Amendment Text: H.Amdt.734 — 113th Congress (2013-2014)

There is one version of the amendment.

Shown Here:
Amendment as Offered (05/29/2014)

This Amendment appears on page H4957 in the following article from the Congressional Record.


[Pages H4955-H4968]
From the Congressional Record Online through the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]




 COMMERCE, JUSTICE, SCIENCE, AND RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 
                                  2015

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to House Resolution 585 and rule 
XVIII, the Chair declares the House in the Committee of the Whole House 
on the state of the Union for the further consideration of the bill, 
H.R. 4660.
  Will the gentlewoman from Tennessee (Mrs. Black) kindly resume the 
chair.

                              {time}  1641


                     In the Committee of the Whole

  Accordingly, the House resolved itself into the Committee of the 
Whole House on the state of the Union for the further consideration of 
the bill (H.R. 4660) making appropriations for the Departments of 
Commerce and Justice, Science, and Related Agencies for the fiscal year 
ending September 30, 2015, and for other purposes, with Mrs. Black 
(Acting Chair) in the chair.
  The Clerk read the title of the bill.
  The Acting CHAIR. When the Committee of the Whole rose earlier today, 
an amendment by Mr. Broun of Georgia had been disposed of and the bill 
had been read through page 60, line 22.
  The Clerk will read.
  The Clerk read as follows:

             National Aeronautics and Space Administration

                                science

       For necessary expenses, not otherwise provided for, in the 
     conduct and support of science research and development 
     activities, including research, development, operations, 
     support, and services; maintenance and repair, facility 
     planning and design; space flight, spacecraft control, and 
     communications activities; program management; personnel and 
     related costs, including uniforms or allowances therefor, as 
     authorized by sections 5901 and 5902 of title 5, United 
     States Code; travel expenses; purchase and hire of passenger 
     motor vehicles; and purchase, lease, charter, maintenance, 
     and operation of mission and administrative aircraft, 
     $5,193,000,000, to remain available until September 30, 2016: 
     Provided, That the formulation and development costs (with 
     development cost as defined under section 30104 of title 51, 
     United States Code) for the James Webb Space Telescope shall 
     not exceed $8,000,000,000: Provided further, That should the 
     individual identified under subsection (c)(2)(E) of section 
     30104 of title 51, United States Code, as responsible for the 
     James Webb Space Telescope determine that the development 
     cost of the program is likely to exceed that limitation, the 
     individual shall immediately notify the Administrator and the 
     increase shall be treated as if it meets the 30 percent 
     threshold described in subsection (f) of section 30104: 
     Provided further, That $100,000,000 shall be for pre-
     formulation and/or formulation activities for a mission that 
     meets the science goals outlined for the Jupiter Europa 
     mission in the most recent planetary science decadal survey.

                              aeronautics

       For necessary expenses, not otherwise provided for, in the 
     conduct and support of aeronautics research and development 
     activities, including research, development, operations, 
     support, and services; maintenance and repair, facility 
     planning and design; space flight, spacecraft control, and 
     communications activities; program management; personnel and 
     related costs, including uniforms or allowances therefor, as 
     authorized by sections 5901 and 5902 of title 5, United 
     States Code; travel expenses; purchase and hire of passenger 
     motor vehicles; and purchase, lease, charter, maintenance, 
     and operation of mission and administrative aircraft, 
     $666,000,000, to remain available until September 30, 2016.

                            space technology

       For necessary expenses, not otherwise provided for, in the 
     conduct and support of space research and technology 
     development activities, including research, development, 
     operations, support, and services; maintenance and repair, 
     facility planning and design; space flight, spacecraft 
     control, and communications activities; program management; 
     personnel and related costs, including uniforms or allowances 
     therefor, as authorized by sections 5901 and 5902 of title 5, 
     United States Code; travel expenses; purchase and hire of 
     passenger motor vehicles; and purchase, lease, charter, 
     maintenance, and operation of mission and administrative 
     aircraft, $620,000,000, to remain available until September 
     30, 2016.


                    Amendment Offered by Ms. Kaptur

  Ms. KAPTUR. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       Page 63, line 8, after the dollar amount insert 
     ``(increased by $7,000,000)''.
       Page 64, line 22, after the dollar amount insert ``(reduced 
     by $7,000,000)''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to the order of the House of today, the 
gentlewoman from Ohio (Ms. Kaptur) and a Member opposed each will 
control 5 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from Ohio.
  Ms. KAPTUR. Madam Chair, I rise today to offer an amendment to shift 
$7 million in funding from the NASA space operations account to NASA's 
space technology mission. I strongly support and urge my colleagues to 
support this amendment.
  I strongly support the improvements to the overall NASA budget, but I 
am concerned that we are missing a critical opportunity in the space 
technology account.
  The space technology mission supports game-changing research and 
development that enhances our current missions and expands the 
opportunity for future missions.
  For example, at NASA Glenn in Ohio, space technology research 
supports the Solar Electric Propulsion project, developing critical 
energy technologies to enable cost-effective trips to Mars and across 
the inner solar system to enrich a variety of next-generation journeys 
and to do so more energy effectively and efficiently.

                              {time}  1645

  This transformative work advances not only our space exploration 
program, but our economy and our national well-being, with spin-off 
benefits to advanced manufacturing, our commercial energy sector, 
defense, automotive, and commercial aviation industries and countless 
other applications.
  The Space Technology Mission Directorate's focus on partnerships and 
strategic integration promotes technology transfer and 
commercialization within private sector companies, sprouting new 
businesses and the important jobs that accompany the future. This 
exciting work challenges our brightest minds, including many of our 
young people, to excel and create a pipeline of innovation driving our 
economy into the future.
  I understand limitations of the constrained budget we are working 
with and want to thank Ranking Member Fattah and our esteemed chairman, 
Frank Wolf, to better fund NASA's Space Technology Program and other 
critical research and development efforts.
  My amendment merely shifts $7 million in funding to the space 
technology account from the space operations account. It is a small but 
important step in the right direction, and space operations has been 
given quite a substantial increase. In addition, my amendment would 
actually reduce outlays by $2 million for fiscal year 2015.

[[Page H4956]]

  So I think it is a win-win-win on all fronts. I look forward to 
continuing to work with the chairman and the ranking member and our 
colleagues as the bill moves forward in the Senate and further address 
the needs of this important program.
  I would urge support of the Kaptur amendment, and I reserve the 
balance of my time.
  Mr. WOLF. Mr. Chair, I move to strike the requisite number of words.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Virginia is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. WOLF. I rise in very, very, very strong support of the amendment 
and will increase the funding and work with you to do what we possibly 
can. I appreciate the gentlewoman's interest and advocacy for space 
technology, as well as her cooperation in working with us to find a way 
to dedicate more resources to it.
  I have no objection, and I ask for a strong ``aye'' vote.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Ms. KAPTUR. I thank the chairman so very much.
  This is my moment also to add my voice to the other Members here who 
have celebrated and expressed gratitude to Chairman Wolf for his years 
of service to the people of the United States and this great Republic.
  I don't think I will ever hear the word ``Darfur'' and not see Frank 
Wolf's face in my mind's eye. I don't think that I will ever read 
articles that deal with child hunger, wherever it might exist, in some 
of the most forgotten places on Earth, and not think of Frank Wolf.
  I will always remember, sir, your gentlemanly manner, your great 
passion. I will always recall the work that you have done to stand up 
for those who speak for liberty in places, forgotten corners in China, 
for religious leaders who have been suppressed around the world. And 
what a great patriot you are and a gentleman who can work across the 
aisle and whose word is always gold.
  I thank you very, very much for your support on this amendment. We 
wish you Godspeed in the years ahead. I know all my colleagues join me 
in wishing you well and thank you for your exemplary service.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. FATTAH. Madam Chair, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Pennsylvania is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. FATTAH. Madam Chair, I share the sentiments of the chairman. 
Space technology is critically important. I want to acknowledge the 
work that was originally done by Bobby Braun, who is now at Georgia 
Tech, Mike Gazarik, who now is the chief space technologist at NASA 
doing an extraordinary job, but the resources are needed.
  I want to thank you for offering this amendment because it points us 
toward greater resources in that regard. I am familiar with the great 
work that is being done in your home State of Ohio at the Glenn 
Research Center.
  Ms. KAPTUR. Will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. FATTAH. I yield to the gentlewoman from Ohio.
  Ms. KAPTUR. I just want to thank the ranking member who had such a 
broad range, Ranking Member Fattah, certainly in the space science 
arena, but also in urban development, energy, and so many other facets 
of what we do as a committee and as a country. I want to thank you very 
much for being able to work in a collegial way on this amendment. We 
thank you very much for remaining true to your commitment to true 
science.
  Mr. FATTAH. I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from Ohio (Ms. Kaptur).
  The amendment was agreed to.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will read.
  The Clerk read as follows:

                              exploration

       For necessary expenses, not otherwise provided for, in the 
     conduct and support of exploration research and development 
     activities, including research, development, operations, 
     support, and services; maintenance and repair, facility 
     planning and design; space flight, spacecraft control, and 
     communications activities; program management; personnel and 
     related costs, including uniforms or allowances therefor, as 
     authorized by sections 5901 and 5902 of title 5, United 
     States Code; travel expenses; purchase and hire of passenger 
     motor vehicles; and purchase, lease, charter, maintenance, 
     and operation of mission and administrative aircraft, 
     $4,167,000,000, to remain available until September 30, 2016: 
     Provided, That not less than $1,140,000,000 shall be for the 
     Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle: Provided further, That not 
     less than $1,915,000,000 shall be for the Space Launch 
     System, which shall have a lift capability not less than 130 
     metric tons and which shall have an upper stage and other 
     core elements developed simultaneously: Provided further, 
     That of the funds made available for the Space Launch System, 
     $1,600,000,000 shall be for launch vehicle development and 
     $315,000,000 shall be for exploration ground systems.

