about the equivalent of 
eliminating all discretionary funding for the Department of 
Transportation or the full annual budgets of the Coast Guard and 
Customs and Border Patrol combined.
  As written, this amendment is an across-the-board cut that holds no 
program safe from harm. Defense spending, which is already facing 
potentially devastating sequestration cuts, is cut by another $10 
billion. It would cut war funding by $1.6 billion, directly affecting 
our troops who are putting their lives on the line in Afghanistan and 
other areas of conflict.
  This amendment also cuts funding for our veterans by $200 million, 
potentially endangering the quality of their care and making a 
statement that Congress is willing to go back on commitments to our 
vets. And the list of other unwise cuts and side effects go on.
  Finally, this amendment goes against the precedent of previous 
emergency supplementals, which did not contain these extreme offsets.
  The CHAIR. The time of the gentleman has expired.
  Mr. ROGERS of Kentucky. I yield myself an additional 30 seconds.
  I believe we can and should attempt to budget for disasters, as we 
did under the BCA. There are times when a disaster simply goes beyond 
our ability to offset. Hurricane Sandy is one of those times.
  I urge a defeat of the amendment.
  I now yield 1 minute to the gentlelady from New York (Mrs. Lowey).
  Mrs. LOWEY. I rise in strong opposition to the Mulvaney amendment. It 
would make indiscriminate across-the-board cuts, it would create a $2.1 
billion shortfall in military pay, take $529 million from military 
health care and $1.4 billion support for our troops in Afghanistan. 
Even before the Mulvaney amendment, the Joint Chiefs of Staff say we 
are on the brink of creating a hollow force.
  It would also cut care for wounded warriors after they come home, 
reducing veterans' medical services by more than $800 million. And here 
at home the amendment would eliminate $650 million in funds to repair, 
rebuild, and expand highways and bridges. It would cut more than 
139,000 low-income pregnant women, infants and young children from the 
WIC program.
  It would take $500 million from the National Institutes of Health for 
research and cures for diseases like cancer, diabetes, and Alzheimer's.
  On many occasions, Democrats and Republicans came together to meet 
these urgent needs caused by major disasters in all parts of the 
Nation. We didn't say we must first cut support for armed forces and 
veterans and reduce investments in research. Let's not do that now.
  Mr. MULVANEY. In closing, Madam Chair, I would just say I don't like 
across-the-board cuts any more than anybody else does. I offered other 
alternatives. They were ruled out of order.
  But I would put it to my colleagues, just tell me what you're willing 
to do without. Are we willing and able to do without anything so that 
these people can get this money this year? That's the question that I 
want to debate. That's what I'm looking for for my colleagues across 
the aisle. Are there no savings, are there no reductions that we could 
put in place this year so these folks get this money?
  With that, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. ROGERS of Kentucky. Madam Chair, I yield the balance of my time 
to the gentleman from Indiana (Mr. Visclosky).
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Indiana is recognized for 30 seconds.
  Mr. VISCLOSKY. I appreciate the chairman yielding. I would simply 
conclude by saying one of my colleagues mentioned that we have a 
crisis. We do have a crisis--a crisis of indecision in this Chamber. We 
are under a continuing resolution. This committee is not allowed to 
complete its work. That creates inefficiencies at the Department of 
Defense, endangering our security.
  The chairman talked about the impact on across-the-board cuts and 
sequestration, and now we're going to pile on with more cuts. The fact 
is the goal the gentleman is looking for is not going to happen, and I 
will simply give you one example. By stringing out acquisition and 
modernization, you increase the cost to the American taxpayer. I would 
ask my colleagues to oppose this amendment.

                              {time}  1550

  The CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman 
from South Carolina (Mr. Mulvaney).
  The question was taken; and the Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.


                             Recorded Vote

  Mr. MULVANEY. Madam Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, the Chair will reduce 
to 5 minutes the minimum time for any electronic vote on the question 
of adoption of the amendment in the nature of a substitute printed in 
part A of House Report 113-1.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 162, 
noes 258, not voting 12, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 14]

                               AYES--162

     Amash
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Barr
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Camp
     Campbell
     Cantor
     Carney
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman
     Collins (GA)
     Conaway
     Cooper
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Daines
     Denham
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)

[[Page H127]]


     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Hall
     Harper
     Harris
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     King (IA)
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Marchant
     Massie
     Matheson
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Radel
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Scalise
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schweikert
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Upton
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Weber (TX)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--258

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Andrews
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Bonner
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Capito
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Cole
     Collins (NY)
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cook
     Courtney
     Crawford
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     Davis, Rodney
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Dent
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fitzpatrick
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Gibson
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Hartzler
     Hastings (FL)
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (WA)
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Hunter
     Israel
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Joyce
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Kuster
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Long
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Marino
     Markey
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCaul
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Neal
     Negrete McLeod
     Noem
     Nolan
     Nugent
     O'Rourke
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Poe (TX)
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Roby
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Valadao
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walorski
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Webster (FL)
     Welch
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)

                             NOT VOTING--12

     Brown (FL)
     Cleaver
     Costa
     Crenshaw
     Emerson
     Jackson Lee
     Kingston
     Kirkpatrick
     Napolitano
     Nunes
     Schwartz
     Speier

                              {time}  1610

  Messrs. JEFFRIES, DENT, and CULBERSON changed their vote from ``aye'' 
to ``no.''
  Mr. MILLER of Florida and Mr. DUFFY changed their vote from ``no'' to 
``aye.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated against:
  Mrs. NAPOLITANO. Madam Chair, on Tuesday, January 15, 2013, I was 
absent during rollcall vote No. 14 due to a death in my family. Had I 
been present, I would have voted ``no'' on the Mulvaney Amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR (Ms. Ros-Lehtinen). The question is on the amendment 
in the nature of a substitute printed in part A of House Report 113-1.
  The question was taken; and the Speaker pro tempore announced that 
the ayes appeared to have it.


                             Recorded Vote

  Mr. ROGERS of Kentucky. Madam Chair, I demand a recorded vote.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 5-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 327, 
noes 91, not voting 14, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 15]

                               AYES--327

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amodei
     Andrews
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Barton
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Bishop (UT)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Braley (IA)
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Brownley (CA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Cantor
     Capito
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cartwright
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Clyburn
     Coble
     Coffman
     Cohen
     Cole
     Collins (NY)
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Courtney
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     Davis, Rodney
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Denham
     Dent
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Duffy
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Ellmers
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farenthold
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hall
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (FL)
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Heck (WA)
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holding
     Holt
     Honda
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Hunter
     Israel
     Issa
     Jeffries
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Joyce
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Kuster
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lance
     Langevin
     Lankford
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Long
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Marino
     Markey
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCaul
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Meng
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller, Gary
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (FL)
     Murphy (PA)
     Nadler
     Neal
     Negrete McLeod
     Noem
     Nolan
     Nugent
     Nunnelee
     O'Rourke
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paulsen
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Pitts
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schock
     Schrader
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sessions
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Southerland
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Terry
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Tipton
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Valadao
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walden
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Webster (FL)
     Welch
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Yarmuth
     Yoder
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                                NOES--91

     Amash
     Bachmann
     Barr
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bridenstine
     Broun (GA)
     Camp
     Campbell
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Collins (GA)
     Conaway
     Cotton
     Daines
     DeSantis

[[Page H128]]


     DesJarlais
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Fincher
     Fleming
     Flores
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Graves (MO)
     Hensarling
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hurt
     Johnson (OH)
     Jordan
     King (IA)
     Lamborn
     Latta
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Marchant
     Massie
     McClintock
     McHenry
     Meadows
     Messer
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Neugebauer
     Pearce
     Perry
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Radel
     Ribble
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Smith (TX)
     Stewart
     Stutzman
     Upton
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walorski
     Weber (TX)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Woodall
     Yoho

                             NOT VOTING--14

     Brown (FL)
     Cleaver
     Cook
     Costa
     Crenshaw
     Emerson
     Jackson Lee
     Kingston
     Kirkpatrick
     Napolitano
     Nunes
     Rice (SC)
     Schwartz
     Speier

                              {time}  1618

  Mr. LONG changed his vote from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated for:
  Mrs. NAPOLITANO. Madam Chair, on Tuesday, January 15, 2013, I was 
absent during rollcall vote No. 15 due to a death in my family. Had I 
been present, I would have voted ``yea'' on the Rogers Amendment.


              Amendment No. 1 Offered by Mr. Frelinghuysen

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 1 
printed in part C of House Report 113-1.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), insert the 
     following:

                                TITLE X

                     ADDITIONAL DISASTER ASSISTANCE

                               CHAPTER 1

                       DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

                        Office of the Secretary

                   emergency conservation activities

                     (including transfer of funds)

       For an additional amount, to remain available until 
     expended, for the Emergency Conservation Program under title 
     IV of the Agriculture Credit Act of 1978 (16 U.S.C. 2201 et 
     seq.) for necessary expenses related to the consequences of 
     Hurricane Sandy and resulting from a major disaster declared 
     pursuant to the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and 
     Emergency Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5121 et seq.), 
     $218,000,000, of which $15,000,000 shall be available for 
     payments under sections 401 and 402 of the Agriculture Credit 
     Act of 1978 (16 U.S.C. 2201, 2202), $180,000,000 shall be 
     available for activities under section 403 of such Act 
     (Emergency Watershed Protection Program; 16 U.S.C. 2203), and 
     $23,000,000 shall be available for activities under section 
     407 of such Act (Emergency Forest Restoration Program; 16 
     U.S.C. 2206): Provided, That the Secretary of Agriculture 
     shall transfer these funds to the Farm Service Agency and the 
     Natural Resources Conservation Service:  Provided further, 
     That such amount is designated by the Congress as being for 
     an emergency requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) 
     of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
     1985.

                    GENERAL PROVISION--THIS CHAPTER

       Sec. 1011.  The Office of Inspector General of the 
     Department of Agriculture shall use unobligated disaster 
     assistance oversight funds provided to such office in 
     division B of Public Law 110-329 (122 Stat. 3585) for 
     continued oversight of Department of Agriculture disaster- 
     and emergency-related activities.

                               CHAPTER 2

                         DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

            National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

                  operations, research, and facilities

       For an additional amount for ``Operations, Research, and 
     Facilities'', $290,000,000 to remain available until 
     September 30, 2014, as follows:
       (1) $50,000,000 for mapping, charting, geodesy services and 
     marine debris surveys for coastal States impacted by 
     Hurricane Sandy;
       (2) $7,000,000 to repair and replace ocean observing and 
     coastal monitoring assets damaged by Hurricane Sandy;
       (3) $3,000,000 to provide technical assistance to support 
     State assessments of coastal impacts of Hurricane Sandy;
       (4) $150,000,000 for Regional Ocean Partnership grants to 
     coastal States impacted by Hurricane Sandy;
       (5) $25,000,000 to improve weather forecasting and 
     hurricane intensity forecasting capabilities, to include data 
     assimilation from ocean observing platforms and satellites;
       (6) $50,000,000 for laboratories and cooperative institutes 
     research activities associated with sustained observations 
     weather research programs, and ocean and coastal research; 
     and
       (7) $5,000,000 for necessary expenses related to fishery 
     disasters resulting from impacts of Hurricane Sandy, and as 
     declared by the Secretary of Commerce in calendar year 2012:
      Provided, That the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
     Administration shall submit a spending plan to the Committees 
     on Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the 
     Senate within 45 days after the date of enactment of this 
     Act: Provided further, That such amount is designated by the 
     Congress as being for an emergency requirement pursuant to 
     section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
     Deficit Control Act of 1985.

               procurement, acquisition and construction

       For an additional amount for ``Procurement, Acquisition and 
     Construction'', $186,000,000, to remain available until 
     September 30, 2015, as follows:
       (1) $9,000,000 to repair National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
     Administration (NOAA) facilities damaged by Hurricane Sandy;
       (2) $44,500,000 for repairs and upgrades to NOAA hurricane 
     reconnaissance aircraft;
       (3) $8,500,000 for improvements to weather forecasting 
     equipment and supercomputer infrastructure;
       (4) $13,000,000 to accelerate the National Weather Service 
     ground readiness project; and
       (5) $111,000,000 for a weather satellite data mitigation 
     gap reserve fund:
      Provided, That NOAA shall submit a spending plan to the 
     Committees on Appropriations of the House of Representatives 
     and the Senate within 45 days after the date of enactment of 
     this Act: Provided further, That such amount is designated by 
     the Congress as being for an emergency requirement pursuant 
     to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and 
     Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.

                         DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE

                    Federal Bureau of Investigation

                         salaries and expenses

       For an additional amount for ``Salaries and Expenses'' for 
     necessary expenses related to the consequences of Hurricane 
     Sandy, $10,020,000: Provided, That such amount is designated 
     by the Congress as being for an emergency requirement 
     pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget 
     and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.

                    Drug Enforcement Administration

                         salaries and expenses

       For an additional amount for ``Salaries and Expenses'' for 
     necessary expenses related to the consequences of Hurricane 
     Sandy, $1,000,000: Provided, That such amount is designated 
     by the Congress as being for an emergency requirement 
     pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget 
     and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.

          Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives

                         salaries and expenses

       For an additional amount for ``Salaries and Expenses'' for 
     necessary expenses related to the consequences of Hurricane 
     Sandy, $230,000: Provided, That such amount is designated by 
     the Congress as being for an emergency requirement pursuant 
     to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and 
     Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.

                         Federal Prison System

                        buildings and facilities

       For an additional amount for ``Buildings and Facilities'' 
     for necessary expenses related to the consequences of 
     Hurricane Sandy, $10,000,000, to remain available until 
     expended: Provided, That such amount is designated by the 
     Congress as being for an emergency requirement pursuant to 
     section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
     Deficit Control Act of 1985.

                                SCIENCE

             National Aeronautics and Space Administration

       construction and environmental compliance and restoration

       For an additional amount for ``Construction and 
     Environmental Compliance and Restoration'' for repair at 
     National Aeronautics and Space Administration facilities 
     damaged by Hurricane Sandy, $15,000,000, to remain available 
     until September 30, 2014: Provided, That such amount is 
     designated by the Congress as being for an emergency 
     requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the 
     Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.

                            RELATED AGENCIES

                       Legal Services Corporation

               payment to the legal services corporation

       For an additional amount for ``Payment to the Legal 
     Services Corporation'' to carry out the purposes of the Legal 
     Services Corporation Act by providing for necessary expenses 
     related to the consequences of Hurricane Sandy, $1,000,000: 
     Provided, That the amount made available under this heading 
     shall be used only to provide the mobile resources, 
     technology, and disaster coordinators necessary to provide 
     storm-related services to the Legal Services Corporation 
     client population and only in the areas significantly 
     affected by Hurricane Sandy: Provided further, That such 
     amount is designated by the Congress as being for an 
     emergency requirement

[[Page H129]]

     pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget 
     and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985: Provided further, 
     That none of the funds appropriated in this Act to the Legal 
     Services Corporation shall be expended for any purpose 
     prohibited or limited by, or contrary to any of the 
     provisions of, sections 501, 502, 503, 504, 505, and 506 of 
     Public Law 105-119, and all funds appropriated in this Act to 
     the Legal Services Corporation shall be subject to the same 
     terms and conditions set forth in such sections, except that 
     all references in sections 502 and 503 to 1997 and 1998 shall 
     be deemed to refer instead to 2012 and 2013, respectively, 
     and except that sections 501 and 503 of Public Law 104-134 
     (referenced by Public Law 105-119) shall not apply to the 
     amount made available under this heading: Provided further, 
     That, for the purposes of this Act, the Legal Services 
     Corporation shall be considered an agency of the United 
     States Government.

                               CHAPTER 3

                         DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE

                    DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE--MILITARY

                       OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE

                    Operation and Maintenance, Army

       For an additional amount for ``Operation and Maintenance, 
     Army'', $5,370,000, to remain available until September 30, 
     2013, for necessary expenses related to the consequences of 
     Hurricane Sandy:  Provided, That such amount is designated by 
     the Congress as being for an emergency requirement pursuant 
     to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and 
     Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.

                    Operation and Maintenance, Navy

       For an additional amount for ``Operation and Maintenance, 
     Navy'', $40,015,000, to remain available until September 30, 
     2013, for necessary expenses related to the consequences of 
     Hurricane Sandy:  Provided, That such amount is designated by 
     the Congress as being for an emergency requirement pursuant 
     to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and 
     Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.

                  Operation and Maintenance, Air Force

       For an additional amount for ``Operation and Maintenance, 
     Air Force'', $8,500,000, to remain available until September 
     30, 2013, for necessary expenses related to the consequences 
     of Hurricane Sandy:  Provided, That such amount is designated 
     by the Congress as being for an emergency requirement 
     pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget 
     and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.

             Operation and Maintenance, Army National Guard

       For an additional amount for ``Operation and Maintenance, 
     Army National Guard'', $3,165,000, to remain available until 
     September 30, 2013, for necessary expenses related to the 
     consequences of Hurricane Sandy:  Provided, That such amount 
     is designated by the Congress as being for an emergency 
     requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the 
     Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.

             Operation and Maintenance, Air National Guard

       For an additional amount for ``Operation and Maintenance, 
     Air National Guard'', $5,775,000, to remain available until 
     September 30, 2013, for necessary expenses related to the 
     consequences of Hurricane Sandy:  Provided, That such amount 
     is designated by the Congress as being for an emergency 
     requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the 
     Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.

                              PROCUREMENT

                    Procurement of Ammunition, Army

       For an additional amount for ``Procurement of Ammunition, 
     Army'', $1,310,000, to remain available until September 30, 
     2015, for necessary expenses related to the consequences of 
     Hurricane Sandy:  Provided, That such amount is designated by 
     the Congress as being for an emergency requirement pursuant 
     to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and 
     Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.

                     REVOLVING AND MANAGEMENT FUNDS

                     Defense Working Capital Funds

       For an additional amount for ``Defense Working Capital 
     Funds'', $24,200,000, to remain available until September 30, 
     2013, for necessary expenses related to the consequences of 
     Hurricane Sandy:  Provided, That such amount is designated by 
     the Congress as being for an emergency requirement pursuant 
     to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and 
     Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.

