Amendment Text: S.Amdt.273 — 114th Congress (2015-2016)

Shown Here:
Amendment as Proposed (04/22/2015)

This Amendment appears on page S2326 in the following article from the Congressional Record.


[Pages S2319-S2348]
From the Congressional Record Online through the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]




       JUSTICE FOR VICTIMS OF TRAFFICKING ACT OF 2015--Continued

  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Vermont.
  Mr. LEAHY. Mr. President, I understand there are 4 more minutes on 
this side. Am I correct?
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. There are 2\1/2\ minutes of debate remaining 
on the Democratic side.
  Mr. LEAHY. Mr. President, I yield back our time.


                       Vote on Amendment No. 301

  The PRESIDING OFFICER. All time having been yielded back, under the 
previous order, the question is on agreeing to amendment No. 301, 
offered by the Senator from Vermont, Mr. Leahy.
  Mr. LEAHY. Mr. President, I ask for the yeas and nays.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there a sufficient second?
  There appears to be a sufficient second.
  The clerk will call the roll.
  The senior assistant legislative clerk called the roll.
  Mr. CORNYN. The following Senators are necessarily absent: the 
Senator from Texas (Mr. Cruz) and the Senator from Florida (Mr. Rubio).
  The PRESIDING OFFICER (Mr. Sullivan). Are there any other Senators in 
the Chamber desiring to vote?
  The result was announced--yeas 43, nays 55, as follows:

                      [Rollcall Vote No. 156 Leg.]

                                YEAS--43

     Baldwin
     Bennet
     Blumenthal
     Booker
     Boxer
     Brown
     Cantwell
     Cardin
     Carper
     Coons
     Durbin
     Feinstein
     Franken
     Gillibrand
     Heinrich
     Heitkamp
     Hirono
     Kaine
     King
     Klobuchar
     Leahy
     Markey
     McCaskill
     Menendez
     Merkley
     Mikulski
     Murphy
     Murray
     Nelson
     Peters
     Reed
     Reid
     Sanders
     Schatz
     Schumer
     Shaheen
     Stabenow
     Tester
     Udall
     Warner
     Warren
     Whitehouse
     Wyden

                                NAYS--55

     Alexander
     Ayotte
     Barrasso
     Blunt
     Boozman
     Burr
     Capito
     Casey
     Cassidy
     Coats
     Cochran
     Collins
     Corker
     Cornyn
     Cotton
     Crapo
     Daines
     Donnelly
     Enzi
     Ernst
     Fischer

[[Page S2320]]


     Flake
     Gardner
     Graham
     Grassley
     Hatch
     Heller
     Hoeven
     Inhofe
     Isakson
     Johnson
     Kirk
     Lankford
     Lee
     Manchin
     McCain
     McConnell
     Moran
     Murkowski
     Paul
     Perdue
     Portman
     Risch
     Roberts
     Rounds
     Sasse
     Scott
     Sessions
     Shelby
     Sullivan
     Thune
     Tillis
     Toomey
     Vitter
     Wicker

                             NOT VOTING--2

     Cruz
     Rubio
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Under the previous order requiring 60 votes 
for the adoption of this amendment, the amendment is rejected.


                       Vote on Amendment No. 1124

  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Under the previous order, the question is on 
agreeing to amendment No. 1124, offered by the Senator from Texas, Mr. 
Cornyn.
  Mr. CORNYN. I ask for the yeas and nays.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there a sufficient second?
  There is a sufficient second.
  The clerk will call the roll.
  The legislative clerk called the roll.
  Mr. CORNYN. The following Senators are necessarily absent: the 
Senator from Texas (Mr. Cruz) and the Senator from Florida (Mr. Rubio).
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Are there any other Senators in the Chamber 
desiring to vote?
  The result was announced--yeas 98, nays 0, as follows:

                      [Rollcall Vote No. 157 Leg.]

                                YEAS--98

     Alexander
     Ayotte
     Baldwin
     Barrasso
     Bennet
     Blumenthal
     Blunt
     Booker
     Boozman
     Boxer
     Brown
     Burr
     Cantwell
     Capito
     Cardin
     Carper
     Casey
     Cassidy
     Coats
     Cochran
     Collins
     Coons
     Corker
     Cornyn
     Cotton
     Crapo
     Daines
     Donnelly
     Durbin
     Enzi
     Ernst
     Feinstein
     Fischer
     Flake
     Franken
     Gardner
     Gillibrand
     Graham
     Grassley
     Hatch
     Heinrich
     Heitkamp
     Heller
     Hirono
     Hoeven
     Inhofe
     Isakson
     Johnson
     Kaine
     King
     Kirk
     Klobuchar
     Lankford
     Leahy
     Lee
     Manchin
     Markey
     McCain
     McCaskill
     McConnell
     Menendez
     Merkley
     Mikulski
     Moran
     Murkowski
     Murphy
     Murray
     Nelson
     Paul
     Perdue
     Peters
     Portman
     Reed
     Reid
     Risch
     Roberts
     Rounds
     Sanders
     Sasse
     Schatz
     Schumer
     Scott
     Sessions
     Shaheen
     Shelby
     Stabenow
     Sullivan
     Tester
     Thune
     Tillis
     Toomey
     Udall
     Vitter
     Warner
     Warren
     Whitehouse
     Wicker
     Wyden

                             NOT VOTING--2

     Cruz
     Rubio
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Under the previous order requiring 60 votes 
for the adoption of this amendment, the amendment is agreed to.
  The Senator from North Carolina.
  Mr. BURR. Mr. President, I rise to propound a unanimous consent 
request to call up an amendment, speak briefly, and then be followed by 
Senator Sanders.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Without objection, it is so ordered.
  Under the previous order, the time until 2 p.m. is equally divided in 
the usual form.


                           Amendment No. 1121

  Mr. BURR. Mr. President, I call up amendment No. 1121.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The clerk will report.
  The legislative clerk read as follows:

       The Senator from North Carolina [Mr. Burr] proposes an 
     amendment numbered 1121.

  Mr. BURR. Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that the reading of 
the amendment be dispensed with.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Without objection, it is so ordered.
  The amendment is as follows:

 (Purpose: To require the Secretary of Defense to inform the Attorney 
       General of persons required to register as sex offenders)

       At the end, add the following:

               TITLE __--MILITARY SEX OFFENDER REPORTING

     SEC. ___. SHORT TITLE.

       This title may be cited as the ``Military Sex Offender 
     Reporting Act of 2015''.

     SEC. ___. REGISTRATION OF SEX OFFENDERS RELEASED FROM 
                   MILITARY CORRECTIONS FACILITIES OR UPON 
                   CONVICTION.

       (a) In General.--The Sex Offender Registration and 
     Notification Act is amended by inserting after section 128 
     (42 U.S.C. 16928) the following:

     ``SEC. 128A. REGISTRATION OF SEX OFFENDERS RELEASED FROM 
                   MILITARY CORRECTIONS FACILITIES OR UPON 
                   CONVICTION.

       ``The Secretary of Defense shall provide to the Attorney 
     General the information described in section 114 to be 
     included in the National Sex Offender Registry and the Dru 
     Sjodin National Sex Offender Public Website regarding 
     persons--
       ``(1)(A) released from military corrections facilities; or
       ``(B) convicted if the sentences adjudged by courts-martial 
     under chapter 47 of title 10, United States Code (the Uniform 
     Code of Military Justice), do not include confinement; and
       ``(2) required to register under this title.''.
       (b) Technical and Conforming Amendment.--The table of 
     contents of the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act is 
     amended by inserting after the item relating to section 128 
     the following:

``Sec. 128A. Registration of sex offenders released from military 
              corrections facilities or upon conviction.''.

  Mr. BURR. Mr. President, I wish to speak very briefly on an amendment 
the Senate will have an opportunity to vote on this afternoon.
  Due to the way the Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act is 
currently written, there is a problem with tracking sex offenders 
convicted in a military justice system. Some of these offenders are 
exploiting the cracks in that system.
  My amendment is, quite honestly, a fix to the problem and will help 
authorities and the public better track sex offenders in our 
communities.
  To explain, currently, military sex offenders are only required to 
self-report to a State government after they are released from a 
military correctional facility.
  Under the civilian justice system, sex offenders are registered in 
the State before they are released. The State then provides the 
information to the Department of Justice to be included in both the 
public and the private National Sex Offender Registry, which is where 
the average citizen can go and see if there is a sex offender in their 
neighborhood.
  A Department of Defense inspector general report issued in August of 
last year revealed that an estimated 242 of the 1,312 released sex 
offenders failed to self-report.
  In that inspector general's report, they said:

       The lack of jurisdiction for DOD to register military sex 
     offenders with the National Sex Offender Registry enables 
     military sex offenders released from military prisons to 
     evade sex offender registration requirements.

  I am not sure it can be put any plainer than that.
  The Department of Defense tried to correct the problem by working 
with State authorities and the U.S. Marshals, but underreporting 
continues today.
  Differences in State laws in military reporting procedures enables 
some criminals to totally evade reporting and detection.
  A recent Scripps news report revealed grim examples of the 
consequences of these cracks in the system.
  Consider the recent case of Matthew Carr. The military convicted 
Matthew Carr for posing as a gynecologist. He preyed on seven women. 
After spending 7 years incarcerated, he evaded registration upon his 
release. He assaulted another woman before being apprehended by 
civilian authorities. This assault was preventable in that community, 
but the DOD wasn't required to post him as a sex offender.
  In another case, a former officer served 5 years for sexually 
assaulting 3 minors in the cruelest way possible. He evaded 
registration, and Scripps located this individual living within a mile 
of a school. It is scary, a pedophile living next to a school--and no 
one knew he was there.
  This amendment requires the Department of Defense to communicate a 
criminal's information directly to the Attorney General to improve 
tracking and public notification.
  My amendment is based upon a bipartisan bill, S. 409, that I 
introduced with the support of Senator McCaskill. That bill already has 
the support of 15 of our colleagues: Senators Ayotte, Blunt, Cornyn, 
Cotton, Crapo, Fischer, Rubio, Sessions, Tillis, Toomey, Feinstein, 
King, Mikulski, and Nelson.
  My amendment costs taxpayers nothing, and it is a commonsense 
solution to a real problem that exists.
  I encourage my colleagues this afternoon, when we have an opportunity 
to

[[Page S2321]]

get back into votes, that they support amendment No. 1121.
  I yield the floor to my colleague.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Vermont.


                       Trans-Pacific Partnership

  Mr. SANDERS. Mr. President, I objected to the unanimous consent 
request to waive rule XXVI to allow the Finance Committee to pass a 
fast-track bill because I think it is time we slowed down fast-track.
  This trade agreement, I think everybody acknowledges, is of enormous 
consequence to working people all over this country. We need more 
transparency. We need to know what is in this legislation, and we need 
to involve the American people in this discussion.
  I must say I am extremely disappointed that on a piece of legislation 
which involves 40 percent of the world's economy, that is the largest 
trade agreement in the history of the United States of America, much of 
the major media has virtually ignored this issue.
  Now, you may be for the agreement, you may be against the agreement. 
I am strongly against it--and I will tell you why in a moment, but I 
would hope we could all agree this is an enormously important issue 
that deserves significant discussion on the part of the American people 
and their elected representatives.
  I find it incomprehensible that, to the best of my knowledge, ABC--
the ABC television network--has had zero coverage of the Trans-Pacific 
Partnership, zero; CBS television, zero coverage; NBC, zero coverage. 
PBS has had three mentions of the TPP. CNN has had zero coverage, FOX 
television has had four mentions, and MSNBC--mostly because of the 
excellent work of Ed Schultz--has covered it on 33 occasions, and all 
of this since January of 2015.
  So here we are engaged in a discussion--some people are for it and 
some people are against it--but how do the American people know what is 
going on if the major networks are virtually blocking out any serious 
discussion, any mention of the agreement?
  Supporters of the fast-track bill have told us over and over again 
that unfettered free trade will increase American jobs and increase 
American wages, but they have been proven dead wrong every single time 
we have had a trade agreement. In other words, we hear the same 
rhetoric: vote for NAFTA, vote for CAFTA, vote for the free-trade 
agreement with China. It is going to increase jobs in America, improve 
life for the middle class. Yet every single time the rhetoric around 
these past trade agreements has been proven to be dead wrong.
  I was in the House of Representatives in 1993 and 1994 during the 
debate over NAFTA, the North American Free Trade Agreement. I remember 
all of those people who supported that agreement telling us how NAFTA 
was going to open the Mexican economy for products made in the United 
States of America and how it was going to create all kinds of good-
paying jobs in this country.
  On September 19, 1993, President Bill Clinton said the following:

       I believe that NAFTA will create 200,000 American jobs in 
     the first two years of its effect. . . . I believe that NAFTA 
     will create a million jobs in the first five years of its 
     impact.

  That was President Bill Clinton, who strongly supported that 
agreement.
  But it wasn't only President Clinton who made those claims. The 
Heritage Foundation, one of the most conservative think tanks in this 
country, said in 1993: ``Virtually all economists agree that NAFTA will 
produce a net increase of U.S. jobs over the next decade.'' That is 
from the Heritage Foundation, a conservative think tank.
  Further, during the debate over NAFTA and the Senate in 1993, the 
distinguished Senator from Kentucky, Mitch McConnell, who is now the 
majority leader, said: American firms will not move to Mexico just for 
lower wages.
  That was Senator McConnell. Virtually every major newspaper in 
America had editorials saying: Support NAFTA--the Washington Post, New 
York Times, Wall Street Journal. Support NAFTA; it is good for the 
American worker.
  Well, it turns out that NAFTA, which, of course, was supported by 
every major corporation in America, supported by Wall Street, supported 
by all of the Big Money interests--well, it turns out that all of those 
projections regarding NAFTA turned out to be dead wrong.
  According to the well-respected economists at the Economic Policy 
Institute, NAFTA has led to the loss of more than 680,000 jobs--not the 
creation of 1 million jobs, the loss of 680,000 American jobs.
  In 1993, the year before NAFTA was implemented, the United States had 
a trade surplus with Mexico of more than $1.6 billion. Last year, the 
trade deficit with Mexico was $53 billion.
  I quote what the Economic Policy Institute says about NAFTA:

       [President] Clinton and his collaborators promised [NAFTA] 
     would bring ``good-paying American jobs,'' a rising trade 
     surplus with Mexico, and a dramatic reduction in illegal 
     immigration. Instead, NAFTA directly cost the United States a 
     net loss of 700,000 jobs. The [trade] surplus with Mexico 
     turned into a chronic deficit. And the economic dislocation 
     in Mexico increased the flow of undocumented workers into the 
     United States.