                            space operations

       For necessary expenses, not otherwise provided for, in the 
     conduct and support of space operations research and 
     development activities, including research, development, 
     operations, support, and services; maintenance and repair, 
     facility planning and design; space flight, spacecraft 
     control, and communications activities, including operations, 
     production, and services; program management; personnel and 
     related costs, including uniforms or allowances therefor, as 
     authorized by sections 5901 and 5902 of title 5, United 
     States Code; travel expenses; purchase and hire of passenger 
     motor vehicles; and purchase, lease, charter, maintenance, 
     and operation of mission and administrative aircraft, 
     $3,885,000,000, to remain available until September 30, 2016.

                               education

       For necessary expenses, not otherwise provided for, in the 
     conduct and support of aerospace and aeronautical education 
     research and development activities, including research, 
     development, operations, support, and services; program 
     management; personnel and related costs, including uniforms 
     or allowances therefor, as authorized by sections 5901 and 
     5902 of title 5, United States Code; travel expenses; 
     purchase and hire of passenger motor vehicles; and purchase, 
     lease, charter, maintenance, and operation of mission and 
     administrative aircraft, $106,000,000, to remain available 
     until September 30, 2016, of which $9,000,000 shall be for 
     the Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research 
     and $30,000,000 shall be for the National Space Grant College 
     program.

                 safety, security and mission services

       For necessary expenses, not otherwise provided for, in the 
     conduct and support of science, aeronautics, space 
     technology, exploration, space operations and education 
     research and development activities, including research, 
     development, operations, support, and services; maintenance 
     and repair, facility planning and design; space flight, 
     spacecraft control, and communications activities; program 
     management; personnel and related costs, including uniforms 
     or allowances therefor, as authorized by sections 5901 and 
     5902 of title 5, United States Code; travel expenses; 
     purchase and hire of passenger motor vehicles; not to exceed 
     $63,000 for official reception and representation expenses; 
     and purchase, lease, charter, maintenance, and operation of 
     mission and administrative aircraft, $2,779,000,000, to 
     remain available until September 30, 2016.

       construction and environmental compliance and restoration

       For necessary expenses for construction of facilities 
     including repair, rehabilitation, revitalization, and 
     modification of facilities, construction of new facilities 
     and additions to existing facilities, facility planning and 
     design, and restoration, and acquisition or condemnation of 
     real property, as authorized by law, and environmental 
     compliance and restoration, $446,000,000, to remain available 
     until September 30, 2020: Provided, That hereafter, 
     notwithstanding section 20145(b)(2)(A) of title 51, United 
     States Code, all proceeds from leases entered into under that 
     section shall be deposited into this account: Provided 
     further, That such proceeds shall be available for a period 
     of 5 years to the extent and in amounts as provided in annual 
     appropriations Acts: Provided further, That such proceeds 
     referred to in the two preceding provisos shall be available 
     for obligation for fiscal year 2015 in an amount not to 
     exceed $9,584,100: Provided further, That each annual budget 
     request shall include an annual estimate of gross receipts 
     and collections and proposed use of all funds collected 
     pursuant to section 20145 of title 51, United States Code.

                      office of inspector general

       For necessary expenses of the Office of Inspector General 
     in carrying out the Inspector General Act of 1978, 
     $34,000,000, of which $500,000 shall remain available until 
     September 30, 2016.

                       administrative provisions

                     (including transfer of funds)

       Funds for any announced prize otherwise authorized shall 
     remain available, without fiscal year limitation, until the 
     prize is claimed or the offer is withdrawn.
       Not to exceed 5 percent of any appropriation made available 
     for the current fiscal year for the National Aeronautics and 
     Space Administration in this Act may be transferred between 
     such appropriations, but no such appropriation, except as 
     otherwise specifically provided, shall be increased by more 
     than 10 percent by any such transfers. Balances so 
     transferred shall be merged with

[[Page H4957]]

     and available for the same purposes and the same time period 
     as the appropriations to which transferred. Any transfer 
     pursuant to this provision shall be treated as a 
     reprogramming of funds under section 505 of this Act and 
     shall not be available for obligation except in compliance 
     with the procedures set forth in that section.
       The spending plan required by this Act shall be provided by 
     NASA at the theme, program, project and activity level. The 
     spending plan, as well as any subsequent change of an amount 
     established in that spending plan that meets the notification 
     requirements of section 505 of this Act, shall be treated as 
     a reprogramming under section 505 of this Act and shall not 
     be available for obligation or expenditure except in 
     compliance with the procedures set forth in that section.

                          (transfer of funds)

       The unexpired balances of a previous account, for 
     activities for which funds are provided in this Act, may be 
     transferred to the new account established in this Act that 
     provides such activities. Balances so transferred shall be 
     merged with the funds in the newly established account, but 
     shall be available under the same terms, conditions and 
     period of time as previously appropriated.

                      National Science Foundation

                    research and related activities

       For necessary expenses in carrying out the National Science 
     Foundation Act of 1950 (42 U.S.C. 1861 et seq.), and Public 
     Law 86-209 (42 U.S.C. 1880 et seq.); services as authorized 
     by section 3109 of title 5, United States Code; maintenance 
     and operation of aircraft and purchase of flight services for 
     research support; acquisition of aircraft; and authorized 
     travel; $5,973,645,000, to remain available until September 
     30, 2016, of which not to exceed $520,000,000 shall remain 
     available until expended for polar research and operations 
     support, and for reimbursement to other Federal agencies for 
     operational and science support and logistical and other 
     related activities for the United States Antarctic program: 
     Provided, That receipts for scientific support services and 
     materials furnished by the National Research Centers and 
     other National Science Foundation supported research 
     facilities may be credited to this appropriation.

          major research equipment and facilities construction

       For necessary expenses for the acquisition, construction, 
     commissioning, and upgrading of major research equipment, 
     facilities, and other such capital assets pursuant to the 
     National Science Foundation Act of 1950 (42 U.S.C. 1861 et 
     seq.), including authorized travel, $200,760,000, to remain 
     available until expended.

  Mr. WOLF. Madam Chair, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Virginia is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. WOLF. I yield to the gentleman from Michigan (Mr. Walberg).
  Mr. WALBERG. Madam Chair, I wish to enter into a colloquy with 
Chairman Wolf.
  I rise today to highlight an increasingly abused law enforcement 
tactic known as ``civil asset forfeiture.'' This process is an ugly 
development that enables law enforcement to take legal action against 
property of individuals, regardless of whether the property owner is 
guilty, innocent, or even charged with a crime at all.
  Although criminal forfeiture is a legitimate tool for law enforcement 
that has helped in the war on drugs and human trafficking, the civil 
forfeiture system has created the opportunity for local and State law 
enforcement to police for profit in coordination with the Department of 
Justice.
  Specifically, the practice of equitable sharing between local and/or 
State Departments and the Federal Government has increased 250 percent 
over the last 12 years, reaching $657 million in 2013 alone, according 
to The Heritage Foundation. Equitable sharing allows State and local 
agencies to work around State laws that prohibit civil forfeitures so 
long as the State agency partners with the Department of Justice and 
splits the profits.
  State and local governments, in their pursuit of the fruits of 
seizures have at times been too eager to seize property, with the 
result that innocent citizens have been adversely affected with little 
or no compensation for their damages and economic losses. The recent 
story of Terry Dehko from Michigan exemplifies the problems that can 
occur under the civil asset forfeiture policy.
  On January 22, 2013, the IRS obtained a secret warrant and used their 
civil asset forfeiture powers to empty Mr. Dehko's bank account of over 
$35,000 based on spurious evidence that the longtime grocer was a money 
launderer. The IRS offered to settle the case for 20 cents on the 
dollar. Unfortunately, this is a normal procedure for IRS, Department 
of Justice, and the law enforcement partners: seize property, then 
negotiate without having to prove guilt in a court of law.
  It is time to rethink our Federal policies on civil asset forfeiture 
and end the abusive era of seize, forfeit, and profit. Law-abiding 
citizens should not fall prey to police departments and their Federal 
partners. I believe we can find a solution to this problem that 
maintains a legitimate policing tool while respecting our Constitution.
  I will continue to work with the chairman, the Judiciary Committee, 
and my colleagues in the House to craft a sensible forfeiture policy 
that helps law enforcement but protects our constitutionally protected 
property rights.
  Mr. WOLF. I thank the gentleman for bringing this matter to the 
attention of the committee and your leadership in making us aware of 
the pressing need to review Federal forfeiture policies.
  As you were speaking, I thought: Why don't we ask the inspector 
general to look into this? So we will work with you to do a letter 
asking the IG to see if he has the authority to look in to see, because 
based on what you said, we don't want this to happen.
  Although an appropriation bill is not the best place to address civil 
asset forfeiture reform, we look forward to a constructive partnership 
to make sure we are protecting Americans. We will work with you on 
crafting a letter to the inspector general to see what we can find out 
and how we can make this not happen again.
  Mr. FATTAH. Will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. WOLF. I yield to the gentleman from Pennsylvania.
  Mr. FATTAH. Madam Chair, I would join and sign such a request to the 
IG.
  Secondly, I do think that, given what you said and given the 
overreach, we do need to see if we can work with the authorizing 
committee and if, perhaps, a package that could be acceptable to the 
authorizers, it could even be included in such a conference committee 
when we finalize this bill, because we should protect Americans from 
the loss of property absent due process.
  So what you have explained is a process that is backwards under our 
system of laws. Before someone is penalized, there should be an 
allegation, there should be a fact hearing, people should have a chance 
to answer and hear from their accusers, versus a circumstance where 
their property is taken and then they have to fight a rear guard action 
to try to get it back.
  I am very concerned about this. I would be glad to work with the 
chairman.
  Mr. WOLF. Madam Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.


