Amendment Text: H.Amdt.961 — 114th Congress (2015-2016)

There is one version of the amendment.

Shown Here:
Amendment as Offered (02/26/2016)

This Amendment appears on page H981 in the following article from the Congressional Record.


[Pages H955-H991]
From the Congressional Record Online through the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]




     SPORTSMEN'S HERITAGE AND RECREATIONAL ENHANCEMENT ACT OF 2015


                             General Leave

  Mr. WESTERMAN. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that all Members 
may have 5 legislative days in which to revise and extend their remarks 
and include extraneous material on the bill, H.R. 2406.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. Thompson of Pennsylvania). Is there 
objection to the request of the gentleman from Arkansas?
  There was no objection.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to House Resolution 619 and rule 
XVIII, the Chair declares the House in the Committee of the Whole House 
on the state of the Union for the further consideration of the bill, 
H.R. 2406.
  Will the gentleman from Illinois (Mr. Hultgren) kindly take the 
chair.

                              {time}  0916


                     In the Committee of the Whole

  Accordingly, the House resolved itself into the Committee of the 
Whole House on the state of the Union for the further consideration of 
the bill (H.R. 2406) to protect and enhance opportunities for 
recreational hunting, fishing, and shooting, and for other purposes, 
with Mr. Hultgren (Acting Chair) in the chair.
  The Clerk read the title of the bill.
  The Acting CHAIR. When the Committee of the Whole rose on Thursday, 
February 25, 2016, all time for general debate had expired.
  Pursuant to the rule, the bill shall be considered for amendment 
under the 5-minute rule.
  It shall be in order to consider as an original bill for the purpose 
of amendment under the 5-minute rule an amendment in the nature of a 
substitute, recommended by the Committee on Natural Resources, printed 
in the bill. The committee amendment in the nature of a substitute 
shall be considered as read.
  The text of the committee amendment in the nature of a substitute is 
as follows:

                               H.R. 2406

       Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of 
     the United States of America in Congress assembled,

     SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

       This Act may be cited as the ``Sportsmen's Heritage and 
     Recreational Enhancement Act of 2015'' or the ``SHARE Act''.

     SEC. 2. TABLE OF CONTENTS.

       The table of contents for this Act is as follows:

Sec. 1. Short title.
Sec. 2. Table of contents.
Sec. 3. Report on economic impact.

   TITLE I--HUNTING, FISHING AND RECREATIONAL SHOOTING PROTECTION ACT

Sec. 101. Short title.
Sec. 102. Modification of definition.
Sec. 103. Limitation on authority to regulate ammunition and fishing 
              tackle.

    TITLE II--TARGET PRACTICE AND MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING SUPPORT ACT

Sec. 201. Short title.
Sec. 202. Findings; purpose.
Sec. 203. Definition of public target range.
Sec. 204. Amendments to Pittman-Robertson Wildlife Restoration Act.
Sec. 205. Limits on liability.
Sec. 206. Sense of Congress regarding cooperation.

          TITLE III--POLAR BEAR CONSERVATION AND FAIRNESS ACT

Sec. 301. Short title.
Sec. 302.  Permits for importation of polar bear trophies taken in 
              sport hunts in Canada.

             TITLE IV--RECREATIONAL LANDS SELF-DEFENSE ACT

Sec. 401. Short title.
Sec. 402. Protecting Americans from violent crime.

 TITLE V--WILDLIFE AND HUNTING HERITAGE CONSERVATION COUNCIL ADVISORY 
                               COMMITTEE

Sec. 501. Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council Advisory 
              Committee.

 TITLE VI--RECREATIONAL FISHING AND HUNTING HERITAGE OPPORTUNITIES ACT

Sec. 601. Short title.
Sec. 602. Findings.
Sec. 603. Fishing, hunting, and recreational shooting.
Sec. 604. Volunteer Hunters; Reports; Closures and Restrictions.

              TITLE VII--FARMER AND HUNTER PROTECTION ACT

Sec. 701. Short title.
Sec. 702. Baiting of migratory game birds.

    TITLE VIII--TRANSPORTING BOWS ACROSS NATIONAL PARK SERVICE LANDS

Sec. 801. Short title.
Sec. 802. Bowhunting opportunity and wildlife stewardship.

  TITLE IX--FEDERAL LAND TRANSACTION FACILITATION ACT REAUTHORIZATION 
                                (FLTFA)

Sec. 901. Short title.
Sec. 902. Federal Land Transaction Facilitation Act.

 TITLE X--AFRICAN ELEPHANT CONSERVATION AND LEGAL IVORY POSSESSION ACT

Sec. 1001. Short title.
Sec. 1002. References.
Sec. 1003. Limited exemption for certain African elephant ivory.
Sec. 1004. Placement of United States Fish and Wildlife Service law 
              enforcement officer in each African elephant range 
              country.
Sec. 1005.  Certification for the purposes of the Fishermen's 
              Protective Act of 1967.
Sec. 1006. Treatment of elephant ivory.
Sec. 1007. Sport-hunted elephant trophies.
Sec. 1008. African Elephant Conservation Act financial assistance 
              priority and reauthorization.

               TITLE XI--RESPECT FOR TREATIES AND RIGHTS

Sec. 1101. Respect for Treaties and Rights.

  TITLE XII--INTEREST ON OBLIGATIONS HELD IN THE WILDLIFE RESTORATION 
                                  FUND

Sec. 1201. Interest on obligations held in the wildlife restoration 
              fund.

       TITLE XIII--PERMITS FOR FILM CREWS OF FIVE PEOPLE OR LESS

Sec. 1301. Annual permit and fee for film crews of 5 persons or fewer.

[[Page H956]]

            TITLE XIV--STATE APPROVAL OF FISHING RESTRICTION

Sec. 1401. State or Territorial Approval of Restriction of Recreational 
              or Commercial Fishing Access to Certain State or 
              Territorial Waters.

  TITLE XV--HUNTING AND RECREATIONAL FISHING WITHIN CERTAIN NATIONAL 
                                FORESTS

Sec. 1501. Definitions.
Sec. 1502. Hunting and recreational fishing within the national forest 
              system.

              TITLE XVI--GRAND CANYON BISON MANAGEMENT ACT

Sec. 1601. Short title.
Sec. 1602. Definitions.
Sec. 1603. Bison management plan for Grand Canyon National Park.

     SEC. 3. REPORT ON ECONOMIC IMPACT.

       Not later than 12 months after the date of the enactment of 
     this Act, the Secretary of Interior shall submit a report to 
     Congress that assesses expected economic impacts of the Act. 
     Such report shall include--
       (1) a review of any expected increases in recreational 
     hunting, fishing, shooting, and conservation activities;
       (2) an estimate of any jobs created in each industry 
     expected to support such activities described in paragraph 
     (1), including in the supply, manufacturing, distribution, 
     and retail sectors;
       (3) an estimate of wages related to jobs described in 
     paragraph (2); and
       (4) an estimate of anticipated new local, State, and 
     Federal revenue related to jobs described in paragraph (2).

   TITLE I--HUNTING, FISHING AND RECREATIONAL SHOOTING PROTECTION ACT

     SEC. 101. SHORT TITLE.

       This title may be cited as the ``Hunting, Fishing, and 
     Recreational Shooting Protection Act''.

     SEC. 102. MODIFICATION OF DEFINITION.

       Section 3(2)(B) of the Toxic Substances Control Act (15 
     U.S.C. 2602(2)(B)) is amended--
       (1) in clause (v), by striking ``, and'' and inserting ``, 
     or any component of any such article including, without 
     limitation, shot, bullets and other projectiles, propellants, 
     and primers,'';
       (2) in clause (vi) by striking the period at the end and 
     inserting ``, and''; and
       (3) by inserting after clause (vi) the following:
       ``(vii) any sport fishing equipment (as such term is 
     defined in subsection (a) of section 4162 of the Internal 
     Revenue Code of 1986) the sale of which is subject to the tax 
     imposed by section 4161(a) of such Code (determined without 
     regard to any exemptions from such tax as provided by section 
     4162 or 4221 or any other provision of such Code), and sport 
     fishing equipment components.''.

     SEC. 103. LIMITATION ON AUTHORITY TO REGULATE AMMUNITION AND 
                   FISHING TACKLE.

       (a) Limitation.--Except as provided in section 20.21 of 
     title 50, Code of Federal Regulations, as in effect on the 
     date of the enactment of this Act, or any substantially 
     similar successor regulation thereto, the Secretary of the 
     Interior, the Secretary of Agriculture, and, except as 
     provided by subsection (b), any bureau, service, or office of 
     the Department of the Interior or the Department of 
     Agriculture, may not regulate the use of ammunition 
     cartridges, ammunition components, or fishing tackle based on 
     the lead content thereof if such use is in compliance with 
     the law of the State in which the use occurs.
       (b) Exception.--The limitation in subsection (a) shall not 
     apply to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service or the National 
     Park Service.

    TITLE II--TARGET PRACTICE AND MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING SUPPORT ACT

     SEC. 201. SHORT TITLE.

       This title may be cited as the ``Target Practice and 
     Marksmanship Training Support Act''.

     SEC. 202. FINDINGS; PURPOSE.

       (a) Findings.--Congress finds that--
       (1) the use of firearms and archery equipment for target 
     practice and marksmanship training activities on Federal land 
     is allowed, except to the extent specific portions of that 
     land have been closed to those activities;
       (2) in recent years preceding the date of enactment of this 
     Act, portions of Federal land have been closed to target 
     practice and marksmanship training for many reasons;
       (3) the availability of public target ranges on non-Federal 
     land has been declining for a variety of reasons, including 
     continued population growth and development near former 
     ranges;
       (4) providing opportunities for target practice and 
     marksmanship training at public target ranges on Federal and 
     non-Federal land can help--
       (A) to promote enjoyment of shooting, recreational, and 
     hunting activities; and
       (B) to ensure safe and convenient locations for those 
     activities;
       (5) Federal law in effect on the date of enactment of this 
     Act, including the Pittman-Robertson Wildlife Restoration Act 
     (16 U.S.C. 669 et seq.), provides Federal support for 
     construction and expansion of public target ranges by making 
     available to States amounts that may be used for 
     construction, operation, and maintenance of public target 
     ranges; and
       (6) it is in the public interest to provide increased 
     Federal support to facilitate the construction or expansion 
     of public target ranges.
       (b) Purpose.--The purpose of this title is to facilitate 
     the construction and expansion of public target ranges, 
     including ranges on Federal land managed by the Forest 
     Service and the Bureau of Land Management.

     SEC. 203. DEFINITION OF PUBLIC TARGET RANGE.

       In this title, the term ``public target range'' means a 
     specific location that--
       (1) is identified by a governmental agency for recreational 
     shooting;
       (2) is open to the public;
       (3) may be supervised; and
       (4) may accommodate archery or rifle, pistol, or shotgun 
     shooting.

     SEC. 204. AMENDMENTS TO PITTMAN-ROBERTSON WILDLIFE 
                   RESTORATION ACT.

       (a) Definitions.--Section 2 of the Pittman-Robertson 
     Wildlife Restoration Act (16 U.S.C. 669a) is amended--
       (1) by redesignating paragraphs (2) through (8) as 
     paragraphs (3) through (9), respectively; and
       (2) by inserting after paragraph (1) the following:
       ``(2) the term `public target range' means a specific 
     location that--
       ``(A) is identified by a governmental agency for 
     recreational shooting;
       ``(B) is open to the public;
       ``(C) may be supervised; and
       ``(D) may accommodate archery or rifle, pistol, or shotgun 
     shooting;''.
       (b) Expenditures for Management of Wildlife Areas and 
     Resources.--Section 8(b) of the Pittman-Robertson Wildlife 
     Restoration Act (16 U.S.C. 669g(b)) is amended--
       (1) by striking ``(b) Each State'' and inserting the 
     following:
       ``(b) Expenditures for Management of Wildlife Areas and 
     Resources.--
       ``(1) In general.--Except as provided in paragraph (2), 
     each State'';
       (2) in paragraph (1) (as so designated), by striking 
     ``construction, operation,'' and inserting ``operation'';
       (3) in the second sentence, by striking ``The non-Federal 
     share'' and inserting the following:
       ``(3) Non-federal share.--The non-Federal share'';
       (4) in the third sentence, by striking ``The Secretary'' 
     and inserting the following:
       ``(4) Regulations.--The Secretary''; and
       (5) by inserting after paragraph (1) (as designated by 
     paragraph (1) of this subsection) the following:
       ``(2) Exception.--Notwithstanding the limitation described 
     in paragraph (1), a State may pay up to 90 percent of the 
     cost of acquiring land for, expanding, or constructing a 
     public target range.''.
       (c) Firearm and Bow Hunter Education and Safety Program 
     Grants.--Section 10 of the Pittman-Robertson Wildlife 
     Restoration Act (16 U.S.C. 669h-1) is amended--
       (1) in subsection (a), by adding at the end the following:
       ``(3) Allocation of additional amounts.--Of the amount 
     apportioned to a State for any fiscal year under section 
     4(b), the State may elect to allocate not more than 10 
     percent, to be combined with the amount apportioned to the 
     State under paragraph (1) for that fiscal year, for acquiring 
     land for, expanding, or constructing a public target 
     range.'';
       (2) by striking subsection (b) and inserting the following:
       ``(b) Cost Sharing.--
       ``(1) In general.--Except as provided in paragraph (2), the 
     Federal share of the cost of any activity carried out using a 
     grant under this section shall not exceed 75 percent of the 
     total cost of the activity.
       ``(2) Public target range construction or expansion.--The 
     Federal share of the cost of acquiring land for, expanding, 
     or constructing a public target range in a State on Federal 
     or non-Federal land pursuant to this section or section 8(b) 
     shall not exceed 90 percent of the cost of the activity.''; 
     and
       (3) in subsection (c)(1)--
       (A) by striking ``Amounts made'' and inserting the 
     following:
       ``(A) In general.--Except as provided in subparagraph (B), 
     amounts made''; and
       (B) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(B) Exception.--Amounts provided for acquiring land for, 
     constructing, or expanding a public target range shall remain 
     available for expenditure and obligation during the 5-fiscal-
     year period beginning on October 1 of the first fiscal year 
     for which the amounts are made available.''.

     SEC. 205. LIMITS ON LIABILITY.

       (a) Discretionary Function.--For purposes of chapter 171 of 
     title 28, United States Code (commonly referred to as the 
     ``Federal Tort Claims Act''), any action by an agent or 
     employee of the United States to manage or allow the use of 
     Federal land for purposes of target practice or marksmanship 
     training by a member of the public shall be considered to be 
     the exercise or performance of a discretionary function.
       (b) Civil Action or Claims.--Except to the extent provided 
     in chapter 171 of title 28, United States Code, the United 
     States shall not be subject to any civil action or claim for 
     money damages for any injury to or loss of property, personal 
     injury, or death caused by an activity occurring at a public 
     target range that is--
       (1) funded in whole or in part by the Federal Government 
     pursuant to the Pittman-Robertson Wildlife Restoration Act 
     (16 U.S.C. 669 et seq.); or
       (2) located on Federal land.

     SEC. 206. SENSE OF CONGRESS REGARDING COOPERATION.

       It is the sense of Congress that, consistent with 
     applicable laws and regulations, the Chief of the Forest 
     Service and the Director of the Bureau of Land Management 
     should cooperate with State and local authorities and other 
     entities to carry out waste removal and other activities on 
     any Federal land used as a public target range to encourage 
     continued use of that land for target practice or 
     marksmanship training.

          TITLE III--POLAR BEAR CONSERVATION AND FAIRNESS ACT

     SEC. 301. SHORT TITLE.

       This title may be cited as the ``Polar Bear Conservation 
     and Fairness Act of 2015''.

[[Page H957]]

  


     SEC. 302. PERMITS FOR IMPORTATION OF POLAR BEAR TROPHIES 
                   TAKEN IN SPORT HUNTS IN CANADA.

       Section 104(c)(5)(D) of the Marine Mammal Protection Act of 
     1972 (16 U.S.C. 1374(c)(5)(D)) is amended to read as follows:
       ``(D)(i) The Secretary of the Interior shall, expeditiously 
     after the expiration of the applicable 30-day period under 
     subsection (d)(2), issue a permit for the importation of any 
     polar bear part (other than an internal organ) from a polar 
     bear taken in a sport hunt in Canada to any person--
       ``(I) who submits, with the permit application, proof that 
     the polar bear was legally harvested by the person before 
     February 18, 1997; or
       ``(II) who has submitted, in support of a permit 
     application submitted before May 15, 2008, proof that the 
     polar bear was legally harvested by the person before May 15, 
     2008, from a polar bear population from which a sport-hunted 
     trophy could be imported before that date in accordance with 
     section 18.30(i) of title 50, Code of Federal Regulations.
       ``(ii) The Secretary shall issue permits under clause 
     (i)(I) without regard to subparagraphs (A) and (C)(ii) of 
     this paragraph, subsection (d)(3), and sections 101 and 102. 
     Sections 101(a)(3)(B) and 102(b)(3) shall not apply to the 
     importation of any polar bear part authorized by a permit 
     issued under clause (i)(I). This clause shall not apply to 
     polar bear parts that were imported before June 12, 1997.
       ``(iii) The Secretary shall issue permits under clause 
     (i)(II) without regard to subparagraph (C)(ii) of this 
     paragraph or subsection (d)(3). Sections 101(a)(3)(B) and 
     102(b)(3) shall not apply to the importation of any polar 
     bear part authorized by a permit issued under clause (i)(II). 
     This clause shall not apply to polar bear parts that were 
     imported before the date of enactment of the Polar Bear 
     Conservation and Fairness Act of 2015.''.

             TITLE IV--RECREATIONAL LANDS SELF-DEFENSE ACT

     SEC. 401. SHORT TITLE.

       This title may be cited as the ``Recreational Lands Self-
     Defense Act of 2015''.

     SEC. 402. PROTECTING AMERICANS FROM VIOLENT CRIME.

       (a) Findings.--Congress finds the following:
       (1) The Second Amendment to the Constitution provides that 
     ``the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be 
     infringed''.
       (2) Section 327.13 of title 36, Code of Federal 
     Regulations, provides that, except in special circumstances, 
     ``possession of loaded firearms, ammunition, loaded 
     projectile firing devices, bows and arrows, crossbows, or 
     other weapons is prohibited'' at water resources development 
     projects administered by the Secretary of the Army.
       (3) The regulations described in paragraph (2) prevent 
     individuals complying with Federal and State laws from 
     exercising the second amendment rights of the individuals 
     while at such water resources development projects.
       (4) The Federal laws should make it clear that the second 
     amendment rights of an individual at a water resources 
     development project should not be infringed.
       (b) Protecting the Right of Individuals To Bear Arms at 
     Water Resources Development Projects.--The Secretary of the 
     Army shall not promulgate or enforce any regulation that 
     prohibits an individual from possessing a firearm, including 
     an assembled or functional firearm, at a water resources 
     development project covered under section 327.0 of title 36, 
     Code of Federal Regulations (as in effect on the date of 
     enactment of this Act), if--
       (1) the individual is not otherwise prohibited by law from 
     possessing the firearm; and
       (2) the possession of the firearm is in compliance with the 
     law of the State in which the water resources development 
     project is located.

 TITLE V--WILDLIFE AND HUNTING HERITAGE CONSERVATION COUNCIL ADVISORY 
                               COMMITTEE

     SEC. 501. WILDLIFE AND HUNTING HERITAGE CONSERVATION COUNCIL 
                   ADVISORY COMMITTEE.

       The Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act (16 U.S.C. 661 et 
     seq.) is amended by adding at the end the following:

     ``SEC. 10. WILDLIFE AND HUNTING HERITAGE CONSERVATION COUNCIL 
                   ADVISORY COMMITTEE.

       ``(a) Establishment.--There is hereby established the 
     Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council Advisory 
     Committee (in this section referred to as the `Advisory 
     Committee') to advise the Secretaries of the Interior and 
     Agriculture on wildlife and habitat conservation, hunting, 
     and recreational shooting.
       ``(b) Continuance and Abolishment of Existing Wildlife and 
     Hunting Heritage Conservation Council.--The Wildlife and 
     Hunting Heritage Conservation Council established pursuant to 
     section 441 of the Revised Statutes (43 U.S.C. 1457), section 
     2 of the Fish and Wildlife Act of 1956 (16 U.S.C. 742a), and 
     other Acts applicable to specific bureaus of the Department 
     of the Interior--
       ``(1) shall continue until the date of the first meeting of 
     the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council 
     established by the amendment made by subsection (a); and
       ``(2) is hereby abolished effective on that date.
       ``(c) Duties of the Advisory Committee.--The Advisory 
     Committee shall advise the Secretaries with regard to--
       ``(1) implementation of Executive Order No. 13443: 
     Facilitation of Hunting Heritage and Wildlife Conservation, 
     which directs Federal agencies `to facilitate the expansion 
     and enhancement of hunting opportunities and the management 
     of game species and their habitat';
       ``(2) policies or programs to conserve and restore 
     wetlands, agricultural lands, grasslands, forest, and 
     rangeland habitats;
       ``(3) policies or programs to promote opportunities and 
     access to hunting and shooting sports on Federal lands;
       ``(4) policies or programs to recruit and retain new 
     hunters and shooters;
       ``(5) policies or programs that increase public awareness 
     of the importance of wildlife conservation and the social and 
     economic benefits of recreational hunting and shooting; and
       ``(6) policies or programs that encourage coordination 
     among the public, the hunting and shooting sports community, 
     wildlife conservation groups, and States, tribes, and the 
     Federal Government.
       ``(d) Membership.--
       ``(1) Appointment.--
       ``(A) In general.--The Advisory Committee shall consist of 
     no more than 16 discretionary members and 7 ex officio 
     members.
       ``(B) Ex officio members.--The ex officio members are--
       ``(i) the Director of the United States Fish and Wildlife 
     Service or a designated representative of the Director;
       ``(ii) the Director of the Bureau of Land Management or a 
     designated representative of the Director;
       ``(iii) the Director of the National Park Service or a 
     designated representative of the Director;
       ``(iv) the Chief of the Forest Service or a designated 
     representative of the Chief;
       ``(v) the Chief of the Natural Resources Conservation 
     Service or a designated representative of the Chief;
       ``(vi) the Administrator of the Farm Service Agency or a 
     designated representative of the Administrator; and
       ``(vii) the Executive Director of the Association of Fish 
     and Wildlife Agencies.
       ``(C) Discretionary members.--The discretionary members 
     shall be appointed jointly by the Secretaries from at least 
     one of each of the following:
       ``(i) State fish and wildlife agencies.
       ``(ii) Game bird hunting organizations.
       ``(iii) Wildlife conservation organizations.
       ``(iv) Big game hunting organizations.
       ``(v) Waterfowl hunting organizations.
       ``(vi) The tourism, outfitter, or guiding industry.
       ``(vii) The firearms or ammunition manufacturing industry.
       ``(viii) The hunting or shooting equipment retail industry.
       ``(ix) Tribal resource management organizations.
       ``(x) The agriculture industry.
       ``(xi) The ranching industry.
       ``(xii) Women's hunting and fishing advocacy, outreach, or 
     education organization.
       ``(xiii) Minority hunting and fishing advocacy, outreach, 
     or education organization.
       ``(xiv) Veterans service organization.
       ``(D) Eligibility.--Prior to the appointment of the 
     discretionary members, the Secretaries shall determine that 
     all individuals nominated for appointment to the Advisory 
     Committee, and the organization each individual represents, 
     actively support and promote sustainable-use hunting, 
     wildlife conservation, and recreational shooting.
       ``(2) Terms.--
       ``(A) In general.--Except as provided in subparagraph (B), 
     members of the Advisory Committee shall be appointed for a 
     term of 4 years. Members shall not be appointed for more than 
     3 consecutive or nonconsecutive terms.
       ``(B) Terms of initial appointees.--As designated by the 
     Secretary at the time of appointment, of the members first 
     appointed--
       ``(i) 6 members shall be appointed for a term of 4 years;
       ``(ii) 5 members shall be appointed for a term of 3 years; 
     and
       ``(iii) 5 members shall be appointed for a term of 2 years.
       ``(3) Preservation of public advisory status.--No 
     individual may be appointed as a discretionary member of the 
     Advisory Committee while serving as an officer or employee of 
     the Federal Government.
       ``(4) Vacancy and removal.--
       ``(A) In general.--Any vacancy on the Advisory Committee 
     shall be filled in the manner in which the original 
     appointment was made.
       ``(B) Removal.--Advisory Committee members shall serve at 
     the discretion of the Secretaries and may be removed at any 
     time for good cause.
       ``(5) Continuation of service.--Each appointed member may 
     continue to serve after the expiration of the term of office 
     to which such member was appointed until a successor has been 
     appointed.
       ``(6) Chairperson.--The Chairperson of the Advisory 
     Committee shall be appointed for a 3-year term by the 
     Secretaries, jointly, from among the members of the Advisory 
     Committee. An individual may not be appointed as Chairperson 
     for more than 2 consecutive or nonconsecutive terms.
       ``(7) Pay and expenses.--Members of the Advisory Committee 
     shall serve without pay for such service, but each member of 
     the Advisory Committee may be reimbursed for travel and 
     lodging incurred through attending meetings of the Advisory 
     Committee approved subgroup meetings in the same amounts and 
     under the same conditions as Federal employees (in accordance 
     with section 5703 of title 5, United States Code).
       ``(8) Meetings.--
       ``(A) In general.--The Advisory Committee shall meet at the 
     call of the Secretaries, the chairperson, or a majority of 
     the members, but not less frequently than twice annually.
       ``(B) Open meetings.--Each meeting of the Advisory 
     Committee shall be open to the public.
       ``(C) Prior notice of meetings.--Timely notice of each 
     meeting of the Advisory Committee shall be published in the 
     Federal Register and be submitted to trade publications and 
     publications of general circulation.

[[Page H958]]

       ``(D) Subgroups.--The Advisory Committee may establish such 
     workgroups or subgroups as it deems necessary for the purpose 
     of compiling information or conducting research. However, 
     such workgroups may not conduct business without the 
     direction of the Advisory Committee and must report in full 
     to the Advisory Committee.
       ``(9) Quorum.--Nine members of the Advisory Committee shall 
     constitute a quorum.
       ``(e) Expenses.--The expenses of the Advisory Committee 
     that the Secretaries determine to be reasonable and 
     appropriate shall be paid by the Secretaries.
       ``(f) Administrative Support, Technical Services, and 
     Advice.--A designated Federal Officer shall be jointly 
     appointed by the Secretaries to provide to the Advisory 
     Committee the administrative support, technical services, and 
     advice that the Secretaries determine to be reasonable and 
     appropriate.
       ``(g) Annual Report.--
       ``(1) Required.--Not later than September 30 of each year, 
     the Advisory Committee shall submit a report to the 
     Secretaries, the Committee on Natural Resources and the 
     Committee on Agriculture of the House of Representatives, and 
     the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources and the 
     Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry of the 
     Senate. If circumstances arise in which the Advisory 
     Committee cannot meet the September 30 deadline in any year, 
     the Secretaries shall advise the Chairpersons of each such 
     Committee of the reasons for such delay and the date on which 
     the submission of the report is anticipated.
       ``(2) Contents.--The report required by paragraph (1) shall 
     describe--
       ``(A) the activities of the Advisory Committee during the 
     preceding year;
       ``(B) the reports and recommendations made by the Advisory 
     Committee to the Secretaries during the preceding year; and
       ``(C) an accounting of actions taken by the Secretaries as 
     a result of the recommendations.
       ``(h) Federal Advisory Committee Act.--The Advisory 
     Committee shall be exempt from the Federal Advisory Committee 
     Act (5 U.S.C. App.).''.

 TITLE VI--RECREATIONAL FISHING AND HUNTING HERITAGE OPPORTUNITIES ACT

     SEC. 601. SHORT TITLE.

       This title may be cited as the ``Recreational Fishing and 
     Hunting Heritage and Opportunities Act''.

     SEC. 602. FINDINGS.

       Congress finds that--
       (1) recreational fishing and hunting are important and 
     traditional activities in which millions of Americans 
     participate;
       (2) recreational anglers and hunters have been and continue 
     to be among the foremost supporters of sound fish and 
     wildlife management and conservation in the United States;
       (3) recreational fishing and hunting are environmentally 
     acceptable and beneficial activities that occur and can be 
     provided on Federal lands and waters without adverse effects 
     on other uses or users;
       (4) recreational anglers, hunters, and sporting 
     organizations provide direct assistance to fish and wildlife 
     managers and enforcement officers of the Federal Government 
     as well as State and local governments by investing volunteer 
     time and effort to fish and wildlife conservation;
       (5) recreational anglers, hunters, and the associated 
     industries have generated billions of dollars of critical 
     funding for fish and wildlife conservation, research, and 
     management by providing revenues from purchases of fishing 
     and hunting licenses, permits, and stamps, as well as excise 
     taxes on fishing, hunting, and recreational shooting 
     equipment that have generated billions of dollars of critical 
     funding for fish and wildlife conservation, research, and 
     management;
       (6) recreational shooting is also an important and 
     traditional activity in which millions of Americans 
     participate;
       (7) safe recreational shooting is a valid use of Federal 
     lands, including the establishment of safe and convenient 
     recreational shooting ranges on such lands, and participation 
     in recreational shooting helps recruit and retain hunters and 
     contributes to wildlife conservation;
       (8) opportunities to recreationally fish, hunt, and shoot 
     are declining, which depresses participation in these 
     traditional activities, and depressed participation adversely 
     impacts fish and wildlife conservation and funding for 
     important conservation efforts; and
       (9) the public interest would be served, and our citizens' 
     fish and wildlife resources benefitted, by action to ensure 
     that opportunities are facilitated to engage in fishing and 
     hunting on Federal land as recognized by Executive Order No. 
     12962, relating to recreational fisheries, and Executive 
     Order No. 13443, relating to facilitation of hunting heritage 
     and wildlife conservation.

     SEC. 603. FISHING, HUNTING, AND RECREATIONAL SHOOTING.