                               CHAPTER 4

                         DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY

                       Corps of Engineers--Civil

                             investigations

       For an additional amount for ``Investigations'' for 
     necessary expenses related to the consequences of Hurricane 
     Sandy, $50,000,000, to remain available until expended to 
     expedite at full Federal expense studies of flood and storm 
     damage reduction: Provided, That using $29,500,000 of the 
     funds provided herein, the Secretary of the Army shall 
     expedite and complete ongoing flood and storm damage 
     reduction studies in areas that were impacted by Hurricane 
     Sandy in the North Atlantic Division of the United States 
     Army Corps of Engineers: Provided further, That using up to 
     $20,000,000 of the funds provided herein, the Secretary shall 
     conduct a comprehensive study to address the flood risks of 
     vulnerable coastal populations in areas that were affected by 
     Hurricane Sandy within the boundaries of the North Atlantic 
     Division of the Corps: Provided further, That an interim 
     report with an assessment of authorized Corps projects for 
     reducing flooding and storm risks in the affected area that 
     have been constructed or are under construction, including 
     construction cost estimates, shall be submitted to the 
     Committees on Appropriations of the House of Representatives 
     and the Senate not later than March 1, 2013: Provided 
     further, That an interim report identifying any previously 
     authorized but unconstructed Corps project and any project 
     under study by the Corps for reducing flooding and storm 
     damage risks in the affected area, including updated 
     construction cost estimates, that are, or would be, 
     consistent with the comprehensive study shall be submitted to 
     the appropriate congressional committees by May 1, 2013: 
     Provided further, That a final report shall be submitted to 
     the appropriate congressional committees within 24 months of 
     the date of enactment of this Act: Provided further, That as 
     a part of the study, the Secretary shall identify those 
     activities warranting additional analysis by the Corps, as 
     well as institutional and other barriers to providing 
     protection to the affected coastal areas: Provided further, 
     That the Secretary shall conduct the study in coordination 
     with other Federal agencies, and State, local and Tribal 
     officials to ensure consistency with other plans to be 
     developed, as appropriate: Provided further, That using 
     $500,000 of the funds provided herein, the Secretary shall 
     conduct an evaluation of the performance of existing projects 
     constructed by the Corps and impacted by Hurricane Sandy for 
     the purposes of determining their effectiveness and making 
     recommendations for improvements thereto: Provided further, 
     That as a part of the study, the Secretary shall identify 
     institutional and other barriers to providing comprehensive 
     protection to affected coastal areas and shall provide this 
     report to the Committees on Appropriations of the House of 
     Representatives and the Senate within 120 days of enactment 
     of this Act: Provided further, That the amounts in this 
     paragraph are designated by the Congress as being for an 
     emergency requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of 
     the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
     1985: Provided further, That the Assistant Secretary of the 
     Army for Civil Works shall provide a monthly report to the 
     Committees on Appropriations of the House of Representatives 
     and the Senate detailing the allocation and obligation of 
     these funds, beginning not later than 60 days after enactment 
     of this Act.

                              construction

       For an additional amount for ``Construction'' for necessary 
     expenses related to the consequences of Hurricane Sandy, 
     $3,461,000,000, to remain available until expended to 
     rehabilitate, repair and construct United States Army Corps 
     of Engineers projects: Provided, That $2,902,000,000 of the 
     funds provided under this heading shall be used to reduce 
     future flood risk in ways that will support the long-term 
     sustainability of the coastal ecosystem and communities and 
     reduce the economic costs and risks associated with large-
     scale flood and storm events in areas along the Atlantic 
     Coast within the boundaries of the North Atlantic Division of 
     the Corps that were affected by Hurricane Sandy: Provided 
     further, That $858,000,000 of such funds shall be made 
     available not earlier than 14 days after the Secretary of the 
     Army submits the report required under the heading 
     ``Investigations'' to be submitted not later than March 1, 
     2013, and $2,044,000,000 shall be made available not earlier 
     than 14 days after the Secretary submits the report required 
     under the heading ``Investigations'' to be submitted not 
     later than May 1, 2013: Provided further, That efforts using 
     these funds shall incorporate current science and engineering 
     standards in constructing previously authorized Corps 
     projects designed to reduce flood and storm damage risks and 
     modifying existing Corps projects that do not meet these 
     standards, with such modifications as the Secretary 
     determines are necessary to incorporate these standards or to 
     meet the goal of providing sustainable reduction to flooding 
     and storm damage risks: Provided further, That upon approval 
     of the Committees on Appropriations of the House of 
     Representatives and the Senate these funds may be used to 
     construct any project under study by the Corps for reducing 
     flooding and storm damage risks in areas along the Atlantic 
     Coast within the North Atlantic Division of the Corps that 
     were affected by Hurricane Sandy that the Secretary 
     determines is technically feasible, economically justified, 
     and environmentally acceptable: Provided further, That the 
     completion of ongoing construction projects receiving funds 
     provided by this Act shall be at full Federal expense: 
     Provided further, That the non-Federal cash contribution for 
     projects using these funds shall be financed in accordance 
     with the provisions of section 103(k) of Public Law 99-662 
     over a period of 30 years from the date of completion of the 
     project or separable element: Provided further, That for 
     these projects, the provisions of section 902 of the Water 
     Resources Development Act of 1986 shall not apply to these 
     funds: Provided further, That up to $51,000,000 of the funds 
     provided under this heading shall be used to expedite 
     continuing authorities projects to reduce the risk of 
     flooding

[[Page H130]]

     along the coastal areas in States impacted by Hurricane Sandy 
     within the boundaries of the North Atlantic Division of the 
     Corps: Provided further, That $9,000,000 of the funds 
     provided under this heading shall be used for repairs to 
     projects that were under construction and damaged by the 
     impacts of Hurricane Sandy: Provided further, That any 
     projects using funds appropriated under this heading shall be 
     initiated only after non-Federal interests have entered into 
     binding agreements with the Secretary requiring the non-
     Federal interests to pay 100 percent of the operation, 
     maintenance, repair, replacement, and rehabilitation costs of 
     the project and to hold and save the United States free from 
     damages due to the construction or operation and maintenance 
     of the project, except for damages due to the fault or 
     negligence of the United States or its contractors: Provided 
     further, That the Assistant Secretary of the Army for Civil 
     Works shall submit to the Committees on Appropriations of the 
     House of Representatives and the Senate a monthly report 
     detailing the allocation and obligation of these funds, 
     beginning not later than 60 days after the date of the 
     enactment of this Act.

                       operation and maintenance

       For an additional amount for ``Operation and Maintenance'' 
     for necessary expenses related to the consequences of 
     Hurricane Sandy, $821,000,000, to remain available until 
     expended to dredge Federal navigation channels and repair 
     damage to United States Army Corps of Engineers projects: 
     Provided, That such amount is designated by the Congress as 
     being for an emergency requirement pursuant section 
     251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
     Control Act of 1985: Provided further, That the Assistant 
     Secretary of the Army for Civil Works shall provide a monthly 
     report to the Committees on Appropriations of the House of 
     Representatives and the Senate detailing the allocation and 
     obligation of these funds, beginning not later than 60 days 
     after enactment of this Act.

                 flood control and coastal emergencies

       For an additional amount for ``Flood Control and Coastal 
     Emergencies'' for necessary expenses related to the 
     consequences of Hurricane Sandy, $1,008,000,000, to remain 
     available until expended to prepare for flood, hurricane, and 
     other natural disasters and support emergency operations, 
     repairs and other activities as authorized by law: Provided, 
     That $430,000,000 of the funds provided herein shall be made 
     available not earlier than 14 days after the Secretary of the 
     Army submits the report required under the heading 
     ``Investigations'' to be submitted not later than March 1, 
     2013, and shall be utilized by the United States Army Corps 
     of Engineers to restore projects impacted by Hurricane Sandy 
     in the North Atlantic Division of the Corps to design 
     profiles of the authorized projects: Provided further, That 
     the provisions of section 902 of the Water Resources 
     Development Act of 1986 shall not apply to funds provided 
     under this heading: Provided further, That the amounts in 
     this paragraph are designated by the Congress as being for an 
     emergency requirement pursuant section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the 
     Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985: 
     Provided further, That the Assistant Secretary of the Army 
     for Civil Works shall provide a monthly report to the 
     Committees on Appropriations of the House of Representatives 
     and the Senate detailing the allocation and obligation of 
     these funds, beginning not later than 60 days after enactment 
     of this Act.

                                expenses

       For an additional amount for ``Expenses'' for necessary 
     expenses related to the consequences of Hurricane Sandy, 
     $10,000,000, to remain available until expended to oversee 
     emergency response and recovery activities: Provided, That 
     such amount is designated by the Congress as being for an 
     emergency requirement pursuant section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the 
     Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985: 
     Provided further, That the Assistant Secretary of the Army 
     for Civil Works shall provide a monthly report to the 
     Committees on Appropriations of the House of Representatives 
     and the Senate detailing the allocation and obligation of 
     these funds, beginning not later than 60 days after enactment 
     of this Act.

                    GENERAL PROVISION--THIS CHAPTER

       Sec. 1041.  This chapter shall apply in place of title II 
     of this Act, and such title shall have no force or effect.

                               CHAPTER 5

                    General Services Administration

                        real property activities

                         federal buildings fund

       For an additional amount to be deposited in the ``Federal 
     Buildings Fund'', $7,000,000, to remain available until 
     September 30, 2015, for necessary expenses related to the 
     consequences of Hurricane Sandy, for basic repair and 
     alteration of buildings under the custody and control of the 
     Administrator of General Services, and real property 
     management and related activities not otherwise provided for: 
     Provided, That such amount is designated by the Congress as 
     being for an emergency requirement pursuant to section 
     251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
     Control Act of 1985.

                     Small Business Administration

                         salaries and expenses

       The provisions under this heading in title III of this Act 
     shall be applied by substituting ``$20,000,000'' for 
     ``$10,000,000''.

                      office of inspector general

       For an additional amount for ``Office of Inspector 
     General'', $5,000,000, to remain available until expended: 
     Provided, That such amount is designated by the Congress as 
     being for an emergency requirement pursuant to section 
     251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
     Control Act of 1985: Provided further, That this paragraph 
     shall apply in place of the previous provisions under this 
     heading in title III of this Act, and such previous 
     provisions shall have no force or effect.

                     disaster loans program account

                     (including transfers of funds)

       For an additional amount for ``Disaster Loans Program 
     Account'' for the cost of direct loans authorized by section 
     7(b) of the Small Business Act, $520,000,000, to remain 
     available until expended: Provided, That such costs, 
     including the cost of modifying such loans, shall be defined 
     in section 502 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974: 
     Provided further, That in addition, for administrative 
     expenses to carry out the direct loan program authorized by 
     section 7(b) of the Small Business Act, an additional 
     $260,000,000 to remain available until expended, of which 
     $250,000,000 is for direct administrative expenses of loan 
     making and servicing to carry out the direct loan program, 
     which may be transferred to and merged with the 
     appropriations for Salaries and Expenses, and of which 
     $10,000,000 is for indirect administrative expenses for the 
     direct loan program, which may to be transferred to and 
     merged with appropriations for Salaries and Expenses: 
     Provided further, That such amounts are designated by the 
     Congress as being for an emergency requirement pursuant to 
     section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
     Deficit Control Act of 1985: Provided further, That this 
     paragraph shall apply in place of the previous provisions 
     under this heading in title III of this Act, and such 
     previous provisions shall have no force or effect.

                               CHAPTER 6

                    DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY

                   U.S. Customs and Border Protection

                         salaries and expenses

       For an additional amount for ``Salaries and Expenses'' for 
     necessary expenses related to the consequences of Hurricane 
     Sandy, $1,667,000: Provided, That such amount is designated 
     by the Congress as being for an emergency requirement 
     pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget 
     and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985: Provided further, 
     That a description of all property to be replaced, with 
     associated costs, shall be submitted to the Committees on 
     Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Senate 
     no later than 90 days after the date of enactment of this 
     Act.

                U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement

                         salaries and expenses

       For an additional amount for ``Salaries and Expenses'' for 
     necessary expenses related to the consequences of Hurricane 
     Sandy, $855,000: Provided, That such amount is designated by 
     the Congress as being for an emergency requirement pursuant 
     to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and 
     Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985: Provided further, That 
     a description of all property to be replaced, with associated 
     costs, shall be submitted to the Committees on Appropriations 
     of the House of Representatives and the Senate no later than 
     90 days after the date of enactment of this Act.

                      United States Secret Service

                         salaries and expenses

       For an additional amount for ``Salaries and Expenses'' for 
     necessary expenses related to the consequences of Hurricane 
     Sandy, $300,000: Provided, That such amount is designated by 
     the Congress as being for an emergency requirement pursuant 
     to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and 
     Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985: Provided further, That 
     a description of all property to be replaced, with associated 
     costs, shall be submitted to the Committees on Appropriations 
     of the House of Representatives and the Senate no later than 
     90 days after the date of enactment of this Act.

                              Coast Guard

              acquisition, construction, and improvements

                      (including transfer of funds)

       The provisions under this heading in title IV of this Act 
     shall be applied by substituting ``$274,233,000'' for 
     ``$143,899,000''.

                  Federal Emergency Management Agency

                          disaster relief fund

                     (including transfer of funds)

       For an additional amount for the ``Disaster Relief Fund'' 
     in carrying out the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and 
     Emergency Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5121 et seq.), 
     $11,487,735,000, to remain available until expended: 
     Provided, That of the total amount provided, $5,379,000,000 
     shall be for major disasters declared pursuant to the Robert 
     T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (42 
     U.S.C. 5121 et seq.): Provided further, That the amount in 
     the preceding proviso is designated by the Congress as being 
     for disaster relief pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(D) of the 
     Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985: 
     Provided further, That of the total amount provided, 
     $6,108,735,000 is designated by the Congress as being for an 
     emergency requirement

[[Page H131]]

     pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget 
     and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 which shall be for 
     major disasters declared pursuant to the Robert T. Stafford 
     Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5121 
     et seq.): Provided further, That of the total amount 
     provided, $3,000,000 shall be transferred to the Department 
     of Homeland Security ``Office of Inspector General'' for 
     audits and investigations related to disasters; Provided 
     further, That the Administrator of the Federal Emergency 
     Management Agency shall publish on the Agency's website not 
     later than 24 hours after an award of a public assistance 
     grant under section 406 of the Robert T. Stafford Disaster 
     Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5172) that is 
     in excess of $1,000,000, the specifics of each such grant 
     award: Provided further, That for any mission assignment or 
     mission assignment task order to another Federal department 
     or agency regarding a major disaster, not later than 24 hours 
     after the issuance of a mission assignment or task order in 
     excess of $1,000,000, the Administrator shall publish on the 
     Agency's website the following: the name of the impacted 
     state and the disaster declaration for such State, the 
     assigned agency, the assistance requested, a description of 
     the disaster, the total cost estimate, and the amount 
     obligated: Provided further, That not later than 10 days 
     after the last day of each month until the mission assignment 
     or task order is completed and closed out, the Administrator 
     shall update any changes to the total cost estimate and the 
     amount obligated: Provided further, That for a disaster 
     declaration related to Hurricane Sandy, the Administrator 
     shall submit to the Committees on Appropriations of the House 
     of Representatives and the Senate, not later than 5 days 
     after the first day of each month beginning after the date of 
     enactment of this Act, and shall publish on the Agency's 
     website not later than 10 days after the first day of each 
     such month, an estimate or actual amount, if available, for 
     the current fiscal year of the cost of the following 
     categories of spending: public assistance, individual 
     assistance, operations, mitigation, administrative, and any 
     other relevant category (including emergency measures and 
     disaster resources): Provided further, That not later than 10 
     days after the first day of each month beginning after the 
     date of enactment of this Act, the Administrator shall 
     publish on the Agency's website the report (referred to as 
     the Disaster Relief Monthly Report) as required by Public Law 
     112-74: Provided further, That this paragraph shall apply in 
     place of the previous provisions under this heading in title 
     IV of this Act, and such previous provisions shall have no 
     force or effect.

            disaster assistance direct loan program account

       For an additional amount for ``Disaster Assistance Direct 
     Loan Program Account'' for the cost of direct loans, 
     $300,000,000, to remain available until expended, as 
     authorized by section 417 of the Robert T. Stafford Disaster 
     Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5184), of 
     which up to $4,000,000 is for administrative expenses to 
     carry out the direct loan program: Provided, That such costs, 
     including the cost of modifying such loans, shall be as 
     defined in section 502 of the Congressional Budget Act of 
     1974: Provided further, That these funds are available to 
     subsidize gross obligations for the principal amount of 
     direct loans not to exceed $400,000,000: Provided further, 
     That these amounts are designated by the Congress as an 
     emergency requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of 
     the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
     1985.

                         Science and Technology

           research, development, acquisition, and operations

       The provisions under this heading in title IV of this Act 
     shall be applied by substituting ``$3,249,000'' and 
     ``September 30, 2014'' for ``$585,000'' and ``September 30, 
     2013'', respectively.

                               CHAPTER 7

                       DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

                       Fish and Wildlife Service

                              construction

       The provisions under this heading in title V of this Act 
     shall be applied by substituting ``$78,000,000'' for 
     ``$49,875,000''.

                         National Park Service

                       historic preservation fund

       For an additional amount for the ``Historic Preservation 
     Fund'' for necessary expenses related to the consequences of 
     Hurricane Sandy, $50,000,000, to remain available until 
     September 30, 2015, including costs to States necessary to 
     complete compliance activities required by section 106 of the 
     National Historic Preservation Act and costs needed to 
     administer the program: Provided, That grants shall only be 
     available for areas that have received a major disaster 
     declaration pursuant to the Robert T. Stafford Disaster 
     Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5121 et seq.): 
     Provided further, That individual grants shall not be subject 
     to a non-Federal matching requirement: Provided further, That 
     such amount is designated by the Congress as being for an 
     emergency requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of 
     the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
     1985.

                              construction

       The provisions under this heading in title V of this Act 
     shall be applied by substituting ``$348,000,000'' for 
     ``$234,000,000''.

                        Departmental Operations

                        office of the secretary

                     (including transfers of funds)

       For an additional amount for ``Departmental Operations'' 
     and any Department of the Interior component bureau or office 
     for necessary expenses related to the consequences of 
     Hurricane Sandy, $360,000,000, to remain available until 
     expended: Provided, That funds appropriated herein shall be 
     used to restore and rebuild national parks, national wildlife 
     refuges, and other Federal public assets; increase the 
     resiliency and capacity of coastal habitat and infrastructure 
     to withstand storms and reduce the amount of damage caused by 
     such storms: Provided further, That the Secretary of the 
     Interior may transfer these funds to any other account in the 
     Department and may expend such funds by direct expenditure, 
     grants, or cooperative agreements, including grants to or 
     cooperative agreements with States, Tribes, and 
     municipalities, to carry out the purposes provided herein: 
     Provided further, That the Secretary shall submit to the 
     Committees on Appropriations of the House of Representatives 
     and the Senate a detailed spending plan for the amounts 
     provided herein within 60 days of enactment of this Act: 
     Provided further, That such amount is designated by the 
     Congress as being for an emergency requirement pursuant to 
     section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
     Deficit Control Act of 1985.