                Amendment Offered by Mr. Smith of Texas

  Mr. SMITH of Texas. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       Page 69, line 4, after the dollar amount insert ``(reduced 
     by $15,350,000)(increased by $15,350,000)''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to the order of the House of today, the 
gentleman from Texas (Mr. Smith) and a Member opposed each will control 
5 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Texas.
  Mr. SMITH of Texas. Madam Chair, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.
  Madam Chair, first I want to thank the majority leader, Mr. Cantor, 
for his earlier comments about our National Science Foundation 
amendment. I appreciate his efforts to hold the NSF accountable for its 
grant funding decisions.
  The Smith-Cantor amendment reduces the fiscal year 2015 funding in 
the bill, the National Science Foundation's Social, Behavioral, and 
Economic Sciences directorate, or SBE directorate, by more than $15 
million. This reduction will freeze SBE at its current funding level 
rather than increase it to the level requested by the President.
  The Smith-Cantor amendment maintains the overall level of National 
Science Foundation research funding in the bill. It redirects the 
amount of the SBE cut to the physical sciences and engineering, the 
areas that were prioritized in the NSF authorization act reported out 
of the Science Committee yesterday.

[[Page H4958]]

  Much of the research funded through the SBE directorate has obvious 
scientific merit and is in the national interest. But the SBE 
directorate has also funded dozens, perhaps hundreds, of questionable 
grants. For example, when the National Science Foundation pays a 
researcher more than $227,000 to thumb through the pages of old 
National Geographic magazines to look at animal pictures, taxpayers 
feel as though the NSF is thumbing its nose at them.
  The NSF also spent $340,000 for a study of human-set forest fires 
2,000 years ago in New Zealand. Americans who have lost their homes and 
businesses to wildfires could ask how this helps them.
  Taxpayers can't help but wonder why NSF spent $1.5 million of their 
money to study rangeland management in Mongolia rather than, say, in 
Texas.

                              {time}  1700

  We shouldn't reward frivolous use of taxpayer money with even more 
money. This is what the President has proposed.
  The Smith-Cantor amendment zeros out the SBE increase for fiscal year 
2015. This should encourage the NSF to apply higher standards when 
awarding its grants.
  Yesterday, the House Science Committee marked up the FIRST Act, 
legislation that reauthorizes NSF programs.
  My colleagues and I approved an amendment to the bill that cuts the 
SBE directorate to $150 million, $100 million less than the current 
fiscal year. That is where we think the discussion ought to start next 
year. So this amendment is only the first step.
  I also want to point out the SBE directorate isn't the only source of 
questionable NSF grants. For instance, NSF that handed out $700,000 for 
``The Great Immensity,'' a climate change musical, and $5.6 million for 
a climate change scavenger hunt and phone game.
  Such grants make taxpayers even more skeptical about how their hard-
earned tax dollars are being spent and diminishes public support for 
scientific research.
  Investments in science are essential if our country is to continue to 
lead the world in nanotechnology, supercomputing, and other fields that 
yield new jobs, new businesses, and, in fact, entire new industries.
  The way to restore public support is not to continue funding 
questionable grants with taxpayer money.
  The Smith-Cantor amendment is a small but important step in the right 
direction. It sets the precedent for the Science Committee, the 
Appropriations Committee, and the House to take additional steps in the 
future to assure that NSF-funded research is, in fact, in the national 
interest.
  Madam Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. WOLF. Madam Chair, I move to strike the requisite number of 
words.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Virginia is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. WOLF. Madam Chair, I have no objection to the amendment.
  I share the opinion that NSF must exercise caution. I should tell 
Members, the NSF funding here is at an all-time high. This is a 
Republican committee, if you will. The House and we support the 
sciences. I want our country to stay ahead of China and the other 
countries. I want America to be number one.
  But I appreciate what Mr. Smith, the chairman, said: NSF must 
exercise caution and grant awards and ensure--and I hope NSF is 
listening today--that every grant is both scientifically, meritorious, 
and responsive to the national interest. The subcommittee has already 
taken steps to help improve accountability and transparency in its NSF 
operations by including language in the FY15 CGS report and is working 
with NSF to understand improvements that the agency is making in its 
review and communication process.
  In addition, last week, I sent a letter to the NSF director, Ms. 
Cordova. She is a very impressive person, very knowledgeable, she is 
brand new, I think she is committed to making sure that they only fund 
scientific things. But this letter emphasizes the need for the agency 
to be judicious in a grant it awards and to ensure that taxpayer funds 
are used wisely.
  The subcommittee will continue to provide oversight on this topic as 
needed.
  I thank the gentleman. I think it is important for NSF to know that 
since the funding is at a record high in order that America can be and 
will always be number one in math and science and physics and chemistry 
and biology and lead the world, with that excess funding, extra 
funding, goes the responsibility to make sure there are not grants that 
then weaken the program and give there an opportunity for people to say 
this program is out of kilter. I appreciate Mr. Smith raising these.
  With that, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. FATTAH. Madam Chair, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Pennsylvania is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. FATTAH. Madam Chair, I want to acknowledge the great work of the 
gentleman from Texas on patent reform. We worked together and he led 
the effort that has reformed our patent system, I think, in a 
remarkable way.
  The majority leader and I spent some time on one of the last vote 
days here to go over to NIH and hear from Dr. Collins about great 
research, particularly interested in pediatric cancers and the like.
  So these are two gentlemen, the authors of this amendment, who have 
been very positive and focused in a number of areas that I share with 
them. However, this amendment is misguided, and I want to speak in 
opposition to it.
  The notion that we would want to eliminate certain investigations by 
the National Science Foundation into economic science or behavioral 
science, when we talk about disasters, the reason why we have saved so 
many lives, it is not just that we have improved weather forecasting, 
even though that would be eliminated in terms of the moneys here for 
investigative purposes by the National Science Foundation, but also 
understanding the behaviors of people facing disasters is very 
important. That would be cut.
  This area of posttraumatic stress is a critical area. We know now 
that many of our returning soldiers face posttraumatic stress, but we 
also know that children living in very difficult circumstances in our 
country are more traumatized than if they were living in a war zone, an 
active war zone in another country. So eliminating, cutting back 
scientific investigations in this regard would be, I think, disastrous.
  That is why I am hoping that whatever is causing this, there will be 
some reversal of it eventually. But in the meantime, I want to suggest 
to the House that we should oppose this amendment, we should oppose the 
notion that somehow we don't want to know certain things.
  I was at the University of Pittsburgh. I saw some results of National 
Science Foundation funding that started out 30 years ago that a Member 
on this floor would be on the floor complaining about now. It was the 
examination of what happens in the neurons of a monkey when they move 
their arm, what neurons fire off in their brain.
  Well, that research today, 30 years later, literally has a woman who, 
because of a disease, has no control of her body, but can now move an 
artificial arm through her thoughts. This is the result of research by 
the National Science Foundation. It is the world premier basic science 
foundation, it is the model for our economic competitors. They are 
imitating it.
  A small country like Singapore with less than 5 million people is 
investing $7 billion in their national science foundation. Here we are, 
the wealthiest country in the world, and we are putting $7.4 billion, 
which is the highest ever, and I thank the chairman.
  But now we want to put handcuffs on the agency about what it is that 
they can look at in terms of improving the life chances of Americans. 
The research has paid off. That is why we are the great country that we 
are today. The World Economic Forum says our Nation and our Nation's 
economy is driven by innovation.
  The last thing that we should be doing on the floor of this House is 
equivocating or compromising or making it more challenging for those 
who are engaged in the innovation ecosystem to do their work.
  Even though I compliment the gentleman, Mr. Smith, and the majority

[[Page H4959]]

leader, Mr. Cantor, for all their efforts, I can't imagine for the life 
of me why we would be on this floor tonight debating a retreat on 
behavioral science, on economic science. It makes no sense. I would 
hope that the House, notwithstanding the fact that the majority is held 
by the other team, I hope in this instance, as the chairman said, we 
would realize that this is not a competition between Democrats and 
Republicans. We are competing against countries that have big and plus 
populations like China and India, they want to eat our lunch 
economically, and what we need to do is stop the bickering back and 
forth and figure out what is best for our country.
  The chairman and I voted for Simpson-Bowles. We were one of just less 
than 40 Members who did so. I might be in the minority on this vote, 
but I am going to vote on what is in the best interest of our Nation, 
and that is to continue to invest in innovation.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Texas (Mr. Smith).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. LIPINSKI. Madam Chair, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Texas will 
be postponed.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will read.
  The Clerk read as follows:

          major research equipment and facilities construction

       For necessary expenses for the acquisition, construction, 
     commissioning, and upgrading of major research equipment, 
     facilities, and other such capital assets pursuant to the 
     National Science Foundation Act of 1950 (42 U.S.C. 1861 et 
     seq.), including authorized travel, $200,760,000, to remain 
     available until expended.