       (a) Definitions.--In this section:
       (1) Federal land.--The term ``Federal land'' means any land 
     or water that is owned by the United States and under the 
     administrative jurisdiction of the Bureau of Land Management 
     or the Forest Service.
       (2) Federal land management officials.--The term ``Federal 
     land management officials'' means--
       (A) the Secretary of the Interior and Director of the 
     Bureau of Land Management regarding Bureau of Land Management 
     lands and interests in lands under the administrative 
     jurisdiction of the Bureau of Land Management; and
       (B) the Secretary of Agriculture and Chief of the Forest 
     Service regarding National Forest System lands.
       (3) Hunting.--
       (A) In general.--Except as provided in subparagraph (B), 
     the term ``hunting'' means use of a firearm, bow, or other 
     authorized means in the lawful--
       (i) pursuit, shooting, capture, collection, trapping, or 
     killing of wildlife;
       (ii) attempt to pursue, shoot, capture, collect, trap, or 
     kill wildlife; or
       (iii) the training of hunting dogs, including field trials.
       (B) Exclusion.--The term ``hunting'' does not include the 
     use of skilled volunteers to cull excess animals (as defined 
     by other Federal law).
       (4) Recreational fishing.--The term ``recreational 
     fishing'' means the lawful--
       (A) pursuit, capture, collection, or killing of fish; or
       (B) attempt to capture, collect, or kill fish.
       (5) Recreational shooting.--The term ``recreational 
     shooting'' means any form of sport, training, competition, or 
     pastime, whether formal or informal, that involves the 
     discharge of a rifle, handgun, or shotgun, or the use of a 
     bow and arrow.
       (b) In General.--Subject to valid existing rights and 
     subsection (e), and cooperation with the respective State 
     fish and wildlife agency, Federal land management officials 
     shall exercise authority under existing law, including 
     provisions regarding land use planning, to facilitate use of 
     and access to Federal lands, including National Monuments, 
     Wilderness Areas, Wilderness Study Areas, and lands 
     administratively classified as wilderness eligible or 
     suitable and primitive or semi-primitive areas, for fishing, 
     hunting, and recreational shooting, except as limited by--
       (1) statutory authority that authorizes action or 
     withholding action for reasons of national security, public 
     safety, or resource conservation;
       (2) any other Federal statute that specifically precludes 
     fishing, hunting, or recreational shooting on specific 
     Federal lands, waters, or units thereof; and
       (3) discretionary limitations on fishing, hunting, and 
     recreational shooting determined to be necessary and 
     reasonable as supported by the best scientific evidence and 
     advanced through a transparent public process.
       (c) Management.--Consistent with subsection (a), Federal 
     land management officials shall exercise their land 
     management discretion--
       (1) in a manner that supports and facilitates fishing, 
     hunting, and recreational shooting opportunities;
       (2) to the extent authorized under applicable State law; 
     and
       (3) in accordance with applicable Federal law.
       (d) Planning.--
       (1) Evaluation of effects on opportunities to engage in 
     fishing, hunting, or recreational shooting.--Planning 
     documents that apply to Federal lands, including land 
     resources management plans, resource management plans, travel 
     management plans, and general management plans shall include 
     a specific evaluation of the effects of such plans on 
     opportunities to engage in fishing, hunting, or recreational 
     shooting.
       (2) Strategic growth policy for the national wildlife 
     refuge system.--Section 4(a)(3) of the National Wildlife 
     Refuge System Administration Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 
     668dd(a)(3)) is amended--
       (A) by redesignating subparagraphs (C) and (D) as 
     subparagraphs (D) and (E), respectively; and
       (B) by inserting after subparagraph (B), the following:
       ``(C) the Secretary shall integrate wildlife-dependent 
     recreational uses in accordance with their status as priority 
     general public uses into proposed or existing regulations, 
     policies, criteria, plans, or other activities to alter or 
     amend the manner in which individual refuges or the National 
     Wildlife Refuge System (System) are managed, including, but 
     not limited to, any activities which target or prioritize 
     criteria for long and short term System acquisitions;''.
       (3) No major federal action.--No action taken under this 
     title, or under section 4 of the National Wildlife Refuge 
     System Administration Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 668dd), either 
     individually or cumulatively with other actions involving 
     Federal lands or lands managed by the United States Fish and 
     Wildlife Service, shall be considered to be a major Federal 
     action significantly affecting the quality of the human 
     environment, and no additional identification, analysis, or 
     consideration of environmental effects, including cumulative 
     effects, is necessary or required.
       (4) Other activity not considered.--Federal land management 
     officials are not required to consider the existence or 
     availability of fishing, hunting, or recreational shooting 
     opportunities on adjacent or nearby public or private lands 
     in the planning for or determination of which Federal lands 
     are open for these activities or in the setting of levels of 
     use for these activities on Federal lands, unless the 
     combination or coordination of such opportunities would 
     enhance the fishing, hunting, or recreational shooting 
     opportunities available to the public.
       (e) Federal Lands.--
       (1) Lands open.--Lands under the jurisdiction of the Bureau 
     of Land Management and the Forest Service, including 
     Wilderness Areas, Wilderness Study Areas, lands designated as 
     wilderness or administratively classified as wilderness 
     eligible or suitable and primitive or semi-primitive areas 
     and National Monuments, but excluding lands on the Outer 
     Continental Shelf, shall be open to fishing, hunting, and 
     recreational shooting unless the managing Federal agency acts 
     to close lands to such activity. Lands may be subject to 
     closures or restrictions if determined by the head of the 
     agency to be necessary and reasonable and supported by facts 
     and evidence, for purposes including resource conservation, 
     public safety, energy or mineral production, energy 
     generation or transmission infrastructure, water supply 
     facilities, protection of other permittees, protection of 
     private property rights or interest, national security, or 
     compliance with other law.

[[Page H959]]

       (2) Recreational shooting ranges.--
       (A) In general.--The head of each Federal agency shall use 
     his or her authorities in a manner consistent with this Act 
     and other applicable law, to--
       (i) lease or permit use of lands under the jurisdiction of 
     the agency for recreational shooting ranges; and
       (ii) designate specific lands under the jurisdiction of the 
     agency for recreational shooting activities.
       (B) Limitation on liability.--Any designation under 
     subparagraph (A)(ii) shall not subject the United States to 
     any civil action or claim for monetary damages for injury or 
     loss of property or personal injury or death caused by any 
     activity occurring at or on such designated lands.
       (f) Necessity in Wilderness Areas and ``Within and 
     Supplemental to'' Wilderness Purposes.--
       (1) Minimum requirements for administration.--The provision 
     of opportunities for fishing, hunting, and recreational 
     shooting, and the conservation of fish and wildlife to 
     provide sustainable use recreational opportunities on 
     designated Federal wilderness areas shall constitute measures 
     necessary to meet the minimum requirements for the 
     administration of the wilderness area, provided that this 
     determination shall not authorize or facilitate commodity 
     development, use, or extraction, motorized recreational 
     access or use that is not otherwise allowed under the 
     Wilderness Act (16 U.S.C. 1131 et seq.), or permanent road 
     construction or maintenance within designated wilderness 
     areas.
       (2) Application of wilderness act.--Provisions of the 
     Wilderness Act (16 U.S.C. 1131 et seq.), stipulating that 
     wilderness purposes are ``within and supplemental to'' the 
     purposes of the underlying Federal land unit are reaffirmed. 
     When seeking to carry out fish and wildlife conservation 
     programs and projects or provide fish and wildlife dependent 
     recreation opportunities on designated wilderness areas, each 
     Federal land management official shall implement these 
     supplemental purposes so as to facilitate, enhance, or both, 
     but not to impede the underlying Federal land purposes when 
     seeking to carry out fish and wildlife conservation programs 
     and projects or provide fish and wildlife dependent 
     recreation opportunities in designated wilderness areas, 
     provided that such implementation shall not authorize or 
     facilitate commodity development, use or extraction, or 
     permanent road construction or maintenance within designated 
     wilderness areas.
       (g) No Priority.--Nothing in this section requires a 
     Federal land management official to give preference to 
     fishing, hunting, or recreational shooting over other uses of 
     Federal land or over land or water management priorities 
     established by Federal law.
       (h) Consultation With Councils.--In fulfilling the duties 
     under this section, Federal land management officials shall 
     consult with respective advisory councils as established in 
     Executive Order Nos. 12962 and 13443.
       (i) Authority of the States.--Nothing in this section shall 
     be construed as interfering with, diminishing, or conflicting 
     with the authority, jurisdiction, or responsibility of any 
     State to exercise primary management, control, or regulation 
     of fish and wildlife under State law (including regulations) 
     on land or water within the State, including on Federal land.
       (j) Federal Licenses.--Nothing in this section shall be 
     construed to authorize a Federal land management official to 
     require a license, fee, or permit to fish, hunt, or trap on 
     land or water in a State, including on Federal land in the 
     States, except that this subsection shall not affect the 
     Migratory Bird Stamp requirement set forth in the Migratory 
     Bird Hunting and Conservation Stamp Act (16 U.S.C. 718 et 
     seq.).

     SEC. 604. VOLUNTEER HUNTERS; REPORTS; CLOSURES AND 
                   RESTRICTIONS.

       (a) Definitions.--For the purposes of this section:
       (1) Public land.--The term ``public land'' means--
       (A) units of the National Park System;
       (B) National Forest System lands; and
       (C) land and interests in land owned by the United States 
     and under the administrative jurisdiction of--
       (i) the Fish and Wildlife Service; or
       (ii) the Bureau of Land Management.
       (2) Secretary.--The term ``Secretary'' means--
       (A) the Secretary of the Interior and includes the Director 
     of the National Park Service, with regard to units of the 
     National Park System;
       (B) the Secretary of the Interior and includes the Director 
     of the Fish and Wildlife Service, with regard to Fish and 
     Wildlife Service lands and waters;
       (C) the Secretary of the Interior and includes the Director 
     of the Bureau of Land Management, with regard to Bureau of 
     Land Management lands and waters; and
       (D) the Secretary of Agriculture and includes the Chief of 
     the Forest Service, with regard to National Forest System 
     lands.
       (3) Volunteer from the hunting community.--The term 
     ``volunteer from the hunting community'' means a volunteer 
     who holds a valid hunting license issued by a State.
       (b) Volunteer Hunters.--When planning wildlife management 
     involving reducing the size of a wildlife population on 
     public land, the Secretary shall consider the use of and may 
     use volunteers from the hunting community as agents to assist 
     in carrying out wildlife management on public land. The 
     Secretary shall not reject the use of volunteers from the 
     hunting community as agents without the concurrence of the 
     appropriate State wildlife management authorities.
       (c) Report.--Beginning on the second October 1 after the 
     date of the enactment of this Act and biennially on October 1 
     thereafter, the Secretary shall submit to the Committee on 
     Natural Resources of the House of Representatives and the 
     Committee on Energy and Natural Resources of the Senate a 
     report that describes--
       (1) any public land administered by the Secretary that was 
     closed to fishing, hunting, and recreational shooting at any 
     time during the preceding year; and
       (2) the reason for the closure.
       (d) Closures or Significant Restrictions.--
       (1) In general.--Other than closures established or 
     prescribed by land planning actions referred to in section 
     604(e) or emergency closures described in paragraph (2), a 
     permanent or temporary withdrawal, change of classification, 
     or change of management status of public land that 
     effectively closes or significantly restricts any acreage of 
     public land to access or use for fishing, hunting, 
     recreational shooting, or activities related to fishing, 
     hunting, or recreational shooting, or a combination of those 
     activities, shall take effect only if, before the date of 
     withdrawal or change, the Secretary--
       (A) publishes appropriate notice of the withdrawal or 
     change, respectively;
       (B) demonstrates that coordination has occurred with a 
     State fish and wildlife agency; and
       (C) submits to the Committee on Natural Resources of the 
     House of Representatives and the Committee on Energy and 
     Natural Resources of the Senate written notice of the 
     withdrawal or change, respectively.
       (2) Emergency closures.--Nothing in this Act prohibits the 
     Secretary from establishing or implementing emergency 
     closures or restrictions of the smallest practicable area to 
     provide for public safety, resource conservation, national 
     security, or other purposes authorized by law. Such an 
     emergency closure shall terminate after a reasonable period 
     of time unless converted to a permanent closure consistent 
     with this Act.

              TITLE VII--FARMER AND HUNTER PROTECTION ACT

     SEC. 701. SHORT TITLE.

       This title may be cited as the ``Hunter and Farmer 
     Protection Act''.

     SEC. 702. BAITING OF MIGRATORY GAME BIRDS.

       Section 3 of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (16 U.S.C. 704) 
     is amended by striking subsection (b) and inserting the 
     following:
       ``(b) Prohibition of Baiting.--
       ``(1) Definitions.--In this subsection:
       ``(A) Baited area.--
       ``(i) In general.--The term `baited area' means--

       ``(I) any area on which salt, grain, or other feed has been 
     placed, exposed, deposited, distributed, or scattered, if the 
     salt, grain, or feed could lure or attract migratory game 
     birds; and
       ``(II) in the case of waterfowl, cranes (family Gruidae), 
     and coots (family Rallidae), a standing, unharvested crop 
     that has been manipulated through activities such as mowing, 
     discing, or rolling, unless the activities are normal 
     agricultural practices.

       ``(ii) Exclusions.--An area shall not be considered to be a 
     `baited area' if the area--

       ``(I) has been treated with a normal agricultural practice;
       ``(II) has standing crops that have not been manipulated; 
     or
       ``(III) has standing crops that have been or are flooded.

       ``(B) Baiting.--The term `baiting' means the direct or 
     indirect placing, exposing, depositing, distributing, or 
     scattering of salt, grain, or other feed that could lure or 
     attract migratory game birds to, on, or over any areas on 
     which a hunter is attempting to take migratory game birds.
       ``(C) Migratory game bird.--The term `migratory game bird' 
     means migratory bird species--
       ``(i) that are within the taxonomic families of Anatidae, 
     Columbidae, Gruidae, Rallidae, and Scolopacidae; and
       ``(ii) for which open seasons are prescribed by the 
     Secretary of the Interior.
       ``(D) Normal agricultural practice.--
       ``(i) In general.--The term `normal agricultural practice' 
     means any practice in 1 annual growing season that--

       ``(I) is carried out in order to produce a marketable crop, 
     including planting, harvest, postharvest, or soil 
     conservation practices; and
       ``(II) is recommended for the successful harvest of a given 
     crop by the applicable State office of the Cooperative 
     Extension System of the Department of Agriculture, in 
     consultation with, and if requested, the concurrence of, the 
     head of the applicable State department of fish and wildlife.

       ``(ii) Inclusions.--

       ``(I) In general.--Subject to subclause (II), the term 
     `normal agricultural practice' includes the destruction of a 
     crop in accordance with practices required by the Federal 
     Crop Insurance Corporation for agricultural producers to 
     obtain crop insurance under the Federal Crop Insurance Act (7 
     U.S.C. 1501 et seq.) on land on which a crop during the 
     current or immediately preceding crop year was not 
     harvestable due to a natural disaster (including any 
     hurricane, storm, tornado, flood, high water, wind-driven 
     water, tidal wave, tsunami, earthquake, volcanic eruption, 
     landslide, mudslide, drought, fire, snowstorm, or other 
     catastrophe that is declared a major disaster by the 
     President in accordance with section 401 of the Robert T. 
     Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (42 
     U.S.C. 5170)).
       ``(II) Limitations.--The term `normal agricultural 
     practice' only includes a crop described in subclause (I) 
     that has been destroyed or manipulated through activities 
     that include (but are not limited to) mowing, discing, or 
     rolling if the Federal Crop Insurance Corporation certifies 
     that flooding was not an acceptable method of destruction to 
     obtain crop insurance under the

[[Page H960]]

     Federal Crop Insurance Act (7 U.S.C. 1501 et seq.).

       ``(E) Waterfowl.--The term `waterfowl' means native species 
     of the family Anatidae.
       ``(2) Prohibition.--It shall be unlawful for any person--
       ``(A) to take any migratory game bird by baiting or on or 
     over any baited area, if the person knows or reasonably 
     should know that the area is a baited area; or
       ``(B) to place or direct the placement of bait on or 
     adjacent to an area for the purpose of causing, inducing, or 
     allowing any person to take or attempt to take any migratory 
     game bird by baiting or on or over the baited area.
       ``(3) Regulations.--The Secretary of the Interior may 
     promulgate regulations to implement this subsection.
       ``(4) Reports.--Annually, the Secretary of Agriculture 
     shall submit to the Secretary of the Interior a report that 
     describes any changes to normal agricultural practices across 
     the range of crops grown by agricultural producers in each 
     region of the United States in which the recommendations are 
     provided to agricultural producers.''.

    TITLE VIII--TRANSPORTING BOWS ACROSS NATIONAL PARK SERVICE LANDS

     SEC. 801. SHORT TITLE.

       This title may be cited as the ``Hunter Access Corridors 
     Act''.

     SEC. 802. BOWHUNTING OPPORTUNITY AND WILDLIFE STEWARDSHIP.

       (a) In General.--Subchapter II of chapter 1015 of title 54, 
     United States Code, is amended by adding at the end the 
     following:

     ``Sec. 101513. Hunter access corridors

       ``(a) Definitions.--In this section:
       ``(1) Not ready for immediate use.--The term `not ready for 
     immediate use' means--
       ``(A) a bow or crossbow, the arrows of which are secured or 
     stowed in a quiver or other arrow transport case; and
       ``(B) with respect to a crossbow, uncocked.
       ``(2) Valid hunting license.--The term `valid hunting 
     license' means a State-issued hunting license that authorizes 
     an individual to hunt on private or public land adjacent to 
     the System unit in which the individual is located while in 
     possession of a bow or crossbow that is not ready for 
     immediate use.
       ``(b) Transportation Authorized.--
       ``(1) In general.--The Director shall not require a permit 
     for, or promulgate or enforce any regulation that prohibits 
     an individual from transporting bows and crossbows that are 
     not ready for immediate use across any System unit if--
       ``(A) in the case of an individual traversing the System 
     unit on foot--
       ``(i) the individual is not otherwise prohibited by law 
     from possessing the bows and crossbows;
       ``(ii) the bows or crossbows are not ready for immediate 
     use throughout the period during which the bows or crossbows 
     are transported across the System unit;
       ``(iii) the possession of the bows and crossbows is in 
     compliance with the law of the State in which the System unit 
     is located; and
       ``(iv)(I) the individual possesses a valid hunting license;
       ``(II) the individual is traversing the System unit en 
     route to a hunting access corridor established under 
     subsection (c)(1); or
       ``(III) the individual is traversing the System unit in 
     compliance with any other applicable regulations or policies; 
     or
       ``(B) the bows or crossbows are not ready for immediate use 
     and remain inside a vehicle.
       ``(2) Enforcement.--Nothing in this subsection limits the 
     authority of the Director to enforce laws (including 
     regulations) prohibiting hunting or the taking of wildlife in 
     any System unit.
       ``(c) Establishment of Hunter Access Corridors.--
       ``(1) In general.--On a determination by the Director under 
     paragraph (2), the Director may establish and publish (in 
     accordance with section 1.5 of title 36, Code of Federal 
     Regulations (or a successor regulation)), on a publicly 
     available map, hunter access corridors across System units 
     that are used to access public land that is--
       ``(A) contiguous to a System unit; and
       ``(B) open to hunting.
       ``(2) Determination by director.--The determination 
     referred to in paragraph (1) is a determination that the 
     hunter access corridor would provide wildlife management or 
     visitor experience benefits within the boundary of the System 
     unit in which the hunter access corridor is located.
       ``(3) Hunting season.--The hunter access corridors shall be 
     open for use during hunting seasons.
       ``(4) Exception.--The Director may establish limited 
     periods during which access through the hunter access 
     corridors is closed for reasons of public safety, 
     administration, or compliance with applicable law.
       ``(5) Identification of corridors.--The Director shall--
       ``(A) make information regarding hunter access corridors 
     available on the individual website of the applicable System 
     unit; and
       ``(B) provide information regarding any processes 
     established by the Director for transporting legally taken 
     game through individual hunter access corridors.
       ``(6) Registration; transportation of game.--The Director 
     may--
       ``(A) provide registration boxes to be located at the 
     trailhead of each hunter access corridor for self-
     registration;
       ``(B) provide a process for online self-registration; and
       ``(C) allow nonmotorized conveyances to transport legally 
     taken game through a hunter access corridor established under 
     this subsection, including game carts and sleds.
       ``(7) Consultation with states.--The Director shall consult 
     with each applicable State wildlife agency to identify 
     appropriate hunter access corridors.
       ``(d) Effect.--Nothing in this section--
       ``(1) diminishes, enlarges, or modifies any Federal or 
     State authority with respect to recreational hunting, 
     recreational shooting, or any other recreational activities 
     within the boundaries of a System unit; or
       ``(2) authorizes--
       ``(A) the establishment of new trails in System units; or
       ``(B) authorizes individuals to access areas in System 
     units, on foot or otherwise, that are not open to such 
     access.
       ``(e) No Major Federal Action.--
       ``(1) In general.--Any action taken under this section 
     shall not be considered a major Federal action significantly 
     affecting the quality of the human environment under the 
     National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321 et 
     seq.).
       ``(2) No additional action required.--No additional 
     identification, analyses, or consideration of environmental 
     effects (including cumulative environmental effects) is 
     necessary or required with respect to an action taken under 
     this section.''.
       (b) Clerical Amendment.--The table of sections for title 
     54, United States Code, is amended by inserting after the 
     item relating to section 101512 the following:

``101513. Hunter access corridors.''.

  TITLE IX--FEDERAL LAND TRANSACTION FACILITATION ACT REAUTHORIZATION 
                                (FLTFA)

     SEC. 901. SHORT TITLE.

       This title may be cited as the ``Federal Land Transaction 
     Facilitation Act Reauthorization of 2015''.

     SEC. 902. FEDERAL LAND TRANSACTION FACILITATION ACT.

       The Federal Land Transaction Facilitation Act is amended--
       (1) in section 203(1) (43 U.S.C. 2302(1)), by striking 
     ``cultural, or'' and inserting ``cultural, recreational 
     access and use, or other'';
       (2) in section 203(2) in the matter preceding subparagraph 
     (A), by striking ``on the date of enactment of this Act was'' 
     and inserting ``is'';
       (3) in section 205 (43 U.S.C. 2304)--
       (A) in subsection (a), by striking ``section 206'' and all 
     that follows through the period and inserting the following: 
     ``section 206--
       ``(1) to complete appraisals and satisfy other legal 
     requirements for the sale or exchange of public land 
     identified for disposal under approved land use plans under 
     section 202 of the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 
     1976 (43 U.S.C. 1712);
       ``(2) not later than 180 days after the date of the 
     enactment of the Federal Land Transaction Facilitation Act 
     Reauthorization of 2015, to establish and make available to 
     the public, on the website of the Department of the Interior, 
     a database containing a comprehensive list of all the land 
     referred to in paragraph (1); and
       ``(3) to maintain the database referred to in paragraph 
     (2).''; and
       (B) in subsection (d), by striking ``11'' and inserting 
     ``22'';
       (4) by amending section 206(c)(1) (43 U.S.C. 2305(c)(1)) to 
     read as follows:
       ``(1) Use of funds.--
       ``(A) In general.--Funds in the Federal Land Disposal 
     Account shall be expended in accordance with this subsection.
       ``(B) Purposes.--Except as authorized under paragraph (2), 
     funds in the Federal Land Disposal Account shall be used for 
     one or more of the following purposes:
       ``(i) To purchase lands or interests therein that are 
     otherwise authorized by law to be acquired and are one or 
     more of the following:

       ``(I) Inholdings.
       ``(II) Adjacent to federally designated areas and contain 
     exceptional resources.
       ``(III) Provide opportunities for hunting, recreational 
     fishing, recreational shooting, and other recreational 
     activities.
       ``(IV) Likely to aid in the performance of deferred 
     maintenance or the reduction of operation and maintenance 
     costs or other deferred costs.

       ``(ii) To perform deferred maintenance or other maintenance 
     activities that enhance opportunities for recreational 
     access.'';
       (5) in section 206(c)(2) (43 U.S.C. 2305(c)(2))--
       (A) by striking subparagraph (A);
       (B) by redesignating subparagraphs (B), (C), and (D) as 
     subparagraphs (A), (B), and (C), respectively;
       (C) in subparagraph (C) (as so redesignated by this 
     paragraph)--
       (i) by striking ``purchases'' and inserting ``land 
     purchases and performance of deferred maintenance 
     activities'';
       (ii) by striking ``subparagraph (C)'' and inserting 
     ``subparagraph (B)''; and
       (iii) by inserting ``for the activities outlined in 
     paragraph (2)'' after ``generated''; and
       (D) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(D) Any funds made available under subparagraph (C) that 
     are not obligated or expended by the end of the fourth full 
     fiscal year after the date of the sale or exchange of land 
     that generated the funds may be expended in any State.'';
       (6) in section 206(c)(3) (43 U.S.C. 2305(c)(3))--
       (A) by inserting after subparagraph (A) the following:
       ``(B) the extent to which the acquisition of the land or 
     interest therein will increase the public availability of 
     resources for, and facilitate public access to, hunting, 
     fishing, and other recreational activities;''; and
       (B) by redesignating subparagraphs (B) and (C) as 
     subparagraphs (C) and (D);

[[Page H961]]

       (7) in section 206(f) (43 U.S.C. 2305(f)), by amending 
     paragraph (2) to read as follows:
       ``(2) any remaining balance in the account shall be 
     deposited in the Treasury and used for deficit reduction, 
     except that in the case of a fiscal year for which there is 
     no Federal budget deficit, such amounts shall be used to 
     reduce the Federal debt (in such manner as the Secretary of 
     the Treasury considers appropriate).''; and
       (8) in section 207(b) (43 U.S.C. 2306(b))--
       (A) in paragraph (1)--
       (i) by striking ``96-568'' and inserting ``96-586''; and
       (ii) by striking ``; or'' and inserting a semicolon;
       (B) in paragraph (2)--
       (i) by inserting ``Public Law 105-263;'' before ``112 
     Stat.''; and
       (ii) by striking the period at the end and inserting a 
     semicolon; and
       (C) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(3) the White Pine County Conservation, Recreation, and 
     Development Act of 2006 (Public Law 109-432; 120 Stat. 3028);
       ``(4) the Lincoln County Conservation, Recreation, and 
     Development Act of 2004 (Public Law 108-424; 118 Stat. 2403);
       ``(5) subtitle F of title I of the Omnibus Public Land 
     Management Act of 2009 (16 U.S.C. 1132 note; Public Law 111-
     11);
       ``(6) subtitle O of title I of the Omnibus Public Land 
     Management Act of 2009 (16 U.S.C. 460www note, 1132 note; 
     Public Law 111-11);
       ``(7) section 2601 of the Omnibus Public Land Management 
     Act of 2009 (Public Law 111-11; 123 Stat. 1108); or
       ``(8) section 2606 of the Omnibus Public Land Management 
     Act of 2009 (Public Law 111-11; 123 Stat. 1121).''.

 TITLE X--AFRICAN ELEPHANT CONSERVATION AND LEGAL IVORY POSSESSION ACT

     SEC. 1001. SHORT TITLE.

       This title may be cited as the ``African Elephant 
     Conservation and Legal Ivory Possession Act of 2015''.

     SEC. 1002. REFERENCES.

       Except as otherwise specifically provided, whenever in this 
     title an amendment or repeal is expressed in terms of an 
     amendment to, or repeal of, a provision, the reference shall 
     be considered to be made to a provision of the African 
     Elephant Conservation Act (16 U.S.C. 4201 et seq.).

     SEC. 1003. LIMITED EXEMPTION FOR CERTAIN AFRICAN ELEPHANT 
                   IVORY.

       Section 2203 (16 U.S.C. 4223) is amended--
       (1) by inserting ``(a) In General.--'' before the first 
     sentence;
       (2) by inserting ``and subsection (b) of this section'' 
     after ``2202(e)''; and
       (3) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(b) Exemption.--Nothing in this Act or subsection (a) or 
     (d) of section 9 of the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (16 
     U.S.C. 1538) shall be construed to prohibit importation or 
     exportation, or to require permission of the Secretary for 
     importation or exportation, of--
       ``(1) any raw ivory or worked ivory--
       ``(A) imported solely for purposes of becoming part of a 
     museum's permanent collection, return to a lending museum, or 
     display in a museum; or
       ``(B) exported solely for purposes of--
       ``(i) display in a foreign museum; or
       ``(ii) return to a foreign person who lent such ivory to a 
     museum in the United States;
       ``(2) any raw ivory or worked ivory that was lawfully 
     importable into the United States on February 24, 2014, 
     regardless of when acquired; or
       ``(3) any worked ivory that was previously lawfully 
     possessed in the United States.''.

     SEC. 1004. PLACEMENT OF UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE 
                   SERVICE LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICER IN EACH AFRICAN 
                   ELEPHANT RANGE COUNTRY.

       Part I (16 U.S.C. 4211 et seq.) is amended by adding at the 
     end the following:

     ``SEC. 2105. PLACEMENT OF UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE 
                   SERVICE LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICER IN EACH AFRICAN 
                   ELEPHANT RANGE COUNTRY.

       ``The Secretary, in coordination with the Secretary of 
     State, may station one United States Fish and Wildlife 
     Service law enforcement officer in the primary United States 
     diplomatic or consular post in each African country that has 
     a significant population of African elephants, who shall 
     assist local wildlife rangers in the protection of African 
     elephants and facilitate the apprehension of individuals who 
     illegally kill, or assist the illegal killing of, African 
     elephants.''.

     SEC. 1005. CERTIFICATION FOR THE PURPOSES OF THE FISHERMEN'S 
                   PROTECTIVE ACT OF 1967.

       Section 2202 (16 U.S.C. 4222) is amended by adding at the 
     end the following:
       ``(g) Certification.--When the Secretary of the Interior 
     finds that a country, directly or indirectly, is a 
     significant transit or destination point for illegal ivory 
     trade, the Secretary shall certify such fact to the President 
     with respect to the country for the purposes of section 8(a) 
     of the Fishermen's Protective Act of 1967 (22 U.S.C. 
     1978(a)).''.

     SEC. 1006. TREATMENT OF ELEPHANT IVORY.

       Section 2203 (16 U.S.C. 4223) is further amended by adding 
     at the end the following:
       ``(c) Treatment of Elephant Ivory.--Nothing in this Act or 
     the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (16 U.S.C. 1538) shall be 
     construed--
       ``(1) to prohibit, or to authorize prohibiting, the 
     possession, sale, delivery, receipt, shipment, or 
     transportation of African elephant ivory, or any product 
     containing African elephant ivory, that has been lawfully 
     imported or crafted in the United States; or
       ``(2) to authorize using any means of determining for 
     purposes of this Act or the Endangered Species Act of 1973 
     whether African elephant ivory has been lawfully imported, 
     including any presumption or burden of proof applied in such 
     determination, other than such means used by the Secretary as 
     of February 24, 2014.''.

     SEC. 1007. SPORT-HUNTED ELEPHANT TROPHIES.

       Section 2203 (16 U.S.C. 4223) is further amended by adding 
     at the end the following:
       ``(d) Sport-Hunted Elephant Trophies.--Nothing in this Act 
     or subsection (a) or (d) of section 9 of the Endangered 
     Species Act of 1973 (16 U.S.C. 1538) shall be construed to 
     prohibit any citizen or legal resident of the United States, 
     or an agent of such an individual, from importing a sport-
     hunted African elephant trophy under section 2202(e) of this 
     Act, if the country in which the elephant was taken had an 
     elephant population on Appendix II of CITES at the time the 
     trophy elephant was taken.
       ``(e) Relationship to the Convention.--Nothing in this 
     section shall be construed as modifying or repealing the 
     Secretary's duties to implement CITES and the appendices 
     thereto, or as modifying or repealing section 8A or 9(c) of 
     the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (16 U.S.C. 1537a and 
     1538(c)).''.

     SEC. 1008. AFRICAN ELEPHANT CONSERVATION ACT FINANCIAL 
                   ASSISTANCE PRIORITY AND REAUTHORIZATION.

       (a) Financial Assistance Priority.--Section 2101 (16 U.S.C. 
     4211) is amended by redesignating subsections (e) and (f) as 
     subsections (f) and (g), respectively, and by inserting after 
     subsection (d) the following:
       ``(e) Priority.--In providing financial assistance under 
     this section, the Secretary shall give priority to projects 
     designed to facilitate the acquisition of equipment and 
     training of wildlife officials in ivory producing countries 
     to be used in anti-poaching efforts.''.
       (b) Reauthorization.--Section 2306(a) (16 U.S.C. 4245(a)) 
     is amended by striking ``2007 through 2012'' and inserting 
     ``2016 through 2020''.