  Further, I quote an article that appeared in the New York Times 
yesterday:

       Mexico has become the most attractive place in North 
     America to build new automobile factories, a shift that has 
     siphoned jobs from the U.S. and Canada. . . . In the past two 
     years, eight automakers have opened or announced new plants 
     or expansions in Mexico. . . . Low labor costs and fewer 
     tariffs are the swing factors.

  That was the New York Times yesterday. In other words, despite all of 
the rhetoric about how this unfettered free-trade agreement with Mexico 
was going to create jobs in this country, it turned out--not too 
surprisingly, I voted against NAFTA--to be exactly the opposite. Those 
people who told us how great the agreement was going to be were dead 
wrong.
  Why were they wrong? Well, for obvious reasons. When you have workers 
in low-wage countries, people who are prepared to work for 50 cents an 
hour, $1 an hour, $2 an hour, it doesn't take a Ph.D. in economics to 
figure out that corporations will shut down in America, move to those 
countries, pay workers pennies an hour--not have to worry about 
environmental regulations, not have to worry about, in some cases, 
trade unions. You don't have to worry about that stuff.
  So what would American corporations do? Of course they would go to 
those countries. That is exactly what they have done.
  I talked for a moment about NAFTA. What about permanent normal trade 
relations with China? I don't think I have to elaborate on the fact 
that when Americans go shopping and they walk into a department store--
just look at the labels. Look at where the products are manufactured. 
Time after time, the products come from China, China, and China.
  As unbelievable as it may sound, back in 1999 and 2000, we were 
told--this is again what we were told--that permanent normal trade 
relations with China would open up the huge Chinese market to all kinds 
of American-made products. The argument was, look, China is the largest 
country in the world. If we can just have an unfettered free-trade 
agreement with them, think about all the products manufactured in 
America that would be sold to the huge population in China.
  That was the argument. I think it is important for the American 
people to hear what the supporters of permanent normal trade relations 
with China--free trade with China--had to say back then and whether 
those arguments turned out to be right. In other words, if we are going 
to look at TPP today and hear what people are saying now, it is 
important to hear what people said about these other free trade 
agreements back then.
  Here is what President Bill Clinton said about PNTR with China back 
in 1999:

       In opening the economy of China, the agreement will create 
     unprecedented opportunities for American farmers, workers and 
     companies to compete successfully in China's market . . . 
     This is a hundred-to-nothing deal for America when it comes 
     to the economic consequences.

  That was President Bill Clinton.
  In addition, this is what the conservative economists at the Cato 
Institute--a very conservative think tank--wrote back in 1999:

       The silliest argument against PNTR is that Chinese imports 
     would overwhelm U.S. industry. In fact, American workers are 
     far

[[Page S2322]]

     more productive than their Chinese counterparts . . . PNTR 
     would create far more export opportunities for American than 
     Chinese concerns.

  In other words, we had a liberal President, President Clinton, saying 
PNTR--free trade--with China would open up great economic opportunities 
in America, create new jobs, and raise wages. We had a conservative 
think tank say exactly the same thing. We had all of corporate America, 
all of Wall Street, all of the big-money interests saying: Oh boy, what 
a great opportunity for the United States. We can create all these 
jobs.
  Well, were they right or were they wrong? I think everybody knows--
the facts are pretty clear--they were, once again, not wrong, they were 
dead wrong. The Economic Policy Institute estimated that PNTR with 
China has led to the net loss of over 2.7 million American jobs. The 
trade deficit with China has increased from $83 billion back in 2001 to 
a recordbreaking $342 billion in 2014. I note that my Republican 
colleagues often talk about our national deficit, which is an important 
issue, but I don't hear much discussion about our huge trade deficit, 
especially with China, which was at $342 billion in 2014.
  After all of the talk on the floor of the Senate and the floor of the 
House, after all of the editorials written in the major newspapers 
throughout our country, after all of the discussion and expositions of 
Wall Street and the big-money interests, it turned out that the trade 
agreement with China was an unmitigated disaster for American workers.
  PNTR was passed in the year 2000. A couple of years later--and this 
kind of tells you everything you need to know about unfettered free 
trade--Jeffrey Immelt, the CEO of General Electric, one of our large 
corporations, was quoted on this subject at an investor meeting 1 year 
after China was admitted to the World Trade Organization, and this is 
what Mr. Immelt said:

       When I am talking to GE managers, I talk China, China, 
     China, China, China. You need to be there. You need to change 
     the way people talk about it and how they get there. I am a 
     nut on China. Outsourcing from China is going to grow to $5 
     billion. We are building a tech center in China. Every 
     discussion today has to center on China. The cost basis is 
     extremely attractive. You can take an 18 cubic foot 
     refrigerator, make it in China, land it in the United States, 
     and land it for less than we can make an 18 cubic foot 
     refrigerator today ourselves.

  What Mr. Immelt was saying is what virtually every major corporation 
CEO was thinking, and it is not hard to understand why. In China, wages 
are very, very low. Environmental regulations are almost nonexistent. 
It is hard to find a trade union to negotiate for workers. Why wouldn't 
a company shut down in America and run to China? And that is exactly, 
of course, what they have done.
  Before PNTR with China passed, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce told us 
it would create jobs. But just a few years later, on July 1, 2004, the 
Associated Press ran an article with the headline ``Chamber of Commerce 
leader advocates offshoring of jobs.'' The article quotes Thomas 
Donohue, the president and CEO, who, by the way, just yesterday was 
before the Senate Committee on Finance advocating for the Trans-Pacific 
Partnership. This is what the AP article said back in 2004:

       Mr. Donohue urged American companies to send jobs overseas 
     as a way to boost American competitiveness . . . Donohue said 
     that exporting high-paid tech jobs to low-cost countries such 
     as India, China and Russia saves companies money.

  So the dirty secret is that of course these guys like these free-
trade agreements--not because they are going to create jobs in America. 
No one seriously believes that. When they are honest about it, they 
understand and they say that if companies shut down plants in America, 
throw millions of people onto the streets in this country and move 
abroad--when they do that, their profits go up. And they are right. I 
give them credit for that. That is right. That is what unfettered free 
trade has meant in this country.
  And on and on it goes. It is not just Mr. Immelt, the head of General 
Electric; it is not just Mr. Donohue, the head of the chamber of 
commerce; it is major corporation after major corporation. It is Wall 
Street. It is all of the moneyed interests. Before the agreement, they 
tell us as part of the discussion how many good jobs NAFTA is going to 
create, how many good jobs free trade with China will create, how many 
good jobs the Korean trade agreement will create. After the agreement, 
word comes out: Hey, this is a good opportunity. Shut down in America, 
go abroad, pay people pennies an hour, and bring your products back 
into this country.
  In 2011, we were told we just had to pass the South Korea Free Trade 
Agreement because of all the jobs it would create. Same arguments--
another free-trade agreement that is going to be great for the American 
worker. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce told us this free-trade agreement 
could create some 280,000 jobs in America. Instead, the South Korea 
Free Trade Agreement has led to the loss of some 60,000 jobs and the 
trade deficit with our country has gone from $16.6 billion in 2012 to 
$25 billion in 2014.
  Now the administration, Wall Street, and the largest corporations in 
this country are saying: Trust us. Forget about everything we said 
about all of these other trade agreements. Yeah, maybe we were wrong on 
NAFTA. Maybe we were wrong on CAFTA. Maybe we were wrong on the China 
Free Trade Agreement. Maybe we were wrong on the South Korea Free Trade 
Agreement. But trust us, on the Trans-Pacific Partnership, it is 
different. This one really, really, really--cross our fingers--really 
is going to be different.
  This one will support about, they say, some 650,000 American jobs. 
You know, it is one thing to be fooled once. It is another thing to be 
fooled twice. It is another thing to be fooled three times. But there 
comes a point where the American people are catching on that one of the 
reasons why the middle class of this country is disappearing, one of 
the reasons why most or many of the new jobs being created are low wage 
and part time, one of the reasons why real inflation-accounted-for 
wages for American workers has plummeted is because of these disastrous 
free-trade agreements. So you can fool me once. You can fool me twice. 
Maybe I am dumb and you can fool me three times. But there does come a 
limit to how many times you think you can fool the American people.
  When we talk about why the middle class of this country has been in 
decline for the last 40 years, one of the important reasons is that 
since 2001 we have lost nearly 60,000 factories in this country. Over 
that same time period, we have lost over 4.7 million manufacturing 
jobs. In 1970, 25 percent of all jobs in the United States were 
manufacturing jobs. Today, that number is just 9 percent. In January of 
2001, there were 17.1 million manufacturing workers in this country. 
Today, there are only 12.3 million manufacturing workers.
  In my small State of Vermont, we have lost 34 percent of our 
manufacturing jobs over the past 14 years. In January of 2001, Vermont 
had 47,000 factory jobs. Last February, it was down to 30,700. And that 
is true for virtually every State in this country.
  Why is this significant? It is significant because historically 
manufacturing jobs paid the highest wages available to blue-collar 
workers. If you had a job at a manufacturing plant, if you had a union, 
the likelihood was that you would earn decent wages, have decent 
benefits, and you could actually support your family. You earned the 
wages that enabled you to take good care of your family. With the 
decline of manufacturing, what has happened is we have seen a huge 
increase in service industry jobs--McDonald's, Walmart--where wages are 
low, benefits are nil, and American workers who work there are having a 
hard time surviving economically. Manufacturing goes down, people lose 
their jobs, wages go down, and new jobs are being created that pay 
significantly less than the jobs people used to have.
  The fact is that TPP is just a new and easy way for corporations to 
ship jobs overseas and force Americans to compete with low-wage workers 
in Vietnam and other countries. The minimum wage in Vietnam is 56 cents 
an hour. What this trade agreement says to American workers is, you are 
now competing against people who in some cases will be working for 56 
cents an hour. I think that is grossly unfair. We should not force 
American workers into a race to the bottom.

[[Page S2323]]

  Let's be clear. The TPP is much more than a free-trade agreement; it 
is part of a global race to the bottom to boost the profits of large, 
multinational corporations and Wall Street by outsourcing jobs, 
undercutting workers' rights, dismantling labor, environmental, health, 
food safety, and financial laws, and allowing corporations to challenge 
our laws in international tribunals rather than our own court system.
  The TPP is poised to be the largest free-trade agreement in history, 
encompassing 12 nations that account for roughly 40 percent of the 
global economy. That is why it has been referred to as ``NAFTA on 
steroids.''
  Incredibly, while Wall Street, the pharmaceutical industry, and major 
media companies have full knowledge as to what is in this treaty, the 
American people and Members of Congress do not. They have been locked 
out of the process. While the full text of the TPP has not been made 
public, there have been some leaks of what is included in it, and what 
I have seen is very disturbing.
  It has been estimated by outside experts that the United States would 
lose more than 130,000 jobs to Vietnam and Japan alone if the TPP goes 
into effect. But that is just the tip of the iceberg. At a time when 
corporations have already outsourced over 3 million service sector jobs 
that were in the United States, the TPP includes rules that will make 
it even easier for corporate America to outsource call centers, 
computer programming, engineering, accounting, and medical diagnostic 
jobs. So these are not just manufacturing jobs; these are all kinds of 
other jobs which, if they can be done cheaper in other countries, will 
be sent there.
  Under TPP, Vietnamese companies would be able to compete with 
American companies for Federal contracts funded by U.S. taxpayers, 
undermining American laws. The TPP will undermine U.S. sovereignty by 
giving foreign corporations the right to challenge any law in this 
country that threatens their expected future profits before 
international tribunals. In other words, if we pass an increase in the 
minimum wage, under the TPP, Vietnamese companies that invest in 
America could sue the United States in an international court full of 
corporate lawyers if they believe it will hurt their profits. By the 
way, that is what this whole agreement is about--maximizing the 
investment profits of corporations from the United States and all over 
the world.
  If localities--local governments, state governments, federal 
governments--stand up and say: You know what, we want to protect 
health, and we want to protect the environment--if that impinges on the 
future profits of the corporation, it can take legal action against 
that local, state, or federal agency. That may sound kind of crazy, but 
that is exactly what has already happened in Egypt after it signed a 
free-trade agreement with France. In 2012, a French utility company 
sued Egypt in an international tribunal for 82 million euros. And what 
was Egypt's crime? For what were they being sued? They were being sued 
because they had increased their minimum wage, among other things. The 
French company saw raising the minimum wage for Egyptian workers--which 
is very low--as an impingement on their ability to make profits.
  Further, large pharmaceutical companies are working hard to ensure 
that the TPP extends the monopolies for their prescription drugs by 
extending patents that already can last for 20 years or more. Doctors 
Without Borders--a heroic organization of doctors who go to some of the 
most difficult, the poorest, the most dangerous parts of this world to 
treat people who desperately need medical care--they are very brave 
people. They wrote that ``the TPP agreement is on track to become the 
most harmful trade pact ever for access to medicines in developing 
countries.'' In other words, what the big pharmaceutical industry wants 
is for countries all over the world to have to pay top dollar for 
prescription drugs. They want to be able to maintain their patents for 
as long as possible and prevent those drugs from going generic, where 
the prices would be significantly lower. The problem is that people in 
poor countries cannot pay a lot of money for their prescription drugs. 
So if this agreement goes through and the pharmaceutical industry can 
force poor countries to pay high prices for prescription drugs, people 
will suffer and people will die.
  After one disastrous trade agreement after another, I think it is 
time for the American people and their elected officials to reassess 
how we do trade in America. It is time to say we need trade agreements 
that work for working people in this country and not just trade 
agreements that work for the CEOs of large, multinational corporations. 
It is time to say to corporate America: If you want us to purchase your 
products, it is time you started manufacturing those products here in 
the United States and not in low-wage countries all over the world.
  The evidence is overwhelming. For decades, our trade policies have 
been responsible for lowering the standard of living of tens of 
millions of Americans. People today all over this country are working 
longer hours for lower wages. Most of the new jobs being created are 
low-wage jobs, and many of them are part-time jobs.
  We need to rebuild our manufacturing sector. To do that, we need a 
fundamental revision in our trade policies. NAFTA has failed. CAFTA has 
failed. Permanent normal trade relations with China has failed. The 
Korea trade agreement has failed. It is basically insane to keep going 
with the same type of trade policy that has failed and failed and 
failed.
  I hope very much that here in the Senate and in the House we can 
defeat this TPP and come back to the table and develop a trade 
agreement that works for American workers, works for people all over 
the world, and not continue these disastrous trade agreements.
  I yield the floor.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER (Mrs. Ernst). The Senator from Montana.
  Mr. DAINES. Madam President, I am glad that today the Senate will 
take the long-overdue step forward and approve the Justice for Victims 
of Trafficking Act--bipartisan legislation that I am proud to be a 
cosponsor of that will help victims of human trafficking.
  Montanans know firsthand the immeasurable damage human trafficking 
has inflicted on our communities, our schools, and, most of all, the 
victims of these horrific crimes. We also know the importance of coming 
together to support the victims of this modern-day slavery.
  Too often, victims of human trafficking are underserved and fail to 
get the resources they so desperately need. This important bill will 
provide our law enforcement officials and the communities with the 
necessary tools to help lift these innocent victims out of the shadows.
  Montanans understand the importance of cracking down on the 
perpetrators of these crimes and ensuring that we are serving as an 
advocate for victims--without letting partisan politics get in the way.
  I strongly urge all of my colleagues to come together today and do 
what is right for the victims of human trafficking and pass the Justice 
for Victims of Trafficking Act.
  I yield the floor.
  I suggest the absence of a quorum.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The clerk will call the roll.
  The senior assistant legislative clerk proceeded to call the roll.
  Mr. NELSON. Madam President, I ask unanimous consent that the order 
for the quorum call be rescinded.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Without objection, it is so ordered.