               Amendment Offered by Mr. Broun of Georgia

  Mr. BROUN of Georgia. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 69, line 22, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(reduced by $760,000)''.
       Page 70, line 5, after the dollar amount, insert ``(reduced 
     by $29,500,000)''.
       Page 70, line 17, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(reduced by $37,000,000)''.
       Page 71, line 11, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(reduced by $70,000)''.
       Page 100, line 17, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(increased by $67,330,000)''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to the order of the House of today, the 
gentleman from Georgia (Mr. Broun) and a Member opposed each will 
control 5 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Georgia.
  Mr. BROUN of Georgia. Madam Chair, this amendment would cut about $67 
million from the National Science Foundation's appropriations 
increase--again, increase; not reduce their funding, but reduce the 
increase--and apply that amount to the spending reduction account.
  The cuts in this amount are to four areas not directly involved in 
basic research such as construction, education and human resources, 
agency operations, and the Office of the National Science Board.
  In 2007 and again in 2010, NSF was granted funding to launch new STEM 
education programs under the America COMPETES Act, not to mention the 
Recovery Act stimulus with the same focus.
  Unfortunately, the U.S. continues to fall behind in producing enough 
STEM workers to compete globally, and our high school graduates' math 
and science scores are stagnant.
  A 2013 GAO study found that 209 different Federal STEM education 
programs overlap across 13 agencies, spending a total of $3 billion--$3 
billion, with a b. GAO also found that 173 of these programs shared 
similarities in objectives and focus.
  The underlying committee report acknowledges program reductions and 
consolidation and yet increases spending on education and human 
resources by $29.5 million for an abandoned program that will be taken 
over by existing programs.
  More often than not, increasing Federal Government spending on non-
research science initiatives grows the Federal Government, not just the 
next generation of scientists.
  Today, we are the world's leader in combined Federal as well as 
private sector investment in research and development, at last 
estimate, $465 billion for 2014.
  Some are worried that China will catch up to our spending by the 
2020s. Of course, those making that assumption also estimate that both 
the U.S. and China will be spending $600 billion each by 2022. Is 
Federal spending a race in which we want to engage with China?
  National government expenditure per capita on R&D in China is $218 
per capita--again, research and development in China is $218 compared 
to the U.S. per person amount of $1,276. This is not sustainable.
  As the science community can attest, Congress often overpromises on 
funding and pulls the rug out on projects halfway through.
  NSF is sitting on unnecessary and outmoded facilities without needed 
action on whether to close and sell. NSF should not be given more money 
for new facilities until it is established that NSF is operating 
existing facilities efficiently and effectively.
  I urge my colleagues to adopt this amendment. I reserve the balance 
of my time.

                              {time}  1715

  Mr. FATTAH. Madam Chair, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Pennsylvania is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. FATTAH. Madam Chair, in defense of the National Science 
Foundation and in opposition to these cuts, I yield to the gentleman 
from New Jersey, Congressman Holt. This is another one of these 
amendments that works against the effort of the committee, which is to 
try to increase--in fact, we did increase--the National Science 
Foundation's budget.
  Mr. HOLT. I thank the gentleman.
  Madam Chair, I should point out, first of all, that as a percentage 
of our economy, the Federal Government's support for scientific 
research is half of what it was back when I was in college many decades 
ago. The point is that we are not keeping up.
  Part of the problem is, here in this Chamber and around the country, 
people value the fruits of research, but they don't have a clue about 
how it is done. We see here, on the floor, people ridiculing research 
because of the title.
  A prominent politician recently ridiculed NSF-funded research in 
fruit flies or game theory. Obviously, she didn't understand that one 
of the principal biological organisms that has been studied is 
Drosophila, which is the so-called fruit fly.
  Social and behavioral research is important in understanding how 
people make decisions about energy use or about how to invest or about 
disaster response. It tells us a great deal about brain processes; so, 
in pointing out NSF studies to ridicule because they sound foolish, we 
here--we policymakers--can look like the fools.
  I am a physicist by background, so I am pleased to hear the chairman 
talk about research in physics and chemistry and math, but we also need 
studies, based on evidence, as NSF studies are, on human behavior. 
Let's look at library science.
  It would be easy to ridicule a study that I saw described not long 
ago in library science, which was funded by the National Science 
Foundation. It just so happens that it turned out to be the basis for 
what we now know as Google.
  Yes, that research was done with taxpayer money, and it could have 
been ridiculed as foolish, as a waste of taxpayer money, but I think 
the country's economy has benefited, maybe several thousand times 
over--maybe many thousands of times over--the amount that was spent on 
that foolish research on library science.
  We should be asking, through NSF studies, why humans engage in 
unhealthy behavior. We could learn a lot about applicable public health 
programs through such things.
  This idea of cutting back on funding in the taxpayers' interest is 
terribly misguided. As a country, we are greatly underinvesting in 
research. I thank the gentleman for standing up for NSF research.
  Mr. FATTAH. Madam Chair, in reclaiming my time, there will also be

[[Page H4960]]

another amendment on NSF that the gentleman from North Carolina (Mr. 
Price) may speak to, and with that, I yield back the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. ADERHOLT. Madam Chair, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Alabama is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. ADERHOLT. Madam Chair, I rise in opposition to the amendment of 
my good friend from Georgia because it would negatively impact a range 
of NSF activities. The amendment would hamstring NSF's main operational 
account that funds activities like financial management, grant 
oversight, and procurement.
  I know the gentleman cares very strongly about protecting the 
taxpayers' interests, and I don't believe that making it more difficult 
for NSF to monitor and to oversee its funds helps those interests in 
any way.
  The memo would eliminate the increase that the bill provides for 
NSF's critical STEM education programs. These funds are urgently needed 
to address widespread and serious challenges that we have currently in 
our U.S. economy.
  Compared to our major international competitors, our K-12 students do 
not perform well in STEM-related subjects, and our universities produce 
a smaller percentage of STEM-related graduates.
  In addition, our STEM workforce is not big enough to meet the current 
or projected demand for skilled employees by high-tech companies. NSF's 
STEM education programs will play a major role in solving these 
programs by improving the quality of STEM instructors, by attracting 
more students to STEM fields, and by enabling talented students to 
pursue STEM degrees.
  These investments are important to the economy and to the overall 
importance of the Nation as a whole. For this reason, I would urge my 
fellow Members to reject this amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. BROUN of Georgia. Madam Chair, how much time do I have remaining?
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman has 1\1/2\ minutes remaining.
  Mr. BROUN of Georgia. Madam Chair, in closing, I am not cutting basic 
research here at all. I am suggesting cuts in the directorate.
  There are just silly things that they have--the Climate Change 
Narrative Game, for instance, and the climate change media exhibition 
that portrays scientists and students at work in Amazonia, which is the 
indoctrination of young girls. There is ``The Matter of Origins.'' I 
could go on and on.
  I believe in research. I am an applied scientist, and I am a 
physician. We are not cutting research. In fact, I believe in research, 
yet what we are doing is just trying to cut the directorate and save 
the taxpayers money.
  We are broke as a Nation, and we have just got to stop spending money 
at random and without, really, responsibility. I encourage the 
acceptance of my amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. FATTAH. Madam Chair, I rise in opposition to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Pennsylvania is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. FATTAH. Madam Chair, I yield to the gentleman from North Carolina 
(Mr. Price), who represents, in part, one of the greatest research 
triangles in the country outside of Philadelphia.
  Mr. PRICE of North Carolina. I thank my friend for yielding.
  Madam Chair, I rise in strong opposition to these efforts to target 
the funding for the National Science Foundation's Social, Behavioral, 
and Economic Sciences directorate (SBE).
  The world is changing rapidly, and we need quality research to help 
us understand how imminent and unforeseen changes in areas such as 
technology, climate, immigration, and the economy will affect our 
society and our future. And these things do have policy implications.
  We shouldn't be wasting hard-earned taxpayer money, in fact, on 
policy solutions that are not rooted in sound research, precisely the 
type of research that some of these efforts here today seek to curtail.
  As a result of research funded by the SBE directorate, for example, 
we are learning how to better respond to natural and economic 
disasters, how to improve the educational methods practiced in our 
Nation's classrooms, how to expand outreach to children regarding STEM 
education.
  We have learned how to increase the safety of our troops in combat, 
how to better reduce violence among our young people, and we have 
expanded our knowledge of how the human mind works through the BRAIN 
Initiative, led by Ranking Member Fattah and Chairman Wolf.
  In this era of Tea Party preeminence and so-called fiscal discipline 
at the expense of rational policy decisions, taking cheap shots at 
Federal programs and research projects has become a favorite indoor 
sport.
  I wish my conservative colleagues would spend as much time learning 
the facts about the programs they deride as they do in preparing the 
flurry of floor amendments and floor speeches to target them.
  Helping policymakers make informed decisions is what NSF's Political 
Science Program (PSP), in particular, is all about. Let me just say a 
word about the SBE's Political Science Program, which is close to my 
heart by virtue of my previous life.
  The PSP has consistently produced valuable, practical research that 
informs policymakers and government agencies on issues as vital as 
natural disaster response, environmental regulation, and foreign 
policy. Here are a few examples.
  NSF's Political Science Program helps us gain a better understanding 
of public reactions to natural disasters, including Hurricane Katrina, 
which was researched at Rice University, as well as to the BP oil 
spill, which was researched at Louisiana State University. It has 
helped Federal, State, and local authorities develop more effective 
evacuation and recovery plans.
  It has supported research on the causes and consequences of terrorist 
attacks, at Pennsylvania State University and at UNC-Chapel Hill; on 
competition for natural resources as a driving force in international 
conflict, research at the University of Georgia and at the University 
of Colorado; on third-party peacemaking, research at the University of 
Notre Dame; and on dispute resolution mechanisms that lead to lasting 
peace, at the University of Alabama-Tuscaloosa.
  But this isn't just about political science research; it's about the 
entire SBE. NSF's rigorous peer-review process assures that only 
meritorious proposals are funded.
  In an era when a quick Internet search can generate a statistic or an 
opinion to support any argument, it is more important than ever that we 
have clear, dependable, peer-reviewed research into the most pressing 
social, behavioral, and economic questions of the day.
  Should you question the quality of such research, I simply note that 
nearly a quarter--that is 50 of 212--of the Nobel Prize winners in 
science funded by NSF since 1951 were recipients of funding from the 
SBE program. Every winner of the Nobel Prize in economic sciences since 
1998 has been an NSF grantee.
  In short, SBE taps the best minds in the country to help us better 
understand and address some of the most vexing policy dilemmas we face. 
The body of work it has produced informs the decisions of America's 
first responders, military leaders, regulators, diplomats, and 
policymakers.
  I urge my colleagues to reject misguided attempts to target the work 
of NSF and, in particular, of the Social, Behavioral, and Economic 
Sciences Directorate, which is and will be uniquely valuable in 
informing our country's policy decisions as we face the future.
  Mr. FATTAH. I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Georgia (Mr. Broun).
  The amendment was rejected.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will read.
  The Clerk read as follows:

                     education and human resources

       For necessary expenses in carrying out science, mathematics 
     and engineering education and human resources programs and 
     activities pursuant to the National Science Foundation Act of 
     1950 (42 U.S.C. 1861 et seq.), including services as 
     authorized by section 3109 of title 5, United States Code, 
     authorized travel, and rental of conference rooms in the 
     District of Columbia, $876,000,000, to remain available until 
     September 30, 2016.