               TITLE XI--RESPECT FOR TREATIES AND RIGHTS

     SEC. 1101. RESPECT FOR TREATIES AND RIGHTS.

       Nothing in this Act or the amendments made by this Act 
     shall be construed to affect or modify any treaty or other 
     right of any federally recognized Indian tribe.

  TITLE XII--INTEREST ON OBLIGATIONS HELD IN THE WILDLIFE RESTORATION 
                                  FUND

     SEC. 1201. INTEREST ON OBLIGATIONS HELD IN THE WILDLIFE 
                   RESTORATION FUND.

       Section 3(b)(2)(C) of the Pittman-Robertson Wildlife 
     Restoration Act (16 U.S.C. 669b(b)(2)(C)) is amended by 
     striking ``2016'' and inserting ``2026''.

       TITLE XIII--PERMITS FOR FILM CREWS OF FIVE PEOPLE OR LESS

     SEC. 1301. ANNUAL PERMIT AND FEE FOR FILM CREWS OF 5 PERSONS 
                   OR FEWER.

       (a) Purpose.--The purpose of this section is to provide 
     commercial film crews of 5 persons or fewer access to film in 
     areas designated for public use during public hours on 
     Federal land and waterways.
       (b) National Park System Land.--Section 100905 of title 54, 
     United States Code, is amended--
       (1) in subsection (a)--
       (A) in paragraph (1), by striking ``The Secretary'' and 
     inserting ``Except as provided in paragraph (3), the 
     Secretary''; and
       (B) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(3) Special rules for film crews of 5 persons or fewer.--
       ``(A) Definition of film crew.--In this paragraph, the term 
     `film crew' means any persons present on Federal land or 
     waterways under the jurisdiction of the Secretary who are 
     associated with the production of a film.
       ``(B) Required permit and fee.--For any film crew of 5 
     persons or fewer, the Secretary shall require a permit and 
     assess an annual fee of $200 for commercial filming 
     activities or similar projects on Federal land and waterways 
     administered by the Secretary.
       ``(C) Commercial filming activities.--A permit issued under 
     subparagraph (B) shall be valid for commercial filming 
     activities or similar projects that occur in areas designated 
     for public use during public hours on all Federal land and 
     waterways administered by the Secretary for a 1-year period 
     beginning on the date of issuance of the permit.
       ``(D) No additional fees.--For persons holding a permit 
     issued under this paragraph, during the effective period of 
     the permit, the Secretary shall not assess any fees in 
     addition to the fee assessed under subparagraph (B).
       ``(E) Use of cameras.--The Secretary shall not prohibit, as 
     a mechanized apparatus or under any other purposes, use of 
     cameras or related equipment used for the purpose of 
     commercial filming activities or similar projects in 
     accordance with this paragraph on Federal land and waterways 
     administered by the Secretary.
       ``(F) Notification required.--A film crew of 5 persons or 
     fewer subject to a permit issued under this paragraph shall 
     notify the applicable land management agency with 
     jurisdiction over the Federal land at least 48 hours before 
     entering the Federal land.
       ``(G) Denial of access.--The head of the applicable land 
     management agency may deny access to a film crew under this 
     paragraph if--
       ``(i) there is a likelihood of resource damage that cannot 
     be mitigated;
       ``(ii) there would be an unreasonable disruption of the use 
     and enjoyment of the site by the public;
       ``(iii) the activity poses health or safety risks to the 
     public; or
       ``(iv) the filming includes the use of models or props that 
     are not part of the natural or cultural resources or 
     administrative facilities of the Federal land.''; and

[[Page H962]]

       (2) in the first sentence of subsection (b), by striking 
     ``collect any costs'' and inserting ``recover any costs''.
       (c) Other Federal Land.--Section 1 of Public Law 106-206 
     (16 U.S.C. 460l-6d) is amended--
       (1) in subsection (a)--
       (A) in paragraph (1), by striking ``The Secretary'' and 
     inserting ``Except as provided in paragraph (3), the 
     Secretary''; and
       (B) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(3) Special rules for film crews of 5 persons or fewer.--
       ``(A) Definition of film crew.--In this paragraph, the term 
     `film crew' means any persons present on Federal land or 
     waterways under the jurisdiction of the Secretary who are 
     associated with the production of a film.
       ``(B) Required permit and fee.--For any film crew of 5 
     persons or fewer, the Secretary shall require a permit and 
     assess an annual fee of $200 for commercial filming 
     activities or similar projects on Federal land and waterways 
     administered by the Secretary.
       ``(C) Commercial filming activities.--A permit issued under 
     subparagraph (B) shall be valid for commercial filming 
     activities or similar projects that occur in areas designated 
     for public use during public hours on all Federal land and 
     waterways administered by the Secretary for a 1-year period 
     beginning on the date of issuance of the permit.
       ``(D) No additional fees.--For persons holding a permit 
     issued under this paragraph, during the effective period of 
     the permit, the Secretary shall not assess any fees in 
     addition to the fee assessed under subparagraph (B).
       ``(E) Use of cameras.--The Secretary shall not prohibit, as 
     a mechanized apparatus or under any other purposes, use of 
     cameras or related equipment used for the purpose of 
     commercial filming activities or similar projects in 
     accordance with this paragraph on Federal land and waterways 
     administered by the Secretary.
       ``(F) Notification required.--A film crew of 5 persons or 
     fewer subject to a permit issued under this paragraph shall 
     notify the applicable land management agency with 
     jurisdiction over the Federal land at least 48 hours before 
     entering the Federal land.
       ``(G) Denial of access.--The head of the applicable land 
     management agency may deny access to a film crew under this 
     paragraph if--
       ``(i) there is a likelihood of resource damage that cannot 
     be mitigated;
       ``(ii) there would be an unreasonable disruption of the use 
     and enjoyment of the site by the public;
       ``(iii) the activity poses health or safety risks to the 
     public; or
       ``(iv) the filming includes the use of models or props that 
     are not part of the natural or cultural resources or 
     administrative facilities of the Federal land.''; and
       (2) in the first sentence of subsection (b)--
       (A) by striking ``collect any costs'' and inserting 
     ``recover any costs''; and
       (B) by striking ``similar project'' and inserting ``similar 
     projects''.

            TITLE XIV--STATE APPROVAL OF FISHING RESTRICTION

     SEC. 1401. STATE OR TERRITORIAL APPROVAL OF RESTRICTION OF 
                   RECREATIONAL OR COMMERCIAL FISHING ACCESS TO 
                   CERTAIN STATE OR TERRITORIAL WATERS.

       (a) Approval Required.--The Secretary of the Interior and 
     the Secretary of Commerce shall not restrict recreational or 
     commercial fishing access to any State or territorial marine 
     waters or Great Lakes waters within the jurisdiction of the 
     National Park Service or the Office of National Marine 
     Sanctuaries, respectively, unless those restrictions are 
     developed in coordination with, and approved by, the fish and 
     wildlife management agency of the State or territory that has 
     fisheries management authority over those waters.
       (b) Definition.--In this section, the term ``marine 
     waters'' includes coastal waters and estuaries.

  TITLE XV--HUNTING AND RECREATIONAL FISHING WITHIN CERTAIN NATIONAL 
                                FORESTS

     SEC. 1501. DEFINITIONS.

       In this title:
       (1) Hunting.--The term ``hunting'' means use of a firearm, 
     bow, or other authorized means in the lawful pursuit, 
     shooting, capture, collection, trapping, or killing of 
     wildlife; attempt to pursue, shoot, capture, collect, trap, 
     or kill wildlife; or the training and use of hunting dogs, 
     including field trials.
       (2) Recreational fishing.--The term ``recreational 
     fishing'' means the lawful pursuit, capture, collection, or 
     killing of fish; or attempt to capture, collect, or kill 
     fish.
       (3) Forest plan.--The term ``forest plan'' means a land and 
     resource management plan prepared by the Forest Service for a 
     unit of the National Forest System pursuant to section 6 of 
     the Forest and Rangeland Renewable Resources Planning Act of 
     1974 (16 U.S.C. 1604).
       (4) National forest system.--The term ``National Forest 
     System'' has the meaning given that term in section 11(a) of 
     the Forest and Rangeland Renewable Resources Planning Act of 
     1974 (16 U.S.C. 1609(a))

     SEC. 1502. HUNTING AND RECREATIONAL FISHING WITHIN THE 
                   NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM.

       (a) Prohibition of Restrictions.--The Secretary of 
     Agriculture or Chief of the Forest Service may not establish 
     policies, directives, or regulations that restrict the type, 
     season, or method of hunting or recreational fishing on lands 
     within the National Forest System that are otherwise open to 
     those activities and are consistent with the applicable 
     forest plan.
       (b) Prior Restrictions Void.--Any restrictions imposed by 
     the Secretary of Agriculture or Chief of the Forest Service 
     regarding the type, season, or method of hunting or 
     recreational fishing on lands within the National Forest 
     System that are otherwise open to those activities in force 
     on the date of the enactment of this Act shall be void and 
     have no force or effect.
       (c) Applicability.--This section shall apply only to the 
     Kisatchie National Forest in the State of Louisiana, the De 
     Soto National Forest in the State of Mississippi, and the 
     Ozark National Forest, the St. Francis National Forest and 
     the Ouachita National Forest in the States of Arkansas and 
     Oklahoma.
       (d) State Authority.--Nothing in this section, section 1 of 
     the Act of June 4, 1897 (16 U.S.C. 551), or section 32 of the 
     Act of July 22, 1937 (7 U.S.C. 1011) shall affect the 
     authority of States to manage hunting or recreational fishing 
     on lands within the National Forest System.

              TITLE XVI--GRAND CANYON BISON MANAGEMENT ACT

     SEC. 1601. SHORT TITLE.

       This title may be cited as the ``Grand Canyon Bison 
     Management Act''.

     SEC. 1602. DEFINITIONS.

       In this title:
       (1) Management plan.--The term ``management plan'' means 
     the management plan published under section 1603(a).
       (2) Park.--The term ``Park'' means the Grand Canyon 
     National Park.
       (3) Secretary.--The term ``Secretary'' means the Secretary 
     of the Interior.
       (4) Skilled public volunteer.--The term ``skilled public 
     volunteer'' means an individual who possesses--
       (A) a valid hunting license issued by the State of Arizona; 
     and
       (B) such other qualifications as the Secretary may require, 
     after consultation with the Arizona Game and Fish Commission.

     SEC. 1603. BISON MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR GRAND CANYON NATIONAL 
                   PARK.

       (a) Publication of Plan.--Not later than 180 days after the 
     date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall publish a 
     management plan to reduce, through humane lethal culling by 
     skilled public volunteers and by other nonlethal means, the 
     population of bison in the Park that the Secretary determines 
     are detrimental to the use of the Park.
       (b) Removal of Animal.--Notwithstanding any other provision 
     of law, a skilled public volunteer may remove a full bison 
     harvested from the Park.
       (c) Coordination.--The Secretary shall coordinate with the 
     Arizona Game and Fish Commission regarding the development 
     and implementation of the management plan.
       (d) NEPA Compliance.--In developing the management plan, 
     the Secretary shall comply with all applicable Federal 
     environmental laws (including regulations), including the 
     National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321 et 
     seq.).
       (e) Limitation.--Nothing in this title applies to the 
     taking of wildlife in the Park for any purpose other than the 
     implementation of the management plan.

  The Acting CHAIR. No amendment to the committee amendment in the 
nature of a substitute shall be in order except those printed in House 
Report 114-429. Each such amendment may be offered only in the order 
printed in the report, by a Member designated in the report, shall be 
considered read, shall be debatable for the time specified in the 
report, equally divided and controlled by the proponent and an 
opponent, shall not be subject to amendment, and shall not be subject 
to a demand for division of the question.


                 Amendment No. 1 Offered by Mr. Wittman

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 1 
printed in House Report 114-429.
  Mr. WITTMAN. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 53, line 18, insert ``, subject to appropriation,'' 
     after ``expended''.
       Page 63, strike lines 1 through 8.
       Strike ``of 2015'' each place it appears.
       At the end of the bill, add the following:

            TITLE XVII--OPEN BOOK ON EQUAL ACCESS TO JUSTICE

     SEC. 1701. SHORT TITLE.

       This title may be cited as the ``Open Book on Equal Access 
     to Justice Act''.

     SEC. 1702. MODIFICATION OF EQUAL ACCESS TO JUSTICE 
                   PROVISIONS.

       (a) Agency Proceedings.--Section 504 of title 5, United 
     States Code, is amended--
       (1) in subsection (c)(1), by striking ``, United States 
     Code'';
       (2) by redesignating subsection (f) as subsection (i); and
       (3) by striking subsection (e) and inserting the following:
       ``(e)(1) The Chairman of the Administrative Conference of 
     the United States, after consultation with the Chief Counsel 
     for Advocacy of the Small Business Administration, shall 
     report to the Congress, not later than March 31 of each year 
     through the 6th calendar year beginning after the initial 
     report under this subsection is submitted, on the amount of 
     fees and other expenses awarded during the preceding fiscal 
     year pursuant to this section. The report shall describe the 
     number, nature, and amount of the awards, the claims involved 
     in the controversy, and any other relevant information that 
     may aid the Congress in evaluating the scope and impact of 
     such awards. The report shall be made available to the public 
     online.

[[Page H963]]

       ``(2)(A) The report required by paragraph (1) shall account 
     for all payments of fees and other expenses awarded under 
     this section that are made pursuant to a settlement 
     agreement, regardless of whether the settlement agreement is 
     sealed or otherwise subject to nondisclosure provisions.
       ``(B) The disclosure of fees and other expenses required 
     under subparagraph (A) does not affect any other information 
     that is subject to nondisclosure provisions in the settlement 
     agreement.
       ``(f) The Chairman of the Administrative Conference shall 
     create and maintain, during the period beginning on the date 
     the initial report under subsection (e) is submitted and 
     ending one year after the date on which the final report 
     under that subsection is submitted, online a searchable 
     database containing the following information with respect to 
     each award of fees and other expenses under this section:
       ``(1) The case name and number of the adversary 
     adjudication, if available.
       ``(2) The name of the agency involved in the adversary 
     adjudication.
       ``(3) A description of the claims in the adversary 
     adjudication.
       ``(4) The name of each party to whom the award was made, as 
     such party is identified in the order or other agency 
     document making the award.
       ``(5) The amount of the award.
       ``(6) The basis for the finding that the position of the 
     agency concerned was not substantially justified.
       ``(g) The online searchable database described in 
     subsection (f) may not reveal any information the disclosure 
     of which is prohibited by law or court order.
       ``(h) The head of each agency shall provide to the Chairman 
     of the Administrative Conference in a timely manner all 
     information requested by the Chairman to comply with the 
     requirements of subsections (e), (f), and (g).''.
       (b) Court Cases.--Section 2412(d) of title 28, United 
     States Code, is amended by adding at the end the following:
       ``(5)(A) The Chairman of the Administrative Conference of 
     the United States shall submit to the Congress, not later 
     than March 31 of each year through the 6th calendar year 
     beginning after the initial report under this paragraph is 
     submitted, a report on the amount of fees and other expenses 
     awarded during the preceding fiscal year pursuant to this 
     subsection. The report shall describe the number, nature, and 
     amount of the awards, the claims involved in each 
     controversy, and any other relevant information that may aid 
     the Congress in evaluating the scope and impact of such 
     awards. The report shall be made available to the public 
     online.
       ``(B)(i) The report required by subparagraph (A) shall 
     account for all payments of fees and other expenses awarded 
     under this subsection that are made pursuant to a settlement 
     agreement, regardless of whether the settlement agreement is 
     sealed or otherwise subject to nondisclosure provisions.
       ``(ii) The disclosure of fees and other expenses required 
     under clause (i) does not affect any other information that 
     is subject to nondisclosure provisions in the settlement 
     agreement.
       ``(C) The Chairman of the Administrative Conference shall 
     include and clearly identify in the annual report under 
     subparagraph (A), for each case in which an award of fees and 
     other expenses is included in the report--
       ``(i) any amounts paid from section 1304 of title 31 for a 
     judgment in the case;
       ``(ii) the amount of the award of fees and other expenses; 
     and
       ``(iii) the statute under which the plaintiff filed suit.
       ``(6) The Chairman of the Administrative Conference shall 
     create and maintain, during the period beginning on the date 
     the initial report under paragraph (5) is submitted and 
     ending one year after the date on which the final report 
     under that paragraph is submitted, online a searchable 
     database containing the following information with respect to 
     each award of fees and other expenses under this subsection:
       ``(A) The case name and number.
       ``(B) The name of the agency involved in the case.
       ``(C) The name of each party to whom the award was made, as 
     such party is identified in the order or other court document 
     making the award.
       ``(D) A description of the claims in the case.
       ``(E) The amount of the award.
       ``(F) The basis for the finding that the position of the 
     agency concerned was not substantially justified.
       ``(7) The online searchable database described in paragraph 
     (6) may not reveal any information the disclosure of which is 
     prohibited by law or court order.
       ``(8) The head of each agency (including the Attorney 
     General of the United States) shall provide to the Chairman 
     of the Administrative Conference of the United States in a 
     timely manner all information requested by the Chairman to 
     comply with the requirements of paragraphs (5), (6), and 
     (7).''.
       (c) Clerical Amendments.--Section 2412 of title 28, United 
     States Code, is amended--
       (1) in subsection (d)(3), by striking ``United States 
     Code,''; and
       (2) in subsection (e)--
       (A) by striking ``of section 2412 of title 28, United 
     States Code,'' and inserting ``of this section''; and
       (B) by striking ``of such title'' and inserting ``of this 
     title''.
       (d) Effective Date.--
       (1) In general.--The amendments made by subsections (a) and 
     (b) shall first apply with respect to awards of fees and 
     other expenses that are made on or after the date of the 
     enactment of this Act.
       (2) Initial reports.--The first reports required by section 
     504(e) of title 5, United States Code, and section 2412(d)(5) 
     of title 28, United States Code, shall be submitted not later 
     than March 31 of the calendar year following the first 
     calendar year in which a fiscal year begins after the date of 
     the enactment of this Act.
       (3) Online databases.--The online databases required by 
     section 504(f) of title 5, United States Code, and section 
     2412(d)(6) of title 28, United States Code, shall be 
     established as soon as practicable after the date of the 
     enactment of this Act, but in no case later than the date on 
     which the first reports under section 504(e) of title 5, 
     United States Code, and section 2412(d)(5) of title 28, 
     United States Code, are required to be submitted under 
     paragraph (2) of this subsection.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 619, the gentleman 
from Virginia (Mr. Wittman) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Virginia.
  Mr. WITTMAN. Mr. Chairman, this manager's amendment makes technical 
changes to the underlying bill, makes expenditures under the Federal 
Land Transaction Facilitation Act subject to appropriation, and 
eliminates the Pittman-Robertson interest on obligations language, 
title XII, which was signed into law last year.
  The manager's amendment also adds an important new title to the bill, 
the Open Book on Equal Access to Justice Act, which makes that law more 
transparent. The Equal Access to Justice Act, or EAJA, was originally 
passed in 1980 as a social safety net program for seniors, veterans, 
and small businesses.
  It was designed to pay back these little guys for the cost of suing 
the Federal Government in a once-in-a-lifetime event. However, special 
interest groups have used EAJA as a way to be reimbursed for lawsuits 
when they can't be reimbursed under the Nation's environmental laws. 
These illegitimate reimbursements not only cost taxpayers money, but 
they tie up our land management agencies, chasing procedural lawsuits 
instead of doing their actual job.
  Mr. Chairman, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. BEYER. Mr. Chairman, I rise in opposition to the manager's 
amendment, although I do not oppose the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman from Virginia is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. BEYER. Mr. Chairman, I simply take a minute. Since we have no 
amendments on leaded bullets or lead in fishing, this may be the only 
time it is germane to clear up an issue from our debate yesterday 
evening.
  The gentleman from Virginia (Mr. Wittman), my good friend, mentioned 
about at shooting ranges, especially, bullets often end up back in the 
ground.
  I just wanted to clarify, and let me quote from the Science and 
Environmental Health Network, that in the environment many chemicals 
are degraded by sunlight, destroyed through reactions with other 
environmental substances or metabolized by naturally occurring 
bacteria. Some chemicals, however, have features that enable them to 
resist environmental degradation. They are classified as persistent and 
can accumulate in soils and aquatic environments. Metals such as lead, 
mercury, and arsenic are always persistent since they are basic 
elements and cannot be further broken down and destroyed in the 
environment. Lead contamination of air, soil, or drinking water can 
ultimately result in significant exposures in fetuses, infants, and 
children, resulting in impaired brain development.
  Mr. Chair, I just wanted to get that on the record that the lead is 
not going to degrade once it hits the soil during hunting or fishing.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. WITTMAN. Mr. Chairman, I urge adoption of the amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Virginia (Mr. Wittman).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                  Amendment No. 2 Offered by Mr. Beyer

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 2 
printed in House Report 114-429.

[[Page H964]]

  

  Mr. BEYER. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 9, strike ``and'' after the semicolon at line 14, 
     strike the period at line 16 and insert ``; and'', and after 
     line 16 insert the following:
       (5) prohibits use of the location by any individual who is 
     prohibited from purchasing a firearm by section 922(g) of 
     title 18, United States Code.
       Page 10, strike ``and'' after the semicolon at line 6, 
     strike the closing quotation marks and period at line 8 and 
     insert ``and'', and after line 8 insert the following:
       ``(E) prohibits use of the location by any individual who 
     is prohibited from purchasing a firearm by section 922(g) of 
     title 18, United States Code.''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 619, the gentleman 
from Virginia (Mr. Beyer) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Virginia.
  Mr. BEYER. Mr. Chair, H.R. 2406 would increase Federal assistance 
made available in the Pittman-Robertson Act for construction, 
operations, and maintenance of recreational shooting ranges on public 
lands.
  I, myself, am an avid outdoorsman and a big proponent of recreational 
activities, and I understand the value of recreational shooting. 
However, I believe that with these privileges come certain 
responsibilities. One of those responsibilities is to ensure that we 
are not creating a situation where dangerous people are allowed to hone 
their shooting skills on the taxpayers' dime.
  My amendment today simply says, if you operate a public shooting 
range and if you receive Federal assistance by way of this act, then 
you must have a policy, a notice of some sort in place stating that no 
person who is prohibited by Federal law from possessing a firearm is 
allowed to use the shooting range.
  Nothing in this amendment creates new gun laws. Nothing in this 
amendment would infringe on the rights of responsible gun owners. 
Nothing in this amendment is onerous in any way. We are simply saying 
that the Federal Government should not be in the business of 
subsidizing dangerous people improving their marksmanship or creating 
spaces around guns where convicted felons feel like they can operate 
outside the law and endanger law-abiding sportsmen and -women. The 
Federal Government has an obligation to keep people safe.
  I urge my colleagues to support this amendment.
  Mr. Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. WITTMAN. Mr. Chairman, I claim the time in opposition to the 
amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Virginia (Mr. Wittman) is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. WITTMAN. Mr. Chairman, this amends the definition of public 
target ranges in title II and the definition of public target range as 
used for Pittman-Robertson funding.
  This amendment is unnecessary, as it prohibits behavior which is 
already against the law. This amendment is also impractical. 
Administrators at public ranges would have no way of knowing who is 
prohibited and who is not. Public target ranges are not equipped to run 
background checks, and requiring them to do so would largely undermine 
the other purposes of the bill, like expanding access to ranges.
  This amendment does not distinguish between public target ranges that 
allow only archery versus those that allow firearm use. The amendment 
would prohibit, without justification, certain persons from taking 
advantage of otherwise lawful and harmless recreational archery.
  Access to the national background check screening data base is 
strictly limited by law and cannot be used to screen people just 
because they want to use a target range. The National Rifle 
Association, the National Shooting Sports Foundation, and Safari Club 
International oppose this amendment.
  Mr. Chairman, I strongly encourage my colleagues to oppose this 
amendment.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. BEYER. Mr. Chair, with respect for my friend from Virginia, there 
is nothing in the amendment that suggests or requires background checks 
for people wanting to use public shooting ranges--in fact, just the 
opposite. All we are asking is that there be a policy or a notice 
saying, if you are otherwise prohibited from using weapons under 
Federal law, that you can't practice, hone your shooting skills on 
these ranges.
  Mr. Wittman and I both come from Virginia, where we have six target 
ranges managed by the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries. 
Those six public target ranges have 17 rules. These rules include: use 
paper targets only; organized competitive shooting is prohibited; use 
of unauthorized target materials, such as cans, bottles, clay birds is 
prohibited. None of these is onerous. All we are asking is for an 18th 
rule that says, if you are otherwise prohibited from using a gun under 
Federal law, then you can't use it at the target range.
  We are not trying to extend background checks to everyone. That is 
not what this says. All we are trying to do is make sure that people 
who can't otherwise have possession of a gun don't go to a target 
range, rent one, and practice.
  Mr. Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. WITTMAN. Mr. Chairman, I remind the gentleman from Virginia--we 
all have an interest in shooting sports--that there is no evidence to 
suggest that there is an issue right now with felons using this 
opportunity to perpetrate crimes at public shooting ranges, so I think 
it is a solution in search of a problem. We want to make sure that 
there is a balance there and that, indeed, people have access to these 
ranges.
  I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from California (Mr. McClintock).
  Mr. McCLINTOCK. Mr. Chairman, Federal law prohibits certain criminals 
from possessing firearms. This amendment assumes that a criminal who is 
forbidden from possessing a firearm, who then breaks that law and 
possesses one anyway, will then obey a law that says he can't bring the 
illegally possessed gun to a shooting range.
  I have news for the author of this amendment. The last place a 
criminal wants to be is on a shooting range where he is surrounded by 
law-abiding and armed citizens. Criminals prefer gun-free zones where 
decent people can't fight back.
  So what is the real purpose of this amendment? I think it is twofold. 
The first is to imply that gun ranges are brimming with criminals who 
are honing their skills to go on rampages. That is an insult to the 
many millions of Americans who own guns and who use shooting ranges.
  Second, and more disturbing, it is to put the owners and managers of 
shooting ranges in an impossible legal position. How are they supposed 
to comply with this law? The gentleman says, well, they don't need to 
do background checks of every consumer, but what else are they then 
supposed to do in order to abide by this law? Require a 2-week waiting 
period to make reservations? How long before leftist legal firms begin 
suing these gun ranges for failing to do due diligence in thoroughly 
probing the backgrounds of their customers?
  We have many laws on the books to prohibit the illegal use of 
firearms and to prohibit criminals from possessing them. That is the 
problem with criminals: they just don't obey our laws. But instead of 
putting them behind bars, where they can't hurt anyone, the left seeks 
to make it increasingly difficult for law-abiding citizens to defend 
themselves.
  It shouldn't surprise us that the sum total of these laws is more gun 
violence and not less. I urge the House to defeat this amendment.
  Mr. BEYER. Mr. Chair, how much time is remaining?
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Virginia (Mr. Beyer) has 2\1/2\ 
minutes remaining. The gentleman from Virginia (Mr. Wittman) has 1\1/2\ 
minutes remaining.
  Mr. BEYER. Mr. Chair, all I need is just a few seconds to point out 
to my friend from California that many of the things that he objects to 
are irrelevant and not germane to this amendment.

  We are not asking for background checks. We are certainly not setting 
up a structure where lawyers can sue. We are simply asking for a policy 
or notice

[[Page H965]]

to be in place, as many other policies and notices are in place at gun 
shooting ranges around the country, that recognize that Federal law 
prohibits certain people, some dangerous people from possessing or 
using firearms in the United States, and especially the public shooting 
range that is being funded by the Federal Government under Pittman-
Robertson.
  Mr. Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. WITTMAN. Mr. Chairman, I want to remind folks, too, that the law 
already prohibits certain individuals from possessing a firearm, from 
using it at a public range. The acquisition or possession of a firearm 
by a person subject to 18 U.S. Code 922, section (g), under any 
circumstances for any purpose is already a Federal felony. I think the 
law already covers that as far as who can and cannot own a firearm.
  Having the additional effort of saying you can't access a public 
range is secondary to the primary violation of the law. I think that 
that is already covered if you are looking at making sure that guns 
aren't put in the hands of those folks who are convicted of these 
crimes.
  Again, I rise in strong opposition to the amendment. I encourage my 
colleagues to do the same, to oppose the amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Virginia (Mr. Beyer).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. BEYER. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Virginia 
will be postponed.

                              {time}  0930


               Amendment No. 3 Offered by Ms. Jackson Lee

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 3 
printed in House Report 114-429.
  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Beginning at page 14, line 3, strike title III.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 619, the gentlewoman 
from Texas (Ms. Jackson Lee) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from Texas.
  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Mr. Chairman, let me, first of all, thank the Rules 
Committee for making my amendment in order. Let me also thank Mr. 
Wittman and Mr. Beyer for their leadership on this issue.
  Let me state for the record that I am from Texas, where there are 
many fishermen, many hunters, and many sportsmen and -women, but we are 
also a people that understand unto whom much is given, much is 
expected. My amendment speaks to that very issue.
  My amendment No. 3 strikes title III of the underlying bill that 
creates a loophole in the Marine Mammal Protection Act that would allow 
a handful of hunters to import polar bear trophies into the United 
States.
  Let me provide for my colleagues a simple bit of information. Most 
people do not know, but polar bears are officially classified as marine 
mammals and, as such, are included under the 1972 Marine Mammal 
Protection Act. They are also listed under the U.S. Endangered Species 
Act, affording the iconic animals further protection against hunting, 
trapping, and capturing.
  Over the last few years, these laws did not stop a handful of wealthy 
individuals from flying up to Canada to bag a trophy polar bear for 
their collection back home, even though they were warned that U.S. law 
would prohibit the importation of skins, heads, and other products from 
bears that they were hunting.
  In 1994, well-funded hunting interests convinced Congress to amend 
the act, allowing a limited number of bears from trophy hunts, but only 
if the animal came from a designated population that could withstand 
the loss. Then in 2007, the Fish and Wildlife Service issued a proposed 
rule to list the polar bear as threatened. This continues.
  In the Humane Society letter that supports my amendment, it is 
indicated that, in fact, we may lose two-thirds of the polar bear 
population by 2070.
  My amendment is smart, it is right, it is humane. It responds to the 
conscience and the rightness of this country.
  I am saddened to see these lovely animals--if I can call them that--
become trophies to make someone else feel good. I ask my colleagues to 
recognize the importance of taking care of what God has given us.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. WITTMAN. Mr. Chairman, I rise in opposition to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Virginia is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. WITTMAN. Mr. Chairman, this amendment strikes a provision of the 
SHARE Act that will allow the importation of 41 polar bears legally 
harvested from sustainable populations in Canada before the polar bear 
was listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act.
  I yield to the gentleman from Alaska (Mr. Young).
  Mr. YOUNG of Alaska. I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  Mr. Chairman, it always interests me when some people try to undo 
something that has already occurred legally.
  Legally, these bears were taken under license of the Canadian 
Government. Legally, they should have been allowed to be imported. And 
then, Secretary Kempthorne listed the polar bear as a threatened 
species. They are not endangered. In fact, we have a study now that the 
polar bear population has increased, not decreased.
  The point is, these are 41 hides that were shot legally by individual 
hunters under the auspices of the Canadian law with proper guiding 
facilities, proper taxidermy facilities, and these bears are dead.
  By the way, as these dead bears come to the United States, they 
create money to take and help conserve the rest of the live bears. If I 
was out buying something or it was given to me and it was declared 
illegal later on, I can't keep it? This is silliness.
  This is a good part of this bill. It rectifies something that was 
done legally for hunters that did their hunting legally. Now we are 
saying that for human purposes, for the protection of the polar bear, 
we are not going to allow those 41 hides to come back into the United 
States that were shot legally?
  We are not going to collect the money we used to save polar bears 
from these legally shot bears. This is not about the future. And by the 
way, Fish and Wildlife sort of likes this program.
  I am always amazed that somebody is going to save a species that is 
not endangered--in fact, is not threatened--because they are going to 
save dead bears from coming into the United States that were shot 
legally.
  I oppose this amendment. It is a mischievous amendment.
  This amendment was backed by the Humane Society. Of course they are 
going to support her amendment, but the fact is they were shot legally. 
They should be allowed to be brought back in the country, as they were 
shot under the Government of Canada's auspices.
  So let's reject this amendment. Let's stick to the facts, not 
emotions.
  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Mr. Chairman, how much time do I have remaining?
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentlewoman from Texas has 2\1/2\ minutes 
remaining. The gentleman from Virginia also has 2\1/2\ minutes 
remaining.
  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Mr. Chairman, I have a letter from the Humane 
Society that I will include in the Record, along with an article 
regarding polar bear hunting.