                            Airport Security

  Mr. NELSON. Madam President, our Nation's airports are not secure. We 
were rudely awakened to that fact last December when it was discovered 
that for a several-month period at the Atlanta Airport, employees of 
the airport--one in particular--since there was limited, if any, 
screening of the airport employees coming into the airport, had 
concocted a scheme with another fellow to transport guns to New York, 
where they were sold on the streets of Brooklyn.
  The police couldn't figure out how in the world they were getting 
these guns to New York because they kept watching the roads. It was in 
plain sight. What they were using were the defects in airport 
security--if you can believe this--to bring guns to the Atlanta 
Airport. Then once at the airport, the airport employee would go up to 
the sterile passenger area, where, in the restroom, he would meet a 
passenger who

[[Page S2324]]

came through security with an empty backpack and transfer the guns he 
had brought onto the airport property to the passenger, who then would 
take them on the flight from Atlanta to New York.
  This went on for several months. This passenger even carried a 
carbine. When he was arrested in December, he had 16 handguns in his 
backpack on the airplane. It is a good thing these guys were criminals 
and not terrorists because you can imagine--this is exactly what we are 
trying to prevent: weapons getting on airplanes.
  Interestingly, when I got into this from the position of having the 
privilege of being the ranking member of the commerce committee, where 
we have jurisdiction over aviation, lo and behold, what I discovered in 
my own State is that two airports had already solved the problem by 
increasing security. The security we as passengers go through--they 
have similar security for all airport employees. The first one to do 
that was Miami International Airport back in 1999 after they discovered 
a drug-smuggling ring. Instead of having hundreds of entry points into 
the airport for employees, what they had was boiled down to a handful, 
where they screen the employees. It was then inaugurated by the Orlando 
International Airport after 2007 when they discovered a drug-smuggling 
ring, and Orlando has boiled it down to about five entry points for 
airline employees. I went through those entry points at both Orlando 
and Miami, and it is not only what we go through as passengers, but 
they also have to double-check that the person is who they say they 
are. They have their badge. The airport employee checks the photograph 
on the badge with the person, and they swipe the card. In the case of 
the Orlando Airport, they also have to punch in an identification 
number.
  That seems to have solved the problem at those two huge airports, 
Orlando and Miami, but what about the other 448 commercial airports in 
the United States? Are they going to be the victims? Are we, the 
American traveling public, going to be the victims like they were in 
Atlanta?
  In this age of terrorism, we cannot afford any of those mistakes. We 
have been after the Department of Homeland Security and TSA to start 
changing this. The Department of Homeland Security Secretary just 
announced that they will take immediate steps to increase the screening 
of airport employees across the country because they indeed understand 
this is a problem. They are going to have a comprehensive review. They 
are not saying they are going to require what Orlando and Miami do, but 
at the end of the day, they are going to have to end up doing that.
  We have to simplify the system by boiling down the hundreds of entry 
points to just a few, and then we have to put up screening devices 
similar to the ones passengers go through to go into a sterile 
environment.
  I am very grateful to Secretary Johnson for calling on TSA to start 
this immediate inquiry and to have some action. I hope the increased 
attention to this matter now will get airports and airport employees 
more highly sensitized to what had been such a breach at the Atlanta 
Airport. If we can do this, then it will be another measure we can take 
to make sure the public is traveling safely.
  I yield the floor.
  I suggest the absence of a quorum.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The clerk will call the roll.
  The senior assistant legislative clerk proceeded to call the roll.
  Mr. COTTON. Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that the order for 
the quorum call be rescinded.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER (Mr. Tillis). Without objection, it is so 
ordered.


                   United States-Canada Relationship

  Mr. COTTON. Mr. President, in 1941, in an address delivered at an 
event in honor of the Canadian Prime Minister, Winston Churchill 
famously declared, ``Canada is the linchpin of the English-speaking 
world.'' As with most things, Churchill was able to see deeper truths 
and recognize Canada for what it really is. Today, I wish to recognize 
the close and vital relationship between the United States and Canada, 
our great neighbor to the north. Canada is a critical partner to both 
America and Arkansas. We ought to find every way to strengthen our 
relationship and avoid every possible trouble on the horizon.
  The bond between the United States and Canada starts with our common 
heritage and our common way of life, including individuals rights, 
constitutional democracy, the rule of law, open markets, and the 
defense of freedom around the world. Canada has stood with the United 
States in our toughest hours to defend our common way of life. Canadian 
troops fought alongside our GIs on D-day at Juno Beach, where 1 in 
every 13 Canadians perished. After the 9/11 attacks, Canada was one of 
the first countries to join our campaign in Afghanistan, where 158 
brave Canadians died on the battlefield--the rough equivalent of 1,400 
American troops. As with our own soldiers, we honor their ultimate 
sacrifice and entrust their families to the tender care of a loving 
providence.
  Canada has also been a willing partner in many other security and 
humanitarian operations around the globe, including Libya, Haiti, and 
the NATO-led stabilization force in Bosnia-Herzegovina in the 1990s. 
Moreover, Canada is part of the Five Eyes intelligence partnership, 
which has its roots in World War II. This partnership is vital to our 
national security, helping, for example, to disrupt a 2013 Al Qaeda-
associated plot to derail a train traveling between New York and 
Canada. If successful, this attack could have killed dozens, perhaps 
even hundreds.
  Canada and the United States also share the world's longest border--
and the world's longest peaceful border. Over 300,000 people cross our 
shared border every day by every mode of transport. Americans too often 
forget ours is the most secure and mutually beneficial international 
relationship among nations, taking for granted our peaceful partner to 
the north. Our success as the global superpower and the ability to 
protect our interests and global stability depends heavily on our 
peaceful and productive relationship with Canada. Without it, the New 
World would not be able to project power into the Old.
  Our relationship with Canada is indeed productive, as Canada has 
remained our best and most important trading partner. Last year, $759 
billion in goods and services moved between Canada and the United 
States. To put that into perspective, Canada purchased more goods from 
the United States than did all 28 members of the European Union 
combined and 2\1/2\ times more than did China. These purchases included 
everything from raw materials to paper produced in Ashdown, rice milled 
in Stuttgart, and construction hardware manufactured in Blytheville.
  Moreover, Canada is the largest supplier of energy to the United 
States. In January, in fact, the United States imported more oil from 
Canada than all OPEC countries combined, and Canada produces 97 percent 
of all U.S. natural gas imports. Of course, these numbers would be even 
greater if President Obama would finally approve the Keystone XL 
Pipeline which would also create thousands of high-paying American and 
Canadian jobs.
  Arkansas, like America as a whole, has benefited immensely from our 
close ties to Canada. Agricultural products, iron and steel produced in 
Arkansas factories, and countless other products manufactured in the 
natural state find their way to our friends in the north, providing 
Arkansans with good customers and good jobs. Indeed, Canada is 
Arkansas' No. 1 foreign customer and 66,000 Arkansas jobs depend on 
United States-Canada trade and investment, which totals $2.3 billion 
every year.
  Some of Arkansas' most recognizable names reflect these Arkansas-
Canada ties. Murphy Oil, headquartered in El Dorado, has operated in 
Canada for over 60 years, producing oil and natural gas through stakes 
in several projects off the coast of Newfoundland and in Alberta and 
British Columbia. Walmart has also had a strong presence in Canada for 
over 20 years. Today, they employ over 90,000 Canadians across nearly 
400 retail stores. Tyson and Skippy Peanut Butter are just two of the 
household names produced in Arkansas that are pantry staples in Canada. 
With agricultural products making up nearly 20 percent of Arkansas' 
exports to Canada, Arkansas' ranchers and farmers help round out 
Canada's pantries and freezers.
  Given these warm, longstanding ties to Canada, my team and I have 
worked

[[Page S2325]]

closely with the Canadian Embassy during my time in Congress to promote 
and strengthen our relationship. Unfortunately, the Obama 
administration at times has impeded it. The Keystone Pipeline, for 
instance, is not just good for American jobs but also a critical 
project for Canada's economy. Yet President Obama dismissed it as mere 
Canadian oil from Canadian companies--cavalier comments that minimize 
the pipeline's benefits for American workers, while also manifesting a 
casual disregard for our close ally's interests.
  Now we are seeing this neglect again with country-of-origin labeling 
requirements for meat products processed in the United States which 
threaten to disrupt trade between our two countries. These so-called 
COOL regulations needlessly require different labeling for products 
born, raised or slaughtered in either country. Today, processors are 
forced to either operate two production lines to keep their Canadian-
born or raised cattle separate from those born and raised in the United 
States or maintain extensive records on where each head of cattle came 
from. These regulations unduly burden Canadian producers and American 
processors while also violating our treaty obligations. Yet they 
deliver little value to consumers.
  Yet, despite multiple adverse rulings from the World Trade 
Organization, the administration continues to pursue appeals, a process 
which is expected to end next month. As a result of these trade 
barriers and WTO rulings, Canada may be forced to impose reciprocal 
trade barriers on American products. Unfortunately, products already 
targeted for trade barriers include Arkansas rice, poultry, grains, and 
beef. If the administration does not relent, nearly $130 million in 
Arkansas agricultural trade with Canada will be threatened--more than 
half our State's annual total.
  We should put a stop now to this trade dispute that no one intended 
and no one wants. I stand ready to work with my fellow Senators and the 
administration to modify the labeling requirements at the earliest 
opportunity following a final WTO ruling. It will be good for Arkansas' 
farmers and ranchers, good for American consumers, and good for the 
health of the United States-Canada partnership. Let's work together to 
fix this problem, protect American jobs, and help our neighbor to the 
north remain our linchpin in the world.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Iowa.