[[Page H4961]]

                 agency operations and award management

       For agency operations and award management necessary in 
     carrying out the National Science Foundation Act of 1950 (42 
     U.S.C. 1861 et seq.); services authorized by section 3109 of 
     title 5, United States Code; hire of passenger motor 
     vehicles; uniforms or allowances therefor, as authorized by 
     sections 5901 and 5902 of title 5, United States Code; rental 
     of conference rooms in the District of Columbia; and 
     reimbursement of the Department of Homeland Security for 
     security guard services; $335,000,000: Provided, That not to 
     exceed $8,280 is for official reception and representation 
     expenses: Provided further, That contracts may be entered 
     into under this heading in fiscal year 2015 for maintenance 
     and operation of facilities and for other services to be 
     provided during the next fiscal year: Provided further, That 
     of the amount provided for costs associated with the 
     acquisition, occupancy, and related costs of new headquarters 
     space, not more that $27,370,000 shall remain available until 
     expended.

                  office of the national science board

       For necessary expenses (including payment of salaries, 
     authorized travel, hire of passenger motor vehicles, the 
     rental of conference rooms in the District of Columbia, and 
     the employment of experts and consultants under section 3109 
     of title 5, United States Code) involved in carrying out 
     section 4 of the National Science Foundation Act of 1950 (42 
     U.S.C. 1863) and Public Law 86-209 (42 U.S.C. 1880 et seq.), 
     $4,370,000: Provided, That not to exceed $2,500 shall be 
     available for official reception and representation expenses.

                      office of inspector general

       For necessary expenses of the Office of Inspector General 
     as authorized by the Inspector General Act of 1978, 
     $14,430,000, of which $400,000 shall remain available until 
     September 30, 2016.

                        administrative provision

       Not to exceed 5 percent of any appropriation made available 
     for the current fiscal year for the National Science 
     Foundation in this Act may be transferred between such 
     appropriations, but no such appropriation shall be increased 
     by more than 15 percent by any such transfers. Any transfer 
     pursuant to this section shall be treated as a reprogramming 
     of funds under section 505 of this Act and shall not be 
     available for obligation except in compliance with the 
     procedures set forth in that section.
       This title may be cited as the ``Science Appropriations 
     Act, 2015''.

                                TITLE IV

                            RELATED AGENCIES

                       Commission on Civil Rights

                         salaries and expenses

       For necessary expenses of the Commission on Civil Rights, 
     including hire of passenger motor vehicles, $9,000,000: 
     Provided, That none of the funds appropriated in this 
     paragraph shall be used to employ in excess of four full-time 
     individuals under Schedule C of the Excepted Service 
     exclusive of one special assistant for each Commissioner: 
     Provided further, That none of the funds appropriated in this 
     paragraph shall be used to reimburse Commissioners for more 
     than 75 billable days, with the exception of the chairperson, 
     who is permitted 125 billable days: Provided further, That 
     none of the funds appropriated in this paragraph shall be 
     used for any activity or expense that is not explicitly 
     authorized by section 3 of the Civil Rights Commission Act of 
     1983 (42 U.S.C. 1975a).

                Equal Employment Opportunity Commission

                         salaries and expenses

       For necessary expenses of the Equal Employment Opportunity 
     Commission as authorized by title VII of the Civil Rights Act 
     of 1964, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967, 
     the Equal Pay Act of 1963, the Americans with Disabilities 
     Act of 1990, section 501 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, 
     the Civil Rights Act of 1991, the Genetic Information Non-
     Discrimination Act (GINA) of 2008 (Public Law 110-233), the 
     ADA Amendments Act of 2008 (Public Law 110-325), and the 
     Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2009 (Public Law 111-2), 
     including services as authorized by section 3109 of title 5, 
     United States Code; hire of passenger motor vehicles as 
     authorized by section 1343(b) of title 31, United States 
     Code; nonmonetary awards to private citizens; and up to 
     $29,500,000 for payments to State and local enforcement 
     agencies for authorized services to the Commission, 
     $364,000,000: Provided, That the Commission is authorized to 
     make available for official reception and representation 
     expenses not to exceed $2,250 from available funds: Provided 
     further, That the Chair is authorized to accept and use any 
     gift or donation to carry out the work of the Commission.

                     International Trade Commission

                         salaries and expenses

       For necessary expenses of the International Trade 
     Commission, including hire of passenger motor vehicles and 
     services as authorized by section 3109 of title 5, United 
     States Code, and not to exceed $2,250 for official reception 
     and representation expenses, $84,500,000, to remain available 
     until expended.

                       Legal Services Corporation

               payment to the legal services corporation

       For payment to the Legal Services Corporation to carry out 
     the purposes of the Legal Services Corporation Act of 1974, 
     $350,000,000, of which $319,650,000 is for basic field 
     programs and required independent audits; $4,350,000 is for 
     the Office of Inspector General, of which such amounts as may 
     be necessary may be used to conduct additional audits of 
     recipients; $18,000,000 is for management and grants 
     oversight; $4,000,000 is for client self-help and information 
     technology; $3,000,000 is for a Pro Bono Innovation Fund; and 
     $1,000,000 is for loan repayment assistance: Provided, That 
     the Legal Services Corporation may continue to provide 
     locality pay to officers and employees at a rate no greater 
     than that provided by the Federal Government to Washington, 
     DC-based employees as authorized by section 5304 of title 5, 
     United States Code, notwithstanding section 1005(d) of the 
     Legal Services Corporation Act (42 U.S.C. 2996(d)): Provided 
     further, That the authorities provided in section 205 of this 
     Act shall be applicable to the Legal Services Corporation: 
     Provided further, That, for the purposes of section 505 of 
     this Act, the Legal Services Corporation shall be considered 
     an agency of the United States Government.

                              {time}  1730


            Amendment Offered by Mr. Austin Scott of Georgia

  Mr. AUSTIN SCOTT of Georgia. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the 
desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       Page 74, line 13 after the dollar amount, insert ``(reduced 
     by $350,000,000)''.
       Page 100, line 17, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(increased by $350,000,000)''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to the order of the House of today, the 
gentleman from Georgia (Mr. Austin Scott) and a Member opposed each 
will control 5 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Georgia.
  Mr. AUSTIN SCOTT of Georgia. Madam Chair, I, along with my colleague 
from Arizona (Mr. Salmon), am offering an amendment to cut all funding 
from the Legal Services Corporation and to allocate that money to the 
Spending Reduction Account.
  Legal Services Corporation was established 40 years ago, and I have 
no doubt that it was for the right reasons, but it hasn't been 
reauthorized since 1980. At no point in the last 34 years has either 
party in Congress felt that this agency was so important that it needed 
to be reauthorized.
  In fact, in 2012, it was estimated that over 94 percent of the 
services that Legal Services was set up to provide were provided by 
State and local governments, bar associations, and pro bono work by 
attorneys.
  This means that taxpayers are footing the bill of a million dollars a 
day for this service, yet this organization handles less than 6 percent 
of all indigent cases.
  The purpose of this bill, Madam Chair, is to provide law enforcement 
to the American people. With $350 million, we could employ thousands of 
FBI agents, U.S. Marshals, and others to protect Americans from 
domestic threats every day. Instead, this bill proposes to provide 
significant funding to an entity that is plagued by abuse.
  Allow me to provide a few examples, Madam Chair, from the recent LSC 
inspector general's report published April 30. The report found 
continued systemic deficiencies in the Legal Service Corporation grant 
program.
  The Inspector General's Office opened 12 new investigations, 
including criminal cases that involved fraudulent activity and 
financial irregularities by grantee employees. The investigation also 
discovered unauthorized outside practice of law, as well as time and 
attendance abuse.
  We are spending millions simply on the inspector general's 
investigations of Legal Services Corporation.
  Additionally, cases arising from the Office of Inspector General 
resulted in the restitution of client trust fund moneys that had been 
converted to personal use.
  As one example, these investigations resulted in the recovery of more 
than $21,000 in Legal Services funds for time spent by a grantee's 
attorney in unauthorized outside practices.
  At a time of record deficits and climbing debt, we should eliminate 
the funding of this program, which has not been reauthorized by 
Congress, including this one, in 34 years.
  Let's take the Legal Services Corporation off the taxpayers' payroll.