                                                The Humane Society


                                         of the United States,

                                                February 24, 2016 
     Hon. Sheila Jackson Lee,
     House of Representatives,
     Washington, DC.
       Dear Rep. Jackson Lee: The Humane Society of the United 
     States, Humane Society Legislative Fund, and Humane Society 
     International strongly support your amendment to H.R. 2406, 
     the so-called ``Sportsmen's Heritage and Recreational 
     Enhancement (SHARE) Act of 2015.'' This harmful legislation 
     contains a variety of provisions that threaten wildlife, 
     including one that would allow U.S. trophy hunters to import 
     the heads and hides of threatened polar bears from Canada. 
     Your amendment to strike this

[[Page H966]]

     language sends a strong message that our country should be 
     protecting vulnerable species, not carving out exceptions for 
     the small fraction of the hunting public that travels the 
     globe to kill its most majestic creatures.
       Title III of H.R. 2406 would weaken the Marine Mammal 
     Protection Act by permitting the importation of trophies from 
     41 polar bears killed as the Fish and Wildlife Service 
     finalized a rule listing them as threatened under the 
     Endangered Species Act. The wealthy trophy hunters that shot 
     these bears had full knowledge of the pending rule, and knew 
     that U.S. law would likely prohibit them from bringing back 
     their kill. We should not give these hunters a free pass to 
     exploit a regulatory loophole.
       This is just the latest in a recent series of import 
     allowances by Congress. It would send a message that 
     politically-connected trophy hunters can kill endangered and 
     threatened species around the globe, put the trophies in 
     storage, and wait around for their congressional allies to 
     get them permission to bring the heads and hides into the 
     country for display over mantles in living rooms. The 
     provision does not help rank-and-file hunters and sportsmen, 
     who would never dream of traveling to the Arctic to shoot a 
     polar bear, or to Africa to shoot a lion.
       Scientists estimate that we may lose two-thirds of the 
     polar bear population by 2050. Congress should do all it can 
     / to protect such vanishing species from extinction instead 
     of incentivizing trophy hunters to kill as many as possible 
     in advance of pending ESA listings. This is a critical 
     measure to ensure the long-term viability of imperiled 
     animals around the globe.
       When Cecil, the beloved African lion, was killed by an 
     American dentist it shined a light on the shameful subculture 
     of trophy hunters, who spend their fortunes traveling the 
     globe to kill the rarest and most majestic species on earth. 
     We applaud your amendment, which provides real protections 
     for endangered and threatened species.
           Sincerely,
     Wayne Pacelle,
       President and CEO, The Humane Society of the United States.
     Michael Markarian,
       President, Humane Society Legislative Fund.
                                  ____


                    [From TakePart.com, May 5, 2013]

       Polar Bear Trophy Hunters: Kill Now, Get Permission Later

                            (By David Kirby)

       Most people don't know it, but polar bears are officially 
     classified as marine mammals, and as such are included under 
     the 1972 Marine Mammal Protection Act. They are also listed 
     under the U.S. Endangered Species Act, affording the iconic 
     animals further protection against hunting, trapping and 
     capturing.
       But over the past few years, those laws did not stop a 
     handful of wealthy individuals from flying up to Canada to 
     bag a ``trophy'' polar bear for their collection back home, 
     even though they were warned that U.S. law would prohibit the 
     importation of skins, heads and other products from the bears 
     they were hunting.
       Those trophy hunters have in the past managed to secure an 
     exemption from Congress, allowing some of the trophy bears to 
     enter the United States.
       Now the trophy hunters and their friends in D.C. are at it 
     again. Last week, Rep. Don Young (R-AK) introduced a new bill 
     in the house, ``To amend the Marine Mammal Protection Act of 
     1972 to allow the importation of polar bear trophies taken in 
     sport hunts in Canada.''
       On the Senate side, Mike Crapo (R-ID) offered a similar 
     though slightly more restrictive bill, the ``Polar Bear 
     Conservation and Fairness Act of 2013.''
       The Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972 outlawed the sport 
     hunting of all polar bears in the United States and banned 
     the import of any marine mammal product into the country.
       But in 1994, well-funded hunting interests convinced 
     Congress to amend the act, allowing in a limited number of 
     bears from trophy hunts, but only if the animal came from a 
     designated population that could withstand the loss.
       Then, in January 2007, the Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) 
     issued a proposed rule to list the polar bear as 
     ``threatened'' on the endangered species list, which meant no 
     bears from any populations could be imported.
       FWS had until January 2008 to issue its final ruling. But 
     the deadline came and went and there was still no listing of 
     the bears. A federal court intervened, ordering the agency to 
     publish the rule by May 15, 2008, adding that the new rule 
     would take effect immediately.
       By law, then, no polar bear killed from any population 
     could be imported after May 15, 2008, into the U.S., 
     regardless of when the permit had been issued.
       Trophy hunters were given repeated warnings from hunting 
     organizations and government agencies that trophy bears 
     killed in 2008 would not be allowed into the United States: 
     They were hunting at their own risk.
       Even pro-trophy-hunting groups such as Conservation Force 
     issued repeated and dire warnings to its members, including 
     one in a December 2007 newsletter that stated, ``American 
     hunters are asking us whether they should even look at polar 
     bear hunts in light of the current effort by the U.S. Fish & 
     Wildlife Service to list this species as threatened; [t]he 
     bottom line is, no American hunter should be putting hard, 
     non-returnable money down on a polar bear hunt at this 
     point.''
       And, the newsletter continued, ``We feel compelled to tell 
     you that American trophy hunters are likely to be barred from 
     importing bears they take this season. Moreover, there is a 
     chance that bears taken previous to this season may be barred 
     as well. American clients with polar bear trophies still in 
     Canada or Nunavut need to get those bears home.''
       The warning was not heeded by everyone. At least 40 
     Canadian polar bears were killed by U.S. trophy hunters from 
     March until May of 2008--when they were cautioned that the 
     Endangered Species Act would be in effect, disallowing any 
     imports of trophy polar bears.
       Now, those polar bear carcasses are collecting dust in 
     refrigerated storage in Canada at great cost to the hunters, 
     who desperately want to bring their trophies back stateside.
       ``We are disheartened to see this type of legislation 
     introduced in Congress. We have seen it time and time 
     again,'' says Lena Spadacene, policy manager for wildlife 
     protection at the Humane Society of the United States, which 
     has spearheaded the fight against importing polar bear 
     products.
       A similar bill was introduced in the last session of 
     Congress, Spadacene said, but was defeated by a coalition of 
     conservation groups. ``We worked diligently on that issue and 
     pulled together one of the most comprehensive reports on 
     trophy hunting and exemptions,'' she says.
       ``The law should be consistently applied, and we should not 
     have a special carve-out for a few trophy hunters who shot 
     polar bears in Canada, knowing full well that they may not be 
     able to import the trophies under U.S. law,'' the report 
     stated.
       ``While some argue this is just a small number of trophies, 
     it encourages hunters to continue killing protected species 
     in other countries, store the trophies in warehouses, and 
     simply wait for their allies in Congress to get them a waiver 
     on the imports,'' the report said. ``It sets a 
     dangerous precedent, and encourages more killing of 
     threatened species and protected marine mammals, which 
     flies in the face of the Endangered Species Act and Marine 
     Mammal Protection Act.''
       ``We don't want to reward bad behavior.'' Spadacene says. 
     When the trophy hunters learned that polar bears would be 
     listed as threatened, ``they rushed to Canada to bag 
     themselves a trophy, but some of them did not make it in 
     time. Now they are paying money every month for refrigeration 
     until they can lobby their friends in Congress.''
       It's a worrying pattern, Spadacene says, and it could 
     easily affect other species in the future.
       Once it becomes known that a species is about to be put on 
     the endangered list, it motivates some hunters to go out and 
     kill while they still can. And if they miss the deadline, 
     then they hope they can just win an exemption from 
     Washington.
       ``Passing this legislation now is only going to entice and 
     incentivize the bad behavior even more,'' Spadacene says.
       She adds, ``Whenever our elected officials grant special 
     exemptions for trophy hunting, it undermines conservation 
     policy. Shooting an iconic species for display or bragging 
     rights and then crying to Congress for a bailout is simply 
     bad form and should not be tolerated.''
       Spadacene explains the trophy hunters ``were warned of the 
     law and they shot polar bears anyway. If we allow this 
     exemption to happen, we can predict it will happen again with 
     other species, or potentially with polar bears again.''
       Then there is the question of priorities in Congress. With 
     so many problems vexing the country, is the fate of 40 dead 
     bears really so important that Capitol Hill should vote on 
     this bill?
       ``The last session was what many considered to be the most 
     ineffective and incompetent legislature in the history of 
     democracy, exactly because they were working on legislation 
     like this,'' Spadacene says. ``It's this kind of special-
     interest legislation that makes Americans frustrated with 
     Congress. It's so self-serving for a small group of wealthy 
     trophy hunters, and does nothing for the American people or 
     conservation.''
       Judd Deere, a spokesman for Senator Crapo, has the opposite 
     take on the matter.
       ``There is nothing more frustrating for the American people 
     than regulations that make no sense,'' Deere says. ``It's 
     frustrating for these hunters, and it's unfortunately 
     requiring Congress to act. This legislation was a commitment 
     that my boss made in the last Congress. We got really close 
     last time. I hope we can get it done this time.''
       It is sure to be a bitter battle.
       The polar bear legislation ``is being cast as a private 
     relief measure to help a few hunters bring in a handful of 
     personal trophies,'' the HSUS report said. ``But in reality 
     it would provide incentive for still more killing of polar 
     bears in Canada, by providing more hope to would-be bear 
     slayers they can convince Congress to amend the law just one 
     more time.''

  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Mr. Chairman, scientists estimate, as I indicated, 
that we may lose two-thirds of the polar bear population by 2050. 
Therefore, we, as custodians of these very precious

[[Page H967]]

animals, should do all that we can to protect a vanishing species from 
extinction instead of incentivizing trophy hunters to kill as many as 
possible in advance of pending ESA listings. This is a critical measure 
to assure the long-term viability of imperiled animals.
  Let me also cite for the record that the appeals court upholds 
Endangered Species Act protections for polar bears.
  Let me suggest to my colleagues that we saw an unfortunate 
circumstance just a few months ago when Cecil the lion was killed out 
of mistake or I don't know what, but this giant of an animal, this 
reflection of the idea of the importance of the animal kingdom, was 
killed.
  I introduced H.R. 3448, Cecil the Lion Endangered and Threatened 
Species Act. It is similar to the amendment I have today. I ask my 
colleagues to support it.
  Mr. Chair, let me express my appreciation to Chairman Bishop and 
Ranking Member Grijalva for their leadership and commitment to working 
to maintain and preserve America's natural resources and wildlife 
habitat.
  I also wish to thank Chairman Sessions, Ranking Member Slaughter, and 
members of the Rules Committee for making in order Jackson Lee 
Amendment No. 3.
  Mr. Chair, thank you for the opportunity to explain my amendment.
  Jackson Lee Amendment No. 3 is an important revision to the SHARE Act 
because it serves to preserve the original intent of Congress under the 
Marine Mammal Protection Act, as well as the Endangered Species Act.
  Specifically, the Jackson Lee Amendment strikes Title III of the 
underlying bill that creates a loophole in the Marine Mammal Protection 
Act which would allow a handful of hunters to import polar bear 
trophies into the United States in contravention of current law.
  While H.R. 2406 purports to enhance recreational outdoor 
opportunities and does in fact have some favorable provisions, Title 
III, as well as many other harmful provisions make clear, that this 
legislation would in reality jeopardize already fragile ecosystems and 
negatively impact animal welfare and wildlife.
  As a longstanding member of the Congressional Animal Rights Caucus 
and champion of wildlife preservation and protection of animals, I am 
deeply concerned about the harmful provisions of H.R. 2406 and the 
impact this legislation will have on endangered and threatened 
populations.
  Title III of the SHARE Act is particularly concerning, because it 
creates a loophole in the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) allowing 
for a special class of hunters to import polar bear trophies into the 
United States in contravention of the law.
  The MMPA was set up because it was recognized that many marine mammal 
stocks, including polar bears, were in danger of becoming endangered or 
extinct.
  The sole, most important, objective of the MMPA is to help maintain 
the health and stability of the ecosystem.
  The polar bears for which these hunters seek permits for were hunted 
in Canada after the species was proposed for listing as threatened 
under the Endangered Species Act and was done so with full knowledge 
and warning that U.S. law would prohibit their eventual importation.
  Enacting Title III of the SHARE Act would threaten this imperiled 
species by encouraging hunters to race for trophies the moment a 
species is considered for listing under the Endangered Species Act, 
store them abroad and then seek waivers from Congress to import their 
trophies later.
  Granting such a waiver sets a dangerous precedent and sends signals 
to trophy hunters that they can flout the law--effectively rewarding 
hunters who raced to kill polar bears for trophies before their listing 
under the Endangered Species Act.
  Alternately, removal of this language will help ensure that hunters 
are not encouraged to seek bad faith waivers from Congress to import 
threatened and endangered species at a later time.
  These bears were knowingly hunted in Canada after the species was 
proposed for listing as threatened under the Endangered Species Act.
  The survival and protection of the polar bear habitat is an urgent 
issue for wildlife experts and those who treasure our natural habitat.
  H.R. 2406, as it stands, is opposed by virtually every leading 
environmental organization in the nation.
  The Humane Society of the United States, the Humane Society 
Legislative Fund, and the Humane Society International, as well as 
several others including the Animal Welfare Institute, Center for 
Biological Diversity, and Born Free USA have all submitted letters in 
strong support my Jackson Lee Amendment as a necessary provision to 
provide real protections for endangered and threatened species.
  Earlier this year, I also introduced H.R. 3448, the Cecil the Lion 
Endangered and Threatened Species Act in response to the tragic killing 
of Cecil the Lion and the impermeable need for greater protections to 
shield all threatened and endangered species from trophy-hunting.
  You have no doubt heard about the recent tragic illegal killing of 
Cecil the Lion, a 13-year-old lion, dominant male of his pride, and one 
of Zimbabwe's most beloved symbols of wildlife and important driver of 
tourism.
  The hunter, along with hired professionals, lured Cecil out of Hwange 
National Park and shot him, allegedly without a permit, and collected 
the head and skin.
  Beyond Cecil, over two thirds of the world's cat species are 
recognized as species in need of protection under federal or 
international law.
  My legislation to amend the Endangered Species Act of 1973, would 
prohibit the taking and transportation of any endangered or threatened 
species as a trophy into the United States.
  Currently, the Endangered Species Act (ESA) does not protect the vast 
majority of wild animals killed and imported by American hunters.
  While the ESA allows for the importation of endangered and threatened 
species for scientific research, propagation or survival of the 
species, hunters are abusing this limited exception to murder and 
transport protected wildlife for sport.
  As a result of the ESA loophole, tens of thousands of wild animals 
are killed every year by American trophy hunters and transported into 
the United States.
  In particular, Africa's lion population has declined 90 percent in 
the past 75 years.
  The conservation of rare and threatened species is critically 
important to the sustainability of our ecosystem and wildlife as we 
know it.
  Polar bears, like African lions, currently face unprecedented threats 
by humans on two fronts: sport hunting and loss of habitat.
  The polar bear and African lion are vulnerable species sitting at the 
top of the food chain. The health of these animals is an indicator and 
foundation for the health of the ecosystem as a whole, and by 
protecting the sustainability of these specific umbrella species, we 
can have tremendous impacts on entire ecosystems.
  The International Union of Conservation of Nature (IUCN) has ``Red 
Listed'' polar bears as a ``Vulnerable'' species--thus, meeting 
criteria as a threatened species facing a high risk of extinction in 
the wild.
  While Canada is the only country that allows for sport hunting of 
polar bears, it is unfortunate that what was once a necessity of life 
for indigenous Inuit communities in Canada, killing polar bears has now 
become a bloody sport for profit and prestige.
  It is estimated there are 20,000-25,000 polar bears left in the wild 
a number that has only been sustainable through federal protection.
  Mr. Chairman, the SHARE Act of 2015, if enacted would continue to 
threaten the sustainability of one our most vulnerable species as well 
as the critical preservation of our wildlife.
  Scaling back protections on vulnerable and threatened species in the 
face of legislation aimed to do otherwise will have substantial adverse 
impacts on wildlife and conservation efforts, as well as policy 
implications rewarding those who failed to comply with federal law.
  We simply cannot afford to let threatened and endangered species die 
needlessly for sport or profit.
  The Jackson Lee Amendment would protect polar bears while at the same 
time preserving Congress's intent under the Marine Mammal Protection 
Act and the Endangered Species Act.
  I urge all members to support Jackson Lee Amendment No. 3.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. WITTMAN. Mr. Chairman, I would like to reiterate something that 
Mr. Young said. There is a thousand-dollar importation fee that is 
assessed on all 41 of those trophies. Those dollars go to polar bear 
conservation and research. So we are looking to use these efforts to 
continue the promulgation of this species. We want to make sure polar 
bear populations continue to grow.
  Hunters provide, I believe, the largest measure of conservation of 
any group out there that is looking to preserve polar bears. It is in 
everyone's interest to make sure these things happen.
  We have a number of groups out there that are in support of this 
bill: the Congressional Sportsmen's Foundation, the National Rifle 
Association, the National Shooting Sports Foundation, Safari Club 
International, and the Boone and Crockett Club. All those organizations 
are deeply committed to

[[Page H968]]

making sure that we continue and grow these species.
  We want to make sure we understand that, but hunters are the best 
conservationists on the planet because they are involved in making sure 
the species continue. They use their resources to put into species 
continuation. They want to make sure these species are properly managed 
and that we have good science in managing those species. I believe that 
this is what we want. We want to make sure that we are encouraging 
that.
  This amendment does not allow us to do that. It strikes those 
provisions. I would strongly urge my colleagues to vote against this 
amendment.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Mr. Chairman, how much time do I have remaining?
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentlewoman from Texas has 1\1/2\ minutes 
remaining.
  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Mr. Chairman, there are a litany of organizations 
that are supporting this amendment: the League of Conservation Voters, 
the Alaskan Wilderness League, Animal Welfare League, Born Free USA.
  With respect to lions, let me recite that over the last 75 years, we 
have lost 90 percent of African lions because we did not have the 
restraints. I would make the argument that we should not do that in 
this case.
  When we let go and let free, we will find out that they will go 
beyond the 41. They will be calling after polar bears for trophies. We 
need to ban this in our legislation to ensure the protection of all of 
those.
  Let me ask my colleagues to take into consideration the importance of 
our responsibilities of preservation.
  Trophies? Money?
  I can assure you that there are a bounty of humane organizations that 
will provide any amount of dollars to do the research that is necessary 
to protect this vulnerable population. They are listed on the 
Endangered Species Act. They are vulnerable.
  These trophies should not be an indication to the American people 
that they can bring in polar bears--who may themselves become extinct--
because we believe that trophies are more important than studying the 
species and growing the species to the extent that scientists and 
others can restrain them and make sure that we do have a population 
within the realm and reason of supporting the ecosystem that we need.
  I ask my colleagues to support the Jackson Lee amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. WITTMAN. Mr. Chairman, I would reiterate polar bears are not 
endangered. They are not on the endangered species list.
  I want to remind folks, too, these 41 trophies were harvested in 
Canada. Canada has a world-class management program for polar bears. 
They have used the best science.
  Remember, these polar bears were taken in 2008, based upon the 
science Canada was using to manage the program. The polar bears in 
Canada, both at the time and now, are increasing in population. Canada 
does a great job in managing this.
  This is just a situation where polar bears legally harvested under 
the best management programs available should be allowed to come back 
into the United States. I would encourage my colleagues to vote against 
this amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from Texas (Ms. Jackson Lee).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from Texas will 
be postponed.


                  Amendment No. 4 Offered by Mr. Costa

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 4 
printed in House Report 114-429.
  Mr. COSTA. Mr. Chairman, as the designee of the gentlewoman from 
Illinois (Mrs. Bustos), I offer amendment No. 4.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 20, line 19, strike ``; and'' and insert a semicolon.
       Page 20, line 21, strike the period and insert ``; and''.
       Page 20, after line 21, insert the following:
       ``(viii) Administrator of the Small Business Administration 
     or designated representative.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 619, the gentleman 
from California (Mr. Costa) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from California.


             Modification to Amendment Offered by Mr. Costa

  Mr. COSTA. Mr. Chairman, I ask unanimous consent that amendment No. 4 
be printed in House Report 114-429 and be modified in the form that I 
have placed at the desk.
  The Clerk will report the modification.
  The Clerk read as follows:
  Modification to amendment offered by Mr. Costa:

       Page 19, line 24, strike ``7'' and insert ``8''.
       Page 20, line 19, strike ``; and'' and insert a semicolon.
       Page 20, line 21, strike the period and insert ``; and''.
       Page 20, after line 21, insert the following:
       ``(viii) Administrator of the Small Business Administration 
     or designated representative.

  The Acting CHAIR. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman 
from California?
  There was no objection.
  The Acting CHAIR. The amendment is modified.
  Mr. COSTA. Mr. Chairman, Representative Bustos and I would like to 
thank Congressmen Beyer and Wittman and the Rules Committee for 
allowing us to present this amendment on the floor.
  This amendment would help ensure that the interests of small 
businesses that rely on wildlife conservation and recreational hunting 
continue to thrive.
  As established by this bill, the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage 
Conservation Council Advisory Committee's duties would include advising 
the Secretaries of Interior and Agriculture on policies and programs 
that help increase the participation in hunting and wildlife 
conservation activities and promote awareness of the importance of both 
wildlife conservation and the economic benefits of recreational 
hunting.
  There is no question that recreational hunting has economic benefits. 
In 2011, hunters put $38.3 billion into our economy. The small 
businesses across the country that cater to the needs of these hunters 
and wildlife watchers--be they stores, hotels, trail guides--are 
bedrocks of our local economies that are near our public lands. We know 
that.

                              {time}  0945

  As is, however, none of the governmental bodies set to serve on this 
advisory committee that is being proposed as a part of this legislation 
represent the perspective or the needs of these small businesses.
  Small businesses are the economic engine that is driving our economy. 
We know that. It has been that way for years. They should not be left 
behind or be left out of this.
  This amendment would simply add the Administrator of the Small 
Business Administration to be listed as an ex-officio member of this 
advisory committee.
  Having a representative from the Small Business Administration or 
their designee will strengthen the voice of small businesses that rely 
on tourism associated with hunting or shooting or sports or 
recreational or wildlife activities that this legislation intends to 
promote.
  So my colleague, Representative Bustos, and I ask that you join us in 
supporting this small-business amendment ensuring that they have a seat 
at the table by supporting this effort.
  Mr. Chairman, I ask for an ``aye'' vote.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment, as modified, 
offered by the gentleman from California (Mr. Costa).
  The amendment, as modified, was agreed to.


            Amendment No. 5 Offered by Mr. Smith of Missouri

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 5 
printed in House Report 114-429.

[[Page H969]]

  

  Mr. SMITH of Missouri. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 49, line 20, after the period, insert ``Such closures 
     shall be clearly marked with signs and dates of closures, and 
     shall not include gates, chains, walls, or other barriers on 
     the hunter access corridor.''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 619, the gentleman 
from Missouri (Mr. Smith) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Missouri.
  Mr. SMITH of Missouri. Mr. Chairman, I rise today in support of the 
numerous hunters in my district who have called me, very frustrated, 
every hunting season that the National Forest Service, with no cause, 
no rationale, and no reason, closes down their access to hunt in the 
Mark Twain National Forest. With gates, locks and chains, they limit 
the residents of central and southeast Missouri.
  I have been contacted by numerous folks in my district about not 
having proper postings of corridors within the National Park System 
whenever they decide to change its random gates. What this amendment 
would do is it would require the National Forest Service to publish 
signs of any hunting corridors that they decide to close.
  I yield to the gentleman from Virginia (Mr. Wittman).
  Mr. WITTMAN. Mr. Chairman, I would like to state that we support this 
amendment.
  Mr. SMITH of Missouri. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my 
time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Missouri (Mr. Smith).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                  Amendment No. 6 Offered by Ms. Meng

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 6 
printed in House Report 114-429.
  Ms. MENG. Mr. Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 59, line 10, strike ``officer'' and insert 
     ``officers''.
       Page 59, beginning at line 16, strike ``officer'' and 
     insert ``officers''.
       Page 59, line 20, strike ``one''.
       Page 59, line 21, strike ``officer'' and insert 
     ``officers''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 619, the gentlewoman 
from New York (Ms. Meng) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from New York.
  Ms. MENG. Mr. Chairman, this amendment would allow U.S. Fish and 
Wildlife Service law enforcement officers to be placed in diplomatic 
posts abroad in an effort to combat the illegal killing of African 
elephants.
  Honestly, this is an activity in which the Fish and Wildlife Service 
already engages. What the underlying bill does in section 1004, 
however, which I think is commendable, is explicitly authorizes this 
activity in law for the first time.
  Unfortunately, I feel the authorization is overly narrow because it 
allows only one FWS officer to be placed in a single country at a time. 
I think this was likely a drafting oversight and simply wish to allow 
more than one FWS officer to be assigned to a foreign country at a 
time.
  Let me be clear. This amendment does not mandate that multiple 
officers be sent abroad. It does not authorize any additional funds for 
these activities. It does not require an increase in any way on the 
number of FWS officers placed abroad. It simply allows more than one 
FWS officer to be placed in a single country at any given time.
  In reality, this amendment could, should we wish it, result in a net 
decrease in the number of FWS law enforcement agents placed abroad, 
resulting in lowered costs to the U.S. Government for these activities.
  Imagine a scenario in which elephant poaching and ivory trafficking 
was running rampant in 20 different nations and we wished to assist in 
the combating of these activities by leveraging the expertise and 
experience of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officers.
  As written, we would only be allowed to place one officer in each 
country, for a total of 20 total officers deployed internationally.
  What if the Secretary of the Interior determined, however, that 
formulating a task force of five specialists, who would be deployed 
jointly, as needed, would be the best possible course of action to 
combat the poaching of African elephants?
  As written, the SHARE Act would force this task force to be split up 
and housed in five different African nations. The amendment before us, 
however, would permit the entire task force to be housed under one 
roof.
  At the end of the day, housing the entire task force in a single 
location could be much more effective strategically and could result in 
significant savings to the U.S. Government if it is housed in the 
nation with the lowest cost of living.
  Mr. Chair, no matter how one may feel about the broader bill before 
us, I feel that section 1004 of the bill is a worthwhile section. I 
hope you will support my amendment seeking to improve it.
  I urge my colleagues to support this amendment.
  Mr. Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from New York (Ms. Meng).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                 Amendment No. 7 Offered by Mr. Huffman

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 7 
printed in House Report 114-429.
  Mr. HUFFMAN. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of title X add the following:

     SEC. __ GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE STUDY.

       Not later than 90 days after the date of the enactment of 
     this Act, the Comptroller General of the United States shall 
     conduct a study examining the effects of a ban of the trade 
     in of fossilized ivory from mammoths and mastodons on the 
     illegal importation and trade of African and Asian elephant 
     ivory within the United States, with the exception of 
     importation or trade thereof related to museum exhibitions or 
     scientific research, and report to Congress the findings of 
     such study.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 619, the gentleman 
from California (Mr. Huffman) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from California.
  Mr. HUFFMAN. Mr. Chairman, today I am offering an amendment to the 
SHARE Act to direct the Government Accountability Office to delve 
deeper into an important issue, and that is the ivory trade, which has 
sparked international concern.
  Last year my home State of California became the third State in the 
country to approve tougher restrictions on the intrastate ivory trade, 
joining New York and New Jersey in that regard.
  The new California law, AB 96, closes a loophole that had allowed the 
import of ivory harvested from animals killed before 1977.
  Now, this loophole made a ban of the import of elephant ivory nearly 
impossible to enforce because distinguishing between pre- and post-1977 
ivory products would require very expensive isotope testing.
  The California law also included a ban on the growing trade in 
mammoth ivory--this is ivory discovered in Siberia and elsewhere--
ironically made easier because of warming weather and melting tundra 
due to the impacts of climate change.
  There is growing concern that Chinese ivory traders are passing off 
illegal elephant tusks as mammoth ivory in order to avoid international 
elephant ivory bans.
  But distinguishing between mammoth ivory and elephant ivory requires 
technical testing, which makes, again, enforcement of an elephant ivory 
ban very difficult unless the mammoth ivory trade is also addressed.
  Now, some argue that, despite this difficulty, legal mammoth ivory 
can reduce the market for illegal elephant ivory. Although I don't 
agree with that, I do understand the concerns.
  That is why, with this amendment, we are simply asking the GAO to 
study

[[Page H970]]

the issue, to look at what various experts have to say, and give us 
some advice.
  To make smart policy decisions, we need that kind of information on 
how a ban on the trade of fossilized ivory from mammoths would affect 
the illegal importation and trade of elephant ivory within the United 
States.
  So I respectfully request your support of this amendment.
  Mr. Chairman, I would request an ``aye'' vote.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from California (Mr. Huffman).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                  Amendment No. 8 Offered by Mr. Beyer

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 8 
printed in House Report 114-429.
  Mr. BEYER. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Beginning at page 69, line 1, strike title XIV.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 619, the gentleman 
from Virginia (Mr. Beyer) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Virginia.
  Mr. BEYER. Mr. Chairman, title XIV of this bill would give States and 
territories the authority to override Federal fishing rules in coastal 
waters of national parks, national marine sanctuaries, and some marine 
national monuments. This is simply not right.
  Places like Biscayne National Park, Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale 
National Marine Sanctuary, and Rose Atoll Marine National Monument 
belong to all Americans, not just to the fishing interests in Florida, 
Hawaii, and American Samoa.
  Protection of these special ocean places has overwhelming public 
support and is recognized by the scientific community as critical to 
making fisheries more productive.
  What is more, most of these areas do not even preclude fishing. 
California's national marine sanctuaries generate more than $140 
million a year in economic impact from commercial fishing.
  Recreational anglers spend more than $100 million a year on fishing 
in the Florida Keys.
  I attended the public hearing in Homestead, Florida, last year on 
closing a very small part--less than 6 percent--of Biscayne National 
Bay for a marine national monument simply to bring the fish back, many 
fish that fishermen there hadn't seen in years.
  But fishing is not the only important use of these waters. Whale 
watching, snorkeling, scuba diving, and scientific research all 
generate enormous benefits, not to mention the impact that protecting 
coral reefs and other diverse productive habitats has on stabilizing 
our oceans and our fisheries in the face of global warming.
  Sometimes it is necessary to protect certain areas of the ocean, 
particularly those that have been over-fished in the past or are 
particularly sensitive to fishing impacts, if we want to support a wide 
variety of uses and keep our oceans healthy. Science shows that this 
benefits fishermen in the long run as well.
  My amendment is simple. It strikes title XIV of H.R. 2406 and leaves 
fishery management decisions in the waters of marine parks, 
sanctuaries, and monuments up to the Federal agencies charged with 
managing these resources in trust for all Americans.
  We would never think of allowing Wyoming to set hunting rules for 
Yellowstone, but without this amendment, this bill would allow the same 
thing to happen for our ocean parks that are every bit as magnificent.
  I urge a ``yes'' vote on the amendment.
  I reserve the balance of my time.