           Commemorating National Crime Victims' Rights Week

  Mr. GRASSLEY. Mr. President, we have commemorated National Crime 
Victims' Rights Week every April since 1981. This year it takes place 
from April 19 through April 25.
  This week is dedicated to remembering victims of crime, building 
awareness, and advocating for victims' rights. It is also an 
opportunity to pay tribute to the millions of Americans and thousands 
of Iowans who fall victim to senseless acts of crime each year.
  On Monday I introduced a bipartisan resolution commemorating National 
Crime Victims' Rights Week, and I am happy that my colleagues have 
joined me by unanimously passing this resolution this morning.
  The theme for this week, ``Engaging Communities. Empowering 
Victims,'' recognizes the importance of offering the support necessary 
to help crime survivors heal.
  During this week we also remember the contributions of the countless 
crisis hotline volunteers and staff, victims' rights attorneys, medical 
professionals, and emergency responders who provide critical assistance 
to survivors of crime every hour, every day in communities across the 
United States.
  The Judiciary Committee has worked to strengthen Federal laws and 
direct resources to efforts to prevent crime from occurring in the 
first place. And, although we still have a way to go to ensure that all 
crime survivors are treated with appropriate fairness and respect in 
the criminal justice system, I am proud that we have made important 
strides toward this goal.
  An important issue for many crime victims is restitution. It is an 
issue that would be addressed by the ``Amy and Vicky Child Pornography 
Victim Restitution Improvement Act,'' a bill introduced by Senator 
Hatch that has my strong support.
  The Judiciary Committee, of which I serve as chairman, reported this 
bill on February 5. If enacted, the measure, which passed the full 
Senate by a vote of 98-0 on February 11, would reverse a Supreme Court 
decision that limits the amount of restitution that victims of child 
pornography can recover from any one perpetrator.
  It would ensure that victims can recover a minimum amount of damages 
for certain child pornography offenses, and it also would make any 
single perpetrator potentially responsible for the full damages that 
result from an offense involving multiple perpetrators.
  Americans also deserve to know that we are doing everything possible 
to prevent sexual assault, especially in our most acclaimed 
institutions of society, including college campuses and our Nation's 
military. In fact, a zero tolerance standard needs to be set at the 
highest levels of the Federal government.
  Take, for example, the lack of accountability within some of our 
Nation's Federal law enforcement entities. In the last few years, a 
string of sex scandals involving prostitutes being solicited by public 
servants working for the FBI, Secret Service and, most recently, the 
Drug Enforcement Administration reflect an embarrassing lack of ethics 
and moral code of conduct by Federal agents hired to flush out illicit 
criminal activity at home and abroad.
  It should go without saying that this type of conduct by Federal law 
enforcement personnel--on or off the clock--cannot be tolerated. This 
behavior telegraphs the wrong message about acceptable sexual conduct 
to society and contributes to the demand for the human sex trade around 
the world.
  I supported the enactment of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act 
of 2000, and earlier this year I chaired a Senate Judiciary Committee 
hearing on human trafficking, where witnesses discussed the 
consequences of sex trafficking for both child and adult victims.
  The witnesses at this hearing, which took place on February 24, 2015, 
also testified in support of several measures that would help us 
further combat the various forms of human trafficking in the United 
States.
  One of these measures is the Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act 
which is now pending on the Senate floor, and of which I am a 
cosponsor.
  It is vitally important that we pass this legislation, which would 
authorize much needed services to victims of child pornography as well 
as labor and sex trafficking.
  The bill also equips law enforcement with new tools for prosecuting 
human trafficking offenses and recognizes that the production of child 
pornography is a form of human trafficking.
  Also, earlier this year, I introduced the Combating Human Trafficking 
Act. Among other things, the bill would clarify that Federal grant 
resources can be used to meet the housing needs of human trafficking 
victims and offer training on the effects of sex trafficking to those 
who offer services to runaway, homeless, and at-risk youth.
  I led the Judiciary Committee in supporting the inclusion of this 
legislation as an amendment to the Justice for Victims of Trafficking 
Act during committee consideration of that bill.
  The committee accepted the measure by voice vote on February 26. The 
committee reported the bill to the Senate floor by a vote of 19-0.
  I am grateful we have been able to reach an agreement that will 
finally allow a vote on this very important legislation, and I look 
forward to casting my vote in favor of this bill.
  Our next challenge should be to address the two broken systems of 
justice found on our college campuses and within our military 
institutions. First, a flawed reporting system on college campuses 
requires a stronger set of tools that would help survivors of sexual 
assault as well as protect the rights of the accused. That is why I 
have cosponsored the ``Campus Accountability and Safety Act'' with 
Senator McCaskill.
  It would establish new campus resources and support services for 
students, including: a requirement that colleges designate a 
confidential advisor for survivors of sexual violence; new transparency 
and reporting requirements; coordination between colleges and local law 
enforcement; and

[[Page S2326]]

protections for due process rights of survivors and the accused.
  It would also increase financial penalties for colleges found not in 
compliance with the new standards.
  Cases of sexual assault, which too often go unreported on college 
campuses and in our own communities, require sustained, collective 
attention by policymakers, law enforcement, advocates, and survivors.
  Every student who heads off to a college campus in America deserves 
to know that there is a system in place to secure justice and due 
process for the victim and the accused.
  Likewise, every young man and woman who serves his or her country in 
uniform deserves to know that sexual assault is a crime and will be 
treated and prosecuted as such.
  In the last Congress, I cosponsored the bipartisan ``Military Justice 
Improvement Act'' with Senator Gillibrand.
  The bill would empower enlisted soldiers and sailors to come forward 
and report a sexual crime.
  It would create an independent system of justice within the ranks of 
the military.
  It would remove the chain of command from prosecutorial decisions 
regarding sexual assault.
  The fear of retaliation and retribution in the military has been a 
reality for too many survivors of sexual assault. The current system 
has created an environment that emboldens predators instead of 
empowering victims.
  Barring access to fair and impartial justice pours salt in the wounds 
of those who have suffered immeasurable indignity and harm while 
serving their country in uniform. I will continue working to advance 
bipartisan measures through Congress to send a clear message. Sexual 
assault is a crime.
  The sooner our culture and systems of justice on college campuses and 
in the Nation's military work together to deter, prosecute, and stop 
sexual violence, the safer our society will be for America's sons and 
daughters growing up in the 21st century.
  In closing, crime victims and survivors in the United States deserve 
our assistance in helping them cope with the often devastating 
consequences of crime. That is why it is so important that we support 
the mission and goals of National Crime Victims' Rights Week.
  Mr. President, I thank my colleagues for joining me in supporting 
passage of this resolution.


                     Amendment No. 273, as Modified

  Mr. President, for the leader, I ask unanimous consent to set aside 
the pending amendment in order to call up amendment No. 273 with the 
changes that are at the desk.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Without objection, it is so ordered.
  The clerk will report.
  The legislative clerk read as follows:

       The Senator from Iowa [Mr. Grassley], for Mr. Kirk, for 
     himself and Mrs. Feinstein, proposes an amendment numbered 
     273, as modified.

  Mr. GRASSLEY. Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that the reading 
of the amendment be dispensed with.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Without objection, it is so ordered.
  The amendment is as follows:

 (Purpose: To amend title 18, United States Code, to provide a penalty 
 for knowingly selling advertising that offers certain commercial sex 
                                 acts)

       At the appropriate place, add the following:

     SECTION __. SAVE ACT.

       (a) Short Title.--This section may be cited as the ``Stop 
     Advertising Victims of Exploitation Act of 2015'' or the 
     ``SAVE Act of 2015''.
       (b) Advertising That Offers Certain Commercial Acts.--
       (1) In general.--Section 1591(a)(1) of title 18, United 
     States Code, as amended by this Act, is further amended by 
     inserting ``advertises,'' after ``obtains,''.
       (2) Mens rea requirement.--Section 1591(a) of title 18, 
     United States Code, is amended in the undesignated matter 
     following paragraph (2), by inserting ``, except where the 
     act constituting the violation of paragraph (1) is 
     advertising,'' after ``knowing, or''.
       (3) Conforming amendments.--Section 1591(b) of title 18, 
     United States Code, as amended by this Act, is further 
     amended--
       (A) in paragraph (1), by inserting ``advertised,'' after 
     ``obtained,''; and
       (B) in paragraph (2), by inserting ``advertised,'' after 
     ``obtained,''.

  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Arizona.
  Mr. FLAKE. Mr. President, I am pleased to be able to speak in support 
of my amendment No. 294 to the Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act. 
It is important as part of our duties as stewards of the taxpayer money 
to ensure that the Federal Government is running as efficiently as 
possible. This is rooting out waste, duplications, and overlap where we 
find it in the Federal Government and in these programs.
  This amendment simply requires the GAO--the Government Accountability 
Office--to study the programs and initiatives which are affected by 
this bill and those which are related to services for trafficking 
victims and other victims services. In particular, the amendment 
directs GAO to look for duplication and overlap and requires GAO to 
issue a report to Congress describing costs associated with them and to 
make recommendations on how to achieve cost savings.
  I do support this legislation. I voted for it when it was considered 
by the Judiciary Committee. It is incumbent upon us to ensure that 
other programs that are affected by this legislation are studied to 
make sure we don't have duplication, that we don't have other programs 
that are doing the same things. We need to make sure we are good 
stewards of the taxpayers' money. The GAO has considerable experience 
of this kind to do this type of analysis.
  I look forward to having support for this amendment, and I ask my 
colleagues to support it.
  Mr. President, I suggest the absence of a quorum.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The clerk will call the roll.
  The legislative clerk proceeded to call the roll.
  Ms. KLOBUCHAR. Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that the order 
for the quorum call be rescinded.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Without objection, it is so ordered.
  Ms. KLOBUCHAR. Mr. President, I come to the Senate floor to thank my 
colleagues and to ask for their support for our first amendment, 
Klobuchar amendment No. 296. I understand it is going to be by voice 
vote, and it is something I have worked on for a long time.
  I know everyone has put a lot of effort into this bill--certainly 
Senator Cornyn and I have--and we are very pleased that it is moving 
forward. I thank all my colleagues for their work.
  This afternoon, I know we will be considering a number of important 
amendments, and, as I mentioned, one is the safe harbor legislation. I 
think we have 26 cosponsors on the bill.
  Let's first get to why we are doing this bill. The United Nations 
considers human trafficking to be one of the three largest criminal 
enterprises in the world. The first is illegal trafficking of drugs, 
the second is illegal trafficking of guns, and the third is illegal 
trafficking of humans. It is not just something, as we know, that is 
happening in faraway lands. It happens in our own backyards. It has 
happened to 12-year-olds in my own State. As Senator Heitkamp knows, it 
happens in the oil patches of North Dakota. That is why this bill and 
this amendment No. 296, which passed with the bill unanimously through 
the Judiciary Committee, are so important.
  This is about treating the children who are victims of these crimes 
as victims because that is what they are. Right now, in many States 
around the country, these kids can still be prosecuted.
  In a State such as mine, the State of Minnesota, we have in place a 
safe harbor law that has been very effective. Why? One, it gives the 
kids the services they need, whether it is through child protection, 
whether it is housing, whether it is getting the kind of medical care 
they need. That is what our bill does. On the other hand, if you just 
prosecute these kids, do you actually think they are going to turn 
against the person running the sex ring? Are they going to turn against 
the pimp? No. They are going to go right back into the hands of the 
person they were with--the perpetrator--to begin with. In our State, we 
have had a lot of success with this safe harbor law. We have obtained 
one of the longest sentences ever--40 years--against someone who was 
running a sex ring because we give help to the victims of the crime.
  As I said, there are 26 of my colleagues across the Senate who have 
cosponsored the bill. It has been an honor to work on the issue with 
Samantha Power, the U.S. Ambassador to the

[[Page S2327]]

United Nations, and Cindy McCain, wife of our colleague Senator McCain. 
Senator Heitkamp, Cindy McCain, and I went down to Mexico to talk with 
them about the partnership we have in going after these cases.
  The amendment has the support of the National Conference of State 
Legislatures, the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, 
the Fraternal Order of Police, Shared Hope International, and the 
National Alliance to End Sexual Violence.
  As I said, this bill and this amendment simply create an incentive 
for States across the country to enact a safe harbor law. Fifteen 
States already have these laws. Another 12 States are making progress 
in that direction. The House passed a similar bill last year under the 
leadership of Erik Paulsen, one of the Congressmen from Minnesota.
  Secondly, in addition to creating an incentive for these States to 
enact safe harbor laws, the bill also creates a national strategy to 
combat human trafficking. The national strategy will encourage 
cooperation and coordination among all the agencies that work on this 
problem--Federal, State, tribal, and local. That is a major part of the 
bill, and it wasn't in the House bill. We think it is very important.
  The bill also gives sex trafficking victims the right support they 
need. It qualifies them for job-training programs. The bill allows 
victims of sex trafficking to participate in the Job Corps program to 
help them get back on their feet.
  Senator Cornyn, who is the lead Republican on this amendment, and I 
were pleased to include a provision that Senators Whitehouse and 
Sessions have been working on to clarify the authority of the U.S. 
Marshals Service to assist local law enforcement agencies in locating 
missing children.
  That is what the amendment does. There are incentives for the safe 
harbor laws we have already seen in 15 States. There is a national sex 
trafficking strategy, which is something we dearly need as we see an 
increase in these kinds of crimes. It qualifies victims of these crimes 
for job-training programs. Finally, there is a provision to make it 
easier for the U.S. Marshals Service to assist local law enforcement, a 
measure proposed by Senator Whitehouse and Senator Sessions which is 
included in this amendment and which came through the committee.
  I want to end by telling you what this is about. It is about a 12-
year-old girl in Rochester who got a text message. The text message 
said she was invited to a party. The text said to go meet in a parking 
lot. She went there, and then she was thrown into a car, brought up to 
the Twin Cities, raped by a man, then sold on craigslist, sold for sex, 
and raped by two other men. Finally, weeks later, the guy who did this 
was found, and he is being prosecuted federally.
  That is what this is about. These are serious crimes. The average age 
of a victim is 12 years old--not even old enough to go to a high school 
prom, not old enough to get a driver's license.
  Again, I thank Senator Cornyn for his work. We worked together on 
both the bill as well as this amendment we are considering today. This 
has been a lot of work the last month, but I am so pleased we are 
advancing this important trafficking bill.
  I see that the Senator from Maine is here. She has also been a leader 
in this area.
  Thank you, Mr. President.
  I yield the floor.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Maine.
  Ms. COLLINS. Thank you, Mr. President.
  First, let me commend Senator Cornyn and Senator Klobuchar for the 
work they have done on this antitrafficking bill.
  This is, in fact, a horrendous crime. Just a few months ago in my 
home State, in Bangor, a couple was arrested for allegedly trafficking 
a 13-year-old girl. That is what we are talking about, and that is why 
this legislation is so important.
  I am proud to be a cosponsor of the bill, and I commend Senator 
Cornyn and Senator Klobuchar and others for working so hard on it.
  The antitrafficking bill deals with the law enforcement piece of this 
horrendous problem. But we also need to pay attention to prevention 
programs. That is why this afternoon we will vote on a proposal that 
Senator Leahy and I, along with Senators Heitkamp, Ayotte, Murkowski, 
and Baldwin, have put forth to reauthorize the Runaway and Homeless 
Youth Act programs, which already have expired. They expired in 2013.