                    ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

                 Environmental Programs and Management

       For an additional amount for ``Environmental Programs and 
     Management'' for necessary expenses related to the 
     consequences of Hurricane Sandy, $725,000, to remain 
     available until expended: Provided, That such amount is 
     designated by the Congress as being for an emergency 
     requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the 
     Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.

                     Hazardous Substance Superfund

       For an additional amount for ``Hazardous Substance 
     Superfund'' for necessary expenses related to the 
     consequences of Hurricane Sandy, $2,000,000, to remain 
     available until expended: Provided, That such amount is 
     designated by the Congress as being for an emergency 
     requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the 
     Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.

                 Leaking Underground Storage Tank Fund

       For an additional amount for ``Leaking Underground Storage 
     Tank Fund'' for necessary expenses related to the 
     consequences of Hurricane Sandy, $5,000,000, to remain 
     available until expended: Provided, That such amount is 
     designated by the Congress as being for an emergency 
     requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the 
     Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.

                   State and Tribal Assistance Grants

       For an additional amount for ``State and Tribal Assistance 
     Grants'', $600,000,000, to remain available until expended, 
     of which $500,000,000 shall be for capitalization grants for 
     the Clean Water State Revolving Funds under title VI of the 
     Federal Water Pollution Control Act, and of which 
     $100,000,000 shall be for capitalization grants under section 
     1452 of the Safe Drinking Water Act: Provided, That 
     notwithstanding section 604(a) of the Federal Water Pollution 
     Control Act and section 1452(a)(1)(D) of the Safe Drinking 
     Water Act, funds appropriated herein shall be provided to 
     States in EPA Region 2 for wastewater and drinking water 
     treatment works and facilities impacted by Hurricane Sandy: 
     Provided further, That notwithstanding the requirements of 
     section 603(d) of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, 
     for the funds appropriated herein, each State shall use not 
     less than 20 percent but not more than 30 percent of the 
     amount of its capitalization grants to provide additional 
     subsidization to eligible recipients in the form of 
     forgiveness of principal, negative interest loans or grants 
     or any combination of these: Provided further, That the funds 
     appropriated herein shall only be used for eligible projects 
     whose purpose is to reduce flood damage risk and 
     vulnerability or to enhance resiliency to rapid hydrologic 
     change or a natural disaster at treatment works as defined by 
     section 212 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act or any 
     eligible facilities under section 1452 of the Safe Drinking 
     Water Act, and for other eligible tasks at such treatment 
     works or facilities necessary to further such purposes: 
     Provided further, That the Administrator of the Environmental 
     Protection Agency may retain up to $1,000,000 of the funds 
     appropriated herein for management and oversight: Provided 
     further, That such amounts are designated by the Congress as 
     being for an emergency requirement pursuant to section 
     251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
     Control Act of 1985.

                            RELATED AGENCIES

                       DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

                             Forest Service

                  capital improvement and maintenance

       For an additional amount for ``Capital Improvement and 
     Maintenance'' for necessary expenses related to the 
     consequences of Hurricane Sandy, $4,400,000, to remain 
     available until expended: Provided, That such amount is 
     designated by the Congress as being for an emergency 
     requirement pursuant to section

[[Page H132]]

     251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
     Control Act of 1985.

                          OTHER RELATED AGENCY

                        Smithsonian Institution

                         salaries and expenses

       For an additional amount for ``Salaries and Expenses'' for 
     necessary expenses related to the consequences of Hurricane 
     Sandy, $2,000,000, to remain available until expended: 
     Provided, That such amount is designated by the Congress as 
     being for an emergency requirement pursuant to section 
     251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
     Control Act of 1985.

                               CHAPTER 8

                          DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

                 Employment and Training Administration

                    training and employment services

                     (including transfers of funds)

       For an additional amount for ``Training and Employment 
     Services'', $25,000,000, for the dislocated workers 
     assistance national reserve for necessary expenses directly 
     related to Hurricane Sandy, which shall be available from the 
     date of enactment of this Act through September 30, 2013: 
     Provided, That the Secretary of Labor may transfer up to 
     $3,500,000 of such funds to any other Department of Labor 
     account for other Hurricane Sandy reconstruction and recovery 
     needs, including worker protection activities: Provided 
     further, That such amounts are designated by the Congress as 
     being for an emergency requirement pursuant to section 
     251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
     Control Act of 1985.

                DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

                        Office of the Secretary

            public health and social services emergency fund

                     (including transfers of funds)

       For an additional amount for ``Public Health and Social 
     Services Emergency Fund'' for disaster response and recovery, 
     and other expenses directly related to Hurricane Sandy, 
     including making payments under the Head Start Act and 
     additional payments for distribution as provided for under 
     the ``Social Services Block Grant Program'', $800,000,000, to 
     remain available until September 30, 2015: Provided, That 
     $100,000,000 shall be transferred to ``Children and Families 
     Services Programs'' for the Head Start program for the 
     purposes provided herein: Provided further, That $500,000,000 
     shall be transferred to ``Social Services Block Grant'' for 
     the purposes provided herein: Provided further, That section 
     2002(c) of the Social Security Act shall be applied to funds 
     appropriated in the preceding proviso by substituting 
     ``succeeding 2 fiscal years'' for ``succeeding fiscal year'': 
     Provided further, That not less than $5,000,000 shall be 
     transferred to the Department of Health and Human Services 
     (``HHS'') ``Office of Inspector General'' to perform 
     oversight, accountability, and evaluation of programs, 
     projects, or activities supported with the funds provided for 
     the purposes provided herein: Provided further, That 
     notwithstanding any other provision of law, the distribution 
     of any amount shall be limited to the States directly 
     affected by Hurricane Sandy and which have been declared by 
     the President as a major disaster under title IV of the 
     Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance 
     Act for Hurricane Sandy: Provided further, That none of the 
     funds appropriated in this paragraph shall be included in the 
     calculation of the ``base grant'' in subsequent fiscal years, 
     as such term is defined in sections 640(a)(7)(A), 
     641A(h)(1)(B), or 644(d)(3) of the Head Start Act: Provided 
     further, That funds appropriated in this paragraph are not 
     subject to the allocation requirements of section 640(a) of 
     the Head Start Act: Provided further, That funds appropriated 
     in this paragraph for the Social Services Block Grant are in 
     addition to the entitlement grants authorized by section 
     2002(a)(1) of the Social Security Act and shall not be 
     available for such entitlement grants: Provided further, That 
     in addition to other uses permitted by title XX of the Social 
     Security Act, funds appropriated in this paragraph for the 
     Social Services Block Grant may be used for health services 
     (including mental health services), and for costs of 
     renovating, repairing, or rebuilding health care facilities, 
     child care facilities, or other social services facilities: 
     Provided further, That the remaining $195,000,000 
     appropriated in this paragraph may be transferred by the 
     Secretary of HHS (``Secretary'') to accounts within HHS, and 
     shall be available only for the purposes provided in this 
     paragraph: Provided further, That the transfer authority 
     provided in this paragraph is in addition to any other 
     transfer authority available in this or any other Act: 
     Provided further, That 15 days prior to the transfer of funds 
     appropriated in this paragraph, the Secretary shall notify 
     the Committees on Appropriations of the House of 
     Representatives and the Senate of any such transfer and the 
     planned uses of the funds: Provided further, That obligations 
     incurred for the purposes provided herein prior to the date 
     of enactment of this Act may be charged to funds appropriated 
     by this paragraph: Provided further, That funds appropriated 
     in this paragraph and transferred to the National Institutes 
     of Health for the purpose of supporting the repair or 
     rebuilding of non-Federal biomedical or behavioral research 
     facilities damaged as a result of Hurricane Sandy shall be 
     used to award grants or contracts for such purpose under 
     section 404I of the Public Health Service Act: Provided 
     further, That section 481A(c)(2) of such Act does not apply 
     to the use of funds described in the preceding proviso: 
     Provided further, That funds appropriated in this paragraph 
     shall not be available for costs that are reimbursed by the 
     Federal Emergency Management Agency, under a contract for 
     insurance, or by self-insurance: Provided further, That such 
     amounts are designated by the Congress as being for an 
     emergency requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of 
     the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
     1985: Provided further, That this paragraph shall apply in 
     place of the previous provisions under this heading in title 
     VI of this Act, and such previous provisions shall have no 
     force or effect.

                               CHAPTER 9

                      DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

                    Federal Aviation Administration

                        facilities and equipment

                    (airport and airway trust fund)

       For an additional amount for ``Facilities and Equipment'', 
     $30,000,000, to be derived from the Airport and Airway Trust 
     Fund and to remain available until expended, for necessary 
     expenses related to the consequences of Hurricane Sandy: 
     Provided, That such amount is designated by the Congress as 
     being for an emergency requirement pursuant to section 
     251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
     Control Act of 1985.

                     Federal Highway Administration

                          federal-aid highways

                        emergency relief program

       For an additional amount for the ``Emergency Relief 
     Program'' as authorized under section 125 of title 23, United 
     States Code, $2,022,000,000, to remain available until 
     expended: Provided, That the obligations for projects under 
     this section resulting from a single natural disaster or a 
     single catastrophic failure in a State shall not exceed 
     $100,000,000, and the total obligations for projects under 
     this section in any fiscal year in the Virgin Islands, Guam, 
     American Samoa, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana 
     Islands shall not exceed $20,000,000: Provided further, That 
     notwithstanding the preceding proviso, the Secretary of 
     Transportation may obligate more than $100,000,000, but not 
     more than $500,000,000, for a single natural disaster event 
     in a State for emergency relief projects arising from damage 
     caused in calendar year 2012 by Hurricane Sandy: Provided 
     further, That no funds provided in this Act shall be used for 
     section 125(g) of such title: Provided further, That the 
     amount provided under this heading is designated by the 
     Congress as being for an emergency requirement pursuant to 
     section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
     Deficit Control Act of 1985.

                    Federal Railroad Administration

         grants to the national railroad passenger corporation

       For an additional amount for ``Grants to the National 
     Railroad Passenger Corporation'' for the Secretary of 
     Transportation to make capital and debt service grants to the 
     National Railroad Passenger Corporation to advance capital 
     projects that address Northeast Corridor infrastructure 
     recovery and resiliency in the affected areas, $86,000,000, 
     to remain available until expended: Provided, That none of 
     the funds may be used to subsidize operating losses of the 
     Corporation: Provided further, That as a condition of 
     eligibility for receipt of such funds, the Corporation shall 
     not, after the enactment of this Act, use any funds provided 
     for Capital and Debt Service Grants to the National Railroad 
     Passenger Corporation in this Act or any other Act for 
     operating expenses, which includes temporary transfers of 
     such funds: Provided further, That the Administrator of the 
     Federal Railroad Administration may retain up to one-half of 
     1 percent of the funds provided under this heading to fund 
     the award and oversight by the Administrator of grants made 
     under this heading: Provided further, That for an additional 
     amount for the Secretary to make operating subsidy grants to 
     the National Railroad Passenger Corporation for necessary 
     repairs related to the consequences of Hurricane Sandy, 
     $32,000,000, to remain available until expended: Provided 
     further, That each amount under this heading is designated by 
     the Congress as being for an emergency requirement pursuant 
     to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and 
     Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.

                     Federal Transit Administration

             public transportation emergency relief program

                     (including transfer of funds)

       For the ``Public Transportation Emergency Relief Program'' 
     as authorized under section 5324 of title 49, United States 
     Code, $10,900,000,000, to remain available until expended, 
     for recovery and relief efforts in the areas most affected by 
     Hurricane Sandy: Provided, That not more than $2,000,000,000 
     shall be made available not later than 60 days after the 
     enactment of this Act: Provided further, That the remainder 
     of the funds shall be made available only after the Federal 
     Transit Administration and the Federal Emergency Management 
     Agency sign the Memorandum of Agreement required by section 
     20017(b) of the Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century 
     Act (Public Law 112-141) and the Federal Transit 
     Administration publishes interim regulations for the

[[Page H133]]

     Public Transportation Emergency Relief Program: Provided 
     further, That of the funds provided under this heading, the 
     Secretary of Transportation may transfer up to $5,383,000,000 
     to the appropriate agencies to fund programs authorized under 
     titles 23 and 49, United States Code, in order to carry out 
     projects related to reducing risk of damage from future 
     disasters in areas impacted by Hurricane Sandy: Provided 
     further, That the Committees on Appropriations of the House 
     of Representatives and the Senate shall be notified at least 
     15 days in advance of any such transfer: Provided further, 
     That up to three-quarters of 1 percent of the funds retained 
     for public transportation emergency relief shall be available 
     for the purposes of administrative expenses and ongoing 
     program management oversight as authorized under 49 U.S.C. 
     5334 and 5338(i)(2) and shall be in addition to any other 
     appropriations for such purposes: Provided further, That, of 
     the funds made available under this heading, $6,000,000 shall 
     be transferred to the Office of Inspector General to support 
     the oversight of activities funded under this heading: 
     Provided further, That such amounts are designated by the 
     Congress as being for an emergency requirement pursuant to 
     section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
     Deficit Control Act of 1985.

              DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT

                   Community Planning and Development

                       community development fund

                     (including transfers of funds)

       For an additional amount for ``Community Development 
     Fund'', $16,000,000,000, to remain available until September 
     30, 2017, for necessary expenses related to disaster relief, 
     long-term recovery, restoration of infrastructure and 
     housing, and economic revitalization in the most impacted and 
     distressed areas resulting from a major disaster declared 
     pursuant to the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and 
     Emergency Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5121 et seq.) due to 
     Hurricane Sandy and other eligible events in calendar years 
     2011, 2012, and 2013, for activities authorized under title I 
     of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974 (42 
     U.S.C. 5301 et seq.): Provided, That funds shall be awarded 
     directly to the State or unit of general local government as 
     a grantee at the discretion of the Secretary of Housing and 
     Urban Development: Provided further, That the Secretary shall 
     allocate to grantees not less than 33 percent of the funds 
     provided under this heading within 60 days after the 
     enactment of this Act based on the best available data: 
     Provided further, That prior to the obligation of funds, a 
     grantee shall submit a plan to the Secretary for approval 
     detailing the proposed use of all funds, including criteria 
     for eligibility and how the use of these funds will address 
     long-term recovery and restoration of infrastructure and 
     housing and economic revitalization in the most impacted and 
     distressed areas: Provided further, That the Secretary shall 
     by notice specify the criteria for approval of such plans 
     within 45 days of enactment of this Act: Provided further, 
     That if the Secretary determines that a plan does not meet 
     such criteria, the Secretary shall disapprove the plan: 
     Provided further, That funds provided under this heading may 
     not be used for activities reimbursable by or for which funds 
     are made available by the Federal Emergency Management Agency 
     or the Army Corps of Engineers: Provided further, That funds 
     allocated under this heading shall not be considered relevant 
     to the non-disaster formula allocations made pursuant to 
     section 106 of the Housing and Community Development Act of 
     1974 (42 U.S.C. 5306): Provided further, That a grantee may 
     use up to 5 percent of its allocation for administrative 
     costs: Provided further, That a grantee shall administer 
     grant funds provided under this heading in accordance with 
     all applicable laws and regulations and may not delegate, by 
     contract or otherwise, the responsibility for administering 
     such grant funds: Provided further, That as a condition of 
     making any grant, the Secretary shall certify in advance that 
     such grantee has in place proficient financial controls and 
     procurement processes and has established adequate procedures 
     to prevent any duplication of benefits as defined by section 
     312 of the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency 
     Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5155), to ensure timely expenditure 
     of funds, to maintain comprehensive websites regarding all 
     disaster recovery activities assisted with these funds, and 
     to detect and prevent waste, fraud, and abuse of funds: 
     Provided further, That the Secretary shall provide grantees 
     with technical assistance on contracting and procurement 
     processes and shall require grantees, in contracting or 
     procuring these funds, to incorporate performance 
     requirements and penalties into any such contracts or 
     agreements: Provided further, That the Secretary shall 
     require grantees to maintain on a public website information 
     accounting for how all grant funds are used, including 
     details of all contracts and ongoing procurement processes: 
     Provided further, That, in administering the funds under this 
     heading, the Secretary may waive, or specify alternative 
     requirements for, any provision of any statute or regulation 
     that the Secretary administers in connection with the 
     obligation by the Secretary or the use by the recipient of 
     these funds (except for requirements related to fair housing, 
     nondiscrimination, labor standards, and the environment) 
     pursuant to a determination by the Secretary that good cause 
     exists for the waiver or alternative requirement and that 
     such action is not inconsistent with the overall purposes of 
     title I of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974 
     (42 U.S.C. 5301 et seq.): Provided further, That, 
     notwithstanding the preceding proviso, recipients of funds 
     provided under this heading that use such funds to supplement 
     Federal assistance provided under sections 402, 403, 404, 
     406, 407, or 502 of the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief 
     and Emergency Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5121 et seq.) may 
     adopt, without review or public comment, any environmental 
     review, approval, or permit performed by a Federal agency, 
     and such adoption shall satisfy the responsibilities of the 
     recipient with respect to such environmental review, approval 
     or permit: Provided further, That, notwithstanding section 
     104(g)(2) of the Housing and Community Development Act of 
     1974 (42 U.S.C. 5304(g)(2)), the Secretary may, upon receipt 
     of a request for release of funds and certification, 
     immediately approve the release of funds for an activity or 
     project assisted under this heading if the recipient has 
     adopted an environmental review, approval or permit under the 
     preceding proviso or the activity or project is categorically 
     excluded from review under the National Environmental Policy 
     Act of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.): Provided further, That 
     a waiver granted by the Secretary may not reduce the 
     percentage of funds that must be used for activities that 
     benefit persons of low and moderate income to less than 50 
     percent, unless the Secretary specifically finds that there 
     is a compelling need to further reduce or eliminate the 
     percentage requirement: Provided further, That the Secretary 
     shall publish in the Federal Register any waiver of any 
     statute or regulation that the Secretary administers pursuant 
     to title I of the Housing and Community Development Act of 
     1974 no later than 5 days before the effective date of such 
     waiver: Provided further, That, of the funds made available 
     under this heading, up to $10,000,000 may be transferred to 
     ``Program Office Salaries and Expenses, Community Planning 
     and Development'' for necessary costs, including information 
     technology costs, of administering and overseeing funds made 
     available under this heading: Provided further, That of the 
     funds made available under this heading, $10,000,000 shall be 
     transferred to ``Office of the Inspector General'' for 
     necessary costs of overseeing and auditing funds made 
     available under this heading: Provided further, That the 
     amounts provided under this heading are designated by the 
     Congress as being for an emergency requirement pursuant to 
     section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
     Deficit Control Act of 1985.