                              {time}  1000

  Mr. McCLINTOCK. Mr. Chairman, I rise in opposition to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from California is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. McCLINTOCK. Mr. Chairman, yesterday I noted that one of our 
principal objectives of the Federal lands policy must be to restore the 
Federal Government as a good neighbor to the communities impacted by 
the Federal lands.
  Gifford Pinchot, the founder of the Forest Service, advised his 
foresters to find out in advance what the public will stand for. If it 
is right and they won't stand for it, postpone action and educate them.
  That is essentially what this bill does. It says that the Federal 
Government needs to listen to States and territories before imposing 
fishing regulations in State waters.
  This amendment would strip this language and say, in effect: We don't 
care what local communities think. We know what is best.
  It speaks volumes about why States and communities are openly 
revolting against Federal lands policy.
  Pinchot also advised us to get rid of an attitude of personal 
arrogance or pride of attainment of superior knowledge. I would commend 
that advice to the gentleman from Virginia.
  Mr. Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. BEYER. Mr. Chairman, with respect to my colleague and friend from 
California, I don't think that is the way the system works.
  In fact, right now fishing limitations are developed in coordination 
with their respective States and territories. They are just not given 
final, blanket veto power. The Park Service and the States benefit from 
cooperative fisheries research and management and full participation. 
My only personal experience is with the Biscayne Bay where there were 
many, many public hearings. The public was fully involved. The 
fishermen, pro and con, were fully involved in it.
  The idea is not to eliminate the close coordination of partnership 
with the States and with the territories, but, rather, to avoid giving 
the States and territories the ultimate veto power over what 
essentially are national decisions.
  Mr. Chairman, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. McCLINTOCK. Mr. Chairman, I yield such time as she may consume to 
the gentlewoman from Florida (Ms. Ros-Lehtinen).
  Ms. ROS-LEHTINEN. Mr. Chairman, I thank my good friend for yielding.
  Mr. Chairman, I rise in strong opposition to this amendment.
  Now, we know the Natural Resources Committee is a rowdy one to 
manage, with lots of difficult decisions and inflamed passions.
  But I thank Chairman Bishop and the great subcommittee chairmen and 
all of the members for doing a great job in ensuring that the American 
people are the ultimate beneficiaries of our amazing public lands and 
waters.
  This title XIV language that would be stripped out of the underlying 
bill by this amendment was taken from my bill, the Preserving Public 
Access to Public Waters Act, which has 36 bipartisan cosponsors, 
including nearly two-thirds of the Florida delegation.
  Floridians understand the importance of balancing environmental, 
recreational, and economic considerations along our coast because our 
State is the fishing capital of the world.
  With that balance in mind, we worked to carefully develop and tailor 
this language so that it would only apply to a very small area of near-
shore waters with deep importance to fishermen.
  My colleague and this amendment's sponsor himself said in the 
committee markup that the National Park Service and the National Marine 
Sanctuaries cover a negligible percentage of waters within traditional 
State jurisdiction.
  He is right that we are talking about a relatively small area, but 
these waters have outsized importance to the folks living in nearby 
communities.
  In my district, the National Park Service is attempting to close over 
30 percent of Biscayne National Park's reefs to fishing in perpetuity 
as part of its new general management plan and in opposition to the 
scientific and management expertise of the FWC, Florida Fish and 
Wildlife Conservation Commission.
  FWC has worked for over a decade to develop mutually agreeable and 
scientifically supported fishing restrictions that stop short of a full 
closure in these waters, but the National Park Service has completely 
disregarded the State's authority to manage its own fishing resources 
in Biscayne National Park.

[[Page H971]]

  Rather than work with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation 
Committee, what did the National Park Service do? It decided to 
abdicate its responsibility to the American public to try to balance 
environmental, recreational, and economic considerations.
  Instead, the National Park Service kowtowed to the whims of a single 
special interest group that bankrolled tens of thousands of form 
letters from across the country to hijack the public comment section in 
favor of closing fishing access to State waters upon which local 
fishermen depend.
  That is not the proper use of the public comment process. It is not 
in the best interests of south Floridians. It is not in the best 
interests of the American people. It is not reflective of how we should 
manage public waters.
  Let me be clear. The title XIV language in this bill is narrowly 
targeted. It is simply to keep States involved in the management of 
their own waters. It does not apply in any way to Federal waters. This 
language is not anti-environment. It does not roll back any existing 
environmental protections nor fishing regulations currently enshrined 
in law.
  Without keeping this language in the bill, Mr. Chairman, the example 
that the National Park Service is setting in Biscayne National Park 
will create a terrible precedent for other State and territorial waters 
in similar circumstances.
  Mr. Chairman, I strongly urge all of our colleagues to oppose this 
harmful amendment.
  Mr. BEYER. Mr. Chairman, how much time do I have remaining?
  The Acting CHAIR (Mr. Carter of Georgia). The gentleman from Virginia 
has 2\1/4\ minutes remaining.
  Mr. BEYER. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Mr. Chairman, in response and with respect to my friend, the 
representative from Florida, Biscayne Bay National Park is 164,800 
acres. These are Federal lands. This is a national park, Federal 
waters.
  She mentioned that only they are going to close 30 percent of the 
reefs. It is very important to note that the reef that existed 100 
years ago is down to only 6 percent that is left. So the 30 percent 
that is going to be closed is 2 percent of the original reef.
  The whole purpose is to actually serve that special interest, the 
fishing interest of Florida, who desperately need the revival of the 
fish.
  We found at the public hearing that at least half of the fishermen 
there were for closing it, and all the fishermen pointed out that the 
water was so far away, it was rarely fished at all. The worry was the 
precedent, not the specific part that is closed.
  We point out that Biscayne Bay itself is only less than 2 percent--
1.4 percent--of all Florida's waters. So this is a very tiny part. But 
the point here is not for any special interest, but to revise, because 
study after study after study have shown that where these marine 
sanctuaries are created, the fish recover much faster even than 
scientists expected.
  This is for the long-term benefit of the fishing community, for 
anglers throughout the world, especially serving the larger interests 
of the American public.
  Mr. Chairman, I urge my colleagues to vote ``yes'' on this important 
amendment. We resist giving veto power over Federal decisions to State 
governments and territorial governments.
  Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. McCLINTOCK. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Virginia (Mr. Beyer).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. BEYER. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Virginia 
will be postponed.


            Amendment No. 9 Offered by Mr. Smith of Missouri

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 9 
printed in House Report 114-429.
  Mr. SMITH of Missouri. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 71, Line 13, insert ``the Mark Twain National Forest 
     in the State of Missouri,'' after ``Mississippi,''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 619, the gentleman 
from Missouri (Mr. Smith) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Missouri.
  Mr. SMITH of Missouri. Mr. Chairman, the great outdoors and hunting 
traditions of the United States are a way of life for folks all over 
our great country.
  Throughout our history, they have been championed by Presidents 
George Washington, Dwight Eisenhower, and Teddy Roosevelt, who 
established national forests, game preserves, and national parks. The 
SHARE Act continues these great traditions.
  My amendment, which adds Mark Twain National Forest to the list of 
forests provided in the section, assures the residents of Missouri that 
no executive order, no executive action, or no bureaucrat sitting in 
Washington, D.C., who has never set foot on Mark Twain National Forest 
will write a rule inhibiting the ability to hunt or fish in our 
national forests.
  This amendment secures our freedom to be avid sportsmen. Folks in 
Missouri don't want an overzealous administration to be able to come in 
and dictate to the hunters and anglers of Missouri by executive fiat.
  Over 1.3 million Missourians hunt or fish, and many go to the Mark 
Twain National Forest each year. It covers roughly 2,331 square miles, 
1.5 million acres, most of which reside in Missouri's Eighth 
Congressional District.
  I ask the body to support the amendment.
  Mr. Chairman, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. BEYER. Mr. Chairman, I rise in opposition to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Virginia is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. BEYER. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Mr. Chairman, I am opposing this amendment, first and foremost, 
because it, like so many provisions already in the bill, seeks to 
prevent U.S. public lands from being managed for the benefit of all 
Americans.
  National forests are lands of many uses, including hunting and 
fishing. But how those uses are balanced should be decided by expert 
land managers at the Forest Service through a process that is open to 
the public and consistent with our national conservation laws, not by a 
few well-connected hunters and their allies in Congress.
  Furthermore, the practice that this section of the bill is trying to 
protect is using dogs to hunt deer. Not only is this an ethically 
questionable hunting tactic, it is wildly controversial in the States 
listed in this title as well as in my State of Virginia.
  Its opponents, Mr. Chairman, are not who you might think. These are 
not what was described yesterday as radical leftists. In fact, it is 
the complaints from private landowners and not overbearing bureaucrats, 
not environmentalists, that led the Forest Service to ban deer hounding 
in Louisiana's Kisatchie National Forest in 2012.
  Don't take my word for it. A 2014 column in Louisiana Sportsman 
stated:

       The boot that finally stamped the life out of deer hunting 
     with dogs in Kisatchie National Forest was trespassing on 
     private property . . . homeowners reported people standing on 
     the public roads in front of their homes with guns, waiting 
     for deer to appear. They reported dogs on their property 
     sometimes attacking their chickens or other livestock. And, 
     worst of all, the homeowners reported belligerent and 
     insolent behavior by these people standing on the roads and 
     entering their property to retrieve their dogs.

  Missouri's Mark Twain National Forest, the subject of this bill, was 
the scene of a major law enforcement action that found 46 people guilty 
of illegally hunting deer with dogs in 2013, this in spite of the fact 
that the practice had already been banned in Missouri.
  Mr. Chairman, I urge a ``no'' vote.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. SMITH of Missouri. Mr. Chairman, I yield such time as he may 
consume to the gentleman from Virginia (Mr. Wittman).

[[Page H972]]

  

  Mr. WITTMAN. Mr. Chairman, I urge my colleagues to support this 
amendment.
  Mr. SMITH of Missouri. Mr. Chairman, I yield such time as he may 
consume to the gentleman from Arkansas (Mr. Westerman).
  Mr. WESTERMAN. Mr. Chairman, I rise in support of this amendment that 
is a commonsense amendment that prevents discrimination against hunters 
on public Federal lands by preventing the Forest Service from creating 
their own hunting laws that are in conflict with State laws on 
neighboring State and privately owned lands.
  Mr. Chairman, for many people, the public lands on the national 
forests are the only place they have to hunt. There are many traditions 
and many different ways that people enjoy hunting in the outdoors in my 
State as well as others.
  We already have similar language in the bill for national forests in 
Louisiana, Oklahoma, Mississippi, and Arkansas, and I support adding 
the Mark Twain National Forest in Missouri to this bill.
  Mr. BEYER. Mr. Chairman, I would just like to emphasize that the 
Forest Service doesn't prohibit hunting right now in the Mark Twain 
National Forest. It simply prohibits hunting deer with dogs.
  It does this because of complaints from private landowners, not from 
the environmentalists and not from bureaucrats. This is literally 
respect for the public input that comes from that.
  I continue to urge my colleagues to vote ``no'' on the amendment.
  Mr. Chairman, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. SMITH of Missouri. Mr. Chairman, this amendment is just a 
commonsense amendment that adds the Mark Twain National Forest to the 
several other forests that are mentioned in the four other States.
  I ask the body to support the amendment.
  Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. BEYER. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Missouri (Mr. Smith).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. BEYER. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Missouri 
will be postponed.


                Amendment No. 10 Offered by Mr. Newhouse

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 10 
printed in House Report 114-429.
  Mr. NEWHOUSE. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       After section 1502, insert the following:

     SEC. 1503. PUBLICATION OF CLOSURE OF ROADS IN FORESTS.

       The Chief of the Forest Service shall publish a notice in 
     the Federal Register for the closure of any public road on 
     Forest System lands, along with a justification for the 
     closure.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 619, the gentleman 
from Washington (Mr. Newhouse) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Washington.

                              {time}  1015

  Mr. NEWHOUSE. Mr. Chairman, I rise today in support of my amendment 
to H.R. 2406, the SHARE Act, and urge my colleagues to support its 
adoption.
  This amendment is very straightforward. It simply requires the Forest 
Service to publish a notice in the Federal Register along with a 
justification explaining the decision for the closure of any public 
road on Forest Service lands.
  Some of you may ask why this amendment is necessary, and that is 
understandable because, fortunately, many Americans have never had to 
deal with this issue. However, in my district in the Pacific Northwest 
and in many Federal forests across the country, many people have faced 
the reality that a public road that they have used for decades is 
suddenly closed. When I say ``closed,'' if I could refer your attention 
to this photograph, there is a picture indicating that a road is no 
longer even available for use. It is not just a chain going across the 
road.
  However, the reality is far worse. When the Forest Service closes 
many of these public roads, they do so by piling gravel, downing trees, 
or both, in order to block access. At other times, they create what are 
called tank traps, essentially large ditches dug into the ground that 
makes passage impossible. Furthermore, these practices create 
impediments that not only block human access but can also restrict the 
movement of wildlife in our national forests.
  This has become a serious issue in central Washington. For many 
people who use these roads, it can have detrimental impacts on their 
everyday lives, whether by making their daily travel much longer or by 
restricting access to campsites or treasured areas in our national 
forests.
  Some of these roads have been in use for 70 or 80 years, with 
generations of Washingtonians using them for forest access and 
recreation. Yet, in most cases, the Forest Service has closed them 
without even first notifying local residents and the surrounding 
communities.
  Mr. Chairman, I believe the first indication of a public road being 
closed should not come when an individual or a family is faced with an 
impassable roadway, but rather through adequate public notice from the 
Forest Service. That is why I have introduced this amendment today.
  Just to be clear, my amendment simply requires the Forest Service to 
provide notification when closing a public road on Forest Service land 
as well as justification for such a decision. This is an important 
first step in ensuring that rural communities and residents are given 
proper warning and advance notice when a public roadway will suddenly 
be blocked and access to a Federal forest area will no longer be 
available.
  Local residents and communities deserve to know when such an action 
is taking place and whether forest action will be denied. This 
amendment will guarantee the Forest Service is being transparent in 
future decisions and closures.
  Mr. WITTMAN. Will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. NEWHOUSE. I yield to the gentleman from Virginia.
  Mr. WITTMAN. Mr. Chairman, I thank Mr. Newhouse for yielding.
  I urge my colleagues to vote in favor of this amendment.
  Mr. NEWHOUSE. Mr. Chairman, rural communities deserve better from 
their government. I urge my colleagues to support this amendment.
  Mr. YOUNG of Alaska. Will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. NEWHOUSE. I yield to the gentleman from Alaska.
  Mr. YOUNG of Alaska. Mr. Chairman, I want to compliment Mr. Newhouse 
on introducing this amendment.
  These roads were built with taxpayer dollars, yet the Forest Service 
arbitrarily goes in and shuts those roads down so people don't have 
access to them.
  We have the same problem in our forests in Alaska: no notification, 
and then they will spend millions of dollars closing down a road that 
the public had access to. Their excuse is: well, it is our land. We 
don't have to worry about other people using this road now, so we will 
just isolate everybody from it.
  So I compliment the gentleman for the introduction of his amendment.
  Mr. NEWHOUSE. Mr. Chairman, I appreciate the comments from the good 
gentleman from Alaska.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. BEYER. Mr. Chairman, I rise in ambivalent opposition to my 
friend's amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Virginia is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. BEYER. Mr. Chairman, first, I want to let Representative Newhouse 
know I completely appreciate the dilemma that he is in and appreciate 
the motivation for this amendment.
  My one concern is that it will require the chief of the Forest 
Service to publish notice in the Federal Register, along with a 
justification, any time a national Forest Service road is closed, and 
there may be some unintended consequences which we should at least 
think about.
  For example, the amendment will require the Forest Service to publish 
the

[[Page H973]]

Federal Register notice to close a road that is being engulfed by 
wildfire, or a road that is covered with debris after a tornado or in 
jeopardy of being swept away after a landslide, a power line down on 
the road, or even one that is closed to prevent militants from coming 
and going, as we have recently seen.
  I certainly am sympathetic to the idea that there should be a 
justification for anything that closes a public road that people have 
used for many, many years, but I also don't want to hamstring them from 
closing roads that are necessary for the public safety.
  I tepidly encourage a ``no'' vote on the amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. NEWHOUSE. Mr. Chairman, I would only say that since this is a 
bill, the SHARE Act, about public access, about use of our treasures, 
our national forests and public lands, all we are asking from the 
Forest Service is a little bit of transparency, notice so that people 
aren't caught off guard. Certainly there are extenuating circumstances 
where notice, if there is a downed power line or debris is in the 
middle of a road that makes it impassable, it seems to me that is a 
time when notice is even more necessary and imperative for the public 
good.
  I appreciate the gentleman's comments, but would still urge my 
colleagues to support the amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Washington (Mr. Newhouse).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                Amendment No. 11 Offered by Mr. Fleming

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 11 
printed in House Report 114-429.
  Mr. FLEMING. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of the bill, add the following:

                  TITLE XVII--UTILITY TERRAIN VEHICLES

     SEC. 1701. UTILITY TERRAIN VEHICLES IN KISATCHIE NATIONAL 
                   FOREST.

       (a) In General.--The Forest Administrator shall amend the 
     applicable travel plan to allow utility terrain vehicles 
     access on all roads nominated by the Secretary of Louisiana 
     Wildlife and Fisheries in the Kisatchie National Forest, 
     except when such designation would pose an unacceptable 
     safety risk, in which case the Forest Administrator shall 
     publish a notice in the Federal Register with a justification 
     for the closure.
       (b) Utility Terrain Vehicles Defined.--For purposes of this 
     section, the term ``utility terrain vehicle''--
       (1) means any recreational motor vehicle designed for and 
     capable of travel over designated roads, traveling on four or 
     more tires with a maximum tire width of 27 inches, a maximum 
     wheel cleat or lug of \3/4\ of an inch, a minimum width of 50 
     inches but not exceeding 74 inches, a minimum weight of at 
     least 700 pounds but not exceeding 2,000 pounds, and a 
     minimum wheelbase of 61 inches but not exceeding 110 inches;
       (2) includes vehicles not equipped with a certification 
     label as required by part 567.4 of title 49, Code of Federal 
     Regulations; and
       (3) does not include golf carts, vehicles specially 
     designed to carry a disabled person, or vehicles otherwise 
     registered under section 32.299 of the Louisiana State 
     statutes.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 619, the gentleman 
from Louisiana (Mr. Fleming) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Louisiana.
  Mr. FLEMING. Mr. Chairman, I rise in support of my amendment to H.R. 
2406, the SHARE Act, which would allow hunters better access to and 
from hunting areas in the Kisatchie National Forest in northern 
Louisiana.
  The Louisiana Legislature passed House Bill 581 by Louisiana 
Representative James Armes in 2015. This new State law would allow 
municipalities to designate certain local roads for use by utility 
terrain vehicles, also known as UTVs or side-by-sides. These are not to 
be confused with ATVs, or all-terrain vehicles. They are larger, weigh 
more, seat multiple passengers, and are often equipped with safety 
features like roll cages, seatbelts, and enclosed cabs.
  My amendment would build on the Louisiana law to allow seamless 
access from these designated local roads into hunting areas within 
Kisatchie National Forest. The size of these vehicles makes them more 
difficult to transport when compared with ATVs. The ever-increasing 
list of features for UTVs makes them very attractive to hunters in 
order to recover game and transport supplies and equipment.
  This amendment would allow the Secretary of the Louisiana Department 
of Wildlife and Fisheries to nominate roads that would be opened in the 
Kisatchie Forest travel plan, unless the Chief of the Forest Service 
determined that such an opening would pose an unacceptable safety risk. 
If so, the Forest Service would have to publish a justification in the 
Federal Register as to why the road could not be opened.
  I believe my amendment strikes the right balance of public safety and 
hunter access, and I urge its adoption.
  Mr. Chairman, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from Louisiana (Mr. 
Abraham), my good friend.
  Mr. ABRAHAM. Mr. Chairman, I thank my good friend, Dr. Fleming, for 
introducing this very important amendment. He and I both know that 
hunting is a major part of Louisiana's heritage and culture. In 
Louisiana, hunters themselves are usually the best steward of our 
environment.
  This amendment would give authority to the Secretary of the Louisiana 
Department of Wildlife and Fisheries to nominate roads that could be 
open for utility terrain vehicles in the Kisatchie National Forest.
  Like Dr. Fleming said, these vehicles have a minimum footprint and 
are much safer than our traditional ATVs. They are often used by 
hunters to recover game and carry supplies and equipment in and out. 
For far too long, they have been prohibited from sharing municipal 
roads with other users.
  Dr. Fleming's amendment would simply make Federal law more consistent 
with existing State laws of Louisiana where these UTVs are commonly 
used in a safe and responsible manner. This would allow hunters greater 
access to roads within the Kisatchie Forest travel plan.
  If the Chief of the Forest Service determined that opening a road to 
UTVs would pose an unacceptable safety risk, then they would have the 
authority to override this nomination. However, they would be required 
to publish their justification in the Federal Register. This is 
important to ensure transparency and accountability in the Federal 
decisionmaking process.
  The Kisatchie National Forest is one of Louisiana's national 
treasures. The citizens of Louisiana should not be unnecessarily 
limited in how they can use this beautiful public space.
  I urge my colleagues to support Dr. Fleming's amendment.
  Mr. BEYER. Mr. Chairman, I rise in opposition to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Virginia is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. BEYER. Mr. Chairman, it is difficult to be debating two doctors 
on one amendment.
  I do think that one of the dilemmas here is that this amendment, like 
so much of H.R. 2406, the SHARE Act, continues the essential idea that 
we should be turning over decisions that have been made at the Federal 
Government level by the National Park Service, by the Bureau of Land 
Management, and by the Forest Service to State governments and even to 
local governments.
  This is not a debate on UTVs. I respect that automobiles and all 
kinds of transportation continue to evolve. Rather, it is the idea that 
we are setting a damaging precedent with regard to our conservation 
laws and regulations that again and again we are saying that, rather 
than taking a national perspective, we are turning to the local folks 
to decide what works best for the country.
  This amendment allows the State of Louisiana, not the Forest Service 
charged with managing the Kisatchie National Forest for the benefit of 
the American people, to determine where and whether it is permissible 
to chase down deer with motorized vehicles. These are thoughtful rules 
established through an open, public process. They seek to balance 
multiple uses and prevent abuses in our national forests.
  The fact that this amendment focuses on off-road vehicles brings to 
mind the illegal 2014 ATV ride through Recapture Canyon in Utah. That 
is the last thing we want to happen in Kisatchie National Forest.
  I urge my colleagues to oppose this amendment and the precedent that 
it would set.

[[Page H974]]

  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. FLEMING. Mr. Chairman, I would like to ask how much time I have 
remaining.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Louisiana has 1\1/2\ minutes 
remaining.
  Mr. FLEMING. Mr. Chairman, I would like to just say in rebuttal to my 
good friend that it is very interesting the radical environmental lobby 
wants to set aside the forest for the enjoyment of humans. The only 
problem is they cut off all access through their lobbying power by 
humans to this valuable land, like Kisatchie National Forest.
  If we are going to have a national forest set side for the American 
people, let the American people enjoy it. As such, they can't get in 
there without some type of vehicle. If they have game, they can't get 
the game out unless they have some type of vehicle.
  As for the Forest Service, yes, of course, the Forest Service opens 
for public comment, but they still do what they want to do anyway. That 
is the whole problem.
  It is time that we allow the American people to step forward and 
speak in favor of their lifestyles, particularly the hunter lifestyle, 
the ``Sportsman's Paradise'' lifestyle that we enjoy in Louisiana.
  Mr. WITTMAN. Will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. FLEMING. I yield to the gentleman from Virginia.
  Mr. WITTMAN. Mr. Chairman, I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  I urge my colleagues to support this amendment.
  Mr. BEYER. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. FLEMING. Mr. Chairman, I would just simply like to close and say 
let's think about the American people, and let's give the American 
people access to the valuable and beautiful land that we have here in 
this Nation.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Louisiana (Mr. Fleming).
  The amendment was agreed to.

                              {time}  1030


                Amendment No. 12 Offered by Mr. Griffith

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 12 
printed in House Report 114-429.
  Mr. GRIFFITH. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Add at the end the following:

    TITLE XVII--INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF FIREARMS OR AMMUNITION

     SEC. 1701. INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF FIREARMS OR 
                   AMMUNITION.

       (a) In General.--Section 926A of title 18, United States 
     Code, is amended to read as follows:

     ``Sec. 926A. Interstate transportation of firearms or 
       ammunition

       ``(a) Notwithstanding any provision of any law, rule, or 
     regulation of a State or any political subdivision thereof:
       ``(1) A person who is not prohibited by this chapter from 
     possessing, transporting, shipping, or receiving a firearm or 
     ammunition shall be entitled to transport a firearm for any 
     lawful purpose from any place where the person may lawfully 
     possess, carry, or transport the firearm to any other such 
     place if, during the transportation, the firearm is unloaded, 
     and--
       ``(A) if the transportation is by motor vehicle, the 
     firearm is not directly accessible from the passenger 
     compartment of the vehicle, and, if the vehicle is without a 
     compartment separate from the passenger compartment, the 
     firearm is in a locked container other than the glove 
     compartment or console, or is secured by a secure gun storage 
     or safety device; or
       ``(B) if the transportation is by other means, the firearm 
     is in a locked container or secured by a secure gun storage 
     or safety device.
       ``(2) A person who is not prohibited by this chapter from 
     possessing, transporting, shipping, or receiving a firearm or 
     ammunition shall be entitled to transport ammunition for any 
     lawful purpose from any place where the person may lawfully 
     possess, carry, or transport the ammunition, to any other 
     such place if, during the transportation, the ammunition is 
     not loaded into a firearm, and--
       ``(A) if the transportation is by motor vehicle, the 
     ammunition is not directly accessible from the passenger 
     compartment of the vehicle, and, if the vehicle is without a 
     compartment separate from the passenger compartment, the 
     ammunition is in a locked container other than the glove 
     compartment or console; or
       ``(B) if the transportation is by other means, the 
     ammunition is in a locked container.
       ``(b) In subsection (a), the term `transport' includes 
     staying in temporary lodging overnight, stopping for food, 
     fuel, vehicle maintenance, an emergency, medical treatment, 
     and any other activity incidental to the transport, but does 
     not include transportation--
       ``(1) with the intent to commit a crime punishable by 
     imprisonment for a term exceeding one year that involves the 
     use or threatened use of force against another; or
       ``(2) with knowledge, or reasonable cause to believe, that 
     such a crime is to be committed in the course of, or arising 
     from, the transportation.
       ``(c)(1) A person who is transporting a firearm or 
     ammunition may not be arrested or otherwise detained for 
     violation of any law or any rule or regulation of a State or 
     any political subdivision thereof related to the possession, 
     transportation, or carrying of firearms, unless there is 
     probable cause to believe that the person is doing so in a 
     manner not provided for in subsection (a).
       ``(2) When a person asserts this section as a defense in a 
     criminal proceeding, the prosecution shall bear the burden of 
     proving, beyond a reasonable doubt, that the conduct of the 
     person did not satisfy the conditions set forth in subsection 
     (a).
       ``(3) When a person successfully asserts this section as a 
     defense in a criminal proceeding, the court shall award the 
     prevailing defendant a reasonable attorney's fee.
       ``(d)(1) A person who is deprived of any right, privilege, 
     or immunity secured by this section, section 926B or 926C, 
     under color of any statute, ordinance, regulation, custom, or 
     usage of any State or any political subdivision thereof, may 
     bring an action in any appropriate court against any other 
     person, including a State or political subdivision thereof, 
     who causes the person to be subject to the deprivation, for 
     damages and other appropriate relief.
       ``(2) The court shall award a plaintiff prevailing in an 
     action brought under paragraph (1) damages and such other 
     relief as the court deems appropriate, including a reasonable 
     attorney's fee.''.
       (b) Clerical Amendment.--The table of sections for such 
     chapter is amended in the item relating to section 926A by 
     striking ``firearms'' and inserting ``firearms or 
     ammunition''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 619, the gentleman 
from Virginia (Mr. Griffith) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Virginia.
  Mr. GRIFFITH. Mr. Chairman, this is a civil liberties amendment. It 
clarifies and strengthens existing Federal law.
  The amendment is necessary, unfortunately, because while the 
underlying law protects a traveler who is transporting a firearm under 
the Federal regulations that the firearm has to be locked in a proper 
container and out of the reach of the person if he is in a car, et 
cetera, in one's traveling from State A to State B, sometimes on the 
way from State A, where the gun is lawful, to State C, where the gun is 
lawful, one must pass through State B, where the gun may or may not be 
lawful.
  What we have found is that, notwithstanding the fact that it is 
lawful in State A and is lawful in State C and is protected by Federal 
law while being transported, some State and local governments have 
decided that they are not going to follow the Federal law, and they end 
up arresting the otherwise law-abiding traveler. We have examples of 
this. It is not just that they are out and are necessarily looking for 
the traveler, but there are circumstances that occur.
  One example that happens fairly frequently is that an airline 
passenger has done everything he is supposed to have done in that he 
has followed all of the security rules. Then, for reasons beyond his 
control, his flight in State B is missed. So he has traveled lawfully 
and he has checked his gun lawfully, he has done everything he is 
supposed to have done, but when he gets to the layover terminal, his 
flight is either already gone or it has been canceled.
  In one case in particular, the gentleman was told ``you need to go a 
hotel. Take your bags. Come back the next morning.'' When he went back 
the next morning, he was arrested by State law enforcement individuals 
because his gun was not legal, notwithstanding the fact that he had 
done everything he was supposed to have done.
  In another very tragic situation, a gentleman was traveling from New 
Jersey to South Carolina. He was a veteran, so he stopped off in 
Washington, D.C., at Walter Reed, to see one of his doctors. He was 
lawfully transporting the firearm under Federal law and he was 
arrested.
  Now, while most of these cases end up getting worked out either as a 
misdemeanor or by some other arrangement, it is still a great 
impediment on the traveler to use the Federal law lawfully.