  These are absolutely critical programs for preventing homeless youth 
and runaway youth from ending up in the hands of sex traffickers. The 
runaway and homeless youth programs are comprised of three programs: 
the Street Outreach Program, the Basic Center Program, and the 
Transitional Living Program. They have helped thousands of our homeless 
youth meet their immediate needs and provided long-term residential 
services for those who, sadly, cannot be reunited with their families.
  The amendment that we are offering complements the underlying bill by 
addressing prevention, intervention, and recovery service for 
trafficking victims, particularly among the most vulnerable 
population--our homeless youth.
  According to a 2013 report by the Institute of Medicine and the 
National Research Council, homelessness is one of the most common risk 
factors for sex trafficking. Without access to food, shelter, and 
social supports, homeless young people often turn to what is termed 
``survival sex;'' that is, a way to trade sex for a place to sleep, for 
food, and for other basic necessities.
  Another recent report found that one in four homeless youth are 
victims of sex trafficking or engage in survival sex. Our amendment 
strengthens the existing programs by ensuring that service providers 
know how to identify trafficking victims and give these youth the 
support they need. In many cases these services can prevent these 
homeless and runaway youth from becoming victims in the first place.
  In Maine, our homeless shelters are critical partners in the fight to 
end human trafficking. In Portland, for example, the Preble Street 
Resource Center has used Runaway and Homeless Youth Act resources to 
connect youth who need food, shelter, health services, and educational 
support. The Preble Street Anti-trafficking Coalition is currently 
helping approximately 50 trafficking victims whose ages range from 14 
to 42. They enable them to start new lives.
  New Beginnings, a great program in Lewiston, ME, and the Shaw House 
in Bangor, ME, are other organizations that have successfully leveraged 
Federal grants from the Runaway and Homeless Youth Program to provide 
shelter and services to homeless youth in my State. With this kind of 
support, young people can make their way off the street and away from 
criminals who will exploit them at a time when they are at their most 
vulnerable.
  There are more than 1.6 million homeless teens in our country--a 
truly astonishing number. A growing number of these homeless youth 
identify themselves as LGBT. It is estimated that up to 40 percent of 
runaway or homeless youth are LGBT. Some of them have been kicked out 
of their own homes. Others have felt that there has been no place for 
them in their community. Our amendment would help ensure that those 
seeking services through the federally funded programs are not denied 
assistance based on their race, color, religion, national origin, sex, 
sexual orientation, gender identity or disability.
  All homeless young people need access to safe beds at night and 
services during the day so that they never have to choose between 
selling their bodies and a safe place to sleep. I would like to thank 
Senator Leahy and Senator Heitkamp for being so passionate about this 
issue. They have worked with me to incorporate important feedback into 
our amendment, particularly from faith-based organizations.
  In fact, Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that at the 
conclusion of my remarks, a letter be printed that I have from numerous 
faith-based organizations endorsing our amendment. These organizations 
represent millions of people in all 50 States. They urge us to pass our 
legislation with that nondiscrimination clause intact.
  They include, for example: Covenant House International, the 
Evangelical Lutheran Church of America, the Interfaith Alliance, the 
National Council of Jewish Women, the Metropolitan Community Churches, 
the Methodist Federation for Social Action, the

[[Page S2328]]

United Church of Christ, Justice and Witness Ministries, and many 
others that are backing our amendment.
  We have clarified that providers can still provide and offer sex-
specific shelters and programming. By that, I mean all-girl shelters or 
all-boy shelters. The nondiscrimination clause is modeled--it is 
virtually identical to a provision enacted into law during the last 
Congress through the bipartisan Violence Against Women Act. Nothing, 
nothing in our amendment alters the ability of faith-based providers to 
give preference in hiring to people of their same faith.
  The stand-alone bill on which our amendment is based was reported out 
of the Judiciary Committee last Congress by an overwhelming bipartisan 
vote of 15 to 3. It has the support of nearly 270 organizations 
including, as I mentioned, many faith-based providers that serve 
homeless youth, other service providers, and antitrafficking groups. 
They all strongly support the reauthorization of these prevention, 
intervention, and treatment programs.
  Our health care workers in Maine are also tremendous partners in 
helping to address trafficking crimes and their victims. Saint Joseph 
Hospital in Bangor has educated its clinicians to identify the signs of 
human trafficking among their patients. Congress must do more both to 
provide law enforcement with the tools it needs to pursue sex 
trafficking, but we cannot forget those prevention and intervention 
programs that are provided by the Runaway and Homeless Youth Program.
  By giving homeless youth the support and the services they need, we 
can help prevent them from becoming trafficked in the first place. 
These programs have provided lifesaving services and housing for 
America's homeless and runaway youth for 40 years. They are vital in 
addressing this serious problem. I urge my colleagues to support the 
amendment that Senator Leahy and I, Senator Heitkamp, Senator Ayotte, 
Senator Murkowski, and Senator Baldwin are offering today. It is so 
important.
  Again, I want to especially thank Senator Heitkamp for all of her 
advocacy. She has done tremendous work.
  I am very happy to yield the floor for her.
  There being no objection, the material was ordered to be printed in 
the Record, as follows:
                                                   March 11, 2015.
       Dear Senators: As faith-based organizations representing 
     millions of people in all 50 states across our nation, we are 
     writing today regarding the Runaway Homeless Youth and 
     Trafficking Prevention Act. Based on the values of our 
     diverse faith traditions, we are committed to ensuring that 
     all victims of violence have equal access to justice, strong 
     legal protections and can access the lifesaving services they 
     need to move from crisis to stability. We urge you to pass 
     this legislation with the nondiscrimination clause intact. 
     Federal funds should not be used to discriminate.
       In times of crisis, victims often turn to their faith 
     communities and leaders for guidance and support. Faith 
     leaders are on the front lines each day identifying victims, 
     providing refuge, referring victims and their families to 
     programs and services for homeless and trafficked youth, and 
     offering hope and healing. Part of meeting these needs 
     includes respecting the religious liberty of those receiving 
     services.
       A study conducted by the U.S. Department of Health and 
     Human Services found that 46% of homeless youth had run away 
     from home because of physical abuse and 17% because of sexual 
     abuse. A growing number of homeless youth identify as LGBT, 
     and it is estimated that they comprise up to 40% of the 
     runaway homeless youth (RHY) population. We believe that ALL 
     vulnerable young people should have access to programs 
     designed to stop the cycle of victimization and provide 
     comprehensive solutions. Federal grantees must be prohibited 
     from discriminating against any youth based on their sexual 
     orientation or gender identity.
       Thank you for your steadfast commitment to working with 
     faith communities to support vulnerable young people and 
     victims of trafficking. We look forward to working with you 
     to swiftly pass the Runaway Homeless Youth and Trafficking 
     Prevention Act.
           Sincerely,
       Catholics for Choice, Congregation Beit Simchat Torah, 
     Covenant House International, Evangelical Lutheran Church of 
     America, Global Faith and Justice Project, Global Justice 
     Institute, Interfaith Alliance, Jewish Labor Committee 
     Western Region, Methodist Federation for Social Action, 
     Metropolitan Community Churches, National Council of Jewish 
     Women;
       National Center for Housing and Child Welfare, Religious 
     Coalition for Reproductive Choice, Religious Institute, 
     Society for Humanistic Judaism, The General Board of Church 
     and Society, United Methodist Church, The Jewish Federations 
     of North America, T'ruah: The Rabbinic Call for Human Rights, 
     Unitarian Universalist Association, Unitarian Universalist 
     Women's Federation, United Church of Christ, Justice and 
     Witness Ministries, Women's League for Conservative Judaism.

  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from North Dakota.
  Ms. HEITKAMP. Mr. President, I want to add my voice to all of the 
accolades that have been expressed today to Senator Cornyn and Senator 
Klobuchar for giving a voice to the victims of the most horrific crime 
that occurs in our country; those are the victims of human trafficking. 
Without their hard work, without their advocacy, we would not be 
debating this on the floor of the Senate. So it is so important to 
acknowledge that work and to advance the cause by working together.
  Today, I wish to speak to amendment No. 290, which is the Collins-
Leahy runaway and homeless youth amendment. I want to thank Senator 
Collins and Senator Leahy for being such fierce advocates for runaway 
and homeless youth. I have had years of experience working with victims 
and vulnerable youth. I can tell you based on this experience that this 
amendment is the most critical piece that we are considering today to 
truly address prevention and early intervention for a population that 
is the most susceptible to being trafficked; that is the population of 
runaway and homeless youth.
  It is a story I believe is too often told. It is a story of a runaway 
and homeless youth engaging in survival sex, being coerced into 
criminal activity by people offering nothing more than a roof over 
their head or maybe even a meal. Since 1995, North Dakota has received 
$11.5 million in this very critical and important prevention program. 
How many of these children have we rescued from a life of despair? We 
will never know.
  But I am certain, telling those stories and visiting them in the 
shelters and in their apartments that are transitory living situations, 
that they would otherwise be so extraordinarily vulnerable. I have 
heard firsthand the stories of these homeless and runaway youth. The 
stories that you hear are literally heartbreaking. With prior physical, 
mental, and sexual abuse, these runaway and homeless youth have already 
been devalued. They have already been told that they are not worth what 
other children are worth. They have substance addictions. They have 
been shunned by their family or communities for who they are and how 
they identify. They are the most marginalized children in our country.
  Last July, a 13-year-old runaway from Minneapolis was picked up by 
her traffickers in the Cities and then worked her way across--she was 
heading off to the oil patch in western North Dakota. She stopped in 
Fargo-Moorhead to make some money on the way, being trafficked by a man 
who was selling a 13-year old for sex online through backpage.com. 
Fargo-Moorhead law enforcement set up a sting and rescued the victim 
and arrested the trafficker.
  Just 2 weeks ago, there was another tragic story of a 14-year old--a 
14-year old runaway from Las Vegas. Her parents did not know where she 
was. She got mixed up in the wrong crowd. She was put in a car and 
taken to Minot, ND. Her mother, desperate to find her, searched through 
her email records, found a connection to Backpage, and saw that her 
daughter was being advertised on Backpage in Minot, ND. She called the 
local authorities. The local authorities were able to rescue her.
  She was rescued with a 16-year-old and returned to Las Vegas. She is 
now with her mother. The 16-year-old got off the plane and ran--got off 
the plane and ran. There was no hope for her, no place to return that 
was welcoming, no mother who searched for her on the Internet and found 
her.
  As we work through these stories, I want you to think about what is 
the common element, what is the common factor. You look behind these 
stories, and you will see in these stories of trafficking runaway and 
homeless youth--runaway and homeless youth--vulnerable, on the street, 
susceptible to a warm bed, susceptible to a hot meal, susceptible to 
any kind of love and comfort they can find, only to find out that it 
might be their worst nightmare.
  They are trapped, and where do they go? Where do they go if there is 
not a program for runaway and homeless

[[Page S2329]]