[[Page H4962]]

  With that, Madam Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. ADERHOLT. Madam Chair, I rise in opposition to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Alabama is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. ADERHOLT. Madam Chairman, I do rise in opposition to the 
amendment of my colleague from Georgia.
  The recommendation in this amendment provides $350 million for Legal 
Services, which is a reduction to 2008 level of almost $70 million. It 
is $80 million below the 2010 request.
  I understand there are some concerns with Legal Services Corporation-
funded programs, but the bill contains several important restrictions 
on political activity by the LSC grantees. That would include lobbying, 
abortion litigation, and class action lawsuits. These restrictions 
cover both the Legal Services funds as well as private funds.
  The administration proposed to eliminate several of these 
restrictions, but the House bill rejects this proposal.
  We have included language in the committee report directing Legal 
Services to vigorously enforce the restrictions on political activity, 
which we think is very important.
  Throughout my time in Congress, I have supported Legal Services for 
Americans who would not otherwise have adequate access to civil legal 
assistance. We are facing an extremely challenging budgetary 
environment--and I realize that--but the recommendation is a fair 
compromise between the need for austerity and also the balance to 
provide civil legal assistance to low-income Americans.
  For that reason, Madam Chair, I would urge a ``no'' vote.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. FATTAH. Madam Chair, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Pennsylvania is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. FATTAH. I am opposed to this amendment.
  I do, however, want to yield to the gentlelady from the great State 
of Florida--part of the Space Coast, and who does an extraordinary 
job--to speak on behalf of Legal Services. Before I do that, I want to 
make one point.
  Last year alone, Legal Services helped 41,000 veterans of the United 
States of America who were facing foreclosure and had other challenges 
related to disability claims.
  This notion that we should do away with access to courts for people 
who have worn the uniform to protect our rights, I think, is 
wrongheaded.
  I yield to the gentlelady from Florida (Ms. Castor) to speak further 
on this subject.
  Ms. CASTOR of Florida. Thank you to the ranking member for yielding 
to me.
  I rise today to oppose the Scott amendment and urge the House to 
oppose the excessive cuts to the nonprofit and independent Legal 
Services Corporation. I am right in sync with the ranking member's 
comments, and appreciate the Republican committee chair's opposition to 
this amendment as well.
  Legal Services has a mission to ``provide equal access to the system 
of justice'' in America. It is the most important provider of civil 
legal aid for Americans who cannot afford high-priced legal counsel. In 
fact, legal representation often is out of reach for many American 
families.
  This amendment will make the lives of millions of American families 
even more challenging. Plus, if you take away legal counsel, you also 
complicate the resolution of disputes for businesses and others as 
well.
  You all know Legal Services is not a Washington-based bureaucratic 
program. To the contrary, there are legal aid attorneys and 
professionals in every State, with more than 800 offices. Legal 
Services' moneys are put to work back home across America outside of 
Washington. In my Tampa Bay community, Bay Area Legal Services has a 
number of community-based offices and is helping the wheels of justice 
turn for everyone.
  What type of legal help? Foreclosure, consumer assistance, domestic 
violence. Many of the domestic violence victims are simply trying to 
keep their children safe and their families together.
  Others include veterans returning from war, families with housing 
issues, those that were hit hard by natural disasters and are dealing 
with the aftermath, and families involved in child custody disputes.

  I have seen these advocates in action. Many Members of Congress 
actually refer cases to Legal Services groups in our area. They help 
families navigate the justice system. They also boost the economy 
through avoided costs and swift resolution of disputes.
  I would also like to remind my colleagues that Legal Services has 
already undergone significant cuts, as mentioned by the chairman, over 
the past few years. The chairman's mark of $350 million is a 4 percent 
cut from current funding.
  Funding for Legal Services was $420 million in fiscal year 2010. It 
was cut--especially after sequestration in 2013--and any further cuts 
will do severe damage.
  This amendment jeopardizes access to justice and the rule of law. 
There have already been layoffs back home, closed offices, and reduced 
services. What you are doing there is saying to families, You can't get 
help. You can't avoid a foreclosure. You can't escape an abusive 
relationship or defend yourself against consumer scams.
  We cannot allow hundreds of thousands of veterans, elderly victims of 
foreclosure, and women and children desperate to escape domestic 
violence to be denied assistance.
  So I strongly urge a ``no'' vote on the Scott amendment.
  Mr. FATTAH. Reclaiming my time, in closing, I participated with the 
former Attorney General, Dick Thornburgh, in a pro bono effort for some 
of our major law firms, which is great. However, national Legal 
Services in many of these rural communities, unlike a big city like 
Philadelphia, don't have the benefit of the law firms where they can 
have pro bono partners and the like. If they are going to have a lawyer 
for a soldier, a veteran who needs help on a foreclosure, it is going 
to be Legal Services.
  So to cut off their access to the court is the wrong thing for us to 
do, and I oppose the amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. AUSTIN SCOTT of Georgia. Madam Chair, if only Legal Services were 
limited to the things that the gentlelady and the gentleman have 
discussed, like helping our veterans with foreclosures and other 
things, but in my part of the country, in the rural areas that I come 
from, Legal Services Corporation has hired plaintiffs that are pursuing 
our farmers and, quite honestly, attempting to put farmers out of 
business in Georgia. That is unacceptable and taxpayer funds should not 
be used for that.
  With that, Madam Chair, I yield the balance of my time to the 
gentleman from Georgia (Mr. Westmoreland).
  Mr. WESTMORELAND. Madam Chair, I want to thank the gentleman for 
yielding.
  As the gentleman stated, we have no problem with the services that 
the Legal Services Corporation offers to the poor and to our veterans. 
What we do have a problem with is the fact that they are targeting our 
farmers, especially in Georgia.
  We have brought this to the attention of Legal Services Corporation 
more than one time. We feel like some of the tactics that are being 
used on our farmers are not the right way and not the intent of what 
the Legal Services Corporation is trying to do.
  If we look at the indigent here, both civil and criminal, for this 
country, including State funds, local funds, from lawyers' interest 
trust funds, and other funds, we spend $5.7 billion a year in indigent 
defense.
  And so the point is, we believe in giving the poor representation. We 
just don't agree in the manner that it is being done.
  We hope that, through this amendment, attention will be brought to 
that and there can be work on all sides to make sure that the intent of 
the Legal Services Corporation is to do what it was intended to do--to 
not go out and solicit clients, but to help the poor.
  I admire them for the help that they have given all the veterans 
across this great country, but at some point you have to draw a line. I 
think this amendment sends a clear message to Legal Services that we 
want to get their attention and we want them to act appropriately, 
especially as far as our agriculture goes. These people

[[Page H4963]]

work very hard every day to produce our food, and we do not need to 
take advantage of them in the situation that we have now.
  Mr. AUSTIN SCOTT of Georgia. Madam Chair, I yield back the balance of 
my time.
  Mr. ADERHOLT. Madam Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Georgia (Mr. Austin Scott).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. AUSTIN SCOTT of Georgia. Madam Chair, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Georgia will 
be postponed.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will read.
  The Clerk read as follows:

          administrative provision--legal services corporation

       None of the funds appropriated in this Act to the Legal 
     Services Corporation shall be expended for any purpose 
     prohibited or limited by, or contrary to any of the 
     provisions of, sections 501, 502, 503, 504, 505, and 506 of 
     Public Law 105-119, and all funds appropriated in this Act to 
     the Legal Services Corporation shall be subject to the same 
     terms and conditions set forth in such sections, except that 
     all references in sections 502 and 503 to 1997 and 1998 shall 
     be deemed to refer instead to 2014 and 2015, respectively.

                        Marine Mammal Commission

                         salaries and expenses

       For necessary expenses of the Marine Mammal Commission as 
     authorized by title II of the Marine Mammal Protection Act of 
     1972 (16 U.S.C. 1361 et seq.), $3,250,000.

            Office of the United States Trade Representative

                         salaries and expenses

       For necessary expenses of the Office of the United States 
     Trade Representative, including the hire of passenger motor 
     vehicles and the employment of experts and consultants as 
     authorized by section 3109 of title 5, United States Code, 
     $53,500,000, of which $1,000,000 shall remain available until 
     expended: Provided, That not to exceed $124,000 shall be 
     available for official reception and representation expenses.

                        State Justice Institute

                         salaries and expenses

       For necessary expenses of the State Justice Institute, as 
     authorized by the State Justice Institute Authorization Act 
     of 1984 (42 U.S.C. 10701 et seq.) $5,121,000, of which 
     $500,000 shall remain available until September 30, 2016: 
     Provided, That not to exceed $2,250 shall be available for 
     official reception and representation expenses: Provided 
     further, That, for the purposes of section 505 of this Act, 
     the State Justice Institute shall be considered an agency of 
     the United States Government.

                                TITLE V

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

                        (including rescissions)