[[Page H975]]

  This amendment says if that happens, if one is stopped by the State 
or the local government, that the prosecutor in that State or local 
area must prove his case beyond a reasonable doubt that this individual 
was not following the Federal law. It sounds like a pretty reasonable 
American principle.
  If it is determined that the traveler was lawful and was actually 
arrested and has to go to court to defend himself, the court will award 
attorneys' fees to that individual.
  We are just trying to make him whole. We are not paying him for the 
time he served in jail. We are not paying him for the fact that his 
vacation plans or his travel plans were disrupted. We are just saying 
that there ought to be something that tells the local and State 
governments that you ought not do this again or you are going to pay 
this gentleman or this gentlewoman her attorneys' fees.
  To me, that is taking care of civil liberties and is making sure that 
the people who are following the law are not wrongfully arrested 
without their having any recourse. I see this as a civil liberties 
amendment.
  Mr. Chairman, I yield such time as he may consume to the gentleman 
from Virginia (Mr. Wittman).
  Mr. WITTMAN. Mr. Chairman, I thank the gentleman from Virginia, and I 
urge my colleagues to support this amendment.
  Mr. BEYER. Mr. Chairman, I rise in opposition to this amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Virginia is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. BEYER. Mr. Chairman, this amendment would weaken current law, 
undermine State laws concerning the carrying of firearms, and harm the 
efforts of law enforcement to take action against illegal firearms 
trafficking.
  Current law applies only to the transportation of a firearm in a 
motor vehicle. This bill would expand current law to allow a person to 
transport a gun outside a motor vehicle so long as the firearm is 
unloaded and locked in a container or is secured with a safety device. 
This would allow a person to walk down the street with an unloaded gun 
as long as the gun had a trigger lock on it, regardless of the State's 
laws on carrying guns in public.
  This amendment would also allow guns on trains, cable cars, and 
trollies so long as the guns are unloaded and locked, regardless of 
State or local laws. This is because trains, cable cars, and trollies 
are not considered to be motor vehicles under the applicable Federal 
definition. Current Federal law gives State governments the authority 
over firearms in these forms of transportation, but the Griffith 
amendment would remove that authority.
  The proposed amendment would also have a negative impact on our law 
enforcement officers' ability to enforce our gun laws. Specifically, 
this amendment would make it more difficult for officers to investigate 
suspected gun traffickers and people who illegally carry weapons.
  Mr. Chairman, I include in the Record a letter from the Police 
Foundation.

Statement of the Police Foundation Regarding Proposed Amendment to the 
             Sportsman's Bill (HR 2406), February 25, 2016

       The Police Foundation expresses its grave concerns with a 
     proposed amendment to the Sportsman's Bill (HR 2406), by 
     Congressman Morgan Griffith from Virginia, which will have a 
     chilling effect on enforcement of illegal gun possession and 
     other gun crimes. We strongly oppose the amendment's 
     provision that could make law enforcement agencies liable for 
     investigative stops and detentions of armed subjects.
       Further, the proposed amendment will drastically undermine 
     states' concealed carry licensing laws. States must be able 
     to determine their own concealed carry statutes and 
     regulations that fit the values and enhance the safety of 
     their communities and constituents.
       At a time when many cities and counties have just witnessed 
     2015 come to an end with increased homicides and non-fatal 
     shootings, Congress should strengthen, not weaken enforcement 
     of our nation's gun laws.
       We call on Members of Congress to support law enforcement 
     officers as they perform the most dangerous job of 
     confronting shooters and other armed criminals, and to uphold 
     state and local efforts to make communities safer.
       We urge Members of Congress to oppose the proposed 
     amendment.

  Mr. BEYER. The letter expresses the Police Foundation's grave 
concerns with this amendment. They write that this amendment ``will 
have a chilling effect on the enforcement of illegal gun possession and 
other crimes.''
  Why would Congress narrow the limited set of enforcement tools our 
police officers currently have to pursue suspected gun traffickers?
  The Griffith amendment subjects a police officer to a personal 
lawsuit when he or she detains or arrests someone whom the officer 
reasonably believed at the time of detainment was illegally trafficking 
or was carrying a firearm.
  We must respect our officers' ability to use discretion, albeit 
limited, when determining if gun trafficking is occurring; so 
subjecting them to personal lawsuits when they are simply trying to do 
their jobs to protect us seems a little reckless. These brave men and 
women should not be afraid to carry out their investigative duties due 
to the fear of being sued.
  For this reason, I urge my colleagues to join me in opposing this 
amendment.
  Mr. Chairman, I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the gentleman from California 
(Mr. Huffman).
  Mr. HUFFMAN. I thank the gentleman from Virginia.
  Mr. Chairman, I am glad that the gentleman brought up the dilemma 
that this amendment would pose for law enforcement. It would, 
shockingly, actually, impose individual penalties on law enforcement 
officers who are just trying to do their jobs but who might mistakenly 
detain someone in connection with his possession of a firearm if he 
were transporting it in a way that is protected under this amendment.
  This is going to have a chilling effect on law enforcement's ability 
to protect Americans from gun trafficking, to make us safer at a time 
when there are more guns in the hands of more people than ever before, 
when we have more accidents, when we are experiencing a tragic gun 
violence epidemic.
  I am also concerned that this amendment goes a little further than 
just being a narrow cleanup of the anecdotal stories we heard about 
travelers who were inconvenienced or detained. As I read the amendment, 
it not only would allow a person to walk down the street with an 
unloaded gun, as long as that gun had a trigger lock on it--regardless 
of State law, regardless of any local rules that may be in effect--it 
would allow one to take that gun onto trains, cable cars, and trollies 
even if local jurisdictions prohibited that. Again, so long as the gun 
had a trigger lock in place.
  Now, in my district we had a tragic incident a couple of years ago in 
which a young teenager had a toy AK-47, and law enforcement believed 
that it was an actual gun that was threatening members of that 
community. They fired shots that took that young man's life. Imagine 
the dilemma, whether intended or unintended, as a consequence of this 
bill, and people could suddenly go into parks or even onto public 
transportation with real AK-47s.
  What kind of dilemma would law enforcement face?
  Mr. GRIFFITH. Mr. Chairman, I have to tell you that I am really 
surprised that my colleagues on the other side of the aisle aren't 
supporting this civil liberties amendment. Clearly, they have 
misinterpreted the amendment.
  First of all, it only applies if somebody is lawfully transporting a 
gun--where it is lawful in State A to another State where it is lawful. 
If you are going to be on a trolly car or on a cable car, you have to 
be transporting that gun from one State to another and it has to have 
been lawful to begin with and lawful at the terminis. It is only in the 
interim that that would be an issue.
  I would say to the gentleman that this is not about any kind of 
personal lawsuits against law enforcement officers. It says the court 
shall award attorneys' fees against the local government or the State 
that is prosecuting the individual. I would also say to the gentleman 
that it is only for wrongful arrest.
  I practiced criminal law for 28 years. There is a huge difference 
between detention, which my colleagues on the other side of the aisle 
have alleged this bill would affect, and arrest. This bill does not do 
one single thing. They are simply mistaken on detention. It doesn't do 
anything. If you want to

[[Page H976]]

stop somebody, if you want to investigate, he may miss his flight. 
Arrest means one has been placed into custody, has been taken down to 
the station, has been booked, and is having to post bond.
  That is what this bill deals with. When someone is wrongfully 
arrested, when he has been following the Federal law, he should, in 
fact, have his attorneys' fees restored to him. It is reasonable 
attorneys' fees. It is not whatever--the sky and the Moon--the attorney 
might ask for. A court determines if they are reasonable attorneys' 
fees.
  This is just a small measure to make sure that when somebody makes a 
mistake and a local government goes forward with a prosecution, that 
you get some of that back. We are not paying you for being in jail. We 
are not paying you for being arrested. We are not paying you for having 
your rights taken.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. BEYER. Mr. Chairman, how much time is remaining?
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Virginia has 1\1/2\ minutes 
remaining.
  Mr. BEYER. Mr. Chairman, I would like to point out that we are 
certainly not objecting to reasonable attorneys' fees and to making 
people whole. It is the idea that law enforcement officers can be held 
personally responsible and can be, actually, personally sued for doing 
their jobs that we object to.
  I yield 1 minute to the gentlewoman from Texas (Ms. Jackson Lee).
  Ms. JACKSON LEE. I thank the gentleman from Virginia (Mr. Beyer) very 
much. I sit on the Judiciary Committee.
  Mr. Chairman, I would say to the gentleman who is the proponent of 
the legislation that, first of all, we have a responsibility to keep 
law and order; we have a responsibility to protect the Second 
Amendment; and we have a responsibility to law enforcement officers.
  Tragically, in the backdrop of this debate was an individual who 
secured guns and killed and slaughtered people just last night. We want 
to make sure that we are safe and that we are dealing with issues that 
are important to protecting our law enforcement.
  First of all, this amendment is unnecessary. Current Federal law 
already entitles a person to transport a firearm from one place to 
another so long as the firearm is unloaded and the needs of the 
firearms or any ammunition being transported is not readily accessible 
or directly accessible from the passenger compartment, et cetera.
  This amendment intends to make a Federal open carry law. This open 
carry law should be one of the State's determinations. It happens to 
exist in the State that I am from. It should not be placed upon the 
entire country by Federal law.
  Why?
  Because whether a gun is supposed to be locked or has a trigger on 
it, it still poses a threat, possibly, to our law enforcement.
  I oppose this amendment because it is unnecessary and because it puts 
our law enforcement persons in danger.
  I would ask my colleagues to oppose the amendment and acknowledge the 
shooting in Kansas as evidence that we don't need more guns being 
carried back and forth on the streets.
  Mr. BEYER. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Virginia (Mr. Griffith).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. BEYER. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Virginia 
will be postponed.


                 Amendment No. 13 Offered by Mr. Hardy

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 13 
printed in House Report 114-429.
  Mr. HARDY. Mr. Chairman, as the designee of the gentleman from Nevada 
(Mr. Heck), I offer amendment No. 13.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of the bill, add the following:

             TITLE XVII--GOOD SAMARITAN SEARCH AND RECOVERY

     SEC. 1701. SHORT TITLE.

       This title may be cited as the ``Good Samaritan Search and 
     Recovery Act''.

     SEC. 1702. EXPEDITED ACCESS TO CERTAIN FEDERAL LAND.

       (a) Definitions.--In this section:
       (1) Eligible.--The term ``eligible'', with respect to an 
     organization or individual, means that the organization or 
     individual, respectively, is--
       (A) acting in a not-for-profit capacity; and
       (B) composed entirely of members who, at the time of the 
     good Samaritan search-and-recovery mission, have attained the 
     age of majority under the law of the State where the mission 
     takes place.
       (2) Good samaritan search-and-recovery mission.--The term 
     ``good Samaritan search-and-recovery mission'' means a search 
     conducted by an eligible organization or individual for 1 or 
     more missing individuals believed to be deceased at the time 
     that the search is initiated.
       (3) Secretary.--The term ``Secretary'' means the Secretary 
     of the Interior or the Secretary of Agriculture, as 
     applicable.
       (b) Process.--
       (1) In general.--Each Secretary shall develop and implement 
     a process to expedite access to Federal land under the 
     administrative jurisdiction of the Secretary for eligible 
     organizations and individuals to request access to Federal 
     land to conduct good Samaritan search-and-recovery missions.
       (2) Inclusions.--The process developed and implemented 
     under this subsection shall include provisions to clarify 
     that--
       (A) an eligible organization or individual granted access 
     under this section--
       (i) shall be acting for private purposes; and
       (ii) shall not be considered to be a Federal volunteer;
       (B) an eligible organization or individual conducting a 
     good Samaritan search-and-recovery mission under this section 
     shall not be considered to be a volunteer under section 
     102301(c) of title 54, United States Code;
       (C) chapter 171 of title 28, United States Code (commonly 
     known as the ``Federal Tort Claims Act''), shall not apply to 
     an eligible organization or individual carrying out a 
     privately requested good Samaritan search-and-recovery 
     mission under this section; and
       (D) an eligible organization or entity who conducts a good 
     Samaritan search-and-recovery mission under this section 
     shall serve without pay from the Federal Government for such 
     service.
       (c) Release of Federal Government From Liability.--The 
     Secretary shall not require an eligible organization or 
     individual to have liability insurance as a condition of 
     accessing Federal land under this section, if the eligible 
     organization or individual--
       (1) acknowledges and consents, in writing, to the 
     provisions described in subparagraphs (A) through (D) of 
     subsection (b)(2); and
       (2) signs a waiver releasing the Federal Government from 
     all liability relating to the access granted under this 
     section and agrees to indemnify and hold harmless the United 
     States from any claims or lawsuits arising from any conduct 
     by the eligible organization or individual on Federal land.
       (d) Approval and Denial of Requests.--
       (1) In general.--The Secretary shall notify an eligible 
     organization or individual of the approval or denial of a 
     request by the eligible organization or individual to carry 
     out a good Samaritan search-and-recovery mission under this 
     section by not later than 48 hours after the request is made.
       (2) Denials.--If the Secretary denies a request from an 
     eligible organization or individual to carry out a good 
     Samaritan search-and-recovery mission under this section, the 
     Secretary shall notify the eligible organization or 
     individual of--
       (A) the reason for the denial of the request; and
       (B) any actions that the eligible organization or 
     individual can take to meet the requirements for the request 
     to be approved.
       (e) Partnerships.--Each Secretary shall develop search-and-
     recovery-focused partnerships with search-and-recovery 
     organizations--
       (1) to coordinate good Samaritan search-and-recovery 
     missions on Federal land under the administrative 
     jurisdiction of the Secretary; and
       (2) to expedite and accelerate good Samaritan search-and-
     recovery mission efforts for missing individuals on Federal 
     land under the administrative jurisdiction of the Secretary.
       (f) Report.--Not later than 180 days after the date of 
     enactment of this Act, the Secretaries shall submit to 
     Congress a joint report describing--
       (1) plans to develop partnerships described in subsection 
     (e)(1); and
       (2) efforts carried out to expedite and accelerate good 
     Samaritan search-and-recovery mission efforts for missing 
     individuals on Federal land under the administrative 
     jurisdiction of each Secretary pursuant to subsection (e)(2).

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 619, the gentleman 
from Nevada (Mr. Hardy) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Nevada.
  Mr. HARDY. Mr. Chairman, I rise in support of a critically important 
amendment being offered by my friend and colleague from Nevada, 
Congressman Joe Heck.
  This amendment would ensure the inclusion of the text of H.R. 373, 
the Good

[[Page H977]]

Samaritan Search and Recovery Act of 2015, in the underlying bill.
  The Good Samaritan Search and Recovery Act, of which I was an 
original cosponsor, is a commonsense, bipartisan solution to tearing 
down the bureaucratic roadblocks that are preventing grieving families 
from achieving closure when their loved ones go missing on Federal 
lands.

                              {time}  1045

  This issue was first brought to light by the separate, but tragically 
similar, cases in Las Vegas of the taxi driver Keith Goldberg and Air 
Force Staff Sergeant Antonio Tucker.
  Mr. Goldberg and Staff Sergeant Tucker were missing and presumed 
dead, with their remains believed to have been missing somewhere within 
the Lake Mead National Recreation Area.
  In both cases, the local, experienced search and recovery groups 
volunteered their time and resources to help locate the remains of the 
missing individuals.
  Unfortunately, due to the unnecessary bureaucratic hurdles from the 
Federal Government, the group volunteering to help locate and recover 
Mr. Goldberg's remains was denied access to the Park Service land to 
conduct its search for 15 months and the group volunteering to help 
locate the remains of Staff Sergeant Tucker were denied access for 10 
months, needlessly delaying the closure their families sought. This is 
absolutely unacceptable, and it must change. This amendment will do 
that.
  Once these bureaucratic hurdles were finally cleared and the Good 
Samaritan search and recovery groups were allowed access to the park, 
Mr. Goldberg's remains were recovered in less than 2 hours and the 
remains of Staff Sergeant Tucker were recovered in less than 2 days.
  Dr. Heck, a former member of the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police 
Department's search and rescue team, originally introduced this 
legislation because he could no longer stomach the cases where 
unnecessary red tape continued to get in the way of providing closure 
for families faced with tragically similar circumstances.
  During the 113th Congress, a similar bill passed the House with a 
unanimous vote of 394-0, further proving its bipartisan support. 
Unfortunately, the Senate failed to take action on the measure. Last 
April the House again passed this important legislation 413-0.
  Mr. Chairman, those are two votes on this Good Samaritan bill 
totaling 807 in favor and none opposed. Given our current political 
climate, it just doesn't get more bipartisan than that.
  We cannot afford to let the Senate's inaction get in the way of 
achieving this critical fix that will provide closure for so many 
Americans. We must pass this amendment so that future families won't 
have to suffer the mental anguish and heartache that the families of 
Keith Goldberg and Antonio Tucker did.
  In closing, I again thank my colleague from Nevada for offering the 
amendment that will truly help the people we serve.
  I also thank the chairman and ranking member of the Natural Resources 
Committee for all their diligent work in the Good Samaritan Search and 
Recovery Act.
  I yield to the gentleman from Virginia (Mr. Wittman).
  Mr. WITTMAN. Mr. Chairman, I thank the gentleman from Nevada. I urge 
my colleagues to strongly support this amendment.
  Mr. HARDY. Mr. Chairman, I urge support of this bill.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Nevada (Mr. Hardy).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                 Amendment No. 14 Offered by Mr. Ribble

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 14 
printed in House Report 114-429.
  Mr. RIBBLE. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of the bill add the following:

                         TITLE __--GRAY WOLVES

     SEC. _01. REISSUANCE OF FINAL RULE REGARDING GRAY WOLVES IN 
                   THE WESTERN GREAT LAKES.

       Before the end of the 60-day period beginning on the date 
     of enactment of this Act, the Secretary of the Interior shall 
     reissue the final rule published on December 28, 2011 (76 
     Fed. Reg. 81666), without regard to any other provision of 
     statute or regulation that applies to issuance of such rule. 
     Such reissuance shall not be subject to judicial review.

     SEC. _02. REISSUANCE OF FINAL RULE REGARDING GRAY WOLVES IN 
                   WYOMING.

       Before the end of the 60-day period beginning on the date 
     of enactment of this Act, the Secretary of the Interior shall 
     reissue the final rule published on September 10, 2012 (77 
     Fed. Reg. 55530), without regard to any other provision of 
     statute or regulation that applies to issuance of such rule. 
     Such reissuance shall not be subject to judicial review.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 619, the gentleman 
from Wisconsin (Mr. Ribble) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Wisconsin.
  Mr. RIBBLE. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  I am proud today to offer the only bipartisan amendment that has been 
found in order on this bill. I am really proud, after working in 
Congress now for three terms, that Members from both the majority and 
the minority have come together in an effort to protect the Endangered 
Species Act.
  This amendment speaks directly to the issue of gray wolves protected 
by the Endangered Species Act in the western Great Lakes region of 
Wisconsin, Michigan, and Minnesota, as well as Wyoming.
  There was a period of time that the gray wolves had become almost 
extinct in these areas and the scientists at the Fish and Wildlife 
Service decided to protect them from extinction by listing the gray 
wolf as an endangered species.
  That work was so successful that, in 2011, the Fish and Wildlife 
Service decided to de-list the gray wolf. In fact, there are now 
hundreds of mating pairs in these regions. However, those wolves have 
created some problems.
  In spite of this remarkable recovery, in spite of how robust this is, 
a surprise Federal court ruling took place in 2014 and invalidated the 
scientists at the Fish and Wildlife Service who were given the 
responsibility under law of the Endangered Species Act to manage this 
population.
  So my amendment is simple. It just simply restates and delists the 
wolves in these four States only. That is what my amendment does. It 
protects the Endangered Species Act and the scientists who work at the 
Fish and Wildlife Service.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. BEYER. Mr. Chairman, I rise in opposition to this amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Virginia is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. BEYER. Mr. Chairman, I yield such time as he may consume to the 
gentleman from Oregon (Mr. DeFazio).
  Mr. DeFAZIO. Mr. Chairman, that was extraordinary. We are here to 
protect the Endangered Species Act by preempting litigation for 
violations of the Endangered Species Act. That is pretty extraordinary.
  I mean, we are not only having Groundhog Day here--because this bill 
has passed three times before and failed to receive any consideration 
in the Senate and the same thing will happen yet again with this bill--
but now we are wandering into Alice in Wonderland. That is 
extraordinary.
  Yes, the Fish and Wildlife Service did delist in the States the 
gentleman mentioned, but they required that each of those States adopt 
scientifically based management plans.
  Well, the scientifically based management plan in Wyoming is open 
season on wolves. Let's try and exterminate them again. There has also 
been a tremendous loss of population in a number of the other States 
that the gentleman referred to.
  So a judge has found that they violated the Endangered Species Act 
because they didn't adopt scientifically based management plans.
  You know, these are horrible predators, as you can see here. They are 
very, very fierce. They are, of course, responsible for huge, huge, 
unbelievable--big, as Donald Trump would say, really big--depredation 
on cattle.
  Let's look at the causes for loss of cattle. Well, let's see. 
Seventy-four percent died because of health issues--perhaps we need a 
little education on husbandry for some of our ranchers--7.8 percent 
died due to weather--well,

[[Page H978]]

we are not having climate change; so, there is nothing we can do about 
the weather. We don't want to mess with that--2.7 percent is due to 
other predators, mostly coyotes.
  Animal damage control, now renamed very aptly Wildlife Services, has 
killed well over a million coyotes. And guess what. There are more 
coyotes now, more distributed than when they started trying to 
exterminate them.
  The wolves are in a much more fragile place. They are responsible for 
0.9 percent of the depredation, and they are at critical population 
levels. They were required to keep 10 breeding pairs in Wyoming. Boy, 
that is a lot of wolves in a State the size of Wyoming, 10 breeding 
pairs.
  Well, they violated that, and that is why the judge made this ruling. 
Now we are being told we are here to protect the Endangered Species 
Act.
  Mr. RIBBLE. Mr. Chairman, I include in the Record, in light of the 
gentleman from Oregon's comments, a letter from the Fish and Wildlife 
Service supporting this amendment.

                                  U.S. Department of the Interior,


                                    Fish and Wildlife Service,

                         Bloomington, Minnesota, January 30, 2015.
     Hon. Reid J. Ribble,
     House of Representatives,
     Washington, DC.
       Dear Representative Ribble: Thank you for your January 16, 
     2015, letter to U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) 
     Director Dan Ashe and to me regarding the Service's views on 
     the status of gray wolf populations in the states of 
     Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin, as well as our view on 
     state management of gray wolves since the Western Great Lakes 
     Distinct Population Segment (DPS) was removed from Endangered 
     Species Act protection in 2011. An identical letter is being 
     sent to each member who signed the original correspondence. 
     Director Ashe has asked that I respond on his behalf.
       Most of the information provided below is taken from the 
     2014 report on post-delisting status of gray wolves in the 
     Western Great Lakes DPS (enclosed). Enclosed, you will also 
     see our gray wolf post-delisting monitoring plan for the 
     Western Great Lakes DPS.
       Our post-delisting monitoring plan used the recovery goals 
     in the 1992 Recovery Plan for the Eastern Timber Wolf to 
     identify the population characteristics that needed 
     monitoring as well as to identify circumstances that could 
     prompt closer scrutiny by the Service and potential 
     consideration of relisting. Those circumstances include the 
     following:
       A decline that reduces the combined Wisconsin-Michigan 
     (excluding Isle Royale and the Lower Peninsula) late winter 
     wolf population estimate to 200 or fewer wolves;
       A decline that brings either the Wisconsin or the Michigan 
     (excluding Isle Royale and the Lower Peninsula) wolf estimate 
     to 100 or fewer wolves; and,
       A decline that brings the Minnesota winter wolf population 
     point estimate or lower end of the 90% confidence interval to 
     1500 or fewer wolves.
       Since delisting in 2011 through the winter of 2013-2014, 
     numbers of wolves in the three states remained well above 
     established recovery goals (Table 1). Population surveys are 
     conducted by the three states in late winter after hunting 
     and trapping seasons and before the birth of pups in the 
     spring. Thus, the surveys are conducted at a time that the 
     wolf population is at its lowest level during the annual 
     cycle.

  TABLE 1.--RECENT POPULATION ESTIMATES FOR GRAY WOLVES IN MICHIGAN, MINNESOTA, AND WISCONSIN. INCLUDED IS THE
  LAST POPULATION ESTIMATE COMPLETED BEFORE THE WOLF WAS DELISTED AND TWO ESTIMATES COMPLETED AFTER DELISTING.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                      Gray Wolf Population Estimates
                         State                          --------------------------------------------------------
                                                                2011-2012            2012-2013       2013-2014
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Michigan...............................................                      687         602-714         594-678
Minnesota..............................................        2,921 (2007-2008)           2,211          22,423
Wisconsin..............................................                  815-880         809-834         660-689
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

       Differences in the trends of wolf numbers among the three 
     states are likely due to different levels of human-caused 
     mortality (Table 2). Also, it is suspected that a decline in 
     white-tailed deer may have played a role in the initial 
     decline of Minnesota wolves after delisting (Table 1). 
     Regardless of the different trends, the wolf population 
     remains well above the original recovery goals for the entire 
     population and within the individual states. In Michigan and 
     Wisconsin, there were at least 594 and 660 wolves, 
     respectively, in early 2014 and the number of wolves in 
     Minnesota appears to have stabilized at around 2400 wolves 
     (Table 1).

  TABLE 2.--WOLF DEATHS CAUSED BY TWO SOURCES OF HUMAN CAUSED MORTALITY, CONTROL OF DOMESTIC ANIMAL DEPREDATION AND HARVEST BY HUNTERS AND TRAPPERS, IN
 THE WESTERN GREAT LAKES DISTINCT POPULATION SEGMENT DURING THE PERIOD WHEN WOLVES IN THE REGION WERE NOT LISTED AS ENDANGERED OR THREATENED, 2012-2014.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                      2012                                   2013                                   2014
               State                --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                     Depredation    Harvest       Total     Depredation    Harvest       Total     Depredation    Harvest       Total
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Michigan...........................           17    No season           17           10           23           33           13    No season           13
Minnesota..........................          295          413          708          127          238          365          211          272          483
Wisconsin..........................           76          117          193           65          257          322           35          154          189
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

       The relationship between human-caused mortality and wolf 
     population numbers is well established and evident in the 
     population trends among the three states. In Wisconsin, 14% 
     of the population was harvested by hunters and trappers in 
     2012, yet no change in wolf numbers was detected in the 
     subsequent survey completed during late winter of 2012-2013 
     (Tables 1 and 2). In 2013, 32% of the population was 
     harvested and the wolf population declined by about 18%. In 
     Minnesota, the decline of the population between 2007-2008 
     and 2012-2013 was 24 to 25% and was likely caused by hunter/
     trapper harvest, depredation control, and a 23% decline in 
     deer between 2007 and 2012. In response to the wolf 
     population decline, the Minnesota Department of Natural 
     Resources reduced wolf harvest levels and the population 
     appears to have stabilized. In Michigan, human-caused 
     mortality of wolves by hunters and for depredation control 
     has been relatively minor after delisting and the Michigan 
     wolf population has shown no significant change (Tables 1 and 
     2).
       Michigan, Minnesota and Wisconsin have managed wolves 
     according to state wolf management plans that the Service 
     evaluated as part of our decision to delist the species in 
     2011. Our evaluation led to a determination that each state's 
     plan provided for the long-term conservation of a viable wolf 
     population in the region. The state management plans and our 
     evaluation acknowledged that the states could carry out 
     regulated harvests after delisting. In the final rule to 
     delist the Western Great Lakes DPS we made the following 
     comment:
       ``Unregulated killing was the primary threat to the species 
     historically. The State management plans that will be 
     implemented after delisting provide protection from 
     unregulated killing. It is not the Service's position to 
     decide whether a regulated harvest in and of itself is an 
     appropriate management tool. Instead the Service is concerned 
     with whether the use of that tool might reduce the number of 
     wolves in such a way that they would again be considered a 
     threatened or endangered species under the Act. A regulated 
     harvest of wolves can be carried out in a manner that would 
     not threaten their continued existence.''
       Since delisting, the states have demonstrated effective 
     management to ensure wolf populations remain viable.
       We value the cooperation and contributions that state and 
     tribal biologists have made to ensure that the Service could 
     monitor the post-delisting status of wolf populations. Staff 
     from each Department of Natural Resources has been highly 
     responsive to our requests for information, even after the 
     wolf was relisted. We believe that each state has 
     demonstrated an ability to respond to the challenges that are 
     unique to conservation of wolves in the wild. Moreover, they 
     have done so in ways that demonstrate their intent to 
     maintain the wolf as a viable component of their ecosystems.
       Thank you for your concerns regarding the wolf and its 
     status. If you have any further questions or concerns, please 
     feel free to contact Mr. Peter Fasbender, Field Supervisor 
     for our Twin Cities Ecological Services Field Office.
           Sincerely,
     Thomas O. Melius,
       Regional Director.
     Hon. Reid J. Ribble,
       House of Representatives, Washington, DC.
     Hon. Collin C. Peterson,
       House of Representatives Washington, DC.
     Hon. Dan Benishek,
       House of Representatives Washington, DC.
     Megan Kelhart,
       Division of Congressional and Legislative Affairs, U.S. 
     Fish and Wildlife Service, Washington, DC.
     Mr. Peter Fasbender,
       Field Supervisor, Twin Cities Ecological Services Field 
     Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Bloomington, MN.
  Mr. RIBBLE. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the gentlewoman 
from Wyoming (Mrs. Lummis).

[[Page H979]]

  

  Mrs. LUMMIS. Mr. Chair, I am just stunned by the misrepresentations 
of the previous opponent of this bill. Let me show you what is going on 
really.
  Here is the habitat of the wolf. Clearly, it is not endangered. On 
the red list, it is considered a species of least concern.
  Let's look at the habitat of the Shiras moose. This is Wyoming, 
Montana, Idaho, and going into Montana. The Shiras moose is in rapid 
decline, and it is because of this critter.
  Now, the gentleman from Oregon showed you little puppies as if they 
do no damage. Look at this moose. This Shiras moose is surrounded by 
wolves, and they are attacking that baby.
  The reason this is such a big issue is they are wiping out the 
babies. So there is no longer a breeding population of moose or elk in 
major areas of this country, including the Lolo elk herd in Montana and 
the moose around the Greater Yellowstone area in Wyoming.
  It is these baby moose they are after. They surround the mother. Two 
of them distract the mother. The rest of them take the babies.
  There are not enough breeding females left. So when the older females 
age out of the population, there are no breeding females to take their 
place. It is the wildlife that is getting decimated, Mr. Chairman. This 
is a wildlife issue.
  To save the moose, I strongly encourage the adoption of this 
amendment.
  Mr. BEYER. Mr. Chairman, I yield such time as he may consume to the 
gentleman from Oregon (Mr. DeFazio).
  Mr. DeFAZIO. Mr. Chairman, actually, I think wolves are part of 
wildlife. I heard a mention of Montana Yellowstone.
  Actually, in Yellowstone, the rivers were in horrible, horrible 
condition because all of the browse that was being done by elk and 
other critters right down into the streams. Fish populations were 
crashing. The water was too hot and lost all of the riparian cover.
  Now you find we have restored balance because there are wolves there 
and the elk and others stay in herds and they stay in the forest. They 
don't go down and stomp around in the streams.
  Natural balance is sometimes problematic. The gentlewoman showed a 
picture of a moose under attack. Fairly natural.
  I don't believe that that is the total cause for the problems with 
the moose population. In fact, those moose are still hunted. So I guess 
we need to save the moose from the wolves so the hunters can hunt the 
moose.
  So I am on the side of the wolves on this one. I think most American 
people would like to see this iconic predator restore balance.
  Coyotes are three times the predators on cattle. If you want to 
protect cattle, guess what. Wolves kill coyotes. But when you don't 
have wolves, the coyotes spread and take over.
  The gentlewoman showed Russia and China and then Canada and a few 
other areas on a map. Those aren't gray wolf populations in many of 
those areas.
  I don't know what Siberian wolves look like, but I don't think that--
since the land bridge went away, whenever that was, they haven't been 
coming to the United States. And I don't know about Chinese wolves. I 
don't know anything at all about Chinese wolves.
  I do know that wolves here are in a fragile state of recovery. If you 
hunt them back to extinction, which is what basically is going on in 
Wyoming, or you hunt below the levels for sustainable populations, as 
some of these other States are doing with trophy hunting and that, then 
we are going to be back where we started with the wolves being 
extinguished in the lower 48 and more coyotes.
  Maybe you will have some more moose. Maybe the elk can go back in the 
streams in Yellowstone. They probably miss thrashing around in there 
and eating all the riparian cover.
  I think that this amendment, to substitute political science for 
sound science and for Congress to preempt litigation with this, is 
somewhat unprecedented, to say the least.
  Mr. BEYER. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. RIBBLE. Mr. Chairman, I have not mentioned protecting cattle at 
all. Maybe some of my colleagues will. I have only mentioned trying to 
protect the Endangered Species Act.