youth? Where do they go if someone is not reaching out a hand? So what 
has become a common recurring fact of these offenders or these victims 
is that they have been thrown away or they are runaways.
  Forty percent, we estimate, of these children, identify themselves as 
gay, lesbian, transgender or bisexual youth.
  If we pass an amendment that doesn't have protection for this 
population, that doesn't have protection for these children, what is 
the message? The message is the message that has been reinforced their 
entire life, which is that they are not worthy of help, they are not 
worthy of being treated as all other children are.
  So this Senate will reinforce the recurring message that is so 
tragically identified and so tragically delivered to these children 
every day.
  I urge my colleagues, I beg my colleagues to please recognize the 
worth of all children. Recognize the vulnerability of this population 
of children.
  Vote with us to support the Leahy-Collins amendment. It is so 
critical to sending the right message, so critical to giving the right 
services, but so critical to sending the right message that all 
children matter and that we in the Senate do not see or discriminate. 
What we do is we help provide shelter to the most vulnerable among us.
  I yield the floor.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Vermont.
  Mr. LEAHY. I thank the Senator from North Dakota for her very, very 
strong statement.
  We sometimes talk about numbers and this and that. It is when you 
talk about real cases that we understand what we are talking about 
here. We are going to consider two amendments related to preventing 
human trafficking of runaway and homeless youth.
  Senator Cornyn's amendment speaks to this effort, but it is not a 
meaningful alternative to the comprehensive amendment that Senator 
Collins and I will offer. Our amendment No. 290, the Runaway and 
Homeless Youth and Trafficking Prevention Act, has the support of 30 
bipartisan cosponsors.
  Senator Cornyn has said that no effort to end human trafficking can 
be complete without addressing the needs of runaway and homeless youth. 
I agree and that is why amendment No. 290 is so important. In fact, 
when the Senate Judiciary Committee voted on this legislation last 
year, it received the vote of almost every single member, including 
Senator Cornyn.
  In our hearings since then, I have listened to the stories of 
survivors. Some have been in my office and some have been in the 
offices of other Senators, and they talked about this. So many of them 
begin the same way. They are a homeless or a runaway teen, scared, 
desperate for affection and a safe place to sleep, especially if they 
are somewhere in inclement weather.
  Traffickers know this. They prey on that desperation. They know there 
are so very few places these children can turn to.
  A recent survey found that one in four--now, think of this--homeless 
youth had been victims of sex trafficking or they have traded sex for 
survival needs such as food or a place to sleep. Just think of this. 
They are the age of our children or our grandchildren.
  This is a human issue. In fact, a survey found that 50 percent of 
homeless youth had been solicited for sex by an adult within 48 hours 
of leaving home. Just think of that--half of these homeless kids were 
solicited by an adult within the first 2 days of leaving home.
  I am talking about kids 12, 13, 14 years old. They have nowhere to 
go, but we can at least, through this legislation, make sure they have 
a safe place to turn. That is what our amendment does.
  Senator Cornyn's amendment is not a good alternative. The amendment I 
am offering assures that homeless youth providers are specifically 
trained to recognize victims of trafficking, address the unique trauma, 
and refer them to the appropriate care and services.
  It also lengthens the time they can stay in shelters or receive 
services. Look at what happens if they are forced back out of those 
shelters. How long does it take for traffickers to grab them?
  The amendment includes important new efforts to encourage family 
reunification and allows the person to define the people they consider 
family. This is particularly important as runaway children are often 
estranged from their parents.
  Senator Cornyn's amendment does not have the crucial 
nondiscrimination provision that is in my amendment. This language 
would prevent the discrimination against youth based on their race, 
their color, their religion, their national origin, their sex, their 
gender identity, their sexual orientation, or their disability.
  It is almost identical to a provision contained in the bipartisan 
Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013, which passed the 
Senate with 78 votes. It passed the Republican-controlled House 
overwhelmingly and was signed into law.
  You may not like to think about this, but the reason this language is 
particularly important is because a growing number of these homeless 
and runaway youth identify as LGBT.
  Many, sadly, have been thrown out of their homes precisely for that 
reason. They have been rejected by their parents. No child should face 
that kind of isolation or rejection--no matter what.
  I am a parent. I am a grandparent. I find it heartbreaking that a 
child could be turned out of their home and then turned away by a 
service provider. We shouldn't allow organizations to take Federal 
funds and then turn their backs against these kids because of their 
race or their religion or whom they love. That is why I can't 
understand why the side-by-side amendment offered had the 
nondiscrimination protections for these children stripped from it.
  I urge all Senators to support my bipartisan amendment.
  I thank Senators Collins and Heitkamp for their steadfast and very 
strong support. We have to support the efforts of dedicated service 
providers. They make these programs work. We have to protect these 
kids. The most important thing is not being in a position where the 
only time we can act or is after someone has been trafficked. Let's 
prevent them from being trafficked in the first place.
  Prevention will cost money, but it is going to save lives, and it is 
going to prevent the far more costly effects of human trafficking. This 
is smart money--we ought to be able and ready to invest in our 
children. We have to include the Runaway and Homeless Youth and 
Trafficking Prevention Act in our efforts to prevent more of our kids 
from becoming victims.
  I have said it so many times on this floor that I almost grow weary 
of hearing myself saying it. I have prosecuted some of these cases. And 
it was nowhere near the problem, when I was a prosecutor, that it is 
today throughout this country.
  I still have nightmares from what we saw. This Senator hopes that 
someday, under this legislation, if we work hard enough, none of us 
will have these nightmares.
  I yield the floor.
  I suggest the absence of a quorum.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The clerk will call the roll.
  The legislative clerk proceeded to call the roll.
  Ms. COLLINS. Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that the order 
for the quorum call be rescinded.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Without objection, it is so ordered.
  Ms. COLLINS. Mr. President, the question really comes down to this: 
Do we want provider services to homeless and runaway youth to be able 
to turn away at the door a 13-year-old girl simply because of her 
sexual orientation? That is what this comes down to, and I think the 
answer is no if that provider is receiving Federal funds. It shouldn't 
matter, and we should be willing to stand and say that we want to help 
all youth stay out of the clutches of these truly evil sex traffickers. 
That is what this is about.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Vermont.


                           Amendment No. 290

       (Purpose: To reauthorize the Runaway and Homeless Youth 
     Act)

  Mr. LEAHY. Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent to set aside the 
pending amendment to call up amendment No. 290.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there objection?
  Without objection, it is so ordered.
  The clerk will report.

[[Page S2330]]

  The legislative clerk read as follows:

       The Senator from Vermont [Mr. Leahy], for himself, Ms. 
     Collins, Ms. Murkowski, Ms. Baldwin, Ms. Ayotte, Ms. 
     Heitkamp, Mrs. Shaheen, Mr. Bennet, Mr. Murphy, Mr. Merkley, 
     Mr. Schatz, Mr. Booker, and Ms. Klobuchar, proposes an 
     amendment numbered 290.

  Mr. LEAHY. I ask unanimous consent that the reading of the amendment 
be dispensed with.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Without objection, it is so ordered.
  (The amendment is printed in the Record of March 11, 2015, under 
``Text of Amendments.'')
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Illinois.
  Mr. DURBIN. Mr. President, I will speak briefly in support of the 
remarks of the Senator from Maine and the Senator from Vermont.
  The Cornyn approach on runaway and homeless youth excludes language 
that would prohibit discrimination against the recipients of these 
services because of their sexual orientation. How can we have reached 
that point in the Senate?
  Haven't we engaged in a national debate that centered on Indiana and 
other States? Haven't we decided in America that, regardless, we aren't 
going to allow discrimination against people because of sexual 
orientation? Sadly, this Cornyn amendment excludes language that 
prohibits discrimination against LGBT youth.
  Secondly, to fund a less than $1 billion a year program, the Senator 
from Texas is eliminating a $10 billion health prevention fund, which 
serves 50 States to deal with infectious disease and serious health 
issues.
  This is, sadly, an effort to attack ObamaCare, and it shouldn't be 
done in this important legislation. We have wasted 4 weeks on an 
extraneous issue. Let us stick to the basic issue before us.
  Defeat the Cornyn amendment and support the amendment being offered 
by Senator Collins and Senator Leahy.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Texas.


                           Amendment No. 1127

  Mr. CORNYN. Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent to set aside the 
pending amendment and call up my amendment No. 1127.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there objection?
  Without objection, it is so ordered.
  The clerk will report.
  The legislative clerk read as follows:

       The Senator from Texas [Mr. Cornyn] proposes an amendment 
     numbered 1127.

  Mr. CORNYN. Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that the reading 
of the amendment be dispensed with.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Without objection, it is so ordered.
  The amendment is as follows:

 (Purpose: To reauthorize the Runaway and Homeless Youth Act, and for 
                            other purposes)

       At the appropriate place, insert the following:

     SEC. ___. RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH ACT REAUTHORIZATION.

       (a) Reauthorization.--Section 388(a) of the Runaway and 
     Homeless Youth Act (42 U.S.C. 5751(a)) is amended--
       (1) in paragraph (1), by striking ``for fiscal year 2009,'' 
     and all that follows through the period and inserting ``for 
     each of fiscal years 2016 through 2020.'';
       (2) in paragraph (3)(B), by striking ``such sums as may be 
     necessary for fiscal years 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, and 
     2013.'' and inserting ``$2,000,000 for each of fiscal years 
     2016 through 2020.' ''; and
       (3) in paragraph (4), by striking ``for fiscal year 2009'' 
     and all that follows through the period and inserting `` `for 
     each of fiscal years 2016 through 2020.''.
       (b) Offset; Repealing Prevention and Public Health Fund.--
       (1) In general.--Section 4002 of the Patient Protection and 
     Affordable Care Act (42 U.S.C. 300u-11) is repealed.
       (2) Rescission of unobligated funds.--Of the funds made 
     available under such section 4002, the unobligated balances 
     are rescinded.
       (3) Effective date.--This subsection takes effect on 
     October 1, 2015.

  Mr. CORNYN. Mr. President, if I could just say in the next 30 seconds 
or so that the first amendment we will vote on reauthorizes the Runaway 
and Homeless Youth Act, which is something that we all support, which 
permits treatment of victims of human trafficking without 
discrimination. It also happens to be paid for, something that the 
Leahy amendment is not.
  Right now, most faith-based organizations, such as Catholic 
Charities, treat all victims of human trafficking without regard to 
sexual orientation, gender issues, and the like--as I am proud to say 
they should.
  But there is nothing--we have been told that the various faith-based 
organizations worry that the Federal Government is basically going to 
intervene and tell them whom they can hire and what their 
administration and implementation practices must be. That is why almost 
uniformly, faith-based organizations that would be eligible for the 
grants to help the victims of human trafficking say that this would 
render this administration of this victims trafficking fund legislation 
unworkable.
  I ask my colleagues to support the Cornyn amendment, to vote against 
the Leahy amendment, and let's get this done.
  I yield the floor.
  Mr. DURBIN. Mr. President, is there any time remaining on this 
amendment?
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. There is 1 minute remaining in opposition.
  Mr. DURBIN. Mr. President, in opposition to the Cornyn amendment, let 
me say this. Up to forty percent of the overall homeless youth 
population identify as LGBT, and many have reported that they have been 
subjected to service denial and discrimination by staff and providers 
based on their sexual orientation. The Leahy-Collins alternative 
expressly prohibits discrimination against youth because of their 
sexual orientation. That should be the gold standard.
  Defeat the Cornyn amendment and vote for the bipartisan Collins-Leahy 
amendment.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The question is on agreeing to amendment No. 
1127, offered by the Senator from Texas.
  Mr. CORNYN. I ask for the yeas and nays.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there a sufficient second?
  There appears to be a sufficient second.
  The clerk will call the roll.
  The legislative clerk called the roll.
  Mr. CORNYN. The following Senators are necessarily absent: the 
Senator from Texas (Mr. Cruz) and the Senator from Alabama (Mr. 
Shelby).
  The PRESIDING OFFICER (Mrs. Fischer). Are there any other Senators in 
the Chamber desiring to vote?
  The result was announced--yeas 45, nays 53, as follows:

                      [Rollcall Vote No. 158 Leg.]

                                YEAS--45

     Alexander
     Barrasso
     Blunt
     Boozman
     Burr
     Cassidy
     Coats
     Cochran
     Corker
     Cornyn
     Cotton
     Crapo
     Daines
     Enzi
     Ernst
     Fischer
     Gardner
     Graham
     Grassley
     Hatch
     Heller
     Hoeven
     Inhofe
     Isakson
     Johnson
     Lankford
     Lee
     McCain
     McConnell
     Moran
     Paul
     Perdue
     Risch
     Roberts
     Rounds
     Rubio
     Sasse
     Scott
     Sessions
     Sullivan
     Thune
     Tillis
     Toomey
     Vitter
     Wicker

                                NAYS--53

     Ayotte
     Baldwin
     Bennet
     Blumenthal
     Booker
     Boxer
     Brown
     Cantwell
     Capito
     Cardin
     Carper
     Casey
     Collins
     Coons
     Donnelly
     Durbin
     Feinstein
     Flake
     Franken
     Gillibrand
     Heinrich
     Heitkamp
     Hirono
     Kaine
     King
     Kirk
     Klobuchar
     Leahy
     Manchin
     Markey
     McCaskill
     Menendez
     Merkley
     Mikulski
     Murkowski
     Murphy
     Murray
     Nelson
     Peters
     Portman
     Reed
     Reid
     Sanders
     Schatz
     Schumer
     Shaheen
     Stabenow
     Tester
     Udall
     Warner
     Warren
     Whitehouse
     Wyden

                             NOT VOTING--2

     Cruz
     Shelby
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Under the previous order requiring 60 votes 
for the adoption of this amendment, the amendment is rejected.


                           Amendment No. 290

  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Under the previous order, there is now 2 
minutes of debate prior to a vote on amendment No. 290, offered by the 
Senator from Vermont, Mr. Leahy.
  The Senator from Vermont.
  Mr. LEAHY. Madam President, my bipartisan amendment to prevent human 
trafficking includes important language to prohibit discrimination 
against homeless children.
  The language should be familiar to most Senators here. It is nearly 
identical to what we voted for overwhelmingly as part of the Violence 
Against Women Act reauthorization 2 years

[[Page S2331]]

ago. It shouldn't be controversial. We should reaffirm our commitment 
to nondiscrimination. All children--all children--deserve our 
protection. We should not be picking and choosing, saying: This child 
deserves protection, this one doesn't. They all deserve our protection.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Texas.
  Mr. CORNYN. Madam President, I urge a ``no'' vote on the Leahy 
amendment.
  I agree with the senior Senator from Vermont that all victims of 
human trafficking should be treated with the dignity they deserve 
without regard to sexual orientation or any discrimination. That is 
what the Cornyn amendment we just voted on would do.
  What we are told by faith-based organizations that provide many of 
these services is that the Leahy language would make rendition of those 
services difficult, if not impossible. There is some debate whether it 
would also intrude on hiring practices and whether people could 
actually be hired in faith-based organizations if they didn't agree 
with some of the services that are rendered here.
  Finally, the Leahy amendment would authorize $115 million of spending 
that it is not paid for and thus would increase the deficit. A number 
of organizations, such as the Conference of Catholic Bishops, the 
National Religious Broadcasters, National Association of Evangelicals, 
among other religious organizations, urge a ``no'' vote on the Leahy 
amendment.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Maine.
  Ms. COLLINS. Madam President, how much time is left?
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Fifteen seconds.
  Ms. COLLINS. Madam President, the question before us is very clear: 
If you believe runaway and homeless youth should receive services that 
are federally funded without regard to their sexual orientation, you 
should vote yes on this amendment. The Cornyn amendment does not 
prohibit discrimination.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Texas.
  Mr. CORNYN. Madam President, I ask that all votes be kept to 10 
minutes.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Without objection, it is so ordered.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The question is on agreeing to amendment No. 
290, offered by the Senator from Vermont.
  Mr. LEAHY. I ask for the yeas and nays.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there a sufficient second?
  There appears to be a sufficient second.
  The clerk will call the roll.
  The bill clerk called the roll.
  Mr. CORNYN. The following Senator is necessarily absent: the Senator 
from Texas (Mr. Cruz).
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Are there any other Senators in the Chamber 
desiring to vote?
  The result was announced--yeas 56, nays 43, as follows:

                      [Rollcall Vote No. 159 Leg.]