       Sec. 501.  No part of any appropriation contained in this 
     Act shall be used for publicity or propaganda purposes not 
     authorized by the Congress, or for contracts to provide 
     training for agency employees to engage in such publicity or 
     propaganda purposes.
       Sec. 502.  No part of any appropriation contained in this 
     Act shall remain available for obligation beyond the current 
     fiscal year unless expressly so provided herein.
       Sec. 503.  The expenditure of any appropriation under this 
     Act for any consulting service through procurement contract, 
     pursuant to section 3109 of title 5, United States Code, 
     shall be limited to those contracts where such expenditures 
     are a matter of public record and available for public 
     inspection, except where otherwise provided under existing 
     law, or under existing Executive order issued pursuant to 
     existing law.
       Sec. 504.  If any provision of this Act or the application 
     of such provision to any person or circumstances shall be 
     held invalid, the remainder of the Act and the application of 
     each provision to persons or circumstances other than those 
     as to which it is held invalid shall not be affected thereby.
       Sec. 505.  None of the funds provided under this Act, or 
     provided under previous appropriations Acts to the agencies 
     funded by this Act that remain available for obligation or 
     expenditure in fiscal year 2015, or provided from any 
     accounts in the Treasury of the United States derived by the 
     collection of fees available to the agencies funded by this 
     Act, shall be available for obligation or expenditure through 
     a reprogramming of funds that: (1) creates or initiates a new 
     program, project or activity; (2) eliminates a program, 
     project or activity; (3) increases funds or personnel by any 
     means for any project or activity for which funds have been 
     denied or restricted; (4) relocates an office or employees; 
     (5) reorganizes or renames offices, programs or activities; 
     (6) contracts out or privatizes any functions or activities 
     presently performed by Federal employees; (7) augments 
     existing programs, projects or activities in excess of 
     $500,000 or 10 percent, whichever is less, or reduces by 10 
     percent funding for any program, project or activity, or 
     numbers of personnel by 10 percent; or (8) results from any 
     general savings, including savings from a reduction in 
     personnel, which would result in a change in existing 
     programs, projects or activities as approved by Congress; 
     unless the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations are 
     notified 15 days in advance of such reprogramming of funds by 
     agencies (excluding agencies of the Department of Justice) 
     funded by this Act and 45 days in advance of such 
     reprogramming of funds by agencies of the Department of 
     Justice funded by this Act.
       Sec. 506. (a) If it has been finally determined by a court 
     or Federal agency that any person intentionally affixed a 
     label bearing a ``Made in America'' inscription, or any 
     inscription with the same meaning, to any product sold in or 
     shipped to the United States that is not made in the United 
     States, the person shall be ineligible to receive any 
     contract or subcontract made with funds made available in 
     this Act, pursuant to the debarment, suspension, and 
     ineligibility procedures described in sections 9.400 through 
     9.409 of title 48, Code of Federal Regulations.
       (b)(1) To the extent practicable, with respect to 
     authorized purchases of promotional items, funds made 
     available by this Act shall be used to purchase items that 
     are manufactured, produced, or assembled in the United 
     States, its territories or possessions.
       (2) The term ``promotional items'' has the meaning given 
     the term in OMB Circular A-87, Attachment B, Item (1)(f)(3).
       Sec. 507. (a) The Departments of Commerce and Justice, the 
     National Science Foundation, and the National Aeronautics and 
     Space Administration shall provide to the Committees on 
     Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Senate 
     a quarterly report on the status of balances of 
     appropriations at the account level. For unobligated, 
     uncommitted balances and unobligated, committed balances the 
     quarterly reports shall separately identify the amounts 
     attributable to each source year of appropriation from which 
     the balances were derived. For balances that are obligated, 
     but unexpended, the quarterly reports shall separately 
     identify amounts by the year of obligation.
       (b) The report described in subsection (a) shall be 
     submitted within 30 days of the end of each quarter.
       (c) If a department or agency is unable to fulfill any 
     aspect of a reporting requirement described in subsection (a) 
     due to a limitation of a current accounting system, the 
     department or agency shall fulfill such aspect to the maximum 
     extent practicable under such accounting system and shall 
     identify and describe in each quarterly report the extent to 
     which such aspect is not fulfilled.
       Sec. 508.  Any costs incurred by a department or agency 
     funded under this Act resulting from, or to prevent, 
     personnel actions taken in response to funding reductions 
     included in this Act shall be absorbed within the total 
     budgetary resources available to such department or agency: 
     Provided, That the authority to transfer funds between 
     appropriations accounts as may be necessary to carry out this 
     section is provided in addition to authorities included 
     elsewhere in this Act: Provided further, That use of funds to 
     carry out this section shall be treated as a reprogramming of 
     funds under section 505 of this Act and shall not be 
     available for obligation or expenditure except in compliance 
     with the procedures set forth in that section: Provided 
     further, That for the Department of Commerce, this section 
     shall also apply to actions taken for the care and protection 
     of loan collateral or grant property.
       Sec. 509.  None of the funds provided by this Act shall be 
     available to promote the sale or export of tobacco or tobacco 
     products, or to seek the reduction or removal by any foreign 
     country of restrictions on the marketing of tobacco or 
     tobacco products, except for restrictions which are not 
     applied equally to all tobacco or tobacco products of the 
     same type.
       Sec. 510.  None of the funds made available in this Act may 
     be used to pay the salaries and expenses of personnel of the 
     Department of Justice to obligate more than $770,000,000 
     during fiscal year 2015 from the fund established by section 
     1402 of Public Law 98-473 (42 U.S.C. 10601).

                              {time}  1745


                     Amendment Offered by Mr. Costa

  Mr. COSTA. Madam Chairwoman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       Page 81, line 22, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(increased by 230,000,000)''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to the order of the House of today, the 
gentleman from California (Mr. Costa) and a Member opposed each will 
control 5 minutes.
  Mr. ADERHOLT. Madam Chair, I reserve a point of order upon the 
gentleman's amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. A point of order is reserved.
  The gentleman from California is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. COSTA. Madam Chair, I rise today to offer an amendment to H.R.

[[Page H4964]]

4660. This amendment would increase the cap on the Crime Victims Fund 
to $1 billion, providing needed funding for victims, while maintaining 
the stability of the fund for years to come.
  Since 1984, the Victims of Crime Act has provided Federal grants to 
provide essential and, oftentimes, lifesaving services for victims of 
crimes across America.
  The Crime Victims Fund is not financed--let's be clear about this--by 
taxpayer dollars, but by fines, forfeitures, and other penalties paid 
by Federal criminal offenders who have been convicted.
  By statute, the fund is dedicated to solely supporting victims' 
services. Because these nontax dollars have already been collected and 
deposited into the fund, raising the cap does not add to the deficit or 
to the debt.
  Right now, the Crime Victims Fund has more than $10 billion sitting 
in the account waiting to reach the hands of our Nation's victims of 
crime. However, budgetary rules that make no sense whatsoever, in my 
opinion, are preventing this critical fund from serving our Nation's 
crime victims.
  The underlying bill caps the Crime Victims Fund to $770 million,--
that is what is in the bill--leaving billions of dollars for the 
government to use to offset for other Federal spending. This is wrong. 
It is immoral. It is what our taxpayers don't like about the system 
here in Washington.
  Thankfully, there is a solution. Congressman Judge Poe--my good 
friend--and I have introduced legislation, H.R. 1624, the Crime Victims 
Fund Preservation Act, which would create a lockbox for the fund. 
Because the fund contains no taxpayer dollars, it should not be 
considered as a part of the budget.
  Without this legislation, Congress will continue to place 
artificially low caps on the fund, which only denies and delays 
necessary services for victims of crime.
  Congressman Poe and I intend to withdraw the amendment with the 
recognition we must fix this problem going forward.
  I would like to thank Chairman Wolf and Ranking Member Fattah for 
your good work on this bill, and I would hope that Judge Poe and I 
could work with you and your staff to fix the rules that prevent this 
funding from reaching crime victims.
  I yield the balance of my time to the Congressman from Texas, Judge 
Ted Poe, my good friend and cochair of the Victims' Rights Caucus.
  Mr. POE of Texas. I thank the gentleman from California (Mr. Costa), 
my friend, for this amendment and not only this, but his hard work on 
victims' issues, even before he came to Congress, in California, being 
the author of the concept of the three strikes and you are out rule 
that is in California and many other States. I want to congratulate him 
on this.
  Madam Chair, the VOCA fund, Victims of Crime Act fund, is a great 
idea. What it is is, when criminals are convicted in Federal court, 
Federal judges impose fees and fines on that criminal, and that money 
goes into a fund that is designed to go to victims of crime.
  Great idea, let those criminals pay the rent on the courthouse, pay 
for the system they have created. $10 billion is in that fund, but less 
than 10 percent of it gets spent every year. Why is that? Because more 
money keeps coming in; those Federal judges are nailing those 
criminals, and more money keeps coming into the fund every year. It is 
$10 billion. Now, we are only spending a little bit of it for victims 
services.
  The reason is--this is my opinion--fuzzy math in the accounting 
procedure. If more money is spent, for some reason, that is counted as 
an increase in spending, even though it is not taxpayer money. The 
money belongs to victims, funded by criminals; so, because of the 
accounting procedure, we are only able to spend a fraction of the money 
each year.
  We want to spend more of the money because more keeps coming in. 
Victims deserve it. As my friend said, it is immoral that this money is 
not spent for victims that is in this fund.
  We understand the problem with the point of order. We would like 
future possibility to have the bill that Mr. Costa and I have 
sponsored, to get it on the floor. To make it very simple, the money 
that goes in the fund goes to victims, and it is not used to pay 
offsets for other government projects.
  I thank the gentleman. I do want to thank Chairman Wolf for working 
with us--he understands the problem--working with us to try to spend 
more of the money that belongs to victims that criminals have donated, 
maybe unwillingly, to the system.
  Mr. COSTA. Madam Chair, I want to thank the gentleman from Texas, my 
good friend and cochair of the Victims' Rights Caucus. I could not have 
said it any better. Common sense suggests that we fix this problem.
  I thank the chairman and the ranking member.
  Madam Chair, I ask unanimous consent to withdraw the amendment, and I 
hope we can work on this in the future.
  The Acting CHAIR. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman 
from California?
  There was no objection.


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, proceedings 
will now resume on those amendments on which further proceedings were 
postponed in the following order:
  Amendment by Mr. Thompson of California.
  Amendment by Mr. Polis of Colorado.
  Amendment by Mr. Cicilline of Rhode Island.
  Amendment by Mr. Smith of Texas.
  Amendment by Mr. Austin Scott of Georgia.
  The Chair will reduce to 2 minutes the time for any electronic vote 
after the first vote in this series.


            Amendment Offered by Mr. Thompson of California

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from California 
(Mr. Thompson) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 260, 
noes 145, answered ``present'' 1, not voting 25, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 249]

                               AYES--260

     Amodei
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barletta
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brooks (IN)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Camp
     Cantor
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clyburn
     Coffman
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crenshaw
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     Davis, Rodney
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Denham
     Dent
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Duffy
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fitzpatrick
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Goodlatte
     Gowdy
     Grayson
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Heck (WA)
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Hurt
     Israel
     Issa
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Jolly
     Jones
     Joyce
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kelly (PA)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Marino
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (FL)
     Murphy (PA)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Negrete McLeod
     Noem
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paulsen
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Pingree (ME)
     Pitts
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Roybal-Allard
     Royce
     Ruiz
     Runyan

[[Page H4965]]


     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Sinema
     Sires
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stivers
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wagner
     Walden
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waxman
     Welch
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Wolf
     Woodall
     Yarmuth
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--145

     Aderholt
     Amash
     Bachmann
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Broun (GA)
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Coble
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cotton
     Crawford
     Culberson
     Daines
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Gosar
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Harper
     Harris
     Hensarling
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jordan
     King (IA)
     Kingston
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Latta
     Long
     Lucas
     Lummis
     Marchant
     Massie
     McAllister
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     Meadows
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Mullin
     Neugebauer
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Pearce
     Perry
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Rahall
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thornberry
     Tipton
     Walberg
     Walorski
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)

                        ANSWERED ``PRESENT''--1

       
     Johnson, E. B.
       