                              {time}  1100

  Mr. Chairman, I yield 1\1/4\ minutes to the gentleman from Michigan 
(Mr. Benishek).
  Mr. BENISHEK. Mr. Chairman, I thank the gentleman from Wisconsin for 
this amendment and the time.
  I rise today in support of this amendment for the SHARE Act. This 
amendment directs the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to reissue a rule 
to delist the gray wolf in Wyoming and the Great Lakes region, which 
includes my State of Michigan.
  In 2011, the Fish and Wildlife Service determined that the wolf 
recovered in Wyoming and the Great Lakes and would remain recovered 
under federally approved State management plans.
  I can speak from personal experience about the impact that wolves and 
their recovery are having on my district. This photo next to me is of a 
constituent in my district. One of his calves was attacked and eaten by 
a wolf, which may not mean much to the opponents of this, but it means 
pretty much to small farmers in Michigan. It isn't just the cattle.
  As the number of wolves have increased well beyond the recommended 
number for recovery, we have seen drastic declines in the deer 
population in northern Michigan. My camp has no deer. The economy of 
the whole area is in collapse because there is no hunting anymore.
  I understand that some are opposed to ever delisting the wolf, but as 
numbers continue to expand, we must consider the impact the wolf has on 
the landscape as a whole. This amendment does not change the Endangered 
Species Act. It simply allows for the following of true sound science.
  The Acting CHAIR. The time of the gentleman has expired.
  Mr. RIBBLE. I yield the gentleman an additional 15 seconds.
  Mr. BENISHEK. The gray wolf was recovered in the Great Lakes and 
ready for delisting and State management.
  I urge my colleagues to support this amendment.
  Mr. RIBBLE. Mr. Chairman, I will go ahead and close.
  About two decades ago, there were only 15 gray wolves in the western 
Great Lakes States. Today the gray wolf population exceeds 3,700, and 
yet we are to act as if some judge someplace decides that that is not 
enough, that the States of Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Wyoming in 
and of themselves cannot manage these populations in accordance with 
the Fish and Wildlife's actions and with their scientific help.
  This is not unprecedented, as the minority has mentioned. This 
exactly has happened with Montana and Idaho before.
  Mr. Chairman, I urge my colleagues to support this amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. PETERSON. Mr. Chair, I rise today in support of the Ribble, 
Lummis, Benishek, and Peterson amendment.
  Managing gray wolves continues to be a huge problem in my state of 
Minnesota. In spite of the overwhelming evidence by the U.S. Fish and 
Wildlife Service that the gray wolf population in the Western Great 
Lakes States has not only recovered, but thrived in the past few years, 
a single judge in Washington, D.C. unilaterally decided that gray 
wolves somehow need federal protection. In 2014, Minnesota had nearly 
2,500 gray wolves, by far the highest number in any state besides 
Alaska.
  This has put the farmers and ranchers in my district in a very 
difficult situation. They are now forced to choose between following 
the law or protecting their livestock and livelihoods. Our amendment 
simply reinstates Fish and Wildlife's original decision to delist gray 
wolves in the Western Great Lakes States from Endangered Species Act 
protections and allows the agency to relist gray wolves if science 
supports it. I believe this amendment is scientific and fair.
  This is a real problem that needs immediate solution. The states--not 
the federal government--are best equipped to manage gray wolf 
populations and provide assistance when problem wolves harass my 
constituent's livelihoods.
  I urge Members to support this amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Wisconsin (Mr. Ribble).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. BEYER. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by

[[Page H980]]

the gentleman from Wisconsin will be postponed.


            Amendment No. 15 Offered by Mr. Young of Alaska

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 15 
printed in House Report 114-429.
  Mr. YOUNG of Alaska. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Add at the end the following:

                   TITLE __--MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS

     SEC. _01. PROHIBITION ON ISSUANCE OF FINAL RULE.

       The Director of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service 
     shall not issue a final rule that--
       (1) succeeds the proposed rule entitled ``Non-Subsistence 
     Take of Wildlife, and Public Participation and Closure 
     Procedures, on National Wildlife Refuges in Alaska'' (81 Fed. 
     Reg. 887 (January 8, 2016)); or
       (2) is substantially similar to that proposed rule.

     SEC. _02. WITHDRAWAL OF EXISTING RULE REGARDING HUNTING AND 
                   TRAPPING IN ALASKA.

       The Director of the National Park Service shall withdraw 
     the final rule entitled ``Alaska; Hunting and Trapping in 
     National Preserves'' (80 Fed. Reg. 64325 (October 23, 2015)) 
     by not later than 30 days after the date of the enactment of 
     this Act, and shall not issue a rule that is substantially 
     similar to that rule.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 619, the gentleman 
from Alaska (Mr. Young) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman.
  Mr. YOUNG of Alaska. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.
  (Mr. YOUNG of Alaska asked and was given permission to revise and 
extend his remarks.)
  Mr. YOUNG of Alaska. Mr. Chairman, my amendment is a relatively 
complicated amendment in the sense that a lot of people don't have any 
history of the Alaska National Lands Act.
  My amendment prohibits the Director of the Fish and Wildlife Service 
from issuing a final ruling that would seize authority from the State 
of Alaska's Alaska Fish and Game to manage fish and game on all lands. 
That was under ANILCA.
  My amendment also withdraws the existing National Park Service rule 
that interferes with State wildlife management authority under the 
National Preserve Lands of Alaska, agreed to by this Congress. The 
Alaska National Interest Land Conservation Act, ANILCA, passed by 
Congress, signed into law in 1980, protects the ability of the State of 
Alaska to manage wildlife across the State on State, private, and 
Federal lands.
  As Alaska's lone Representative and someone who was intimately 
involved in the process of producing ANILCA, an agreement with my 
colleagues, it is my conclusion that the proposed rule set forth by the 
Fish and Wildlife Service and Park Service is in clear violation of 
Federal law.
  The scope of the proposed Fish and Wildlife Service rule is enormous. 
There are 76.8 million acres of wildlife refuges in Alaska, an amount 
of land about the size of four Michigans, at least two or three 
Virginias, and on top of that there is 20 million acres of national 
preserves in Alaska, a total of 100 million acres in the State of 
Alaska.
  But when that agreement was set out, we were to retain management of 
fish and game on all lands, and that is in the law. Very frankly, my 
colleagues, this is a regulatory overreach by this administration, 
promoted by this administration, breaking the law.
  Now, the Fish and Wildlife Service asserts their actions are allowed 
by the National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act. However, as the 
original sponsor of that act, I can knowingly and affirmatively state 
that the Fish and Wildlife Service proposal goes beyond the original 
intent of my legislation that was passed by this House.
  The National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act specifically 
states that ANILCA takes priority over any other conflicts regarding 
refuge lands in the State of Alaska. I find it somewhat concerning that 
the Fish and Wildlife would cite a law which forbids them from taking 
such actions and then say the justification is because of the law. It 
is not. This is a special interest pressuring group that says that Fish 
and Wildlife will take away the States' rights.
  If you believe in States' rights, you will take and support this 
amendment that I am offering. If you believe in the Federal Government 
only, not the United States of America, the United States as the 
Federal Government, you will oppose this amendment.
  I am asking my colleagues to think about what is occurring here: the 
overreach of this Federal Government that has taken away the rights of 
States and is continuing to try to do it.
  I urge the passage of this amendment, and I reserve the balance of my 
time.
  Mrs. DINGELL. Mr. Chairman, I rise in opposition to this amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR (Mr. Womack). The gentlewoman from Michigan is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mrs. DINGELL. Mr. Chairman, with nothing but the deepest respect for 
my colleague from Alaska--and I even want to tell him, I was afraid to 
stand up without getting clearance from one of your other good friends, 
the resident hunter in my household--but this amendment is yet another 
attempt to allow a State to override perfectly reasonable conservation 
policies on U.S. public lands.
  This amendment would prevent the Park Service from managing wildlife 
on these lands, even though they are owned by the American taxpayers, 
not by the State of Alaska.
  Of particular concern is Alaska's policy of eradicating keystone 
predator species. Because of this policy, allowing wolves and bears to 
seek refuge on these Park Service lands may be the only way to keep 
them from requiring protection under the Endangered Species Act.
  I want to be clear about what this rule does and does not do. It does 
not deny access to hunting. This rule does not reduce hunting in the 
national preserves in Alaska, period. In fact, it keeps existing 
hunting rules in place.
  What the rule does do is ban some of the most inhumane and 
ecologically damaging forms of hunting, things that a true sportsman 
would never do anyway. Let me share examples. This rule would prevent 
spotlighting black bears and shooting them and their cubs, babies in 
their den. It would prevent using bait to attract and kill bears. It 
would prevent killing wolves during their denning season. Again, 
babies. And it would prevent the killing of caribou from a motorboat 
while under power. Yes, if a deer is swimming and you go after it in a 
boat, it would prevent that caribou that is swimming from being shot.
  If you think people should be allowed to do any of these what I think 
are unsportsmanlike things, then this amendment is for you. But if you 
are like most Americans, you will be deeply disturbed by these 
practices and will join me in opposing this amendment.
  Mr. Chairman, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. YOUNG of Alaska. Mr. Chairman, may I remind my good friend from 
Michigan--and she is a dear friend and her husband is a dear friend of 
mine, he voted for my bill, ANILCA--it is the law. It was an agreement 
that the State would manage.
  By the way, it is against the law to shoot species of animals from a 
boat. This doesn't change that. It changes the management concept. It 
is overreach by the Federal Government. It is overreach by Fish and 
Wildlife. They would not be fish and wildlife managers anymore. They 
are becoming the preservationist group without the management ability 
in the State that lives there.
  I am not changing anything other than just the fact that the State 
still has authority under ANILCA. He voted for it. I am suggesting, 
respectfully, if you want the Federal Government to manage everything, 
100 million acres that we agreed that we could manage in the ANILCA 
law, the State, if you want the government to take that all over, let's 
just give the government all the land. Let's stop having free land.
  You talk about being public land, the public that lives there, they 
want the State to manage the land. So far they have done a great job.
  As far as shooting bears, that is against the law in the State of 
Alaska.
  Now, why are we saying that?
  Because it is emotionally acceptable. So let's stick to the facts. 
This is a fact.
  Do you want the administration, the government to manage all lands or 
do

[[Page H981]]

you want to follow the law that we passed in this Congress?
  The law.
  We have a tendency here to forget what happened, this Congress. Look 
at the history of ANILCA. It was a compromise. A lot of it I objected 
to, but we passed it in this House and it was accepted by the State 
with the understanding that the State would manage fish and game and 
not the Federal Government.
  By the way, the Park Service in the State of Alaska, the Fish and 
Wildlife in the State of Alaska, in the beginning the BLM are not 
partners anymore. It is all run from Washington, D.C.
  Mrs. DINGELL. Mr. Chairman, I have nothing but the utmost respect for 
my colleague from Alaska. I actually think that he and my spouse share 
the same sportsmanship policies of hunting, but this rule just 
simplifies and updates procedures for closing an area or restricting an 
activity. It updates obsolete subsistence regulations and it prohibits 
very specifically some of these things that I spoke about. I think we 
will respectfully disagree.
  Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Alaska (Mr. Young).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Mrs. DINGELL. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Alaska will 
be postponed.


                Amendment No. 16 Offered by Mr. Huffman

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 16 
printed in House Report 114-429.
  Mr. HUFFMAN. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Add at the end the following:

      TITLE__--PRESERVATION OF ARCTIC COASTAL PLAIN AS WILDERNESS

     SEC. _01. SHORT TITLE.

       This title may be cited as the ``Udall-Eisenhower Arctic 
     Wilderness Act''.

     SEC. _02. FINDINGS AND STATEMENT OF POLICY.

       (a) Findings.--The Congress finds the following:
       (1) Americans cherish the continued existence of expansive, 
     unspoiled wilderness ecosystems and wildlife found on their 
     public lands, and feel a strong moral responsibility to 
     protect this wilderness heritage as an enduring resource to 
     bequeath undisturbed to future generations of Americans.
       (2) It is widely believed by ecologists, wildlife 
     scientists, public land specialists, and other experts that 
     the wilderness ecosystem centered around and dependent upon 
     the Arctic coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife 
     Refuge, Alaska, represents the very epitome of a primeval 
     wilderness ecosystem and constitutes the greatest wilderness 
     area and diversity of wildlife habitats of its kind in the 
     United States.
       (3) President Dwight D. Eisenhower initiated protection of 
     the wilderness values of the Arctic coastal plain in 1960 
     when he set aside 8,900,000 acres establishing the Arctic 
     National Wildlife Range expressly ``for the purpose of 
     preserving unique wildlife, wilderness and recreational 
     values''.
       (4) In 1980, when the Congress acted to strengthen the 
     protective management of the Eisenhower-designated area with 
     the enactment of the Alaska National Interest Lands 
     Conservation Act (Public Law 96-487), Representative Morris 
     K. Udall led the effort to more than double the size of the 
     Arctic National Wildlife Refuge and extend statutory 
     wilderness protection to most of the original area.
       (5) Before the enactment of the Alaska National Interest 
     Lands Conservation Act, the House of Representatives twice 
     passed legislation that would have protected the entire 
     Eisenhower-designated area as wilderness, including the 
     Arctic coastal plain.
       (6) A majority of Americans have supported and continue to 
     support preserving and protecting the Arctic National 
     Wildlife Refuge, including the Arctic coastal plain, from any 
     industrial development and consider oil and gas exploration 
     and development in particular to be incompatible with the 
     purposes for which this incomparable wilderness ecosystem has 
     been set aside.
       (7) When the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge was 
     established in 1980 by paragraph (2) of section 303 of the 
     Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (Public Law 
     96-487; 94 Stat. 2390; 16 U.S.C. 668dd note), subparagraph 
     (B)(iii) of such paragraph specifically stated that one of 
     the purposes for which the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is 
     established and managed would be to provide the opportunity 
     for continued subsistence uses by local residents, and, 
     therefore, the lands designated as wilderness within the 
     Refuge, including the area designated by this title, are and 
     will continue to be managed consistent with such 
     subparagraph.
       (8) Canada has taken action to preserve those portions of 
     the wilderness ecosystem of the Arctic that exist on its side 
     of the international border and provides strong legal 
     protection for the habitat of the Porcupine River caribou 
     herd that migrates annually through both countries to calve 
     on the Arctic coastal plain.
       (9) The extension of full wilderness protection for the 
     Arctic coastal plain within the Arctic National Wildlife 
     Refuge will still leave most of the North Slope of Alaska 
     available for the development of energy resources, which will 
     allow Alaska to continue to contribute significantly to 
     meeting the energy needs of the United States without 
     despoiling the unique Arctic coastal plain of the Arctic 
     National Wildlife Refuge.
       (b) Statement of Policy.--The Congress hereby declares that 
     it is the policy of the United States--
       (1) to honor the decades of bipartisan efforts that have 
     increasingly protected the great wilderness ecosystem of the 
     Arctic coastal plain;
       (2) to sustain this natural treasure for the current 
     generation of Americans; and
       (3) to do everything possible to protect and preserve this 
     magnificent natural ecosystem so that it may be bequeathed in 
     its unspoiled natural condition to future generations of 
     Americans.

     SEC. _03. DESIGNATION OF ADDITIONAL WILDERNESS, ARCTIC 
                   NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE, ALASKA.

       (a) Inclusion of Arctic Coastal Plain.--In furtherance of 
     the Wilderness Act (16 U.S.C. 1131 et seq.), an area within 
     the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in the State of Alaska 
     comprising approximately 1,559,538 acres, as generally 
     depicted on a map entitled ``Arctic National Wildlife 
     Refuge--1002 Area Alternative E--Wilderness Designation'' and 
     dated October 28, 1991, is hereby designated as wilderness 
     and, therefore, as a component of the National Wilderness 
     Preservation System. The map referred to in this subsection 
     shall be available for inspection in the offices of the 
     Secretary of the Interior.
       (b) Administration.--The Secretary of the Interior shall 
     administer the area designated as wilderness by subsection 
     (a) in accordance with the Wilderness Act as part of the 
     wilderness area already in existence within the Arctic 
     National Wildlife Refuge as of the date of the enactment of 
     this Act.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 619, the gentleman 
from California (Mr. Huffman) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from California.
  Mr. HUFFMAN. Mr. Chairman, there are some iconic places in this 
country that define America. The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in 
northeastern Alaska is one of those places. It is a one-of-a-kind 
treasure.
  Today, for the first time, the full House of Representatives has an 
opportunity to cast a vote to permanently preserve and protect this 
special place.
  Now, the gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Fitzpatrick), my Republican 
friend, has joined me in introducing the underlying bill that is 
incorporated in this amendment. Together, we are carrying the torch 
that prior generations of bipartisan leaders have carried. They have 
understood that America's Arctic is a uniquely wild place.
  It was Republican President Dwight Eisenhower who first established 
Federal protections for the coastal plain in 1960 and Democratic 
Chairman Mo Udall who expanded the refuge, doubling its size in 1980.
  I had the great privilege to visit the Arctic Refuge last summer. I 
camped in the wilderness and I came away with an increased sense of 
urgency to permanently protect the Arctic Refuge's coastal plain.
  Allowing drilling in the Arctic Refuge would irreparably disrupt a 
very important ecosystem. It would impact the way of life for the 
Gwich'in people and forever destroy one of our Nation's last great wild 
places. That is why I am offering this amendment to the SHARE Act, to 
ask that we protect this American wilderness once and for all.
  My amendment would designate the threatened biological heart of the 
refuge, the coastal plain, as wilderness, to finally recognize the 
intrinsic value of this land and what it holds to ensure that it 
remains pristine for generations to come.
  Congress has been debating whether to drill in this area for nearly 
three decades. As our public lands suffer from the effects of climate 
change, most significantly in Alaska, I believe time is of the essence.
  Now, the Arctic Refuge is wild, it is spectacular, and most 
importantly, it

[[Page H982]]

is owned by all Americans, not by the oil industry. That is why 
Congressman Fitzpatrick and I introduced our bipartisan legislation to 
permanently designate it as wilderness, following the bipartisan legacy 
that this legislation has enjoyed for decades.

                              {time}  1115

  Arctic Refuge support has always been diverse and nationwide. During 
the recent public comment period for the draft conservation plan, the 
Fish and Wildlife Service received nearly 1 million comments in support 
of wilderness for the Arctic Refuge and in opposition to oil and gas 
exploration and development. Alaskans showed overwhelming support at 
public hearings and sent thousands of comments, including from 100 
businesses across the State from Kaktovik to Juneau.
  This legislation has been introduced in every Congress for almost 
three decades and has never come to a full vote on the House floor. I 
am grateful that, in January of 2015, for the first time, the 
Department of the Interior released a conservation plan for the Arctic 
Refuge that recommended wilderness protection--a recommendation that 
was transmitted to Congress.
  Only Congress can act to designate the coastal plain as wilderness. 
Now is the time to seize that historic opportunity.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. YOUNG of Alaska. Mr. Chairman, I claim the time in opposition.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. YOUNG of Alaska. Mr. Chairman, I always admired my friend from 
California, who doesn't know squat about the Arctic Wildlife Refuge. 
That is the truth. He may have camped out in it, but he didn't camp out 
in the area which we would like to drill for oil, which this Congress 
set aside for that purpose.
  By the way, we did pass opening ANWR 11 times. This Congress did it. 
And it got stopped in the Senate every time but one. Bill Clinton, 
bless his heart, vetoed it.
  We have 18 billion barrels of oil--that is a minimum estimate--74 
miles away from an existing pipeline on the coastal plain.
  You say, well, we don't need the oil now. I heard that in 1960. We 
didn't need the oil, but it went all the way up to $4.50 for gasoline 
at the pump.
  This is a reserve set aside by Scoop Jackson--a Democrat--myself, and 
Ted Stevens so it would be potentially there for development when 
Congress acts. You want to include this as a wilderness area in the 
bill on the behalf and behest of a group of people that really don't 
understand this.
  You say Alaska supports your amendment? In that case, I won't be back 
here next year. Don't applaud. Don't keep that in mind. I have been 
running, now, longer than anybody in this House except for one other 
man. Apparently, Alaska does support this ANWR provision.
  It is Federal oil. It is not our oil. We have infrastructure in place 
right now that can be used to move that oil if and when it is needed.
  I am glad the gentleman said only the Congress can designate this, 
because your Fish and Wildlife Service recommended it all be 
wilderness--another act of this administration.
  I happen to agree, very frankly, that the Congress will vote some 
day.
  And, by the way, if you want to get rid of me, take a vote to open it 
up, and I might retire. But until that time, I am staying here, because 
it is right for this Nation.
  I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the gentleman from California (Mr. 
McClintock).
  Mr. McCLINTOCK. I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  Mr. Chairman, this amendment would forbid development of one of the 
most promising and untapped oilfields in the world. I have to ask: How 
is the cause of American energy independence advanced by forbidding 
development of America's own vast energy resources? We are talking 
about reserves that are larger than the reserves in the entire nation 
of Mexico or Norway, whom we currently depend on for importing oil.
  The gentleman from California is right: that land is owned by the 
American people. So is the oil under it. That means about $300 billion 
of revenues into the Federal Treasury. That is about $2,400 for every 
family in this country.
  The proposed development of the Arctic oil requires about 2,000 acres 
out of 19 million acres of the wildlife reserve. That is one-one 
hundredth of 1 percent of that land area. That is how extreme this 
measure is.
  It would sacrifice American prosperity. It would sacrifice oil 
reserves larger than those in all of Mexico. It would sacrifice 
revenues to the Treasury of $2,400 for every family to place off limits 
a tiny part of the frozen Arctic tundra.
  If you want to know why our economy is stagnating, if you want to 
know why our country is going bankrupt, you need only look to measures 
like the amendment before us.
  Mr. HUFFMAN. Mr. Chairman, with great respect to the senior 
legislator from Alaska, I have no doubt that he knows and understands 
the coastal plain and that area far better than I do and that anyone 
else in this body does, but I do know this: every Member of this body--
in fact, every American--has a stake in protecting the coastal plain of 
the Arctic wilderness.
  Migratory birds from the coastal plain go to all 49 of the other 
States. We are connected, whether we know it or not, with this 
critical, vital ecosystem in the Alaska National Wildlife Refuge.
  The whole point of wilderness is to protect areas that we actually 
may never camp out in, that we may never see, but that are, 
nevertheless, of such great intrinsic value that they deserve this 
special protection. That is what this is all about.
  As to the argument that we need lots of new oil extraction and 
development in the Arctic, I would just point out that right next door 
to the Arctic Refuge is an enormous, essentially equal-sized area that 
we set aside for that purpose. It is called the National Petroleum 
Reserve. The oil industry has not seen fit to develop in that area, nor 
does it look like they will any time soon, with oil hovering around $30 
a barrel and this week the Saudis saying they may be taking it all the 
way down to $20 a barrel.
  Right now, because of its overdependence on the oil economy, the 
State of Alaska is hemorrhaging. Oil revenues are down by half. The 
permanent fund is hemorrhaging. Meanwhile, the tourist economy, which 
is built around preserving and protecting natural resources, is growing 
and will soon eclipse oil revenues in terms of the economic impact.
  Let's look to the future.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. YOUNG of Alaska. Mr. Chairman, I always listen to these well-
written arguments by the Sierra Club and others that like to take this 
Nation to its knees, which is a reality.
  We talk about the petroleum reserve set-aside. It was a reserve set 
aside for use by this Nation. And they are drilling. They are drilling 
today. ConocoPhillips is going in.
  Ironically, for some reason, the sales that were put up by this 
administration are not where they wanted to drill. I have an old 
saying--and people laugh at me when I say it: you don't hunt rabbits on 
a pool table just because it is green. All right. You don't drill oil 
if it is not there.
  Ironically, this administration, bless their hearts, put up sales 
where there was nothing there. It was like the pool table. So why would 
the oil company drill? They can't and will not.
  And I always ask them: Why don't you ask the oil companies where they 
would like to drill? We can't do that because someone has asked us to 
preserve that great area. The other area is just as pretty, but it 
doesn't have any oil.
  This is an attempt to take 18 billion barrels of oil away from the 
American people and an attempt by special interest groups to make sure 
this country cannot grow.
  Oil will be here forever. Let's keep it. Let's oppose this amendment. 
It is mischievous. It is wrong for this Nation.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from California (Mr. Huffman).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. HUFFMAN. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by

[[Page H983]]

the gentleman from California will be postponed.


               Amendment No. 17 Offered by Mr. Lowenthal

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 17 
printed in House Report 114-429.
  Mr. LOWENTHAL. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Add at the end the following:

                   TITLE __--MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS

     SEC. __. PERIODIC INCREASE IN PRICE OF MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING 
                   AND CONSERVATION STAMP TO ACCOUNT FOR 
                   INFLATION.

       Section 2 of the Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation 
     Stamp Act (16 U.S.C. 718b) is amended--
       (1) in subsection (b), by striking ``The Postal'' and 
     inserting ``Except as provided in subsections (c) and (d), 
     the Postal''; and
       (2) by adding at the end of the following:
       ``(d) Increase in Price of Stamp.--
       ``(1) Increase authorized.--The Secretary may, after notice 
     and public comment, increase the price of each stamp sold 
     under this section by an amount not to exceed $10 for a 
     hunting year if the Secretary determines the increase--
       ``(A) is commensurate with the level of inflation as 
     determined by the adjustments in the Consumer Price Index 
     since the last increase; and
       ``(B) is approved unanimously by the Migratory Bird 
     Conservation Commission.
       ``(2) Effective date of increase.--An increase in price 
     under paragraph (1) shall take effect--
       ``(A) no earlier than 2 years after the effective date of 
     the last increase in price; and
       ``(B) no later than January 1 of the calendar year 
     preceding the hunting year.''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 619, the gentleman 
from California (Mr. Lowenthal) and a Member opposed each will control 
5 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from California.
  Mr. LOWENTHAL. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.
  Mr. Chairman, my amendment is very straightforward. It would simply 
allow the price of the Federal duck stamp to be changed by the rate of 
inflation.
  Inflation is something that each and every one of us cannot avoid. 
Just as inflation decreases the value of a dollar for all Americans 
over time, it also steadily decreases the real value of a duck stamp. 
That is very unfortunate, because the duck stamp is a highly effective 
conservation program.
  The revenue from the Federal duck stamp that all hunters must buy 
each year as a permit to hunt waterfowl is used to preserve wetlands 
and maintain a sustainable population for hunters and bird watchers 
alike.
  Moreover, the preservation of wetland habitat from the duck stamp, in 
conjunction with the National Wildlife Refuge System, has reversed the 
decline in waterfowl populations across this country. Also, not 
insignificant, co-benefits are that these wetlands buffer our 
communities from flooding, saving billions of dollars in damages, and 
they help filter water and recharge, Mr. Chair, aquifers that are vital 
to our groundwater supplies.
  The duck stamp works. Ninety-eight cents of every dollar spent on a 
duck stamp goes back to preserving wildlife habitat. To date, more than 
$800 million from duck stamp sales have been spent on the preservation 
of over 6 million acres of habitat. The duck stamp is a true user fee, 
where all the funds are spent to benefit the fee payer.
  I hope this is an amendment that the chairman can support as a 
commonsense update to address the reality of inflation that inevitably 
will erode the ability of the duck stamps and the National Wildlife 
Refuge System to continue this highly successful conservation program.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. WITTMAN. Mr. Chairman, I rise in opposition to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Virginia is recognize for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. WITTMAN. Mr. Chairman, I certainly agree with the gentleman from 
California that the duck stamp program is a great program. It does a 
tremendous amount of good. We all know the wetlands that are preserved 
with that. We all know it is a great opportunity for the hunting 
community and the conservation community to come together.
  As you know, last year, the duck stamp fee was increased, for the 
first time in 24 years, from $15 to $25. I, myself, am an avid duck 
hunter. I buy multiple duck stamps because I firmly believe in the 
program.
  The increase last year we believe will yield about $119 million over 
10 years; but we also know, looking historically, that when you put 
these increases in fees, for the first couple of years the revenue 
drops because people that would buy them without the need don't do 
that, and then they come back to actually purchasing it.
  So we understand that. That is why we have asked the U.S. Fish and 
Wildlife Service to look specifically at how the implementation of this 
fee is going to play out and how the costs associated with the program 
are, so that we can understand how to best manage this, as you said, to 
get the most dollars to wetlands conservation.
  With the idea of now going to an inflationary factor right on the 
heels of a $10 increase without getting, from the Fish and Wildlife 
Service, what the impacts are going to be so we can best maximize the 
dollars, I think, is premature.
  I serve as a member of the Migratory Bird Conservation Commission, 
and still, I believe the responsibility for any type of increases 
should still be on the backs of all Members of Congress, not just the 
four that are on the Migratory Bird Conservation Commission.
  I applaud the gentleman's effort to draw attention to the duck stamp 
program. We all understand the good it does, but I would argue that 
this inflationary increase measure is premature, especially in the face 
of a $10 increase last year. Therefore, Mr. Chairman, I would oppose 
this amendment.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. LOWENTHAL. Mr. Chair, how much time do I have remaining?
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from California has 2\1/2\ minutes 
remaining.
  Mr. LOWENTHAL. Mr. Chair, it is unfortunate that we can't come 
together today to support such a simple fix to, as Mr. Wittman pointed 
out, such a highly successful program. I think the operative word that 
you have said is that it is premature at this point, not that you 
really oppose the ability to protect our waterfowl populations to keep 
them vibrant and make sure that duck hunters have ducks to hunt. I 
think we all agree upon that.
  I also just want to say that the one issue is just to make clear that 
we are not talking about automatically increasing inflation. All we are 
saying is that when inflation does come--which will erode this 
program--that there is a process in place that the Secretary of the 
Interior will make a recommendation to the Migratory Bird Conservation 
Commission. That Commission has to support it. At most, it would have 
been a 35-cent increase.