                    GENERAL PROVISIONS--THIS CHAPTER

       Sec. 1091.  For fiscal year 2013, upon request by a public 
     housing agency and supported by documentation as required by 
     the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development that 
     demonstrates that the need for the adjustment is due to the 
     disaster, the Secretary may make temporary adjustments to the 
     section 8 housing choice voucher annual renewal funding 
     allocations and administrative fee eligibility determinations 
     for public housing agencies in an area for which the 
     President declared a disaster during such fiscal year under 
     title IV of the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and 
     Emergency Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5170 et seq.), to avoid 
     significant adverse funding impacts that would otherwise 
     result from the disaster.
       Sec. 1092.  The Departments of Transportation and Housing 
     and Urban Development shall submit to the Committees on 
     Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Senate 
     within 45 days after the date of the enactment of this Act a 
     plan for implementing the provisions in this chapter, and 
     updates to such plan on a biannual basis thereafter.
       Sec. 1093.  None of the funds provided in this chapter to 
     the Department of Transportation or the Department of Housing 
     and Urban Development may be used to make a grant unless the 
     Secretary of such Department notifies the Committees on 
     Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Senate 
     not less than 3 full business days before any project, State 
     or locality is selected to receive a grant award totaling 
     $1,000,000 or more is announced by either Department or a 
     modal administration.
       Sec. 1094.  This chapter shall apply in place of title VIII 
     of this Act, and such title shall have no force or effect.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 23, the gentleman from 
New Jersey (Mr. Frelinghuysen) and a Member opposed each will control 
10 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from New Jersey.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. Madam Chair, I yield myself 1 minute.
  Hurricane Sandy devastated the northeast coast in late October, 78 
days ago, leaving misery in its wake, disrupting the lives and 
businesses of millions of our fellow citizens. The storm caused 
unprecedented destruction--$100 billion in New York and New Jersey 
alone. My amendment supplements Mr. Rogers' measure in order to bring 
the total aid package to $60 billion, which is the amount requested by 
the President and endorsed by Governors Christie, Cuomo, and Malloy.

[[Page H134]]

  I want the Members to know that this amendment strips out all 
provisions in the Senate that were deemed earmarks and all authorizing 
language.
  Madam Chairman, I'll close by reminding our colleagues of the proud 
tradition of Congress' cite in the recent letter that many of us 
received from the Governors of the States affected. Madam Chair, in 
late December, the Governors of the affected States wrote to each House 
Member, and I quote:

       The congressional delegations of our three States have 
     always been there to provide critical votes to these aid 
     packages, because that is what America is all about--when one 
     of us is in need, we step up to the plate to lend a helping 
     hand.

  It's time to lend that helping hand, and I urge the support of my 
amendment.
  Madam Chair, I am pleased to yield 1 minute to the ranking member of 
the House Appropriations Committee, the gentlelady from New York (Mrs. 
Lowey).
  Mrs. LOWEY. Madam Chair, I rise in strong support of the amendment 
offered by my friend Mr. Frelinghuysen, which would bring the funding 
total of this package to the amount requested by the President.
  I cannot emphasize enough how critical the additional $33.4 billion 
provided in this amendment is to our region. I know there are many 
different viewpoints in this House and many different positions on 
issues we consider here, but Madam Chairwoman, I think we can all agree 
that the Federal Government has a fundamental and critical role when 
disasters of this magnitude strike. No State can do it alone. A Federal 
response is essential.
  My colleagues, I commend Mr. Frelinghuysen on his amendment today, 
and I strongly urge its swift passage.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. Madam Chair, I yield 1 minute to my colleague and 
good friend, Chris Smith, the Representative from New Jersey.
  Mr. SMITH of New Jersey. I thank my good friend for yielding, and I 
strongly support Mr. Frelinghuysen's amendment.
  Madam Chair, gaps in homeowners insurance coverage and a growing 
realization that there will be major tax receipt losses from towns that 
have had their tax bases eviscerated by Sandy is further compounded in 
a State that's reeling from a body blow with no precedent. All of this 
has led to crippling shortfalls. Towns have serious gaps in needed 
resources. They need our help. The $33 billion Frelinghuysen amendment 
fills those gaps for people in need of housing assistance, public 
infrastructure destroyed or damaged by Sandy will get a huge boost, and 
economic revitalization will accelerate.
  I've lost count, Madam Chair, of the number of my constituents who 
either didn't have flood insurance for their homes or who had an 
inadequate amount of coverage. To compound their misery, many have 
upside-down mortgages, and they desperately need our help. The 
Frelinghuysen amendment raises to $16 billion from $3.9 billion in the 
Rogers amendment, funds to aid in the relief of homeowners, buyouts, 
and home elevation. It will also provide very critical moneys for the 
Army Corps of Engineers. Where the Army Corps had projects in place, 
there was a mitigation of the amount of damage to infrastructure and to 
homes. We need this additional funding to protect homes, businesses so 
millions of people can get on with their lives.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. I am pleased to yield 1 minute to the gentleman 
from New York City and Long Island, Congressman King.

                              {time}  1630

  Mr. KING of New York. I thank the gentleman for yielding me this 
time, and let me at the outset commend Congressman Frelinghuysen for 
the outstanding job he has done on this amendment and throughout this 
entire crisis.
  I am proud to stand with Governor Cuomo, Governor Christie, Mayor 
Bloomberg, all the members of the New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut 
delegations. Madam Chair, there has been no disaster which Governors of 
the States have documented the need for more than Sandy. Everything is 
there. Every earmark is out. Every dollar is accounted for. This is a 
real disaster.
  I walk through my neighborhood. I see the people who have lost their 
homes. I know how tragic it is. All of us know it. This is not make-
believe.
  I'm proud to stand for this bill. It's absolutely essential that the 
Frelinghuysen amendment be adopted. I was there for every supplemental 
appropriation bill. I was proud to do it. I am even prouder to stand 
with Congressman Frelinghuysen today.
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. Madam Chair, although I am not opposed, I ask 
unanimous consent to claim the time in opposition in order to yield it 
to my friend from New Jersey because there are important messages to be 
heard.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman from Oregon is 
recognized for 10 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. Madam Chair, I strongly support what is going on, and 
I yield the balance of my time to the gentleman from New Jersey to make 
sure that everybody from the affected area has an opportunity to be 
heard.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman from New Jersey 
shall control the time.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. Madam Chair, I thank the gentleman for that 
courtesy. We highly appreciate it.
  I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from New Jersey (Mr. LoBiondo) who 
probably represents more of New Jersey than any of our other Members.
  Mr. LoBIONDO. Congressman Frelinghuysen, thank you. Chairman Rogers, 
thank you for getting us to this point. It is deeply appreciated. To my 
colleagues from disaster-prone States, States that have had disasters 
in the past who are supporting us in this, thank you very much.
  To my colleagues who are from States that have had disasters, some 
rather recently, who have decided that we need to change the rules of 
the game, shame on you. What does the misery index have to get to for 
our constituents? A new caucus should be formed--we have a lot of 
caucuses here--it should be the hypocritical caucus because when you 
wanted the money 5 minutes before the storm was over, you didn't have 
any hesitation coming to us and asking us. And, yes, I'm angry. You're 
changing the rules for hundreds of thousands of people in the middle of 
the game.
  Florida, good luck with no more hurricanes. California, 
congratulations. Did you get rid of the San Andreas Fault? The 
Mississippi is in a drought. Do you think you're not going to have a 
flood again? Who are you going to come to when you have these things?
  We need this. We need it now. Do the right thing as we have always 
done for you.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. Madam Chair, I'm pleased to yield 1 minute to Mr. 
Grimm of Staten Island.
  Mr. GRIMM. I would also like to give a special thanks to Mr. 
Frelinghuysen, who has been just an incredible stalwart and shown 
leadership, but I also want to echo the sentiments of my good friend 
from New Jersey. I would ask everyone that's going to take this vote to 
consider what we are doing. What are we really doing in this Chamber? 
We're not voting as Republicans or Democrats; we're not voting as 
individuals. We're voting as Americans. And the last time I checked the 
Constitution, that Constitution was to protect all of us, the welfare 
of this great United States. Please remember that when you cast your 
vote today. These are Americans in need that are counting on us to 
stand up and do the right thing. Regardless of whether you're from a 
State that has had disasters or not, when America is calling and your 
neighbor needs a hand, America lends that hand. That's who we are. Make 
me proud today and support this amendment.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. Madam Chair, I'm pleased to yield 1 minute to the 
Representative from New York State, Carolyn Maloney.
  Mrs. CAROLYN B. MALONEY of New York. I thank the gentleman for 
yielding and for his really extraordinary bipartisan leadership on this 
issue with Nita Lowey and so many others from the Northeast region.
  This is truly a bipartisan amendment with bipartisan devotion and 
commitment. The chairman has worked his heart out on this, and he has 
given his all to make this happen with great intelligence and 
commitment, to address the real need and the suffering of the

[[Page H135]]

people. Struck by the second most economically devastating natural 
disaster in our Nation's history, people lost their homes, their cars, 
their jobs, in some cases their entire neighborhoods; and there should 
not be different standards for different storms or for different 
regions.
  We are all one country. We were there when other States and regions 
suffered hurricanes, tornadoes. We need you to be there with the 
Northeast region today. This is a bipartisan effort. The standards 
should not be different. We were there for you. We need you to be there 
for the Northeast.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. Madam Chair, I'm pleased to yield 1 minute to the 
gentleman from New Jersey (Mr. Lance).
  Mr. LANCE. I rise in support of Congressman Frelinghuysen's amendment 
and thank him, Chairman Rogers, and our leadership for all that they 
have done to move this issue forward.
  I speak today not as a New Jerseyan, not as a Northeasterner, but as 
an American. This Nation has in times of natural disasters come 
together as one in support of those in need. Thousands upon thousands 
of our countrymen and countrywomen are in need from Sandy's 
devastation, a horrific occurrence in the history of the State I love.
  I ask all of my colleagues to join me in support of Mr. 
Frelinghuysen's amendment, and I thank all of those on the Republican 
and the Democratic sides of the aisle for their support today.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. Madam Chair, I'm pleased to yield 1 minute to the 
gentleman from New York (Mr. Serrano).
  Mr. SERRANO. I thank the gentleman for the time, and I thank you for 
your work on this, your leadership on this. You've worked very hard to 
make this a bipartisan amendment. That's why I stand in support of it. 
The folks in New York need a lot of help. Your amendment speaks to the 
small business community. It speaks to GSA's need to do repairs on 
buildings that service those communities, otherwise costly leases would 
have to take place in order to provide working places for Federal 
employees. So the details of your amendment, sir, speak to many of the 
needs that we have in the community right now, and that's why I rise in 
support of it, in support of your efforts to make this a bipartisan 
effort; and I thank you for your support of so many people in need not 
only in your State, but in Connecticut and in my State of New York.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. Madam Chair, I am pleased to yield 1 minute to the 
gentleman from New Jersey (Mr. Runyan).
  Mr. RUNYAN. Madam Chair, I rise today in support of the Frelinghuysen 
amendment. We must pass this amendment to ensure that hardworking men 
and women in communities like Brick, Seaside Park, Toms River, and 
Barnegat get the resources they need to get back on their feet.
  After Hurricane Sandy, many of my constituents completely lost their 
homes. Others lost power and heat in their homes for over a month. And 
many, like this home here in Mantaloking, haven't even been permitted 
back to their homes 2 months later.
  Make no mistake, my constituents have suffered. They have seen the 
communities they have grown up in completely destroyed. I urge passage 
of the Frelinghuysen amendment.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. Madam Chair, I'm pleased to yield 1 minute to the 
gentleman from New Jersey (Mr. Sires).
  Mr. SIRES. Madam Chair, let me first congratulate my colleague and 
all of my colleagues from New Jersey for their hard work. This 
unprecedented storm has hurt New Jersey to the tune of 41,000 people; 
41,000 families are currently impacted. Over 300 municipalities have 
been impacted in New Jersey. The PATH stations in Hoboken are 
destroyed. Thousands of families who lived in houses in the area--they 
also lived in the basements--have no place to go.
  And here we are 3 months later, and we're still battling over this 
money. This is for people who are hurting. This is for States like New 
Jersey and New York and Connecticut who are donor States that are 
constantly sending money to the Federal Government. You know, I sat in 
this Chamber when we had these wars and all this money for these wars. 
We destroyed the infrastructure in Iraq, and then we put billions of 
dollars to fix the infrastructure in Iraq. We put billions of dollars 
in Afghanistan.

                              {time}  1640

  This is for the Americans in this country who have been hurt by this 
storm that is unprecedented. My friends, we have to work together to 
get this money to these people so they can start their lives over 
again.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. I yield 1 minute to another Member of Congress 
from New Jersey (Mr. Pascrell).
  Mr. PASCRELL. Mr. Chairman, we either act now, or we wait for the 
consequences of the terrible silence of the decent. And many folks from 
both sides of the aisle have worked together. It can be done, not only 
on this issue, but many other issues.
  This was a tragedy. When you visit each town, be it in Long Island or 
Staten Island, or Hoboken, or Moonachie, Fort Lee, Mantoloking, what's 
the sign you look for whenever you go in neighborhoods? Water line. 
That's the sign.
  What is the water line of our conscience, of our goodwill, and having 
double standards for different storms?
  We've never done that before as a Nation, and we shouldn't now do it 
through ideologues and true believers who think one way or the highway.
  This must be passed today. I commend Mr. Frelinghuysen, Mr. Rogers, 
Nita Lowey. Thank you for putting your task forward in a priority. And 
we're going to pass this today. Congratulations, Mr. Frelinghuysen.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. Madam Chair, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman 
from New York (Mr. Crowley).
  Mr. CROWLEY. I thank the gentleman from New Jersey.
  I have never, in my 14 years, spoken from this side of the aisle. I 
do it today, not as a gimmick, but as part of my plea to my Republican 
colleagues, to all of us, not to act as Democrats and Republicans.
  People are suffering throughout the Northeast. They continue to do 
so. The Frelinghuysen amendment is one that will give assurance to the 
people of the Quad-State region that the Federal Government will be 
there with them throughout this crisis, that they will be there. When 
everyone else has forgotten, the Federal Government will be there.
  The level of devastation is enormous. And as I said before, the level 
of psychological damage is enormous, and we only know the tip of the 
iceberg. We don't know yet what will come.
  This amendment will give peace of mind to Americans who are suffering 
today. Americans just like all of us here today are suffering, and they 
are looking to their Congress, not red, not blue, not Democrat, not 
Republican, just Americans helping Americans. That's what this 
amendment and this bill is all about.
  I thank the gentleman from New Jersey for yielding me this minute.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. Madam Chair, I yield 1 minute to the gentlewoman 
from New York (Ms. Clarke).
  Ms. CLARKE. I thank the gentleman for the time.
  And I want to urge all of my colleagues to support the Frelinghuysen 
amendment, which ensures a full $60.1 billion package will jump-start a 
recovery process for the families and small businesses of the affected 
four-State region.
  I represent an area called Gerritsen Beach in Brooklyn, New York, a 
quaint bungalow community. Operative word, bungalow. They were 
subgrade, and totally deluged during the event known as Superstorm 
Sandy. This is a working-class community of people, real solid 
Americans who have played by the rules all of their lives, and now 
their homes have been moved off of their foundations by the sheer force 
of this storm.
  This amendment, this work that we do today, is why people have sent 
us here, to know that we've got their backs, that we are there, as 
their representatives, in time of need.
  I want to thank my colleagues on the other side of the aisle, in 
particular, those from the affected region, for their advocacy on 
behalf of the people who have been victimized by Sandy.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. Madam Chair, I yield myself the balance of the 
time.
  Madam Chair, I do have a point of clarification before I yield back 
my

[[Page H136]]

time. The amendment includes $22,220,000 for the Federal Highway 
Administration's emergency relief program. It's our intent that the 
$100 million cap applies to only the funds in this act, and not to 
previous emergencies.
  In closing, Madam Chairman, as I said earlier, I ask all Members to 
lend the Northeast a hand, help us put lives and families and 
communities back in good order. Those that have suffered, continue to 
suffer, have had personal misery and loss, we remember them as we pass 
this bill today. And I want to thank all the Members for stepping 
forward to be supportive of this legislation.
  I yield back the balance of my time.


                 Amendment No. 2 Offered by Mr. Flores

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 2 
printed in part C of House Report 113-1.
  Mr. FLORES. Madam Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 3, line 7, after the dollar amount insert ``(reduced 
     by $150,000,000)''.
       Page 3, strike lines 18 through 20 (and redesignate the 
     subsequent paragraphs accordingly).

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 23, the gentleman from 
Texas (Mr. Flores) and a Member opposed each will control 5 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Texas.
  Mr. FLORES. Madam Chairman, I rise to offer an amendment that would 
address concerns in funding the Regional Ocean Partnership program 
under NOAA that is included in the underlying amendment.
  Let me tell you what this amendment is not. It is not a poison pill 
designed to stop funding for Sandy relief. It is not an amendment 
designed to delay aid to Sandy victims. It is not an amendment designed 
to stop the much-needed aid to Sandy victims.
  All the amendment does is it stops the ability to allow a crisis to 
be used by the White House to fund Executive Order 13547, which is 
basically to zone the oceans. Funding for that could be used for 
purposes like this: to regulate economic activity in the Mississippi 
River watershed. And you could see that none of the money that's used 
for this program would be used to help Sandy relief. So that's just an 
example of what it would do.
  According to the NOAA Web site, the Regional Ocean Partnership grant 
program was developed to advance effective coastal and ocean management 
through regional ocean governance, including the goals for national 
ocean policy or, in other words, Executive Order 13547, set out in the 
President's final policy of the Interagency Ocean Task Force, dated 
July 19, 2010. Again, back to the Executive order.
  This amendment is essentially the same amendment that was passed that 
was part of the CJS appropriations bill that passed by a bipartisan 
vote of 246-174 last May.
  Now, we can all agree that ocean planning is a good thing. However, 
that needs to be done through the normal appropriations process when 
approved by Congress, and not through an executive order by the 
President.
  The Natural Resources Committee has held hearings, under the 
leadership of Chairman Doc Hastings, to ask the administration where 
they're getting the funding to implement national ocean policy. They 
have not responded with any answers to that, and now they're using this 
crisis as a way to come up with funding of $150 million to basically 
fund all of these agencies in the President's effort to zone the 
oceans. We think that that's inappropriate.
  And again, this is not to stop Sandy aid. It's not to delay Sandy 
aid. It's not to be a poison pill for Sandy aid. It's only designed to 
stop the use of this crisis to fund a program that this Congress did 
not intend to have an effect.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. Madam Chair, I rise to claim the time in 
opposition.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from New Jersey is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. I am pleased to yield 3 minutes to the gentleman 
from New Jersey (Mr. Runyan).