                             NOT VOTING--25

     Bass
     Benishek
     Campbell
     Capito
     Chaffetz
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Cramer
     Dingell
     Fortenberry
     Green, Al
     Hanna
     Hartzler
     Hastings (FL)
     Lankford
     Lewis
     McCarthy (NY)
     McKeon
     Miller, Gary
     Palazzo
     Rangel
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Shuster
     Slaughter
     Waters

                              {time}  1823

  Messrs. HOLDING, GRIFFIN of Arkansas, NUNNELEE, LAMBORN, NEUGEBAUER, 
TIPTON, ROKITA, HUNTER, McALLISTER, DesJARLAIS, WILSON of South 
Carolina, RAHALL, and ROHRABACHER changed their vote from ``aye'' to 
``no.''
  Messrs. THOMPSON of Pennsylvania, LUETKEMEYER, BECERRA, PETERS of 
California, GRAYSON, MULVANEY, ROTHFUS, and MEEKS changed their vote 
from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                     Amendment Offered by Mr. Polis

  The Acting CHAIR (Mr. Denham). The unfinished business is the demand 
for a recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from 
Colorado (Mr. Polis) on which further proceedings were postponed and on 
which the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 66, 
noes 339, not voting 26, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 250]

                                AYES--66

     Amash
     Bentivolio
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Braley (IA)
     Broun (GA)
     Capps
     Cardenas
     Cohen
     Conyers
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Deutch
     Duncan (TN)
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Eshoo
     Farr
     Hahn
     Hensarling
     Holt
     Honda
     Huelskamp
     Hunter
     Jeffries
     Jones
     Kind
     Labrador
     Lee (CA)
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lummis
     Maffei
     Massie
     McDermott
     McNerney
     Miller, George
     Moran
     Mulvaney
     Nadler
     Negrete McLeod
     O'Rourke
     Owens
     Pelosi
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Polis
     Rohrabacher
     Royce
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schakowsky
     Schrader
     Schweikert
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Sherman
     Speier
     Stewart
     Stockman
     Thompson (CA)
     Van Hollen
     Yoho

                               NOES--339

     Aderholt
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera (CA)
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Boustany
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Camp
     Cantor
     Capuano
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cartwright
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chabot
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clyburn
     Coble
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Connolly
     Cook
     Cooper
     Costa
     Cotton
     Courtney
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Cummings
     Daines
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     Davis, Rodney
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Denham
     Dent
     Diaz-Balart
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Ellmers
     Engel
     Enyart
     Esty
     Farenthold
     Fattah
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Foxx
     Frankel (FL)
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Grayson
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Gutierrez
     Hall
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Heck (WA)
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holding
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Hudson
     Huffman
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Israel
     Issa
     Jackson Lee
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Jolly
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kelly (PA)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kline
     Kuster
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     Latta
     Levin
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Long
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McAllister
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCollum
     McGovern
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Meng
     Messer
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Moore
     Mullin
     Murphy (FL)
     Murphy (PA)
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nolan
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paulsen
     Payne
     Pearce
     Perlmutter
     Perry
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schwartz
     Scott, Austin
     Serrano
     Sessions
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Sires
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Southerland
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Terry
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Tipton
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waxman
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Welch
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (FL)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yarmuth
     Yoder
     Young (AK)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--26

     Bass
     Benishek
     Campbell
     Capito
     Chaffetz
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Cramer
     Dingell
     Garcia
     Green, Al
     Hartzler
     Hastings (FL)
     Hurt
     Lankford
     Lewis
     McCarthy (NY)
     McKeon
     Miller, Gary
     Palazzo
     Rangel
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Schock
     Shuster
     Slaughter
     Waters

                              {time}  1827

  Ms. DUCKWORTH changed her vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated against;

[[Page H4966]]

  Mr. HURT. Mr. Chair, I was not present for rollcall vote No. 250. Had 
I been present, I would have voted ``no.''


                   Amendment Offered by Mr. Cicilline

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Rhode 
Island (Mr. Cicilline) on which further proceedings were postponed and 
on which the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 196, 
noes 212, not voting 23, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 251]

                               AYES--196

     Barber
     Barletta
     Barrow (GA)
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brooks (IN)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Cohen
     Collins (GA)
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Daines
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     Davis, Rodney
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Dent
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Gabbard
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Gibson
     Grayson
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Heck (NV)
     Heck (WA)
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Himes
     Holding
     Honda
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Hudson
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Jones
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     King (NY)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kline
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McAllister
     McGovern
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKinley
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Moore
     Moran
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Negrete McLeod
     Noem
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paulsen
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perry
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Reed
     Reichert
     Richmond
     Roe (TN)
     Roybal-Allard
     Royce
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schneider
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Sires
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Terry
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Upton
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Visclosky
     Walden
     Walorski
     Walz
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--212

     Aderholt
     Amash
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barr
     Barton
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Camp
     Cantor
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chabot
     Clyburn
     Coble
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cotton
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Cummings
     Denham
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Doggett
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Edwards
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Foxx
     Frankel (FL)
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gallego
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hastings (WA)
     Hensarling
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jackson Lee
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Jolly
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kuster
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Latta
     Lofgren
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McKeon
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, George
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (FL)
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Pearce
     Perlmutter
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Polis
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sessions
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Valadao
     Van Hollen
     Vela
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waxman
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Welch
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--23

     Bass
     Benishek
     Campbell
     Capito
     Chaffetz
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Cramer
     Dingell
     Green, Al
     Hartzler
     Hastings (FL)
     Lankford
     Lewis
     McCarthy (NY)
     Miller, Gary
     Palazzo
     Rangel
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Shuster
     Slaughter
     Velazquez
     Waters


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1831

  Mr. GINGREY of Georgia changed his vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                Amendment Offered by Mr. Smith of Texas

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Texas (Mr. 
Smith) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which the 
ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 208, 
noes 201, not voting 22, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 252]

                               AYES--208

     Aderholt
     Amash
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Cantor
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Coble
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cotton
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Garcia
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Hall
     Harper
     Harris
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jolly
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Latham
     Latta
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     McAllister
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Roskam
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thornberry
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf

[[Page H4967]]


     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--201

     Barber
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Boustany
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Camp
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chabot
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Denham
     Dent
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fitzpatrick
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Gerlach
     Gibson
     Grayson
     Grijalva
     Guthrie
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Negrete McLeod
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Reed
     Richmond
     Ross
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Sinema
     Sires
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waxman
     Welch
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                             NOT VOTING--22

     Bass
     Benishek
     Campbell
     Capito
     Chaffetz
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Cramer
     Dingell
     Green, Al
     Hartzler
     Hastings (FL)
     Lankford
     Lewis
     McCarthy (NY)
     Miller, Gary
     Palazzo
     Rangel
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Shuster
     Slaughter
     Waters

                              {time}  1836

  Mr. ROONEY changed his vote from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


            Amendment Offered by Mr. Austin Scott of Georgia

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Georgia 
(Mr. Austin Scott) on which further proceedings were postponed and on 
which the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 116, 
noes 290, not voting 25, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 253]

                               AYES--116

     Amash
     Bachmann
     Barton
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Broun (GA)
     Calvert
     Cantor
     Chabot
     Coble
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cotton
     Denham
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Ellmers
     Fleming
     Flores
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Graves (GA)
     Hall
     Harris
     Hastings (WA)
     Hensarling
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     King (IA)
     Kingston
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Latta
     Long
     Lucas
     Marchant
     McClintock
     McHenry
     Meadows
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Smith (NE)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stutzman
     Thornberry
     Tipton
     Walberg
     Walorski
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Woodall
     Yoho

                               NOES--290

     Aderholt
     Amodei
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Boustany
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brooks (IN)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Byrne
     Camp
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cartwright
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clyburn
     Coffman
     Cohen
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Cummings
     Daines
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     Davis, Rodney
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Dent
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Duncan (TN)
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farenthold
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Gerlach
     Gibson
     Gohmert
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (MO)
     Grayson
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harper
     Heck (NV)
     Heck (WA)
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Hultgren
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jolly
     Joyce
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kelly (PA)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lummis
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Marino
     Massie
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McAllister
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Meng
     Messer
     Michaud
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (FL)
     Murphy (PA)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Negrete McLeod
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Olson
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Poe (TX)
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rooney
     Roskam
     Roybal-Allard
     Runyan
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sessions
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Sires
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stivers
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Terry
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wagner
     Walden
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Yarmuth
     Yoder
     Young (AK)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--25

     Bass
     Benishek
     Campbell
     Capito
     Chaffetz
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Cramer
     Dingell
     Green, Al
     Hartzler
     Hastings (FL)
     Lankford
     Lewis
     McCarthy (NY)
     Miller, Gary
     Palazzo
     Rangel
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Shuster
     Slaughter
     Stockman
     Waters

                              {time}  1840

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Mr. WOLF. Madam Chair, I move that the Committee do now rise.
  The motion was agreed to.
  Accordingly, the Committee rose; and the Speaker pro tempore (Mr. 
Rodney Davis of Illinois) having assumed the chair, Mr. Denham, Acting 
Chair of the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union, 
reported that that Committee, having had under consideration the bill 
(H.R. 4660) making appropriations for the Departments of Commerce and 
Justice, Science, and Related Agencies for the fiscal year

[[Page H4968]]

ending September 30, 2015, and for other purposes, had come to no 
resolution thereon.

                          ____________________