                              {time}  1130

  But I hear what you are saying about that, and if you will work with 
me as we go forward to see when is the best time that we can work on 
this, I will ask to withdraw this amendment.
  Can I get a commitment that we will work together?
  Mr. WITTMAN. Will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. LOWENTHAL. I yield to the gentleman from Virginia.
  Mr. WITTMAN. Yes, I will tell the gentleman from California that we 
will indeed work with you in looking at the future of the duck stamp 
program, making sure that it is managed in the proper way, making sure 
that, indeed, is getting dollars to where they need to go, and that is 
to preserve those critical wetlands.
  Mr. LOWENTHAL. Mr. Chairman, I ask unanimous consent to withdraw my 
amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman 
from California?
  There was no objection.
  The Acting CHAIR. The amendment is withdrawn.


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, proceedings 
will now resume on those amendments printed in House Report 114-429 on 
which further proceedings were postponed, in the following order:
  Amendment No. 2 by Mr. Beyer of Virginia.
  Amendment No. 3 by Ms. Jackson Lee of Texas.

[[Page H984]]

  Amendment No. 8 by Mr. Beyer of Virginia.
  Amendment No. 9 by Mr. Smith of Missouri.
  Amendment No. 12 by Mr. Griffith of Virginia.
  Amendment No. 14 by Mr. Ribble of Wisconsin.
  Amendment No. 15 by Mr. Young of Alaska.
  Amendment No. 16 by Mr. Huffman of California.
  The Chair will reduce to 2 minutes the minimum time for any 
electronic vote after the first vote in this series.


                  Amendment No. 2 Offered by Mr. Beyer

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Virginia 
(Mr. Beyer) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 161, 
noes 244, not voting 28, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 92]

                               AYES--161

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Bass
     Beatty
     Bera
     Beyer
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brady (PA)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Dold
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Graham
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Honda
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lee
     Levin
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meng
     Moore
     Moulton
     Nadler
     Neal
     Nolan
     Norcross
     O'Rourke
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Poliquin
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Sherman
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takai
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tonko
     Torres
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters, Maxine
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--244

     Abraham
     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amash
     Ashford
     Babin
     Barr
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (MI)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Blum
     Bost
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brat
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Clawson (FL)
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comstock
     Conaway
     Costa
     Costello (PA)
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Curbelo (FL)
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Donovan
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers (NC)
     Emmer (MN)
     Engel
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hanna
     Hardy
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Hice, Jody B.
     Hill
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurd (TX)
     Hurt (VA)
     Issa
     Jenkins (KS)
     Jenkins (WV)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jolly
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Katko
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Knight
     Labrador
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Latta
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Love
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     MacArthur
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McSally
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Newhouse
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Peterson
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Posey
     Price, Tom
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney (FL)
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Rouzer
     Royce
     Russell
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Stefanik
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Trott
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Walters, Mimi
     Walz
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (IA)
     Young (IN)
     Zeldin
     Zinke

                             NOT VOTING--28

     Amodei
     Barletta
     Becerra
     Brown (FL)
     Butterfield
     Clyburn
     Cook
     Cooper
     Diaz-Balart
     Fattah
     Fitzpatrick
     Green, Gene
     Hastings
     Herrera Beutler
     Hoyer
     Kelly (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Lewis
     Meeks
     Murphy (FL)
     Napolitano
     Pompeo
     Roby
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sessions
     Smith (WA)
     Westmoreland
     Wilson (FL)

                              {time}  1151

  Messrs. MULLIN, COLLINS of New York, REICHERT, NEUGEBAUER, DENT, and 
BISHOP of Utah changed their vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  Mr. DELANEY, Mrs. LOWEY, Messrs. POLIQUIN, COHEN, CROWLEY, and 
GUTIERREZ changed their vote from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated for:
  Mr. ENGEL. Mr. Chair, during rollcall vote No. 92 on H.R. 2406, I 
mistakenly recorded my vote as ``no'' when I should have voted ``yes.''


               Amendment No. 3 Offered by Ms. Jackson Lee

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from Texas 
(Ms. Jackson Lee) on which further proceedings were postponed and on 
which the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 159, 
noes 242, not voting 32, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 93]

                               AYES--159

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Bass
     Beatty
     Bera
     Beyer
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brady (PA)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Dold
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Graham
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Honda
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Lawrence
     Lee
     Levin
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     Meng
     Moore
     Nadler
     Neal
     Nolan
     Norcross
     O'Rourke
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Reichert
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond

[[Page H985]]


     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Sherman
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takai
     Takano
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tonko
     Torres
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters, Maxine
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--242

     Abraham
     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amash
     Ashford
     Babin
     Barr
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (MI)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Blum
     Bost
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brat
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Clawson (FL)
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comstock
     Conaway
     Costa
     Costello (PA)
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Curbelo (FL)
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Donovan
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers (NC)
     Emmer (MN)
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hanna
     Hardy
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Hice, Jody B.
     Hill
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurd (TX)
     Hurt (VA)
     Issa
     Jenkins (KS)
     Jenkins (WV)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jolly
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Katko
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Knight
     Labrador
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Latta
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Love
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     MacArthur
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McSally
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Moulton
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Newhouse
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Peters
     Peterson
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Poliquin
     Posey
     Price, Tom
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney (FL)
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Rouzer
     Royce
     Russell
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schrader
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Stefanik
     Stewart
     Stutzman
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Trott
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Walters, Mimi
     Walz
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (IA)
     Young (IN)
     Zeldin
     Zinke

                             NOT VOTING--32

     Amodei
     Barletta
     Becerra
     Brown (FL)
     Butterfield
     Carter (TX)
     Clyburn
     Cook
     Cooper
     Cummings
     Diaz-Balart
     Fattah
     Fitzpatrick
     Green, Gene
     Hastings
     Herrera Beutler
     Hoyer
     Kelly (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Larson (CT)
     Lewis
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Murphy (FL)
     Napolitano
     Pompeo
     Roby
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sessions
     Smith (WA)
     Stivers
     Westmoreland


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1154

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                  Amendment No. 8 Offered by Mr. Beyer

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Virginia 
(Mr. Beyer) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 169, 
noes 236, not voting 28, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 94]

                               AYES--169

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Ashford
     Bass
     Beatty
     Bera
     Beyer
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brady (PA)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Honda
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lee
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meng
     Moore
     Moulton
     Nadler
     Neal
     Nolan
     Norcross
     O'Rourke
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Sherman
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takai
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tonko
     Torres
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters, Maxine
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--236

     Abraham
     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amash
     Babin
     Barr
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (MI)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Blum
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brat
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Clawson (FL)
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comstock
     Conaway
     Costa
     Costello (PA)
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Curbelo (FL)
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Dold
     Donovan
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers (NC)
     Emmer (MN)
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Graham
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hanna
     Hardy
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Hice, Jody B.
     Hill
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurd (TX)
     Hurt (VA)
     Issa
     Jenkins (KS)
     Jenkins (WV)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jolly
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Katko
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Knight
     Labrador
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Latta
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Love
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     MacArthur
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McSally
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Newhouse
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Peterson
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Poliquin
     Posey
     Price, Tom
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney (FL)
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Rouzer
     Royce
     Russell
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Stefanik
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Trott
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Walters, Mimi
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (IA)
     Young (IN)
     Zeldin
     Zinke

                             NOT VOTING--28

     Amodei
     Barletta
     Becerra
     Bost
     Brown (FL)
     Butterfield

[[Page H986]]


     Carter (TX)
     Clyburn
     Cook
     Cooper
     Diaz-Balart
     Fattah
     Fitzpatrick
     Green, Gene
     Hastings
     Herrera Beutler
     Hoyer
     Kelly (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Meeks
     Murphy (FL)
     Napolitano
     Pompeo
     Roby
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sessions
     Smith (WA)
     Westmoreland


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1158

  Mr. TURNER changed his vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


            Amendment No. 9 Offered by Mr. Smith of Missouri

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Missouri 
(Mr. Smith) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 232, 
noes 173, not voting 28, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 95]

                               AYES--232

     Abraham
     Aderholt
     Allen
     Babin
     Barr
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (MI)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Blum
     Bost
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brat
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Clawson (FL)
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comstock
     Conaway
     Costello (PA)
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Curbelo (FL)
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Donovan
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers (NC)
     Emmer (MN)
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hanna
     Hardy
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Hice, Jody B.
     Hill
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurd (TX)
     Hurt (VA)
     Issa
     Jenkins (KS)
     Jenkins (WV)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jolly
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Katko
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Knight
     Labrador
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Latta
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Love
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McSally
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Newhouse
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Peterson
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Poliquin
     Posey
     Price, Tom
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney (FL)
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Rouzer
     Royce
     Russell
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Stefanik
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Trott
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Walters, Mimi
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (IA)
     Young (IN)
     Zeldin
     Zinke

                               NOES--173

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Amash
     Ashford
     Bass
     Beatty
     Bera
     Beyer
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brady (PA)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Dold
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Graham
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Honda
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lee
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     MacArthur
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meng
     Moore
     Moulton
     Nadler
     Neal
     Nolan
     Norcross
     O'Rourke
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Sherman
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takai
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tonko
     Torres
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters, Maxine
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                             NOT VOTING--28

     Amodei
     Barletta
     Becerra
     Brown (FL)
     Butterfield
     Clyburn
     Cook
     Cooper
     Diaz-Balart
     Fattah
     Fitzpatrick
     Green, Gene
     Hastings
     Herrera Beutler
     Hoyer
     Kelly (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Lummis
     Meeks
     Murphy (FL)
     Napolitano
     Pompeo
     Roby
     Rogers (AL)
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sessions
     Smith (WA)
     Westmoreland


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1201

  Mrs. ELLMERS of North Carolina changed her vote from ``no'' to 
``aye.''
  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                Amendment No. 12 Offered by Mr. Griffith

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Virginia 
(Mr. Griffith) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 239, 
noes 165, not voting 29, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 96]

                               AYES--239

     Abraham
     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amash
     Ashford
     Babin
     Barr
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (MI)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Blum
     Bost
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brat
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Clawson (FL)
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comstock
     Conaway
     Costello (PA)
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Curbelo (FL)
     DeFazio
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers (NC)
     Emmer (MN)
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Graham
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hanna
     Hardy
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Hice, Jody B.
     Hill
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurd (TX)
     Hurt (VA)
     Issa
     Jenkins (KS)
     Jenkins (WV)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jolly
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Katko
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     Kind
     King (IA)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Knight
     Labrador
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Latta
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Love
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     MacArthur
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McSally
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer

[[Page H987]]


     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Newhouse
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Peterson
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Poliquin
     Posey
     Price, Tom
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney (FL)
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Rouzer
     Royce
     Russell
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schrader
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Stefanik
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Trott
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Walters, Mimi
     Walz
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (IA)
     Young (IN)
     Zeldin
     Zinke

                               NOES--165

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Bass
     Beatty
     Bera
     Beyer
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brady (PA)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Dold
     Donovan
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Honda
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     King (NY)
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lee
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meng
     Moore
     Moulton
     Nadler
     Neal
     Nolan
     Norcross
     O'Rourke
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Sherman
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takai
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tonko
     Torres
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters, Maxine
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                             NOT VOTING--29

     Amodei
     Barletta
     Becerra
     Brown (FL)
     Butterfield
     Clyburn
     Cook
     Cooper
     Davis, Rodney
     Diaz-Balart
     Fattah
     Fitzpatrick
     Green, Gene
     Hastings
     Herrera Beutler
     Hoyer
     Kelly (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Lummis
     Meeks
     Murphy (FL)
     Napolitano
     Pompeo
     Roby
     Rogers (AL)
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sessions
     Smith (WA)
     Westmoreland


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1204

  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                 Amendment No. 14 Offered by Mr. Ribble

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Wisconsin 
(Mr. Ribble) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 232, 
noes 171, not voting 30, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 97]

                               AYES--232

     Abraham
     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amash
     Ashford
     Babin
     Barr
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (MI)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Blum
     Bost
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brat
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Clawson (FL)
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comstock
     Conaway
     Costa
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Donovan
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers (NC)
     Emmer (MN)
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hardy
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Hice, Jody B.
     Hill
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurd (TX)
     Hurt (VA)
     Issa
     Jenkins (KS)
     Jenkins (WV)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jolly
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Knight
     Labrador
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Latta
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Love
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     MacArthur
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McSally
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Moulton
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Newhouse
     Noem
     Nolan
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Peterson
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Poliquin
     Posey
     Price, Tom
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rohrabacher
     Rooney (FL)
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Rouzer
     Royce
     Russell
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Stefanik
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Trott
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Walters, Mimi
     Walz
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (IA)
     Zeldin
     Zinke

                               NOES--171

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Bass
     Beatty
     Bera
     Beyer
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brady (PA)
     Brownley (CA)
     Buchanan
     Bustos
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Costello (PA)
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Curbelo (FL)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Dold
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Graham
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanna
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Honda
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Katko
     Keating
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lee
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meng
     Moore
     Nadler
     Neal
     Norcross
     O'Rourke
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Sherman
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (NJ)
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takai
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Titus
     Tonko
     Torres
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters, Maxine
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                             NOT VOTING--30

     Amodei
     Barletta
     Becerra
     Brown (FL)
     Butterfield
     Clyburn
     Cook
     Cooper
     Diaz-Balart
     Fattah
     Fitzpatrick
     Green, Gene
     Hastings
     Herrera Beutler
     Hoyer
     Kelly (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Meeks
     Murphy (FL)
     Napolitano
     Pompeo
     Roby
     Rogers (AL)
     Rokita
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sessions
     Smith (WA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Westmoreland
     Young (IN)

[[Page H988]]


  



                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1207

  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated for:
  Mr. YOUNG of Indiana. Mr. Chair, on rollcall No. 97, there was an 
error in the transaction of my electronic vote. My office and the Clerk 
are looking into the matter. Had I been present, I would have voted 
``yes.''


            Amendment No. 15 Offered by Mr. Young of Alaska

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Alaska 
(Mr. Young) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 236, 
noes 169, not voting 28, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 98]

                               AYES--236

     Abraham
     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amash
     Ashford
     Babin
     Barr
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (MI)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Blum
     Bost
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brat
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Clawson (FL)
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comstock
     Conaway
     Costello (PA)
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Curbelo (FL)
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Donovan
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers (NC)
     Emmer (MN)
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hanna
     Hardy
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Hice, Jody B.
     Hill
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurd (TX)
     Hurt (VA)
     Issa
     Jenkins (KS)
     Jenkins (WV)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jolly
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Katko
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Knight
     Labrador
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Latta
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Love
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     MacArthur
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McSally
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Newhouse
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Peterson
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Poliquin
     Posey
     Price, Tom
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney (FL)
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Rouzer
     Royce
     Russell
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schrader
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Stefanik
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Trott
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Walters, Mimi
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (IA)
     Young (IN)
     Zeldin
     Zinke

                               NOES--169

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Bass
     Beatty
     Bera
     Beyer
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brady (PA)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Dold
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Duckworth
     Ellison
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Graham
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Honda
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lee
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meng
     Moore
     Moulton
     Nadler
     Neal
     Nolan
     Norcross
     O'Rourke
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Reichert
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Sherman
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takai
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tonko
     Torres
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters, Maxine
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                             NOT VOTING--28

     Amodei
     Barletta
     Becerra
     Brown (FL)
     Butterfield
     Clyburn
     Cook
     Cooper
     Diaz-Balart
     Edwards
     Fattah
     Fitzpatrick
     Green, Gene
     Hastings
     Herrera Beutler
     Hoyer
     Kelly (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Meeks
     Murphy (FL)
     Napolitano
     Pompeo
     Roby
     Rogers (AL)
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sessions
     Smith (WA)
     Westmoreland


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1210

  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                Amendment No. 16 Offered by Mr. Huffman

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from California 
(Mr. Huffman) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 176, 
noes 227, not voting 30, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 99]

                               AYES--176

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Ashford
     Bass
     Beatty
     Bera
     Beyer
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brady (PA)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clawson (FL)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Dold
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Duckworth
     Ellison
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Gibson
     Graham
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Honda
     Huffman
     Hurt (VA)
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lee
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meng
     Moore
     Moulton
     Nadler
     Neal
     Nolan
     Norcross
     O'Rourke
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Paulsen
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Reichert
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond
     Roybal-Allard
     Royce
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Scott (VA)
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Sherman
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (NJ)
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)

[[Page H989]]


     Takai
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tonko
     Torres
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters, Maxine
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--227

     Abraham
     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amash
     Babin
     Barr
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (MI)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Blum
     Bost
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brat
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comstock
     Conaway
     Costa
     Costello (PA)
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Curbelo (FL)
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Donovan
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers (NC)
     Emmer (MN)
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hanna
     Hardy
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Hice, Jody B.
     Hill
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurd (TX)
     Issa
     Jenkins (KS)
     Jenkins (WV)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jolly
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Katko
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Knight
     Labrador
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Latta
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Love
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     MacArthur
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McSally
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Newhouse
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Pearce
     Perry
     Peterson
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Poliquin
     Posey
     Price, Tom
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney (FL)
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Rouzer
     Russell
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Stefanik
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Trott
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Walters, Mimi
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (IA)
     Young (IN)
     Zeldin
     Zinke

                             NOT VOTING--30

     Amodei
     Barletta
     Becerra
     Brown (FL)
     Butterfield
     Clyburn
     Cook
     Cooper
     Diaz-Balart
     Edwards
     Fattah
     Fitzpatrick
     Green, Gene
     Hastings
     Herrera Beutler
     Holding
     Hoyer
     Kelly (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Meeks
     Murphy (FL)
     Napolitano
     Pompeo
     Roby
     Rogers (AL)
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Scott, David
     Sessions
     Smith (WA)
     Westmoreland

                              {time}  1214

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  The Acting CHAIR (Mr. Fleischmann). The question is on the committee 
amendment in the nature of a substitute, as amended.
  The amendment was agreed to.
  The Acting CHAIR. Under the rule, the Committee rises.
  Accordingly, the Committee rose; and the Speaker pro tempore (Mr. 
Womack) having assumed the chair, Mr. Fleischmann, Acting Chair of the 
Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union, reported that 
that Committee, having had under consideration the bill (H.R. 2406) to 
protect and enhance opportunities for recreational hunting, fishing, 
and shooting, and for other purposes, and, pursuant to House Resolution 
619, he reported the bill back to the House with an amendment adopted 
in the Committee of the Whole.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Under the rule, the previous question is 
ordered.
  Is a separate vote demanded on any amendment to the amendment 
reported from the Committee of the Whole?
  If not, the question is on the committee amendment in the nature of a 
substitute, as amended.
  The amendment was agreed to.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the engrossment and third 
reading of the bill.
  The bill was ordered to be engrossed and read a third time, and was 
read the third time.


                           Motion to Recommit

  Mrs. LAWRENCE. Mr. Speaker, I have a motion to recommit at the desk.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is the gentlewoman opposed to the bill?
  Mrs. LAWRENCE. I am opposed in its current form.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The Clerk will report the motion to 
recommit.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       Mrs. Lawrence moves to recommit the bill H.R. 2406 to the 
     Committee on Natural Resources with instructions to report 
     the same back to the House forthwith, with the following 
     amendment:
       At the end of the bill, add the following:

  TITLE XVII--PROTECTING WATER SUPPLY FOR PUBLIC RECREATION AND SAFE 
                                DRINKING

     SEC. 1701. FINDINGS.

       Congress finds as follows:
       (1) Every year in the United States, an estimated 4,000 
     tons of lead are lost in ponds and streams as fishing tackle, 
     such as fishing lures and sinkers.
       (2) The lead content of fishing tackle has the potential to 
     contaminate water supplies.

     SEC. 1702. PROTECTING WATER SUPPLY FOR PUBLIC RECREATION AND 
                   SAFE DRINKING.

       Section 4 of the Toxic Substances Control Act (15 U.S.C. 
     2603) is amended by adding at the end the following:
       ``(h) Protecting Water Supply for Public Recreation and 
     Safe Drinking.--Not later than one year after the date of 
     enactment of this subsection, any manufacturer or processor 
     of an article containing a chemical substance or mixture that 
     has the potential to contaminate water supplies used for 
     public recreation or drinking water provided by a public 
     water system shall generate and provide to all applicable 
     Federal and State agencies responsible for protecting health 
     or the environment data sufficient to understand the risks 
     such article would present to human health and the 
     environment, including studies of the cancer-causing effects, 
     reproductive toxicity, and neurotoxicity of the chemical 
     substance or mixture contained in the article. Exposing the 
     public or the environment to such article without generating 
     such studies shall be considered a prohibited act under this 
     Act.''.

  Mrs. LAWRENCE (during the reading). Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous 
consent that the reading be dispensed with.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentlewoman from Michigan?
  There was no objection.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentlewoman from Michigan is recognized 
for 5 minutes.
  Mrs. LAWRENCE. Mr. Speaker, my amendment will ensure that our public 
water systems and waterways which are used for public recreation will 
be protected from an estimated 4,000 tons of lead that are 
contaminating our ponds and streams from lost fishing tackle.
  My amendment will ensure that all manufacturers of products that 
contain any type of substance with the potential to contaminate our 
water systems provide to Federal and State agencies the research so we 
may understand the risks to human health and the environment.
  Members of Congress, the manmade water crisis in Flint has shown us 
the devastating effects of having contaminated water sources. The 
100,000 residents of Flint lost a basic human right: access to clean 
water.
  According to the American Society of Civil Engineers, our drinking 
water infrastructure has a D grade. That is A, B, C, D. According to 
the American Society of Civil Engineers, $126 billion will be needed to 
restore water and wastewater infrastructure over the next 4 years, 
which leaves a funding gap of $84 billion.
  It is significant to note that the American public overwhelmingly 
supports investment in our Nation's water infrastructure, as drinking 
water is not a luxury. It is a basic need for life.
  A poll released just a week ago by the Value of Water Coalition 
showed that 95 percent of Americans--and that means on both sides of 
the aisle--believe it is important to invest in water infrastructure.
  I regret to say that we in Congress have kicked the can down the road 
year after year when it comes to investing in our infrastructure.
  I know that mayors and Governors and Members of this Congress have 
sounded the warning sign over and over again about the possibility of a 
disaster, but we never imagined that it

[[Page H990]]

would come in the form of the mass poisoning of an entire American 
city.
  The children of Flint, the parents, other citizens of Flint, and the 
citizens of these United States need Congress, not one side of the 
aisle or the other, to act so that we don't see another generation of 
children potentially suffer from the negative effects of lead 
poisoning.
  I urge all Members of this 114th Session of the United States 
Congress to support this motion to recommit on H.R. 2406.
  Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. WITTMAN. Mr. Speaker, I rise in opposition to the motion to 
recommit.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman from Virginia is recognized 
for 5 minutes.
  Mr. WITTMAN. Mr. Speaker, the minority's motion to recommit is an 
issue about chemicals in drinking water. Chemicals in drinking water is 
an issue that was addressed in the Toxic Substances Control Act, which 
was before this House.
  There were multiple opportunities to have a debate about that and to 
determine what we do to address that issue. That bill passed out of the 
House. It is now in a preconference committee with the Senate. That was 
the opportunity.
  This bill, the SHARE Act, is a package of commonsense bills that will 
increase opportunities for hunters, recreational shooters, and anglers; 
will eliminate unneeded regulatory impediments; will safeguard against 
new regulations that impede outdoor sporting activities; and will 
protect Second Amendment rights. It does not pertain to chemicals in 
drinking water.
  Outdoor sporting activities, including hunting, fishing, and 
recreational shooting, are deeply ingrained in the fabric of America's 
culture and heritage. Values that are instilled by partaking in these 
activities are passed down from generation to generation and play a 
significant part in the lives of millions of Americans.
  This important legislation will sustain America's rich hunting and 
fishing traditions, will improve access to our public lands for 
responsible outdoor sporting activities, and will help to ensure that 
the current and future generations of sportsmen and -women are able to 
enjoy the sporting activities this country holds dear.
  Mr. Speaker, I strongly encourage my colleagues to vote ``yes'' on 
this important legislation and to defeat the motion to recommit.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Without objection, the previous question is 
ordered on the motion to recommit.
  There was no objection.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the motion to recommit.
  The question was taken; and the Speaker pro tempore announced that 
the noes appeared to have it.
  Mrs. LAWRENCE. Mr. Speaker, on that I demand the yeas and nays.
  The yeas and nays were ordered.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to clause 9 of rule XX, this 5-
minute vote on the motion to recommit will be followed by a 5-minute 
vote on the passage of the bill, if ordered.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--yeas 165, 
nays 238, not voting 30, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 100]

                               YEAS--165

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Ashford
     Bass
     Beatty
     Bera
     Beyer
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brady (PA)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Duckworth
     Ellison
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Graham
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Honda
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lee
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     Meng
     Moore
     Moulton
     Nadler
     Neal
     Nolan
     Norcross
     O'Rourke
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Peterson
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Scott (VA)
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Sherman
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takai
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tonko
     Torres
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters, Maxine
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NAYS--238

     Abraham
     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amash
     Babin
     Barr
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (MI)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Blum
     Bost
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brat
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Clawson (FL)
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comstock
     Conaway
     Costa
     Costello (PA)
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Curbelo (FL)
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Dold
     Donovan
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers (NC)
     Emmer (MN)
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hanna
     Hardy
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Hice, Jody B.
     Hill
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurd (TX)
     Hurt (VA)
     Issa
     Jenkins (KS)
     Jenkins (WV)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jolly
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Katko
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Knight
     Labrador
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Latta
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Love
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     MacArthur
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     McSally
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Newhouse
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Poliquin
     Posey
     Price, Tom
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney (FL)
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Rouzer
     Royce
     Russell
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schrader
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Stefanik
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Trott
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Walters, Mimi
     Walz
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (IA)
     Young (IN)
     Zeldin
     Zinke

                             NOT VOTING--30

     Amodei
     Barletta
     Becerra
     Brown (FL)
     Butterfield
     Clyburn
     Cook
     Cooper
     Diaz-Balart
     Edwards
     Fattah
     Fitzpatrick
     Green, Gene
     Hastings
     Herrera Beutler
     Hinojosa
     Hoyer
     Kelly (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Meeks
     Murphy (FL)
     Napolitano
     Pompeo
     Roby
     Rogers (AL)
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Scott, David
     Sessions
     Smith (WA)
     Westmoreland

                              {time}  1229

  So the motion to recommit was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the passage of the bill.
  The question was taken; and the Speaker pro tempore announced that 
the ayes appeared to have it.


                             Recorded Vote

  Mr. BEYER. Mr. Speaker, I demand a recorded vote.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. This is a 5-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 242, 
noes 161, not voting 30, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 101]

                               AYES--242

     Abraham
     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amash
     Ashford
     Babin

[[Page H991]]


     Barr
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (MI)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Blum
     Bost
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brat
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Bustos
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Clawson (FL)
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comstock
     Conaway
     Costa
     Costello (PA)
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Curbelo (FL)
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers (NC)
     Emmer (MN)
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Graham
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hanna
     Hardy
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Hice, Jody B.
     Hill
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurd (TX)
     Hurt (VA)
     Issa
     Jenkins (KS)
     Jenkins (WV)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jolly
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Katko
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     Kind
     King (IA)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Knight
     Labrador
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Latta
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Love
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     MacArthur
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McSally
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Newhouse
     Noem
     Nolan
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Peterson
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Poliquin
     Posey
     Price, Tom
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney (FL)
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Rouzer
     Royce
     Russell
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schrader
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Stefanik
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Trott
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Vela
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Walters, Mimi
     Walz
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (IA)
     Young (IN)
     Zeldin
     Zinke

                               NOES--161

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Bass
     Beatty
     Bera
     Beyer
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brady (PA)
     Brownley (CA)
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Dold
     Donovan
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Duckworth
     Ellison
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Honda
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     King (NY)
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lee
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meng
     Moore
     Moulton
     Nadler
     Neal
     Norcross
     O'Rourke
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Scott (VA)
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Sherman
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takai
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tonko
     Torres
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters, Maxine
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                             NOT VOTING--30

     Amodei
     Barletta
     Becerra
     Brown (FL)
     Butterfield
     Clyburn
     Cook
     Cooper
     Diaz-Balart
     Edwards
     Fattah
     Fitzpatrick
     Green, Gene
     Hastings
     Herrera Beutler
     Hinojosa
     Hoyer
     Kelly (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Meeks
     Murphy (FL)
     Napolitano
     Pompeo
     Roby
     Rogers (AL)
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Scott, David
     Sessions
     Smith (WA)
     Westmoreland


                Announcement by the Speaker Pro Tempore

  The SPEAKER pro tempore (Ms. Stefanik) (during the vote). There are 2 
minutes remaining.

                              {time}  1235

  So the bill was passed.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.


                          Personal Explanation

  Mr. SMITH of Washington. Madam Speaker, on Tuesday, February 23; 
Wednesday, February 24; Thursday, February 25; and Friday, February 26, 
2016, I was on medical leave while recovering from hip replacement 
surgery and unable to be present for recorded votes. Had I been 
present, I would have voted:
  ``Yes'' on rollcall vote No. 83 (on the motion to suspend the rules 
and pass H.R. 4408, as amended).
  ``Yes'' on rollcall vote No. 84 (on the motion to suspend the rules 
and pass H.R. 4402, as amended).
  ``No'' on rollcall vote No. 85 (on ordering the previous question on 
H. Res. 618).
  ``No'' on rollcall vote No. 86 (on agreeing to the resolution H. Res. 
618).
  ``Yes'' on rollcall vote No. 87 (on agreeing to the Cartwright 
Amendment to H.R. 3624).
  ``Yes'' on rollcall vote No. 88 (on the motion to recommit H.R. 3624, 
with instructions).
  ``No'' on rollcall vote No. 89 (on passage of H.R. 3624).
  ``No'' on rollcall vote No. 90 (on ordering the previous question on 
H. Res. 619).
  ``No'' on rollcall vote No. 91 (on agreeing to the resolution H. Res. 
619).
  ``Yes'' on rollcall vote No. 92 (on agreeing to the Beyer Amendment 
to H.R. 2406).
  ``Yes'' on rollcall vote No. 93 (on agreeing to the Jackson Lee 
Amendment to H.R. 2406).
  ``Yes'' on rollcall vote No. 94 (on agreeing to the Beyer Amendment 
to H.R. 2406).
  ``No'' on rollcall vote No. 95 (on agreeing to the Smith of Missouri 
Amendment to H.R. 2406).
  ``No'' on rollcall vote No. 96 (on agreeing to the Griffith Amendment 
to H.R. 2406).
  ``No'' on rollcall vote No. 97 (on agreeing to the Ribble Amendment 
to H.R. 2406).
  ``No'' on rollcall vote No. 98 (on agreeing to the Young of Alaska 
Amendment to H.R. 2406).
  ``Yes'' on rollcall vote No. 99 (on agreeing to the Huffman Amendment 
to H.R. 2406).
  ``Yes'' on rollcall vote No. 100 (on the motion to recommit H.R. 
2406, with instructions).
  ``No'' on rollcall vote No. 101 (on passage of H.R. 2406).


                          Personal Explanation

  Mr. COOK. Madam Speaker, on February 26, 2016, I was unavoidably 
absent. Had I been present, I would have voted as follows:
  On rollcall No. 92, 93, 94, 99, and 100, I would have voted ``no.''
  On rollcall No. 95, 96, 97, 98, and 101, I would have voted ``yes.''

                          ____________________