                              {time}  1650

  Mr. RUNYAN. Madam Chair, I rise in opposition to the Flores 
amendment. The Regional Ocean Partnership grants program was 
established in 2004 by President Bush to help prevent damages from 
future natural disasters in coastal States. It is not part of President 
Obama's National Ocean Policy.
  This program is supported through a competitive grant program first 
authorized by President Bush in 2004 to support urgent coastal needs. 
This program is also voluntary and State-led, with individual States 
opting into the program.
  In the areas hardest hit by Hurricane Sandy, there is a Mid-Atlantic 
Regional Council that was established by mid-Atlantic Governors in 
2009. These Governors work together to address coastal issues and 
mitigate future risks.
  State universities like Rutgers University in New Jersey also receive 
funding through States to work and coordinate with States to determine 
how to best mitigate future disaster risks. The Reinsurance Association 
of America has written in opposition to this amendment due to concern 
about future risks to coastal areas.
  I again emphasize this program is not part of President Obama's 
National Ocean Policy and was established by President Bush.
  I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  Mr. FLORES. Madam Chair, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  I thank the gentleman from New Jersey for his remarks, but this 
program is designed and was changed beginning with the Obama 
administration to fund Executive Order 13547.
  If you go to the NOAA budget request, it says, ``The Regional Ocean 
Partnership grants program will establish a competitive grant program 
to support regional ocean partnerships. The program will help support 
the development and implementation of priority actions identified in 
plans of regional ocean partnerships. Support will include the 
development of comprehensive Coastal and Marine Spatial Plans,'' i.e., 
Executive Order 13547.
  So, yes, this program was around before during the Bush 
administration, but it has changed under the Obama administration, and 
now they're using this Sandy relief as a methodology to fund this 
program which, again, was never authorized directly by Congress.
  There were two rounds of grant requests that were granted by NOAA in 
2012. Only one went to a State, and that was to the State of Hawaii 
Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism, and the 
Office of Planning.
  Here are the NGOs and outside groups that did get money from this, 
though: The Nature Conservancy, the Smith River National Recreation 
Area, the University of Hawaii, the South Carolina Sea Grant 
Consortium, and others. But not to States. Only one went to a State and 
that was to the State of Hawaii.
  Again, this is an inappropriate use of funding, the inappropriate use 
of funding in the middle of a crisis to try to carry out something that 
this Congress has never authorized.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. Madam Chair, I yield the balance of my time to my 
colleague from New Jersey (Mr. Holt).
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 3\1/2\ minutes.
  Mr. HOLT. Madam Chair, I thank my colleague from New Jersey, Chairman 
Frelinghuysen, for yielding but also for putting together a very 
thoughtful amendment. A lot of thought has gone into this amendment. It 
is compassionate, yes, but it is thoughtful compassion, not dumb 
compassion.
  I rise in opposition to the amendment offered by the gentleman from 
Texas. It's a misguided amendment that would strike funding from NOAA's 
Regional Ocean Partnership grants program. These grants help scientists 
understand where and how the shoreline has changed, evaluate the long-
term effects of storm damage, and prepare mitigation plans for future 
severe weather events. The whole point is to rebuild better and 
smarter. The Flores amendment eliminates such funding for coastal 
mitigation, which means Congress would lose the opportunity to ensure 
that the money is spent on recovery from this disaster in a smart way 
that makes coastal communities

[[Page H137]]

stronger and safer. It's nonsensical to impair the ability of NOAA to 
prepare properly for hurricanes in an emergency appropriations bill 
designed to respond to a hurricane.
  I strongly urge my colleagues to reject this misguided amendment, and 
I thank my good friend from New Jersey for all the thought that has 
gone into his amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Texas is recognized for his 
remaining 1 minute.
  Mr. FLORES. This is what the $150 million is going to go for. This is 
a bunch of federal bureaucracies to carry out an Executive order that 
this Congress never approved.
  This is not about stopping Sandy relief, this is not about putting 
roofs back over people's head, this is not about providing food and 
sustenance for anybody, this is not about rebuilding our roads and 
bridges, this is not about preventing future storms. This is about just 
growing a Federal bureaucracy that was never authorized by this 
Congress.
  With that being said, I think it's a clear amendment. It does not 
stop Sandy relief.
  I would urge all of my colleagues to support this amendment, and I 
yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from New Jersey does have 2 minutes 
remaining if he would seek recognition.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. CICILLINE. Madam Chair, I rise in strong opposition to this 
Amendment.
  Regional Ocean Partnerships are supported through a NOAA competitive 
grants program first established by President Bush in 2004.
  As the representative from the Ocean State, I know how important this 
funding is in helping coastal states deal with a range of priorities--
including, coastal hazards resiliency to the impacts of major storms 
like Sandy.
  Hurricane Sandy wreaked havoc on the coastline of Rhode Island, 
Massachusetts, New York, New Jersey and the Northeast.
  The allocation for Regional Ocean Partnerships Grants will provide 
much needed funding to states affected by Hurricane Sandy--helping our 
coastal communities recover, be better prepared for future extreme 
weather events, and mitigate future risks.
  These measures will help our coastal communities in Rhode Island and 
throughout the impacted region to rebuild, save lives, and prevent 
future economic and property losses.
  I urge my colleagues to oppose this amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Texas (Mr. Flores).
  The question was taken; and the Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. FLORES. Madam Chair, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Texas will 
be postponed.


                 Amendment No. 3 Offered by Mr. Runyan

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 3 
printed in part C of House Report 113-1.
  Mr. RUNYAN. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 4, lines 6 through 8, strike all after ``fishery 
     disasters'' and insert ``during calendar year 2012 that were 
     declared by the Secretary of Commerce as a direct result of 
     impacts from Hurricane Sandy:''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 23, the gentleman from 
New Jersey (Mr. Runyan) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from New Jersey.
  Mr. RUNYAN. Madam Chair, I rise in support of my amendment, which 
makes a technical correction of the current bill language that makes it 
clear that fisheries disaster funding is restricted to those States 
that were declared fisheries disasters in 2012 as a direct result of 
Hurricane Sandy.
  While I understand that the intent of the appropriators was to limit 
the money to the States impacted by Hurricane Sandy, NOAA has informed 
me that according to the current bill language they will distribute the 
money to any State with the fisheries disaster declaration in 2012.
  While I'm disappointed that more money has not been appropriated to 
the fisheries that were damaged during Sandy, we need to make sure that 
this limited pot of money gets to the fisheries that need it most in 
New Jersey and New York. There is only $5 million appropriated for the 
fisheries bill. In New Jersey alone the commercial fishing industry has 
sustained over $4 million in damage.
  This amendment was supported by the Garden State Seafood Association, 
the Recreational Fishing Alliance, and the Marine Trades Association of 
New Jersey.
  I want to thank the Rules Committee for ruling my amendment in order 
and urge all colleagues to support it.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. Does any Member seek time in opposition?
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from New Jersey.
  Mr. RUNYAN. I would like to yield 1 minute to my colleague from New 
Jersey, Congressman Smith.
  Mr. SMITH of New Jersey. I thank my good friend for yielding.
  Madam Chair, I rise in strong support of the amendment offered by my 
good friend and colleague, Mr. Runyan, to ensure that the funding in 
this bill is targeted to those fishery disasters resulting from 
Superstorm Sandy.
  Recreational angling contributes more than $125 billion annually to 
the American economy, Madam Speaker, in addition to creating and 
sustaining over 1 million jobs.
  New Jersey has a long tradition of fishing along our 130-mile 
shoreline. Recreational and commercial fishing generates over $1.3 
billion in New Jersey in economic activity and supports 8,500 Jersey 
jobs.
  This vital industry not only creates and sustains good jobs but 
boosts fishery conservation efforts, tourism, and contributes 
significantly to the economy in coastal communities. The disaster 
declaration on November 16 and the modest funding provided in the 
pending legislation will help rebuild the damaged and destroyed 
infrastructure so that this industry can recover and return to pre-
storm levels.
  I urge all members to support the Runyan amendment.

                              {time}  1700

  Mr. RUNYAN. I yield 1 minute to another gentleman from New Jersey 
(Mr. Frelinghuysen).
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. Madam Chairman, I'm very pleased to support the 
gentleman's amendment. I commend him for his effort. This is directly 
Sandy related. We thank you for your work on this.
  Mr. RUNYAN. With that, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from New Jersey (Mr. Runyan).
  The amendment was agreed to.


            Amendment No. 4 Offered by Mr. Broun of Georgia

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 4 
printed in part C of House Report 113-1.
  Mr. BROUN of Georgia. Madam Chairman, I have an amendment at the 
desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 4, line 19, after the dollar amount, insert ``(reduced 
     by $13,000,000)''.
       Page 5, line 4, after the dollar amount, insert ``(reduced 
     to $0)''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 23, the gentleman from 
Georgia (Mr. Broun) and a Member opposed each will control 5 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Georgia.
  Mr. BROUN of Georgia. Madam Chairman, my amendment would strike $13 
million in nonemergency funding for the National Weather Service's 
ground readiness project.
  This funding, found in the Frelinghuysen amendment, is for work that 
is already underway as part of a yet unfinished state-of-the-art 
weather satellite system. It is my understanding that this particular 
amount is meant to speed up the preparations needed to get ready for 
data that will come from these new weather satellites, which are set to 
be launched 2 to 5 years from now.
  Madam Chairman, our hearts go out to the victims that are suffering 
from the devastation from Hurricane Sandy.

[[Page H138]]

However, in the wake of large storms like this, government's knee-jerk 
reaction is often to throw money at forecasting or storm modeling in 
order to prevent widespread damage in the future. Unfortunately, even 
with the best imaginable forecasting systems, we would not have been 
able to prevent the structural damages which resulted from this 
particular storm. Yet here we are debating funding for a project due to 
go online years from now in an emergency supplemental bill, which is 
meant to provide aid to those who are still suffering in the wake of 
Sandy.
  For fiscal year 2013, the National Weather Service received a total 
of $991 million. That's $20 million over their initial request. NOAA is 
expected to ask for additional funding for this particular project over 
the next 2 years--nearly $15 million in fiscal year 2014 and $18 
million in fiscal year 2015, the year the first new satellite is due to 
launch. It appears that the funding included in the Frelinghuysen 
amendment is simply meant to get the ground portion of this project 
finished just a little bit faster.
  Madam Chairman, I don't wish to argue the merits of this project, and 
I agree that if we have the ability to improve our forecasting 
infrastructure, we ought to do it, but this is not the time nor the 
place. The time for this project--and other projects like it which are 
funded in the Frelinghuysen amendment--is during the normal 
appropriations process.
  While I offered seven other amendments to the Rules Committee which 
would have removed similar nonemergent spending totaling over $300 
million, unfortunately, only this amendment made it to the House floor. 
I'm disappointed that none of my other amendments to cut excessive 
spending were allowed. I was hopeful that the start of a new Congress 
would usher in a new dedication to cutting wasteful, duplicative, 
unnecessary spending. Unfortunately, it looks like it is business as 
usual.
  That said, I'm hopeful this amendment will pass so this particular 
appropriation may be considered under regular order, as it should.
  I urge my colleagues to support this amendment, and I reserve the 
balance of my time.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. Madam Chair, I claim time in opposition to the 
amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from New Jersey is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. I'm pleased to yield 2 minutes to the gentleman 
from Pennsylvania (Mr. Fattah).
  Mr. FATTAH. I thank the gentleman, my good friend from New Jersey.
  I want to say that this amendment would do serious damage to our 
efforts in terms of the National Weather Service.
  In the mark of the House and the Senate appropriation bills for FY13, 
we had this $13 million. It improves our forecasting. What does that 
mean on the ground? What it means on the ground, all across our 
country, when there is a severe weather incident, it means that we will 
have better information for evacuation purposes, if needed. It's about 
$1 million a mile to evacuate. It's about saving lives.
  So when the gentleman, who is the maker of this amendment, said that 
he wished we could do this faster and he's not opposed to us having 
better information, then I join with him in part, in that part, because 
this is about providing necessary information to the American public 
about severe weather incidents and saving lives. This is money that 
both the House and the Senate intended to provide, but in the 112th we 
were unable to complete our work.
  This is vitally important to every single Member in this House in 
their districts, the businesses and families alike, that the National 
Weather Service and the satellite system be upgraded as quickly as 
possible.
  We've had the greatest series of severe weather events--over $1 
billion each--that we've ever had in our history. It is not time for 
the greatest country and the wealthiest country in the world to retreat 
or to equivocate in making sure that we have the very best weather 
service information, and this satellite system is critically important 
thereto.
  So I thank the gentleman for yielding. I would hope that the 
gentleman who is seeking waste find waste in some other area, because 
this is not waste. This is lifesaving information and important 
throughout our country that the National Weather Service has this 
upgrade. It's something we would have passed anyway in the normal 
appropriations process.
  Mr. BROUN of Georgia. Madam Chairman, he just made my point. We all 
want good satellite weather forecasting. The satellites have already 
been funded and underway. This project is already underway. It's 
nonemergent spending. We should not have nonemergent spending in an 
emergent appropriations bill, particularly when we don't have any 
setoffs for this. There is no reason whatsoever, absolutely zero reason 
that this could not be considered in the normal appropriations process, 
as my good friend just stated.
  My point has been that these types of projects should be considered 
under regular order. They should be considered the way that all 
funding, except for emergency funding, should be considered, and that's 
through the Appropriations Committee, the regular order, the way we're 
supposed to be doing things in this House. This is not one of those.
  My amendment, if it is passed, is not going to shut down this new 
weather system. It's not going to ground the satellites. It's not going 
to ground the ground project. All it's going to do is just say we're 
not going to put this nonemergent spending in an emergency 
appropriations bill, and we will take it under regular order as we 
should. That's my big point. I appreciate my friend saying that we 
could take it under regular order, as we should be doing.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. Madam Chairman, I'm pleased to yield 2 minutes to 
my colleague from New Jersey (Mr. Holt).
  Mr. HOLT. Madam Chairman, this misguided amendment by the gentleman 
from Georgia would strike funding for the National Weather Service's 
ground readiness program.
  Now, the ground readiness program means that weather satellite 
signals can be collected on the ground and those data can be used in 
operational models and forecasts. This satellite data is critical for 
forecasting hurricanes. In fact, the National Weather Service used data 
from these NOAA satellites to accurately predict the scope and the path 
of Hurricane Sandy.
  Now, this amount is a relatively small dollar amount in the overall 
disaster relief bill, but this amendment is of outsized importance in 
its misguided intent. A recent study showed that without the polar 
satellite data from the weather models, the forecasters would have said 
Sandy would stay out at sea, would not have hit the mid-Atlantic coast. 
Imagine how much worse the storm damage would have been if the 
emergency management officials said it would never make landfall.

                              {time}  1710

  It's hard to overestimate how important accurate forecasts are. Let's 
accelerate the program, not slow it down. It's completely nonsensical 
to impair the ability of the National Weather Service to predict 
accurately. This is reminiscent of that ludicrous proposal a few years 
ago that we abolish the National Weather Service because there is a 
successful private cable weather channel.
  I urge my colleagues to reject this misguided amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Georgia has 15 seconds 
remaining. The gentleman from New Jersey has 1 minute remaining.
  Mr. BROUN of Georgia. Madam Chair, this is not going to delay data. 
It's not going to delay the implementation of this new satellite 
system. The current satellite that was just launched last fall has all 
the data-receiving capability that it can send out. So all this is 
doing is just saying let's wait until the regular appropriations 
process.
  I urge passage of my amendment.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. Madam Chair, I'm pleased to yield the balance of 
my time to Mr. Blumenauer of Oregon.
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. I appreciate the gentleman's courtesy.
  My friend from Georgia completely misses the point. Mr. Holt pointed 
out

[[Page H139]]

that this being able to process this ground-based information is 
important to being able to fully utilize the information from the polar 
satellite. The last Congress behaved recklessly, candidly, in terms of 
jeopardizing the flow of this information. It was not treated 
appropriately in terms of the budget.
  I think that this is an opportunity to accelerate in a small way 
something that is an emergency, tell the people who have been faced 
with a chain of natural disasters and storms where we have been able to 
refine our predictions. We can't stop the weather, but we can save 
lives, and this will get us back on track a little bit.
  I cannot imagine a more misguided offset. If anything, we should be 
accelerating this work more. I strongly urge its rejection.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Georgia (Mr. Broun).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. BROUN of Georgia. Madam Chair, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Georgia will 
be postponed.