                                YEAS--56

     Ayotte
     Baldwin
     Bennet
     Blumenthal
     Booker
     Boxer
     Brown
     Cantwell
     Capito
     Cardin
     Carper
     Casey
     Collins
     Coons
     Donnelly
     Durbin
     Feinstein
     Franken
     Gillibrand
     Heinrich
     Heitkamp
     Heller
     Hirono
     Kaine
     King
     Kirk
     Klobuchar
     Leahy
     Manchin
     Markey
     McCaskill
     Menendez
     Merkley
     Mikulski
     Murkowski
     Murphy
     Murray
     Nelson
     Paul
     Peters
     Portman
     Reed
     Reid
     Sanders
     Schatz
     Schumer
     Shaheen
     Stabenow
     Sullivan
     Tester
     Toomey
     Udall
     Warner
     Warren
     Whitehouse
     Wyden

                                NAYS--43

     Alexander
     Barrasso
     Blunt
     Boozman
     Burr
     Cassidy
     Coats
     Cochran
     Corker
     Cornyn
     Cotton
     Crapo
     Daines
     Enzi
     Ernst
     Fischer
     Flake
     Gardner
     Graham
     Grassley
     Hatch
     Hoeven
     Inhofe
     Isakson
     Johnson
     Lankford
     Lee
     McCain
     McConnell
     Moran
     Perdue
     Risch
     Roberts
     Rounds
     Rubio
     Sasse
     Scott
     Sessions
     Shelby
     Thune
     Tillis
     Vitter
     Wicker

                             NOT VOTING--1

       
     Cruz
       
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Under the previous order requiring 60 votes 
for the adoption of this amendment, the amendment is rejected.
  The Senator from Ohio.


                           Amendment No. 311

  Mr. BROWN. Madam President, I ask unanimous consent to set aside the 
pending amendment in order to call up Brown amendment No. 311.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there objection?
  Without objection, it is so ordered.
  The clerk will report.
  The legislative clerk read as follows:

       The Senator from Ohio [Mr. Brown] for himself, Ms. Ayotte, 
     Mrs. Shaheen, Mrs. Gillibrand, and Ms. Baldwin, proposes an 
     amendment numbered 311.

  Mr. BROWN. Madam President, I ask unanimous consent that the reading 
of the amendment be dispensed with.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Without objection, it is so ordered.
  The amendment is as follows:

    (Purpose: To direct the Attorney General to increase the amount 
provided under certain formula grants to States that have in place laws 
 that terminate the parental rights of men who father children through 
                                 rape)

       At the appropriate place, insert the following:

                 TITLE __--RAPE SURVIVOR CHILD CUSTODY

     SEC. __01. SHORT TITLE.

       This title may be cited as the ``Rape Survivor Child 
     Custody Act''.

     SEC. __02. DEFINITIONS.

       In this title:
       (1) Covered formula grant.--The term ``covered formula 
     grant'' means a grant under--
       (A) part T of title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe 
     Streets Act of 1968 (42 U.S.C. 3796gg et seq.) (commonly 
     referred to as the ``STOP Violence Against Women Formula 
     Grant Program''); or
       (B) section 41601 of the Violence Against Women Act of 1994 
     (42 U.S.C. 14043g) (commonly referred to as the ``Sexual 
     Assault Services Program'').
       (2) Termination.--
       (A) In general.--The term ``termination'' means, when used 
     with respect to parental rights, a complete and final 
     termination of the parent's right to custody of, guardianship 
     of, visitation with, access to, and inheritance from a child.
       (B) Rule of construction.--Nothing in this paragraph shall 
     be construed to require a State, in order to receive an 
     increase in the amount provided to the State under the 
     covered formula grants under this title, to have in place a 
     law that terminates any obligation of a person who fathered a 
     child through rape to support the child.

     SEC. __03. FINDINGS.

       Congress finds the following:
       (1) Men who father children through rape should be 
     prohibited from visiting or having custody of those children.
       (2) Thousands of rape-related pregnancies occur annually in 
     the United States.
       (3) A substantial number of women choose to raise their 
     child conceived through rape and, as a result, may face 
     custody battles with their rapists.
       (4) Rape is one of the most under-prosecuted serious 
     crimes, with estimates of criminal conviction occurring in 
     less than 5 percent of rapes.
       (5) The clear and convincing evidence standard is the most 
     common standard for termination of parental rights among the 
     50 States, territories, and the District of Columbia.
       (6) The Supreme Court established that the clear and 
     convincing evidence standard satisfies due process for 
     allegations to terminate or restrict parental rights in 
     Santosky v. Kramer (455 U.S. 745 (1982)).
       (7) Currently only 10 States have statutes allowing rape 
     survivors to petition for the termination of parental rights 
     of the rapist based on clear and convincing evidence that the 
     child was conceived through rape.
       (8) A rapist pursuing parental or custody rights causes the 
     survivor to have continued interaction with the rapist, which 
     can have traumatic psychological effects on the survivor, and 
     can make it more difficult for her to recover.
       (9) These traumatic effects on the mother can severely 
     negatively impact her ability to raise a healthy child.
       (10) Rapists may use the threat of pursuing custody or 
     parental rights to coerce survivors into not prosecuting 
     rape, or otherwise harass, intimidate, or manipulate them.

     SEC. __04. INCREASED FUNDING FOR FORMULA GRANTS AUTHORIZED.

       The Attorney General shall increase the amount provided to 
     a State under the covered formula grants in accordance with 
     this title if the State has in place a law that allows the 
     mother of any child that was conceived through rape to seek 
     court-ordered termination of the parental rights of her 
     rapist with regard to that child, which the court is 
     authorized to grant upon clear and convincing evidence of 
     rape.

     SEC. __05. APPLICATION.

       A State seeking an increase in the amount provided to the 
     State under the covered formula grants shall include in the 
     application of the State for each covered formula grant such 
     information as the Attorney General may reasonably require, 
     including information about the law described in section 
     __04.

[[Page S2332]]

     SEC. __06. GRANT INCREASE.

       The amount of the increase provided to a State under the 
     covered formula grants under this title shall be equal to not 
     more than 10 percent of the average of the total amount of 
     funding provided to the State under the covered formula 
     grants under the 3 most recent awards to the State.

     SEC. __07. PERIOD OF INCREASE.

       (a) In General.--The Attorney General shall provide an 
     increase in the amount provided to a State under the covered 
     formula grants under this title for a 2-year period.
       (b) Limit.--The Attorney General may not provide an 
     increase in the amount provided to a State under the covered 
     formula grants under this title more than 4 times.

     SEC. __08. ALLOCATION OF INCREASED FORMULA GRANT FUNDS.

       The Attorney General shall allocate an increase in the 
     amount provided to a State under the covered formula grants 
     under this title such that--
       (1) 25 percent the amount of the increase is provided under 
     the program described in section __02(1)(A); and
       (2) 75 percent the amount of the increase is provided under 
     the program described in section __02(1)(B).

     SEC. __09. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

       There is authorized to be appropriated to carry out this 
     title $5,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2015 through 2019.

  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Under the previous order, there will be 2 
minutes of debate equally divided prior to a vote on amendment No. 311, 
offered by the Senator from Ohio, Mr. Brown.
  The Senator from Ohio.
  Mr. BROWN. Madam President, women who give birth to a child conceived 
through rape can often face intimidation from attackers who--believe it 
or not--pursue parental rights.
  I was first moved to introduce this bill following the case of Ariel 
Castro in Cleveland. He was on trial for kidnapping, raping, and 
holding prisoner three women for a decade and then he asked the judge 
for parental rights to visit the 6-year-old daughter who was conceived 
through his rape.
  Madam President, the Brown-Ayotte-Shaheen-Gillibrand-Baldwin 
amendment helps protect rape survivors by encouraging States to pass 
laws allowing women to petition for the termination of their attacker's 
parental rights if there is clear and convincing evidence that the 
child was conceived through the rape.
  Madam President, I yield 1 minute to my colleague from New Hampshire.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from New Hampshire.
  Ms. AYOTTE. Madam President, I thank Senator Brown. This is a very 
important amendment.
  If you are for supporting victims, protecting life and children and 
against rapists, vote for this amendment. Unfortunately, rapists too 
often try to manipulate their victims by claiming custodial rights over 
children, and we need to stand with victims on this issue and allow 
States to be incentivized to allow victims to terminate their parental 
rights should they choose to have a child and to raise that child 
without having the threat of a rapist over their shoulder.
  I ask for support on this amendment, and I thank all of my 
colleagues. This is a commonsense bill, and I thank Senator Brown for 
his leadership.
  I ask for the yeas and nays.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there a sufficient second?
  There is a sufficient second.
  The question is on agreeing to amendment No. 311, offered by the 
Senator from Ohio.
  The clerk will call the roll.
  The legislative clerk called the roll.
  Mr. CORNYN. The following Senator is necessarily absent: the Senator 
from Texas (Mr. Cruz).
  The PRESIDING OFFICER (Mr. Toomey). Are there any other Senators in 
the Chamber desiring to vote?
  The result was announced--yeas 99, nays 0, as follows:

                      [Rollcall Vote No. 160 Leg.]

                                YEAS--99

     Alexander
     Ayotte
     Baldwin
     Barrasso
     Bennet
     Blumenthal
     Blunt
     Booker
     Boozman
     Boxer
     Brown
     Burr
     Cantwell
     Capito
     Cardin
     Carper
     Casey
     Cassidy
     Coats
     Cochran
     Collins
     Coons
     Corker
     Cornyn
     Cotton
     Crapo
     Daines
     Donnelly
     Durbin
     Enzi
     Ernst
     Feinstein
     Fischer
     Flake
     Franken
     Gardner
     Gillibrand
     Graham
     Grassley
     Hatch
     Heinrich
     Heitkamp
     Heller
     Hirono
     Hoeven
     Inhofe
     Isakson
     Johnson
     Kaine
     King
     Kirk
     Klobuchar
     Lankford
     Leahy
     Lee
     Manchin
     Markey
     McCain
     McCaskill
     McConnell
     Menendez
     Merkley
     Mikulski
     Moran
     Murkowski
     Murphy
     Murray
     Nelson
     Paul
     Perdue
     Peters
     Portman
     Reed
     Reid
     Risch
     Roberts
     Rounds
     Rubio
     Sanders
     Sasse
     Schatz
     Schumer
     Scott
     Sessions
     Shaheen
     Shelby
     Stabenow
     Sullivan
     Tester
     Thune
     Tillis
     Toomey
     Udall
     Vitter
     Warner
     Warren
     Whitehouse
     Wicker
     Wyden

                             NOT VOTING--1

       
     Cruz
       
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Under the previous order requiring 60 votes 
for the adoption of this amendment, the amendment is agreed to.


                       Vote on Amendment No. 1121

  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Under the previous order, there will now be 2 
minutes of debate equally divided prior to a vote on amendment No. 
1121, offered by the Senator from North Carolina, Mr. Burr.
  Mr. BURR. Mr. President, we yield back all time.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there objection?
  Without objection, all time is yielded back.
  Mr. BURR. I ask for the yeas and nays.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there a sufficient second?
  There appears to be a sufficient second.
  The question is on agreeing to amendment No. 1121, offered by the 
Senator from North Carolina.
  The clerk will call the roll.
  The senior assistant legislative clerk called the roll.
  Mr. CORNYN. The following Senator is necessarily absent: the Senator 
from Texas (Mr. Cruz).
  Mr. DURBIN. I announce that the Senator from Vermont (Mr. Sanders) is 
necessarily absent.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Are there any other Senators in the Chamber 
desiring to vote?
  The result was announced--yeas 98, nays 0, as follows:

                      [Rollcall Vote No. 161 Leg.]

                                YEAS--98

     Alexander
     Ayotte
     Baldwin
     Barrasso
     Bennet
     Blumenthal
     Blunt
     Booker
     Boozman
     Boxer
     Brown
     Burr
     Cantwell
     Capito
     Cardin
     Carper
     Casey
     Cassidy
     Coats
     Cochran
     Collins
     Coons
     Corker
     Cornyn
     Cotton
     Crapo
     Daines
     Donnelly
     Durbin
     Enzi
     Ernst
     Feinstein
     Fischer
     Flake
     Franken
     Gardner
     Gillibrand
     Graham
     Grassley
     Hatch
     Heinrich
     Heitkamp
     Heller
     Hirono
     Hoeven
     Inhofe
     Isakson
     Johnson
     Kaine
     King
     Kirk
     Klobuchar
     Lankford
     Leahy
     Lee
     Manchin
     Markey
     McCain
     McCaskill
     McConnell
     Menendez
     Merkley
     Mikulski
     Moran
     Murkowski
     Murphy
     Murray
     Nelson
     Paul
     Perdue
     Peters
     Portman
     Reed
     Reid
     Risch
     Roberts
     Rounds
     Rubio
     Sasse
     Schatz
     Schumer
     Scott
     Sessions
     Shaheen
     Shelby
     Stabenow
     Sullivan
     Tester
     Thune
     Tillis
     Toomey
     Udall
     Vitter
     Warner
     Warren
     Whitehouse
     Wicker
     Wyden

                             NOT VOTING--2

     Cruz
     Sanders
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Under the previous order requiring 60 votes 
for the adoption of this amendment, the amendment is agreed to.


                     Amendment No. 273, as Modified

  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Under the previous order, there will now be 2 
minutes of debate equally divided prior to a vote on amendment No. 273, 
as modified, offered by the Senator from Illinois, Mr. Kirk.
  The Senator from Illinois.
  Mr. KIRK. Mr. President, I rise to speak on amendment No. 273. It 
stands for the principle that freedom on the Internet is not the 
freedom to enslave others.
  I want to make sure this country stands for the principles under the 
13th Amendment that we enshrined with Lincoln's victory in the Civil 
War, and I urge all Members to adopt this amendment by a strong, 
substantial vote to pass the SAVE Act to make sure that providers of 
human traffic services do not have freedom to advertise on the 
Internet.
  Thank you, Mr. President. I yield back.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from California.