        Amendment No. 5 Offered by Mr. Duncan of South Carolina

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 5 
printed in part C of House Report 113-1.
  Mr. DUNCAN of South Carolina. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the 
desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 7, strike line 19 and all that follows through line 23 
     on page 8 and insert the following: ``No funds made available 
     by this Act shall be used by the Legal Services 
     Corporation.''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 23, the gentleman from 
South Carolina (Mr. Duncan) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from South Carolina.
  Mr. DUNCAN of South Carolina. Madam Chair, this Nation's debt now 
stands in excess of $16 trillion. This is an amount of debt greater 
than our Nation's economy, exceeding our GDP, and yet, Madam Chair, we 
have on the floor today legislation which piles upon our children and 
grandchildren even greater burdens of debt.
  Madam Chair, it's time to end the credit card economics. We simply 
cannot afford to continue to spend money that we're borrowing from 
countries like China on line items that we don't need and that Congress 
isn't constitutionally authorized to spend.
  Madam Chair, my amendment strips one such line item out of this bill. 
This is really low hanging fruit. You see, this Sandy relief effort was 
plussed up, or increased, by $1 million to boost Legal Services 
Corporation, funding masquerading as disaster relief. And I thought we 
had a ban on earmarks in this Congress.
  Why is a bailout for New York lawyers emergency hurricane relief? 
Even if you believe this is a legitimate government program--which I 
don't, by the way--but how can you argue with a straight face that 
spending on lawyers is legitimate emergency spending?
  Madam Chair, let me say again, we're $16 trillion in debt. We're $16 
trillion in debt, America. We simply cannot afford to continue like 
this. We cannot keep spending money that we don't have on things that 
we can't afford and all the while sending our children and our 
grandchildren the bill.
  What part of $16 trillion in debt do you all not understand?
  I sincerely hope that my colleagues will take this opportunity to 
start to get serious about reining in our spending addiction. This 
amendment is a tiny step in that direction. It's only $1 million. A 
million dollars is brushed off as not a lot of money to haggle over 
here in Congress, but let me tell you, $1 million is a lot of money to 
the average American. But in this House, that's barely a blip on the 
radar screen.
  This amendment will cut 6 percent of 1 percent of 1 percent of 1 
percent of the Federal debt. It isn't that much, but at least it's a 
start. The journey of 1,000 miles begins with a single step, Madam 
Chair, and we need to take that step today.
  This is a program that should no longer exist with Federal dollars. 
This program hasn't been reauthorized by the U.S. Congress since 1980; 
33 years--33 years--of unauthorized appropriations, Madam Chair. Are we 
going to continue like it's business as usual?
  The GAO has criticized LSC over its internal controls and lack of 
accountability in their financial reporting processes and systems, yet, 
year after year, we keep throwing money at them. We cannot keep doing 
things the same way and expect anything other than the same result: 
deeper and deeper in debt, with a bill that my sons and their children 
and--hopefully--my grandchildren and maybe their children will get 
stuck with. Today, let's at least not throw more good money after bad 
by wasting another $1 million on an unauthorized giveaway to attorneys.
  Please support my amendment. It will strip $1 million from this bill 
and prevent any ``emergency spending'' to pay for attorneys that should 
be paid for by private citizens in the private sector.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mrs. LOWEY. Madam Chair, I rise to claim the time in opposition to 
this amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentlewoman from New York is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mrs. LOWEY. Legal aid offices in Sandy-affected areas are 
experiencing a huge increase in requests for civil legal assistance 
that is directly related to the storm and its aftermath. The Legal 
Services Corporation exists precisely to help meet the civil legal 
needs of low-income Americans, and the Legal Services Corporation 
assistance is never more important than following a major disaster.
  Since Sandy hit, legal aid programs in New York and New Jersey have 
set up recovery hotlines, staffed FEMA disaster recovery centers, 
partnered with other State and local organizations to conduct disaster 
assistance training, and participated in clinics to provide legal 
counseling to affected communities. Local legal service programs are 
helping families obtain emergency food stamps, disaster-related 
unemployment insurance benefits and FEMA benefits to pay for rent and 
other expenses.
  The funding this amendment proposes to eliminate would enable local 
organizations to purchase the needed mobile resources and equipment and 
to hire the coordinators they need to manage volunteers.
  The $1 million this amendment would strike is a small amount relative 
to all of the other disaster relief efforts in the bill, but it will 
have a disproportionately large impact on the lives of low-income 
Americans it will help. I urge my colleagues to reject the amendment.
  Mr. DUNCAN of South Carolina. I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mrs. LOWEY. I yield 1 minute to the distinguished chairman, Mr. 
Frelinghuysen.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. I thank the gentlewoman for yielding.
  In the hundreds of thousands of people that have been displaced in 
the Northeast are a lot of people who have lost their apartments and 
houses that don't have the money to hire lawyers. Their conditions are 
such they've lost everything that they have--their possessions, their 
apartments, the houses that they've invested in throughout their 
lives--and many of these people do not have the financial means to 
protect their interests.
  I know people have a hate-on for the Legal Services Corporation of 
America--and they've had their problems, and our Appropriations 
Committee has dealt with reining them in when they've acted 
inappropriately--but at a time when people are in such desperate 
straits and misery, to deny the poorest of the poor recourse when fat 
people can be taking advantage of them, or they're looking for some 
sort of food and shelter and they're seeking legal counsel to make sure 
that they can protect their rights and their families, I'm opposed to 
this amendment, I think, for good reason.

                              {time}  1720

  Mrs. LOWEY. Madam Chair, I yield the balance of my time to Mr. Jose 
Serrano of New York.
  Mr. SERRANO. Let me first say that your comments once again, sir, are 
just right on target.

[[Page H140]]

  This is one of those amendments that simply strikes out at a 
government agency not realizing the harm it causes the people. The 
impact is particularly severe for low-income families, individuals who 
are unable to afford the kind of legal assistance they might need to 
help them recover.
  Since Sandy, legal aid programs have been on the front lines of 
disaster assistance, and they will be providing legal assistance for 
Sandy victims for years to come. They've been dealing with FEMA 
assistance, with SNAP benefits, with unemployment benefits, along with 
legal issues related to evictions and housing problems; but the need 
for legal assistance will not end there.
  In future months and perhaps even years, cases involving FEMA 
appeals, bankruptcy, fair housing, and public housing issues will 
arise. Contractor fraud scams will proliferate as Sandy victims start 
receiving cash payments from insurance proceeds and housing repair 
grants. Legal aid programs will be called on to provide help, and more 
than ever now we need this kind of assistance. What's interesting about 
this amendment is that it's not an amendment really directed at the 
funding as much as it is at the whole Legal Services Corporation. It is 
an attempt to attack an agency that stands up for those who can't 
defend themselves.
  Interestingly enough, this was Richard Nixon's proudest program. He 
believed, at that time, as many have after him, that the poor needed a 
way to defend themselves in our courts. To go after this funding is not 
to go after a million dollars. Let's be honest. It's to go after the 
corporation. It is ill-timed, it is wrong, it is unfair; and we should 
reject it by a majority, if not by a unanimous vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from South Carolina (Mr. Duncan).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. DUNCAN of South Carolina. Madam Chair, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from South 
Carolina will be postponed.


               Amendment No. 6 Offered by Mr. Blumenauer

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 6 
printed in part C of House Report 113-1.
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. Madam Chair, I would offer the amendment on behalf of 
my colleague, Mr. Campbell, and myself.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 16, line 6, insert ``with respect to such funds'' 
     after ``expense''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 23, the gentleman from 
Oregon (Mr. Blumenauer) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Oregon.
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. Madam Chair, I rise in support of this amendment.
  I must acknowledge the collaboration and support of my good friend 
and the cosponsor of the amendment, Mr. Campbell from California.
  The amendment is a simple clarification to ensure that the 
Frelinghuysen amendment doesn't put taxpayers on the hook for 100 
percent of the cost of projects that are unrelated to Hurricane Sandy.
  The amendment waives the standard local cost-share for ongoing 
construction projects. This applies to beach renourishment projects, 
which are typically cost-shared at a 65 percent Federal and 35 percent 
local share.
  While the waiving of this local cost-share for this type of project 
is unprecedented, I understand that for our friends in New Jersey, New 
York, and Connecticut, Hurricane Sandy was also unprecedented.
  Our amendment does not change the language with respect to repairing 
the beaches damaged by Hurricane Sandy, but unfortunately the language 
could be interpreted to also waive local cost-share for future periodic 
beach replenishment unrelated to any damage caused by Hurricane Sandy. 
These typically can take up to over a 50-year period and can cost tens 
of millions of dollars. I'm confident that is not what was intended by 
the amendment as it was offered. But the amendment is necessary to make 
sure that that's not how it's interpreted at some point in the future.
  Madam Chair, my heart goes out to the communities in the Northeast 
that have been devastated by Hurricane Sandy. I have strongly supported 
the efforts of the people in the region to step forward and be fully 
compensated to be able to have a robust package. I'm sorry that it's 
delayed, and I commend the leadership that has been displayed on both 
sides of the aisle.
  I strongly support having the Federal Government provide assistance 
for people not only to recover, but to rebuild in a way that is 
stronger and safer. But it does not make sense to use this legislation 
to change standard, non-Federal cost-share procedures for projects 
unrelated to Hurricane Sandy. Doing so, I think, would be fiscally 
irresponsible, and it decrease local communities' involvement and 
investment in local projects that primarily benefit them and I'm afraid 
might be a reason for opposition for legislation that I hope passes.
  With that, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. Will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. I would be happy to yield 30 seconds to the gentleman 
from New Jersey.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. I want to thank the gentleman and Mr. Campbell, 
the cosponsor, for this clarification. I'm pleased to accept it. Thank 
you very much.
  Mr. VISCLOSKY. Will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. I yield to the gentleman from Indiana.
  Mr. VISCLOSKY. The gentleman is correct that he is restating law, and 
we also accept the amendment.
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. Madam Chair, I deeply appreciate the hard work and 
the acceptance of the amendment. I look forward to moving forward with 
the passage of this, and I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Oregon (Mr. Blumenauer).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                Amendment No. 7 Offered by Ms. Velazquez

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 7 
printed in part C of House Report 113-1.
  Ms. VELAZQUEZ. I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 21, line 17, after the dollar amount insert ``(reduced 
     by $12,500,000)''.
       Page 21, line 18, after the dollar amount insert ``(reduced 
     by $12,500,000)''.
       Page 40, line 10, after the dollar amount insert ``(reduced 
     by $12,500,000)''.
       Page 43, line 7, after the dollar amount insert 
     ``(increased by $25,000,000)''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 23, the gentlewoman 
from New York (Ms. Velazquez) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from New York.
  Ms. VELAZQUEZ. Madam Chair, I rise to engage the chairman of the 
Energy and Water Development Appropriations Subcommittee in a colloquy 
and intend to withdraw my amendment.
  Mr. Chairman, Hurricane Sandy has left a lasting impact on New York 
and its residents. The storm surge engulfed low-lying housing--
including the Redhook development in my district--floating basements, 
common areas, and apartments. These areas remained submerged for days, 
cutting off essential services. After the water receded, toxic mold 
spread quickly in damaged areas.
  Mold and mildew infestation can pose serious health risks if not 
addressed in a timely manner. If left untreated, residents and workers 
are at risk of developing respiratory illnesses or infection. Without 
providing emergency funding specifically for this purpose, there is 
serious concern among city residents that calls for more remediation 
will go unanswered.
  Mr. Chairman, I hope that going forward we can work together to 
ensure that the final bill addresses mold contamination in public 
housing.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. Will the gentlewoman yield?

[[Page H141]]

  Ms. VELAZQUEZ. I yield to the gentleman from New Jersey.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. Ms. Velazquez, removing mold is critical to 
restoring the lives and livelihoods of New Yorkers, New Jerseyans, and 
those in Connecticut living in public housing affected by the storm.
  We will work to see that in the final bill funding is made available 
for mold abatement, and we thank you for your focus on this very 
important issue that often escapes public notice unless you're directly 
affected. So I want to commend you for that effort.
  Ms. VELAZQUEZ. I'm very grateful to the chairman.
  The success of our response to this tragedy hinges on helping 
residents rehabilitate the structures they call home.

                              {time}  1730

  It is essential that the resources necessary to provide secure 
housing for New Yorkers and other residents in New Jersey and 
Connecticut are made available.
  Madam Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time, and I ask 
unanimous consent to withdraw my amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentlewoman withdraws her 
amendment.
  There was no objection.


                Amendment No. 8 Offered by Mr. Huelskamp

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 8 
printed in part C of House Report 113-1.
  Mr. HUELSKAMP. Madam Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 25, lines 14 and 15, strike ``that is in excess of 
     $1,000,000, the specifics of each such grant award'' and 
     insert ``the specifics of the grant award''.
       Page 25, lines 19 and 20, strike ``a mission assignment or 
     task order in excess of $1,000,000'' and insert ``the mission 
     assignment or task order''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 23, the gentleman from 
Kansas (Mr. Huelskamp) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Kansas.
  Mr. HUELSKAMP. Madam Chairman, my amendment seeks to ensure maximum 
transparency in a process which will see billions of taxpayer dollars 
distributed through FEMA grants. While I appreciate that a provision 
was included to require the disclosure of grants over $1 million, I 
believe we owe it to the taxpayers to do even more. My amendment 
strikes the $1 million threshold for disclosure, and it requires the 
details of all grants distributed under FEMA's disaster relief program 
to be disclosed.
  Recently, a town in California was the subject of a FEMA Inspector 
General investigation. The FEMA IG found that the grantee received 
$830,000 following a recent flood. The town in question spent all of 
the allocated grant money and has requested reimbursement for $769,000 
more. Among the inappropriate expenditures were a host of purchases 
that had nothing to do with the equipment damaged by the flood, 
including new chairs, computers, telephones, lamps, and a microwave. 
FEMA rejected the claim, fining these and numerous other attempts to 
claim reimbursement outside of the scope of the flood as well as 
outside of the terms of the grant.
  While I commend FEMA for catching this attempted fraud, the sheer 
volume of grants that will come as a result of Sandy necessitates 
maximum transparency at the beginning of the process. My amendment 
requires just that. Let me give you one other example.
  According to a September 2012 Department of Homeland Security IG 
report, I quote:

       Following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005 and other 
     disasters up to December 31, 2010, FEMA disbursed more than 
     $8 billion in assistance payments, some of which were later 
     determined to have been improperly paid to individuals who 
     were ineligible or who received duplicate payments. The debts 
     in question arose in part because FEMA relaxed its internal 
     controls in order to provide the expedited delivery of 
     assistance grants to displaced disaster survivors.

  The relaxed internal controls involved improper payments of as much 
as $621 million to 167,488 recipients. According to the report, FEMA's 
efforts to recoup these improper payments resulted in $1.3 million 
collected thus far, but they spent $7.3 million to collect them--again, 
costing the taxpayers a net of $6 million. Why repeat a process like 
this if we can avoid it?
  The paperwork is already being done on disaster relief grant 
applications. They're already being recorded on a computer somewhere in 
FEMA, so there are already disclosure procedures in place that can 
quickly and appropriately bring forward this information. According to 
the CBO, this amendment will have no budgetary impact. It simply does 
not create an undue burden to make the list public in a timely fashion.
  I ask my colleagues to join me in injecting 100 percent transparency 
and accountability at the beginning of the process in order to help 
root out waste and fraud.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. Will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. HUELSKAMP. I yield to the gentleman from New Jersey.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. I want to thank the gentleman from Kansas for 
putting forward this amendment. I am pleased to accept it. I just want 
to assure you that in both the Rogers amendment and my amendment we 
have plenty of transparency, and we have lots of reports, and I think 
your added protections of the taxpayers' dollars are very much in 
order.
  Mr. HUELSKAMP. I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Kansas (Mr. Huelskamp).
  The amendment was agreed to.


          Amendment No. 9, as Modified, Offered by Mr. Fleming

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 9 
printed in part C of House Report 113-1.
  Mr. FLEMING. Madam Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk. I also 
have a unanimous consent for a technical correction of that amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 28, line 6, after the dollar amount (but inside the 
     quotation marks), insert ``(reduced by $9,800,000)''.
       Page 28, line 7, insert before the period at the end the 
     following:
     : Provided, That none of the funds made available under such 
     heading in title V may be used to repair seawalls or 
     buildings on islands in the Steward B. McKinney National 
     Wildlife Refuge

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 23, the gentleman from 
Louisiana (Mr. Fleming) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  Does the gentleman have a modification to his amendment?
  Mr. FLEMING. Madam Chairman, yes.
  I ask unanimous consent to correct a misspelled word from 
``steward,'' ending in ``d'' to ``Stewart,'' ending in ``t.''
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the modification.
  The Clerk read as follows:
  Technical Correction to the Amendment Offered by Mr. Fleming:

       In the matter proposed to be inserted by the amendment on 
     page 28, line 7, strike ``Steward'' and insert ``Stewart''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the amendment is modified.
  There was no objection.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Louisiana.
  Mr. FLEMING. Madam Chairman, my amendment to the Frelinghuysen 
amendment will strike $9.8 million of spending on buildings and 
seawalls on uninhabited islands within the Stewart B. McKinney National 
Wildlife Refuge.
  The Stewart McKinney refuge is a complex of 10 separate units 
composed of over 800 acres that are stretched across the Connecticut 
shoreline. My amendment specifically addresses the request of the Fish 
and Wildlife Service to spend nearly $10 million to rebuild buildings 
and a seawall on one of the 10 units known as the Outer Island.
  The Service acquired this property through a private donation in 
1995. Since that time, as a result of a memorandum of understanding, 
the island has been managed by Southern Connecticut State University, 
which provides access and guided educational activities to visiting 
school groups during the summer months, which is the only time Outer 
Island is actually open. In fact, the Southern Connecticut State 
University Web site is clear:


[[Page H142]]


       All schools, university, community, and civic associations 
     or other parties interested in participating in educational 
     activities on Outer Island must have prior approval of the 
     Connecticut State University System coordinators.

  While the Fish and Wildlife Service has no staff on Outer Island, the 
university utilizes paid interns and faculty coordinators to supervise 
the educational programming. An occasional kayaker may stop and have 
lunch on the island; but if you want to visit the Outer Island, you 
must coordinate your visit with the university and not with the Fish 
and Wildlife Service. In addition, the university received a $250,000 
grant from the Long Island Sound Fund.
  Madam Chairman, last Friday members of my staff met with 
representatives of the Fish and Wildlife Service. The Service has 
confirmed that they do not charge the university for what amounts to 
almost the exclusive use of the island. Furthermore, the Service did 
not provide at any time any analysis or breakdown on how they will 
spend $9.8 million of our taxpayers' money. In fact, the only 
information they provided was a one-line explanation that the money 
will be used to remove debris deposited by storm floodwaters and to 
repair seawalls and buildings. Frankly, this is totally inadequate.
  As the chairman of the Subcommittee on Fisheries, Wildlife, Oceans 
and Insular Affairs, my subcommittee has jurisdiction over the Fish and 
Wildlife Service. I intend to conduct our annual budget hearing in 
March of this year. This request does not belong in an emergency 
spending bill, and the money should not be in any way appropriated 
until we get a better understanding of how the $9.8 million will be 
spent. I am also interested in hearing why this Service does not charge 
the university for using the island and why they should not be assessed 
a portion of the repair costs, which benefits them far more than the 
general public or certainly the taxpayers of the United States.
  I urge an ``aye'' vote on this, and I reserve the balance of my time.

                              {time}  1740

  Ms. DeLAURO. Madam Chair, I rise to claim the time in opposition.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentlewoman from Connecticut is recognized for 
5 minutes.
  Ms. DeLAURO. Madam Chair, I rise in strong and vociferous opposition 
to what I view as a misguided amendment. It aims to cut funding that 
would help repair the seawalls and research buildings damaged by 
Superstorm Sandy at the Stewart B. McKinney National Wildlife Refuge in 
Connecticut. This is a vindictive amendment, in my view, that 
needlessly slashes disaster relief for one particular State, and I urge 
its defeat.
  Named after the former Republican Congressman from my State, the 
Stewart McKinney Wildlife Refugee spans 70 miles of Connecticut 
shoreline, including 800 acres of island habitats, a beach, and tidal 
wetlands. One of the more remarkable aspects of the McKinney Refuge is 
a chain of seven islands along the coast. The islands support habitat 
for several federally endangered and threatened species and also hosts 
related research facilities.
  These islands are key stops for birds migrating along the Atlantic 
Flyway, and two of them have been named ``important bird areas'' by the 
National Audubon Society. Some of these islands are also in close 
proximity to urban centers. All of them sustained severe damage during 
Superstorm Sandy.
  For example, the storm damaged the dock, seawall, and education 
building on the Outer Island research station, which is also the most 
visited island within the McKinney Refuge. As a result, the natural 
resources on Outer Island cannot currently be properly managed. On 
Outer Island, the lack of repairs will have serious environmental 
consequences. If the seawall isn't repaired, erosion will undermine the 
foundation of the main building, dislodge the septic tank and cause 
significant contamination, and will lead to major repair costs. That's 
why we need to make available disaster aid to the McKinney Refuge so 
that they can recover from this storm, just as we have many times in 
the past for other refuges affected by disasters all across this 
country.
  Let me give you some examples. After Hurricane Katrina in 2005 and 
Hurricane Ike in 2008, we appropriated $71 million for wildlife refuges 
in Texas, $20 million in Mississippi, and $74 million for refuges in 
Louisiana, the sponsor of this amendment's home State.
  One of the central responsibilities of this institution is to act on 
behalf of the American people whenever a major disaster occurs. Federal 
disaster relief is meant to restore homes, businesses, communities, and 
Federal facilities to their pre-disaster condition. We do this whether 
the disaster is a fire in the west, a tornado in the south, or a 
hurricane in the northeast. There is no good reason to make an 
exception of the McKinney Refuge here.
  The sponsor of this amendment, Congressman Fleming of Louisiana, has 
argued that this bill includes $9.8 million solely to repair the damage 
done at the Outer Island. This is simply not true.
  The Fish and Wildlife Service requested over $10.9 million for 
repairs to the McKinney Refuge, including just over $2 million for 
Outer Island. The rest of the funds, however, would support repairs all 
along the 70 miles of affected Connecticut coast. By cutting the 
funding needed to rebuild the Connecticut coastline to its pre-Sandy 
condition, this amendment prevents the McKinney Refuge from meeting its 
Federal commitment to conserve wildlife, to provide education and 
outdoor recreation for the public, and it unfairly singles out 
Connecticut and all of the protected wildlife along our shores. Is the 
State and refuge somehow unworthy of Federal support? It's a terrible 
precedent for disaster aid.
  When these disasters occur, we have always come together as a Nation 
of Americans, just as we did after Katrina and Andrew and Irene, and we 
should not change that now.
  I urge my colleagues to reject what I view as a pernicious amendment 
and help Connecticut's McKinney Refuge rebuild from this storm.


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR. Members are reminded not to traffic the well while 
another Member is under recognition.
  Mr. FLEMING. Madam Chair, the gentlelady is correct: after we got 
more information on this, the nearly $10 million is actually only $2 
million when it comes to the Outer Island. However, the gentlelady is 
incorrect: the university informed us that the vast amount of damage 
actually came from Hurricane Irene and not from Sandy.
  Now as to the other $8 million, it goes to about six different 
islands that are rarely, if ever, touched by humans. It is for 
coastline restoration. So what you have is basically $10 million, $2 
million of which is to repair damage from a previous hurricane for 
which there has not been a request. It is uninhabited island, rarely 
touched or used except in the summertime, and the rest of the islands 
are virtually never touched or used.
  Madam Chair, this is an emergency bill. There's no emergency here. 
And whatever dollars we use are going to be borrowed from China and put 
onto the debt. So as a result of that, this does not fit the definition 
in any way, shape, or form of being an emergency.
  I would suggest to the Chamber today that we focus on the emergency. 
There are a lot of people hurting with this disaster, and we should put 
our money where it needs to be. We can go through regular order through 
my subcommittee and address all of the work needs that need to go on 
here.
  With that, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Ms. DeLAURO. I would just want to say to my colleague, and quite 
frankly, I don't recall whether you were here or not here during the 
extensive debates that we had on this floor as it regarded Hurricane 
Katrina in 2005, Hurricane Ike in 2008--$71 million for wildlife 
refuges in Texas, $20 million for refuges in Mississippi, and $74 
million for refuges in Louisiana.
  Let me just tell you, we have over and over again laid out what the 
difficulties are and what kind of environmental damage this will cause 
to the Outer Island, what will happen to contamination in the area, and 
major areas of our coast along our Connecticut coastline. It is amazing 
to me that we find it necessary, that in the Northeast, somehow we are 
being held hostage when the rest of the Nation

[[Page H143]]

has received every dime they have asked for. It's wrong, and we should 
defeat this amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentlewoman's time has expired. The gentleman 
from Louisiana has 30 seconds remaining.
  Mr. FLEMING. Madam Chair, I would again disagree with the gentlelady. 
I would have to say that, unfortunately, it is our grandchildren who 
are being held hostage. Now they have tens of thousands, if not 
hundreds of thousands of dollars each in future debt from the spending 
we do today. Needless to say, we need to take care of the problem. We 
need to take care of the emergency, and we need to take care of the 
people who are hurt. But for heaven's sake, we should not be spending 
money restoring coastlines on islands that nobody ever goes to.
  With that, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Louisiana (Mr. Fleming), as modified.
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. FLEMING. Madam Chair, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Louisiana 
will be postponed.


                Amendment No. 10 Offered by Mr. Benishek

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 10 
printed in part C of House Report 113-1.
  Mr. BENISHEK. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 28, strike the proviso beginning on line 20.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 23, the gentleman from 
Michigan (Mr. Benishek) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Michigan.
  Mr. BENISHEK. Madam Chair, like all of my colleagues, I come before 
you today very concerned about my fellow Americans whose lives were 
torn apart in October of 2012 due to the impact of Hurricane Sandy.
  Hurricane Sandy, like many natural disasters before it, has caused 
billions of dollars of damage and has upended the lives of thousands of 
Americans. Congress gathers here today to consider a very important 
question: Exactly what is the role of the Federal Government in 
rebuilding our communities following a natural disaster?
  Like many of my colleagues, I believe the Federal Government must be 
a strong partner in responding to natural disasters, but local 
communities must lead the way in making the important decisions. Only 
local communities have the firsthand knowledge to prioritize how 
precious resources should be spent following a natural disaster. While 
the Federal Government can and should be a partner, it must be just 
that--a partner.
  Madam Chair, the Federal Government currently plans ahead and budgets 
for natural disasters. We have an entire agency, FEMA, dedicated to 
managing these disasters. Perhaps Congress should have a more 
comprehensive discussion on how to better budget and prepare for 
natural disasters, but we can't use one hurricane as an excuse to fund 
or enhance programs that would normally go through the regular 
appropriations process.

                              {time}  1750

  Local communities and property owners impacted by Hurricane Sandy 
face tough choices. They must prioritize and decide what projects will 
be rebuilt and in which order.
  One of the provisions in the underlying Frelinghuysen amendment 
provides for an additional $50 million in grants from the Historic 
Preservation Fund for necessary expenses related to the consequences of 
Hurricane Sandy. Currently, these types of grants typically require a 
non-Federal match. The Frelinghuysen amendment strikes the non-Federal 
match requirement for the Sandy funds.
  Madam Chair, my amendment would not reduce any of the supplemental 
funding provided for in the underlying amendment. Again, the amendment 
does not reduce the supplemental funding. My amendment simply restores 
the provision that the non-Federal match be applied, as normally 
required by the National Park Service. In actual practice, this would 
make the funds more widely available for a larger number of citizens.
  My amendment is about good government and good investments. It simply 
ensures that local communities have ``skin in the game'' and truly 
support the grants that they apply for. If a local community is truly 
supportive of rebuilding a project, they will band together and find a 
match, whether it be a local municipality, State government, or private 
nonprofit.
  I understand that those opposed to the amendment will say that the 
impacted property owners require emergency funding. They will argue 
that in order to obtain the funds, stakeholders should be released of 
the obligations of a non-Federal match, as many are struggling to get 
by.
  To this, I'd like to remind you that our government is still 
borrowing over 40 cents for every dollar it spends. Just as families 
must prioritize their budgets, the Federal Government must learn to 
make adjustments.
  Federal grants should not be about having fancy consultants or great 
grant writers. These type of programs should come down to one thing: 
local support for a project. The ability to provide a non-Federal match 
ensures community support for those projects.
  We should no longer waive requirements that ensure local communities 
will support their efforts. This is about good government and ensuring 
fiscal responsibility now and in the future.
  It is my hope that you will join me in supporting this amendment to 
ensure that this good guiding principle of good government is 
continued.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. Madam Chair, I rise in opposition to the 
gentleman's amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from New Jersey is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. I yield as much time as he may consume to Mr. 
Moran.
  Mr. MORAN. I thank the very distinguished gentleman from New Jersey 
for his leadership overall on this bill, but particularly for thinking 
to waive the non-Federal match, and I'll explain why.
  I'm sure the gentleman from Michigan's effort is well-intentioned, 
but many of the buildings damaged by Hurricane Sandy were historic 
structures, and their repair will be very expensive.
  Now, your amendment would make it cost prohibitive, Mr. Benishek, to 
repair or rebuild these historic structures. The Interior Department 
has told us that if the Benishek amendment passes, the historic 
preservation funds will be almost impossible to spend in the 2-year 
timeframe.
  The regular historic preservation matching requirement is 60 Federal/
40 non-Federal. If there is a 60/40 match requirement for the States 
affected by Hurricane Sandy, the State Preservation Offices will not be 
able to meet the matching requirement.
  These offices are already struggling financially, and have challenges 
meeting the match under normal circumstances. If they got the money 
without the waiver, the $50 million that we provide in this bill would 
sit in an administrative morass while we tried and then likely failed 
to spend it. So we would be funding nothing but Federal overhead for 2 
years.
  The language in the Frelinghuysen amendment, like the Senate bill, 
limits Historic Preservation Grant funding to those 10 States that 
received the Stafford Act Major Disaster declaration.
  The density of historic structures in Sandy-impacted States is far 
higher and the damage far greater than any storm in recent memory. In 
New York State alone there were 51,587 structures on the National 
Historic Register that received a direct hit from Hurricane Sandy. 
These are structures of national significance. Likewise, in New Jersey 
and Connecticut.
  These structures include such well-known sites as the South Street 
Seaport Museum and the Coney Island Historic District, as well as 
thousands of other structures, which while perhaps not being as well-
known, are no less important.
  So the fact is that many private homeowners, businesses, and 
communities, they take pride in their historic

[[Page H144]]

structures. These historic structures bring tourists to their 
communities. They help generate economic revenue. We should not 
penalize them as they try to recover from this disaster by making them 
sacrifice the historic character of their homes, their businesses, and 
communities.
  So I support Mr. Frelinghuysen's provision of waivers in his 
amendment for this special category of grants, and I ask my colleagues 
to vote against the Benishek amendment.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. BENISHEK. I just want to use the balance of my time to say $50 
million is able to be spent in a larger area, with more impact, if the 
spending is done with priorities determined by local contributions, and 
that it's not going to be the best grant writer or the person with the 
most connections but it's going to be the communities that come 
together with their local support that is going to determine how this 
money is being spent. And I think that's just a better way of 
prioritizing the increase in spending for the historic preservation 
fund in this method.

  I think we've seen in previous disasters where Federal money has been 
just wasted. And I think that having community input and community 
donations to this would ensure that the money will go as far as it can 
and be put to the most effective use determined by local input.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. Madam Chair, let me associate my remarks with 
those of Mr. Moran. And certainly, we want to commend the gentleman 
from Michigan for wanting to save money.
  I think, in many communities, certainly in the Northeast, but I'm 
sure in your home State, there are certain historical structures that 
define the very essence of those communities. You refer to the fact 
that the communities are supportive. In many cases, it's the nonprofits 
that are supporting them.
  And I asked the staff--and this is why it's in the bill--when we 
looked at Katrina relief and all the historic structures that were 
within that affected area, which was vast, we also provided this 
window.
  Of course, in the Northeast we are often essentially focused on our 
Revolutionary path. But unless we provide to these nonprofits and to 
communities, in some cases governmental entities, this waiver, a lot of 
these historical buildings will be lost forever. And I think that time 
is of the essence.
  I commend you for what you're trying to do, but I oppose your 
amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Michigan (Mr. Benishek).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. BENISHEK. Madam Chair, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Michigan 
will be postponed.


             Amendment No. 11 Offered by Mr. Bishop of Utah

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 11 
printed in part C of House Report 113-1.
  Mr. BISHOP of Utah. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 49, after line 9, add the following:

                      TITLE XI--GENERAL PROVISIONS


                       limitation on use of funds

       Sec. 1101.  None of the funds provided in this Act shall be 
     used for land acquisition by the Secretary of the Interior or 
     the Secretary of Agriculture.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 23, the gentleman from 
Utah (Mr. Bishop) and a Member opposed each will control 5 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Utah.

                              {time}  1800

  Mr. BISHOP of Utah. Thank you, Madam Chair, I appreciate your 
kindness and hope that your ears are very gentle today.
  Unlike some of the other amendments, this particular amendment does 
not reduce the amount appropriated in the basic underlying bill. What 
it does try to say is that the money needs to be used where the money 
needs to be used. It limits the Departments of the Interior and 
Agriculture from using any funds from this emergency appropriation for 
the purchase of additional Federal land.
  When Sandy hit, the Statue of Liberty, Ellis Island, Governors 
Island, Morris Park, Sagamore Hill, they were not spared from what took 
place. The Statue of Liberty is closed. It is not open to the public. 
It is in desperate need of repair. What I want to make sure is that the 
money we put for the repair of the Federal estate is used for the 
repair of the Federal estate. Unfortunately, in an effort to try and do 
that, there was some loose language. Even though it attempts to put 
some parameters on where this money can be used, embedded in the 
language is the phrase that the Secretary of the Interior may transfer 
these funds to any other account in the Department and may expend such 
funds in a myriad of ways to try and come up with something.
  Unfortunately, we were given, or made aware of, an unofficial wish 
list which would actually have used some of the money designed for the 
repair of these desperate issues to be used for the purchase of 
property not currently under the control of the Federal Government. 
That is the practice we wish to curtail. If you want to buy more 
Federal land, that's the icing on the cake. That should go through 
regular order. That is not emergency spending.
  So with this particular money, it needs to be used where it is 
necessary. It does not prohibit the Army Corps of Engineers or the GAO 
from using certain funds as necessary to prohibit any kind of relief or 
human suffering. It simply says you're not going to buy extra land with 
the money that is already identified for the need of repairing what we 
already own.
  The National Park Service has given us a list of what they need to 
do. It consumes the money that is in that approach to it. If you decide 
not to restrict this and allow them to have the flexibility of 
purchasing other land, something from this list that is essential has 
to come off, and that's not right. All we're trying to say is use this 
money to make sure that we put it where it deserves to be, to end the 
suffering and repair the public property that we already own.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Chairman, I rise to claim time in opposition to this 
amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR (Mr. Denham). The gentleman from Virginia is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  I oppose the Bishop amendment which, as he says, prohibits the 
Secretary of the Interior or the Secretary of Agriculture from using 
funds made available under this act from any land acquisition.
  There is no attempt by the Secretary of the Interior or the Secretary 
of Agriculture to use the funds made available under the bill for any 
kind of Federal land grab. However, there are instances when land 
acquisition can be part of a cost-effective solution to repairing the 
damage caused by Hurricane Sandy. For example, we have Interior and 
Agriculture facilities in low-lying areas that were destroyed by the 
hurricane. If either Department wants to move any of those facilities 
to higher ground to protect them from future hurricanes and that higher 
ground is not owned by the Federal Government, then the Bishop 
amendment prohibits the Secretaries from buying that land. So we go 
through the whole thing all over again. They make an assessment. If 
they realize that this building isn't going to withstand another 
hurricane, they should be able to move it to land where it's more 
appropriate; but you couldn't do it if you have the Bishop amendment.
  We also had tidal wetlands that were destroyed that included private 
lands. Under the Bishop amendment, these private lands could not be 
acquired as part of a comprehensive effort to restore these wetlands to 
their natural condition. The private landowners need us to do that. 
They can't restore them, but the wetlands need to be restored. So this 
simply gives the two Departments the ability to act in a rational 
manner to restore the shoreline.
  The Bishop amendment is a solution in search of a problem. So I would 
urge

[[Page H145]]

my colleagues to oppose the amendment, and I reserve the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. BISHOP of Utah. Mr. Chairman, if I may respond for just a moment. 
I do appreciate what the gentleman is saying, but I would take issue at 
the premise upon which it is made. If indeed there needs to be a change 
of venue from any kind of Federal property--they need to go to high 
ground--those properties need to be identified, and it needs to go 
through regular order. Emergency funds should not be used to circumvent 
the process we already have in place, including the preservation of 
environmental standards, simply to do that.
  Here is the bottom line: if you don't accept this amendment, because 
the National Park Service has already told us what they will do with 
this money, if they are allowed because of some pressure from wherever 
source to purchase excess land with this money, which of these projects 
are we going to take off?
  Do you want to go to Liberty Island and take off the storm drain 
cleanage or the removing of the debris, the mold remediation, the 
hazardous debris removal, the removal of storm debris, the replacing of 
water fountains on Ellis Island, the repairing of the Battery Park 
screening site tent?
  The money is already identified here. This is where it should go. 
This is the emergency. For heavens sake, make it very clear that the 
money that's going to be given for an emergency is used to repair what 
was caused in the emergency, and do not have any loose ends that will 
circumvent regular order.
  If indeed there needs to be long-term changes of where administrative 
buildings are to be built, go through the regular order. That's the 
process we have. That should be the way of doing things.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. MORAN. Mr. Chairman, I know Mr. Bishop has been involved in the 
legislative process long enough to know that process and regular order 
can be one of the most facile ways of preventing anything from getting 
done. I will not challenge him now to tell us how many things have been 
held up that thought they could get through regular order in a 
reasonable period of time.
  We have an emergency here. This is urgent, to repair these seashores. 
The fact is that the National Parks and the National Seashores and the 
National Wildlife Refuges are great assets to our communities. Not only 
do they attract tourism; they increase property values, and they 
enhance our quality of life.
  And now it's clear that public lands and natural systems that they 
protect buffered built up areas from the impact of storms. They play a 
very important role, so we need to restore them; and restoration of 
these public resources will require a specific targeted strategy.
  A prohibition on land acquisition may very well frustrate the ability 
to bring back the public value of existing park and refuge lands and to 
meet other community needs. Where new access points are needed, which 
is often-times going to be the case, where small purchases are the best 
or only means to reestablish the lost value of damaged habitat, this 
amendment would preclude the purchase of even a single acre that would 
be needed to reestablish public use and resource integrity.
  This ties the hands of the professionals who know best how to restore 
the seashore. This is not a Federal land grant, but they need the tools 
to be able to make small purchases. We're not talking about a lot of 
money; we're not talking about a lot of land.
  There will be times when you need to buy a small piece of privately 
owned land to get access to a seashore. There will be times when you 
need to move it to a more appropriate area. They're not going to be 
able to spend a lot of money. There isn't a lot of money to do that 
with.
  The fact is that this, I think, is a deliberate effort to frustrate 
the ability of people who have a vision of what the seashore can be 
once we restore it to its natural habitat. It seems to me that should 
be a national objective, to let this area repair and heal. Taking away 
this tool is going to frustrate that objective.
  I would strongly urge a ``no'' vote on the Bishop amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time, Mr. Chairman.
  Mr. BISHOP of Utah. I yield myself the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Utah is recognized for 1 minute.
  Mr. BISHOP of Utah. Thank you very much.
  Though I appreciate the words of the gentleman from Virginia, I have 
to disagree once again. We have a process for the way we do things. 
This is an exception to that process because of an emergency. The Parks 
Department has already identified where they need to spend the money. 
Any authorization that would ask for any kind of acquisition of lands 
will take away from where the money is already identified to be needed.

                              {time}  1810

  The hypothetical situation of where some expert at some point might 
want to do this, to spend some type of money, it's nice, it's cute, 
it's wonderful, but we have a specific process here. If, indeed, you 
need to move an administrative building from point X to point Y, we 
have a process to go through that. And it should go through the 
administrative, it should go through regular order; not be hidden in 
the bowels of an emergency expenditure.
  I'm not cutting any money from this bill. I'm simply saying you spend 
the money where it was designed to be spent, and there is a loophole in 
the language here that would allow that to change. That is wrong. Do 
not allow the Interior Department or the Ag Department to use a 
loophole to move money that is designed to solve an emergency from the 
place where it needs to be spent, on the emergency.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Utah (Mr. Bishop).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. BISHOP of Utah. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Utah will be 
postponed.


               Amendment No. 12 Offered by Ms. Velazquez

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 12 
printed in part C of House Report 113-1.
  Ms. VELAZQUEZ. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 49, after line 9, insert the following:

                                TITLE XI

                      ADDITIONAL GENERAL PROVISION

       Sec. __.  The amounts otherwise provided by this Act are 
     revised by reducing the amount made available for ``Small 
     Business Administration--Disaster Loans Program Account'' for 
     administrative expenses to carry out the direct loan program 
     authorized by section 7(b) of the Small Business Act (and 
     within such amount, the amount made available for direct 
     administrative expenses of loan making and servicing to carry 
     out such program), and increasing the amount made available 
     for ``Department of Veterans Affairs--National Cemetery 
     Administration'', by $1,000,000.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 23, the gentlewoman 
from New York (Ms. Velazquez) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from New York.
  Ms. VELAZQUEZ. Mr. Chairman, from the Revolutionary War to the war in 
Afghanistan, we owe a great debt to our servicemen and -women. One way 
that we honor them is through their internment in national veteran 
cemeteries, which gives them a dignified and honorable final resting 
place.
  As anyone who has walked through the rows of tombstones at Arlington 
National Cemetery knows, these cemeteries are hallowed ground. They 
allow us not only to pay our great respect to these great men and 
women, but to reflect on the cost of defending the very freedoms we 
enjoy in our daily lives. Unfortunately, these burial grounds were not 
left unscathed by Hurricane Sandy. In fact, the Cypress Hills National 
Cemetery--New York City's only such cemetery--was heavily damaged by 
the storm.
  As the final resting place for more than 20,000 soldiers who fought 
in the Revolutionary War, the Civil War, the Spanish-American War, 
Korea, and

[[Page H146]]

Vietnam, it spans our Nation's military history and is a poignant 
reminder of the sacrifices made to defend democracy.
  At Cypress Hills National Cemetery, trees were downed, areas were 
flooded, and many important monuments were jeopardized. Headstones were 
also damaged, with some pulled out of the ground due to trees falling 
on them. To honor those veterans buried there, the cemetery must be 
well maintained, and making these repairs and protecting these 
structures should be a priority for all Americans. To do this, the 
underlying legislation provides $1.1 million to make repairs and 
renovations.
  This amendment would provide another $1 million for this purpose and 
enable those affected veteran cemeteries to take steps to protect this 
sacred ground from future disasters. This could include installing 
measures to prevent the destruction of grave sites, regrading areas 
prone to flooding, and reinforcing critical structures that honor our 
veterans. Such an investment will make sure that future generations can 
visit this memorial and understand the sacrifices of those that came 
before them. Making certain that this memorial stands the test of time 
is the least we can do for those that gave their lives in service to 
our Nation.
  Ultimately, a Nation is truly measured by how it honors its veterans, 
and this amendment does just that, while ensuring that we truly leave 
no man and no woman behind.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. Will the gentlewoman yield?
  Ms. VELAZQUEZ. I yield to the gentleman from New Jersey.
  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. I am very pleased to accept your amendment, and 
thank you for invoking the words of Abraham Lincoln.
  Mrs. LOWEY. Will the gentlewoman yield?
  Ms. VELAZQUEZ. I yield to the gentlewoman from New York.
  Mrs. LOWEY. This amendment increases funding for the National 
Cemetery Association account by $1 million, offset by reductions in the 
SBA Disaster Loan Program.
  As I understand it, the gentlewoman has heard from her constituents 
that these additional funds are needed to address extensive tree damage 
at New York and New Jersey national cemeteries.
  VA cemeteries are national shrines and a lasting tribute that 
commemorate veterans' service and sacrifice to our great Nation. The 
amendment will ensure that the VA cemeteries affected by Hurricane 
Sandy will be repaired in a quick and efficient manner, and I urge all 
Members to support this amendment.
  Ms. VELAZQUEZ. I thank the gentlelady, and I yield back the balance 
of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from New York (Ms. Velazquez).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, proceedings 
will now resume on those amendments printed in part C of House Report 
113-1 on which further proceedings were postponed, in the following 
order:
  Amendment No. 2 by Mr. Flores of Texas.
  Amendment No. 4 by Mr. Broun of Georgia.
  Amendment No. 5 by Mr. Duncan of South Carolina.
  Amendment No. 9 by Mr. Fleming of Louisiana.
  Amendment No. 10 by Mr. Benishek of Michigan.
  Amendment No. 11 by Mr. Bishop of Utah.
  After which, the Chair shall put the question on amendment No. 1 by 
Mr. Frelinghuysen of New Jersey.
  The Chair will reduce to 2 minutes the minimum time for any 
electronic vote after the first vote in this series, except that the 
minimum time on Amendment No. 1 will be 5 minutes.


                 Amendment No. 2 Offered by Mr. Flores

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Texas (Mr. 
Flores) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which the 
noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 221, 
noes 197, not voting 14, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 16]

                               AYES--221

     Aderholt
     Amash
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barr
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carney
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kelly
     Kind
     King (IA)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Radel
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Scalise
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--197

     Alexander
     Andrews
     Barber
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fitzpatrick
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Gerlach
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jeffries
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     King (NY)
     Kuster
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Markey
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Neal
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Richmond
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Sinema

[[Page H147]]


     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth
     Young (FL)

                             NOT VOTING--14

     Cardenas
     Cleaver
     Crenshaw
     Emerson
     Jackson Lee
     Johnson (GA)
     Kingston
     Kirkpatrick
     Napolitano
     Negrete McLeod
     Nunes
     Schwartz
     Speier
     Thompson (MS)


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There are 2 minutes remaining.

                              {time}  1839

  Messrs. POCAN, KILDEE, and BARLETTA changed their vote from ``aye'' 
to ``no.''
  Messrs. WITTMAN, WENSTRUP, Mrs. BLACKBURN, and Mr. TURNER changed 
their vote from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated against:
  Mrs. NAPOLITANO. Mr. Chair, on Tuesday, January 15, 2013, I was 
absent during rollcall vote No. 16 due to a death in my family. Had I 
been present, I would have voted ``no'' on the Flores Amendment.
  Mr. CARDENAS. Mr. Chair, on rollcall No. 16, had I been present, I 
would have voted ``no.''


            Amendment No. 4 Offered by Mr. Broun of Georgia

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Georgia 
(Mr. Broun) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 206, 
noes 214, not voting 12, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 17]

                               AYES--206

     Aderholt
     Amash
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barr
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Culberson
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffith (VA)
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kelly
     Kind
     King (IA)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Latham
     Latta
     Long
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Radel
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Scalise
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--214

     Alexander
     Andrews
     Barber
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Cole
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crawford
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Gibson
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck (WA)
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     King (NY)
     Kuster
     Lance
     Langevin
     Lankford
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Markey
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Neal
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reed
     Reichert
     Richmond
     Rogers (AL)
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth
     Young (FL)

                             NOT VOTING--12

     Cleaver
     Crenshaw
     Emerson
     Jackson Lee
     Kingston
     Kirkpatrick
     Lynch
     Napolitano
     Negrete McLeod
     Nunes
     Schwartz
     Speier

                              {time}  1843

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated against:
  Mrs. NAPOLITANO. Mr. Chair, on Tuesday, January 15, 2013, I was 
absent during rollcall vote No. 17 due to a death in my family. Had I 
been present, I would have voted ``no'' on the Broun Amendment.


        Amendment No. 5 Offered by Mr. Duncan of South Carolina

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from South 
Carolina (Mr. Duncan) on which further proceedings were postponed and 
on which the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 202, 
noes 217, not voting 13, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 18]

                               AYES--202

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amash
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Culberson
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gibbs

[[Page H148]]


     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kelly
     Kind
     King (IA)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lankford
     Latta
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Radel
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Scalise
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--217

     Andrews
     Barber
     Barrow
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Cole
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fitzpatrick
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Gerlach
     Gibson
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harper
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     King (NY)
     Kuster
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Markey
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Neal
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reed
     Reichert
     Richmond
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sessions
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Terry
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                             NOT VOTING--13

     Cleaver
     Crenshaw
     Emerson
     Jackson Lee
     Kingston
     Kirkpatrick
     Lynch
     Napolitano
     Negrete McLeod
     Nunes
     Schwartz
     Smith (TX)
     Speier


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1847

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated against:
  Mrs. NAPOLITANO. Mr. Chair, on Tuesday, January 15, 2013, I was 
absent during rollcall vote No. 18 due to a death in my family. Had I 
been present, I would have voted ``no'' on the Duncan (SC) Amendment.


          Amendment No. 9, as Modified, Offered by Mr. Fleming

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Louisiana 
(Mr. Fleming) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 216, 
noes 205, not voting 11, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 19]

                               AYES--216

     Alexander
     Amash
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Culberson
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kelly
     Kind
     King (IA)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     Long
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Marchant
     Massie
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Radel
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Scalise
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--205

     Aderholt
     Andrews
     Barber
     Barrow
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Cole
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     King (NY)
     Kuster
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Marino
     Markey
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern

[[Page H149]]


     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Neal
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Richmond
     Rogers (KY)
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                             NOT VOTING--11

     Cleaver
     Crenshaw
     Emerson
     Jackson Lee
     Kingston
     Kirkpatrick
     Napolitano
     Negrete McLeod
     Nunes
     Schwartz
     Speier

                              {time}  1851

  Mr. LYNCH changed his vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  So the amendment, as modified, was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated against:
  Mrs. NAPOLITANO. Mr. Chair, on Tuesday, January 15, 2013, I was 
absent during rollcall vote No. 19 due to a death in my family. Had I 
been present, I would have voted ``no'' on the Fleming Amendment.


                Amendment No. 10 Offered by Mr. Benishek

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Michigan 
(Mr. Benishek) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 208, 
noes 212, not voting 12, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 20]

                               AYES--208

     Aderholt
     Amash
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barr
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Culberson
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kelly
     Kind
     King (IA)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lankford
     Latta
     Lipinski
     Long
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Marchant
     Massie
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Peters (CA)
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Radel
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Scalise
     Schrader
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--212

     Alexander
     Andrews
     Barber
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Cole
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Dent
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fitzpatrick
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Gerlach
     Gibson
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Harper
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Joyce
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     King (NY)
     Kuster
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Marino
     Markey
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Neal
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (MI)
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reed
     Richmond
     Rogers (KY)
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schock
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Wolf
     Yarmuth

                             NOT VOTING--12

     Cleaver
     Crenshaw
     Emerson
     Jackson Lee
     Kingston
     Kirkpatrick
     Lynch
     Napolitano
     Negrete McLeod
     Nunes
     Schwartz
     Speier


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1855

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated against:
  Mrs. NAPOLITANO. Mr. Chair, on Tuesday, January 15, 2013, I was 
absent during rollcall vote No. 20 due to a death in my family. Had I 
been present, I would have voted ``no'' on the Benishek Amendment.


             Amendment No. 11 Offered by Mr. Bishop of Utah

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Utah (Mr. 
Bishop) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which the 
noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 223, 
noes 198, not voting 11, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 21]

                               AYES--223

     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Amash
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cotton
     Cramer

[[Page H150]]


     Crawford
     Culberson
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kelly
     King (IA)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Radel
     Reed
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Scalise
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walden
     Walorski
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--198

     Andrews
     Barber
     Barrow
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Clyburn
     Coble
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fitzpatrick
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Gerlach
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     King (NY)
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Markey
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Neal
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reichert
     Richmond
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walberg
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                             NOT VOTING--11

     Cleaver
     Crenshaw
     Emerson
     Jackson Lee
     Kingston
     Kirkpatrick
     Napolitano
     Negrete McLeod
     Nunes
     Schwartz
     Speier

                              {time}  1900

  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated against:
  Mrs. NAPOLITANO. Mr. Chair, on Tuesday, January 15, 2013, I was 
absent during rollcall vote No. 22 due to a death in my family. Had I 
been present, I would have voted ``no'' on the Bishop (UT) Amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on amendment No. 1 printed in part 
C of House Report 113-1 offered by the gentleman from New Jersey (Mr. 
Frelinghuysen), as amended.
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.


                             Recorded Vote

  Mr. FRELINGHUYSEN. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 5-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 228, 
noes 192, not voting 12, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 22]

                               AYES--228

     Alexander
     Andrews
     Barber
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Boustany
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Clyburn
     Cole
     Collins (NY)
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cramer
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     Davis, Rodney
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Denham
     Dent
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fitzpatrick
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibson
     Granger
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harper
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     King (NY)
     Kuster
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Markey
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Neal
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reed
     Reichert
     Richmond
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Wolf
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)

                               NOES--192

     Aderholt
     Amash
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barr
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Cantor
     Capito
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman
     Collins (GA)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cooper
     Cotton
     Crawford
     Daines
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Gardner
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kelly
     King (IA)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     Long
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent

[[Page H151]]


     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Radel
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Scalise
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--12

     Cleaver
     Cohen
     Crenshaw
     Emerson
     Jackson Lee
     Kingston
     Kirkpatrick
     Napolitano
     Negrete McLeod
     Nunes
     Schwartz
     Speier


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). The Chair will remind all persons 
in the gallery that they are here as guests of the House and that any 
manifestation of approval or disapproval of proceedings is in violation 
of the rules of the House.

                              {time}  1907

  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated against:
  Mrs. NAPOLITANO. Mr. Chair, on Tuesday, January 15, 2013, I was 
absent during rollcall vote No. 22 due to a death in my family. Had I 
been present, I would have voted ``no'' on the Frelinghuysen Amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. There being no further amendments, under the rule, 
the Committee rises.
  Accordingly, the Committee rose; and the Speaker pro tempore (Mr. 
Reed) having assumed the chair, Mr. Denham, Acting Chair of the 
Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union, reported that 
that Committee, having had under consideration the bill (H.R. 152) 
making supplemental appropriations for the fiscal year ending September 
30, 2013, and for other purposes, and, pursuant to House Resolution 23, 
he reported the bill back to the House with sundry amendments adopted 
in the Committee of the Whole.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Under the rule, the previous question is 
ordered.
  Is a separate vote demanded on any amendment reported from the 
Committee of the Whole, or on an amendment thereto? If not, the Chair 
will put them en gros.
  The amendments were agreed to.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the engrossment and third 
reading of the bill.
  The bill was ordered to be engrossed and read a third time, and was 
read the third time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the passage of the bill.
  Under clause 10 of rule XX, the yeas and nays are ordered.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--yeas 241, 
nays 180, not voting 11, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 23]

                               YEAS--241

     Alexander
     Andrews
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Cantor
     Capito
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Cole
     Collins (NY)
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     Davis, Rodney
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Denham
     Dent
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fitzpatrick
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibson
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harper
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck (WA)
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     King (NY)
     Kuster
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Marino
     Markey
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Neal
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reed
     Reichert
     Richmond
     Rogers (KY)
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Valadao
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Wolf
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                               NAYS--180

     Aderholt
     Amash
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Barr
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman
     Collins (GA)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cooper
     Cotton
     Daines
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Gardner
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kelly
     King (IA)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     Long
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Marchant
     Massie
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Radel
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Scalise
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Upton
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho

                             NOT VOTING--11

     Cleaver
     Crenshaw
     Emerson
     Jackson Lee
     Kingston
     Kirkpatrick
     Napolitano
     Negrete McLeod
     Nunes
     Schwartz
     Speier

                              {time}  1925

  So the bill was passed.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.


                          Personal Explanation

  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Mr. Speaker, I rise regarding my excused absence 
from rollcall votes 11-23 on Tuesday, January 15, 2013. I was 
unavoidably delayed on my return to Washington due to official business 
in my district.
  I would have voted ``aye'' for my following rollcall votes: 12, 15, 
22, 23.
  I would have voted ``no'' for my following rollcall votes: 11, 13, 
14, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21.


              Authorizing the Clerk to Correct Engrossment

  Mr. ROGERS of Kentucky. I ask unanimous consent, Mr. Speaker, that in 
the engrossment of H.R. 152, the Clerk shall reinsert the text on page 
1, lines 3 through 6, of the bill after the enacting clause.

[[Page H152]]

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentleman from Kentucky?
  There was no objection.

                          ____________________