[[Page S2333]]

  Mrs. FEINSTEIN. Mr. President, as the Democratic sponsor of this 
amendment, I would like to thank the distinguished Senator from 
Illinois for his leadership on this issue. The fact is, this amendment 
is essentially the same as the House stand-alone bill that passed 
unanimously.
  Members, it is a fact that approximately 76 percent of sex 
trafficking of underage girls takes place on the Internet--76 percent.
  We know at least 19 Web sites that post ads for commercial sex acts 
with children. They are paid for so doing.
  The amendment essentially does two things. It adds the word 
``advertises'' as one of the sex trafficking offense verbs. Second, it 
clarifies that only the ``knowing'' intent and not the ``reckless 
disregard of the fact'' intent applies to the new offense.
  We have checked with the Department of Justice. We believe it meets 
constitutional standards. We believe it is necessary and is long 
overdue. I urge an ``aye'' vote of all Members.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The question is on agreeing to amendment No. 
273, as modified, offered by the Senator from Illinois.
  Mr. CORNYN. Mr. President, I ask for the yeas and nays.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there a sufficient second?
  There appears to be a sufficient second.
  The clerk will call the roll.
  The bill clerk called the roll.
  Mr. CORNYN. The following Senator is necessarily absent: the Senator 
from Texas (Mr. Cruz).
  The result was announced--yeas 97, nays 2, as follows:

                      [Rollcall Vote No. 162 Leg.]

                                YEAS--97

     Alexander
     Ayotte
     Baldwin
     Barrasso
     Bennet
     Blumenthal
     Blunt
     Booker
     Boozman
     Boxer
     Brown
     Burr
     Capito
     Cardin
     Carper
     Casey
     Cassidy
     Coats
     Cochran
     Collins
     Coons
     Corker
     Cornyn
     Cotton
     Crapo
     Daines
     Donnelly
     Durbin
     Enzi
     Ernst
     Feinstein
     Fischer
     Flake
     Franken
     Gardner
     Gillibrand
     Graham
     Grassley
     Hatch
     Heinrich
     Heitkamp
     Heller
     Hirono
     Hoeven
     Inhofe
     Isakson
     Johnson
     Kaine
     King
     Kirk
     Klobuchar
     Lankford
     Leahy
     Lee
     Manchin
     Markey
     McCain
     McCaskill
     McConnell
     Menendez
     Merkley
     Mikulski
     Moran
     Murkowski
     Murphy
     Murray
     Nelson
     Paul
     Perdue
     Peters
     Portman
     Reed
     Reid
     Risch
     Roberts
     Rounds
     Rubio
     Sanders
     Sasse
     Schatz
     Schumer
     Scott
     Sessions
     Shaheen
     Shelby
     Stabenow
     Sullivan
     Tester
     Thune
     Tillis
     Toomey
     Udall
     Vitter
     Warner
     Warren
     Whitehouse
     Wicker

                                NAYS--2

     Cantwell
     Wyden
       

                             NOT VOTING--1

       
     Cruz
       
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Under the previous order requiring 60 votes 
for the adoption of this amendment, the amendment, as modified, is 
agreed to.
  The majority whip.


Amendments Nos. 296; 299, as modified; 279; 1126; 294; 308; 1128; 310; 
                           312; 1122; and 303

  Mr. CORNYN. Mr. President, I call up the following amendments en 
bloc: Klobuchar No. 296; Hoeven No. 299, as modified; Sullivan No. 279; 
Wicker No. 1126; Flake No. 294; Cassidy No. 308; Portman No. 1128; 
Brown No. 310; Brown No. 312; Heller No. 1122; and Shaheen No. 303.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there objection?
  Without objection, it is so ordered.
  The clerk will report the amendments en bloc.
  The senior assistant legislative clerk read as follows:

       The Senator from Texas [Mr. Cornyn], for others, proposes 
     amendments numbered 296; 299, as modified; 279; 1126; 294; 
     308; 1128; 310; 312; 1122; and 303.

  The amendments are as follows:


                           Amendment No. 296

          (Purpose: To stop exploitation through trafficking)

       At the end of the bill, add the following:

          TITLE IV--STOPPING EXPLOITATION THROUGH TRAFFICKING

     SEC. 401. SAFE HARBOR INCENTIVES.

       Part Q of title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe 
     Streets Act of 1968 (42 U.S.C. 3796dd et seq.) is amended--
       (1) in section 1701(c), by striking ``where feasible'' and 
     all that follows, and inserting the following: ``where 
     feasible, to an application--
       ``(1) for hiring and rehiring additional career law 
     enforcement officers that involves a non-Federal contribution 
     exceeding the 25 percent minimum under subsection (g); or
       ``(2) from an applicant in a State that has in effect a law 
     that--
       ``(A) treats a minor who has engaged in, or has attempted 
     to engage in, a commercial sex act as a victim of a severe 
     form of trafficking in persons;
       ``(B) discourages or prohibits the charging or prosecution 
     of an individual described in subparagraph (A) for a 
     prostitution or sex trafficking offense, based on the conduct 
     described in subparagraph (A); and
       ``(C) encourages the diversion of an individual described 
     in subparagraph (A) to appropriate service providers, 
     including child welfare services, victim treatment programs, 
     child advocacy centers, rape crisis centers, or other social 
     services.''; and
       (2) in section 1709, by inserting at the end the following:
       ``(5) `commercial sex act' has the meaning given the term 
     in section 103 of the Victims of Trafficking and Violence 
     Protection Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 7102).
       ``(6) `minor' means an individual who has not attained the 
     age of 18 years.
       ``(7) `severe form of trafficking in persons' has the 
     meaning given the term in section 103 of the Victims of 
     Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 
     7102).''.

     SEC. 402. REPORT ON RESTITUTION PAID IN CONNECTION WITH 
                   CERTAIN TRAFFICKING OFFENSES.

       Section 105(d)(7)(Q) of the Victims of Trafficking and 
     Violence Protection Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 7103(d)(7)(Q)) is 
     amended--
       (1) by inserting after ``1590,'' the following: ``1591,'';
       (2) by striking ``and 1594'' and inserting ``1594, 2251, 
     2251A, 2421, 2422, and 2423'';
       (3) in clause (iv), by striking ``and'' at the end;
       (4) in clause (v), by striking ``and'' at the end; and
       (5) by inserting after clause (v) the following:
       ``(vi) the number of individuals required by a court order 
     to pay restitution in connection with a violation of each 
     offense under title 18, United States Code, the amount of 
     restitution required to be paid under each such order, and 
     the amount of restitution actually paid pursuant to each such 
     order; and
       ``(vii) the age, gender, race, country of origin, country 
     of citizenship, and description of the role in the offense of 
     individuals convicted under each offense; and''.

     SEC. 403. NATIONAL HUMAN TRAFFICKING HOTLINE.

       Section 107(b)(1)(B) of the Victims of Crime Trafficking 
     and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 7105(b)(1)(B)) 
     is amended--
       (1) by striking ``Subject'' and inserting the following:
       ``(i) In general.--Subject''; and
       (2) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(ii) National human trafficking hotline.--Beginning in 
     fiscal year 2017, and in each fiscal year thereafter, of 
     amounts made available for grants under paragraph (2), the 
     Secretary of Health and Human Services shall make grants for 
     a national communication system to assist victims of severe 
     forms of trafficking in persons in communicating with service 
     providers. The Secretary shall give priority to grant 
     applicants that have experience in providing telephone 
     services to victims of severe forms of trafficking in 
     persons.''.

     SEC. 404. JOB CORPS ELIGIBILITY.

       Section 144(a)(3) of the Workforce Innovation and 
     Opportunity Act (29 U.S.C. 3194(a)(3)) is amended by adding 
     at the end the following:
       ``(F) A victim of a severe form of trafficking in persons 
     (as defined in section 103 of the Victims of Trafficking and 
     Violence Protection Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 7102)). 
     Notwithstanding paragraph (2), an individual described in 
     this subparagraph shall not be required to demonstrate 
     eligibility under such paragraph.''.

     SEC. 405. CLARIFICATION OF AUTHORITY OF THE UNITED STATES 
                   MARSHALS SERVICE.

       Section 566(e)(1) of title 28, United States Code, is 
     amended--
       (1) in subparagraph (B), by striking ``and'' at the end;
       (2) in subparagraph (C), by striking the period at the end 
     and inserting ``; and''; and
       (3) by inserting after subparagraph (C) the following:
       ``(D) assist State, local, and other Federal law 
     enforcement agencies, upon the request of such an agency, in 
     locating and recovering missing children.''.

     SEC. 406. ESTABLISHING A NATIONAL STRATEGY TO COMBAT HUMAN 
                   TRAFFICKING.

       (a) In General.--The Attorney General shall implement and 
     maintain a National Strategy for Combating Human Trafficking 
     (referred to in this section as the ``National Strategy'') in 
     accordance with this section.
       (b) Required Contents of National Strategy.--The National 
     Strategy shall include the following:
       (1) Integrated Federal, State, local, and tribal efforts to 
     investigate and prosecute human trafficking cases, 
     including--
       (A) the development by each United States attorney, in 
     consultation with State, local, and tribal government 
     agencies, of a district-specific strategic plan to coordinate 
     the identification of victims and the investigation and 
     prosecution of human trafficking crimes;

[[Page S2334]]

       (B) the appointment of not fewer than 1 assistant United 
     States attorney in each district dedicated to the prosecution 
     of human trafficking cases or responsible for implementing 
     the National Strategy;
       (C) the participation in any Federal, State, local, or 
     tribal human trafficking task force operating in the district 
     of the United States attorney; and
       (D) any other efforts intended to enhance the level of 
     coordination and cooperation, as determined by the Attorney 
     General.
       (2) Case coordination within the Department of Justice, 
     including specific integration, coordination, and 
     collaboration, as appropriate, on human trafficking 
     investigations between and among the United States attorneys, 
     the Human Trafficking Prosecution Unit, the Child 
     Exploitation and Obscenity Section, and the Federal Bureau of 
     Investigation.
       (3) Annual budget priorities and Federal efforts dedicated 
     to preventing and combating human trafficking, including 
     resources dedicated to the Human Trafficking Prosecution 
     Unit, the Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section, the 
     Federal Bureau of Investigation, and all other entities that 
     receive Federal support that have a goal or mission to combat 
     the exploitation of adults and children.
       (4) An ongoing assessment of the future trends, challenges, 
     and opportunities, including new investigative strategies, 
     techniques, and technologies, that will enhance Federal, 
     State, local, and tribal efforts to combat human trafficking.
       (5) Encouragement of cooperation, coordination, and mutual 
     support between private sector and other entities and 
     organizations and Federal agencies to combat human 
     trafficking, including the involvement of State, local, and 
     tribal government agencies to the extent Federal programs are 
     involved.


                     Amendment No. 299, as modified

  (Purpose: To ensure that eligible entities that have only recently 
begun collecting data on child human trafficking are not precluded from 
                     being awarded certain grants)

       On page 60, between lines 17 and 18, insert the following:
       ``(4) Eligible entities soliciting data on child human 
     trafficking.--No eligible entity shall be disadvantaged in 
     being awarded a grant under subsection (a) on the grounds 
     that the eligible entity has only recently begun soliciting 
     data on child human trafficking.''.


                           Amendment No. 279

(Purpose: To require the Attorney General of the United States to grant 
 certain requests by State attorneys general to cross designate State 
   and local attorneys to prosecute individuals for sex trafficking)

       At the end, add the following:

     SEC. ___. TRANSPORTATION FOR ILLEGAL SEXUAL ACTIVITY AND 
                   RELATED CRIMES.

       Chapter 117 of title 18, United States Code, is amended by 
     striking section 2421 and inserting the following:

     ``Sec. 2421. Transportation generally

       ``(a) In General.--Whoever knowingly transports any 
     individual in interstate or foreign commerce, or in any 
     Territory or Possession of the United States, with intent 
     that such individual engage in prostitution, or in any sexual 
     activity for which any person can be charged with a criminal 
     offense, or attempts to do so, shall be fined under this 
     title or imprisoned not more than 10 years, or both.
       ``(b) Requests to Prosecute Violations by State Attorneys 
     General.--
       ``(1) In general.--The Attorney General shall grant a 
     request by a State attorney general that a State or local 
     attorney be cross designated to prosecute a violation of this 
     section unless the Attorney General determines that granting 
     the request would undermine the administration of justice.
       ``(2) Reason for denial.--If the Attorney General denies a 
     request under paragraph (1), the Attorney General shall 
     submit to the State attorney general a detailed reason for 
     the denial not later than 60 days after the date on which a 
     request is received.''.


                           Amendment No. 1126

     (Purpose: To direct the Attorney General to create a publicly 
  accessible database for trafficking victims advocates that contains 
         information about services for trafficking survivors)

       At the end of title I, add the following:

     SEC. 118. EDUCATION AND OUTREACH TO TRAFFICKING SURVIVORS.

       The Attorney General shall make available, on the website 
     of the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, 
     a database for trafficking victim advocates, crisis hotline 
     personnel, foster parents, law enforcement personnel, and 
     crime survivors that contains information on--
       (1) counseling and hotline resources;
       (2) housing resources;
       (3) legal assistance; and
       (4) other services for trafficking survivors.

     SEC. 119. EXPANDED STATUTE OF LIMITATIONS FOR CIVIL ACTIONS 
                   BY CHILD TRAFFICKING SURVIVORS.

       Section 1595(c) of title 18, United States Code, is amended 
     by striking ``not later than 10 years after the cause of 
     action arose.'' and inserting ``not later than the later of--
       ``(1) 10 years after the cause of action arose; or
       ``(2) 10 years after the victim reaches 18 years of age, if 
     the victim was a minor at the time of the alleged offense.''.


                           Amendment No. 294

  (Purpose: To require a GAO study on the programs authorized by the 
                                 bill)

       At the appropriate place, insert the following:

     SEC. __. GAO STUDY AND REPORT.

       (a) Study.--The Comptroller General of the United States 
     shall conduct a study on each program or initiative 
     authorized under this Act and the following statutes and 
     evaluate whether any program or initiative is duplicative:
       (1) Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 
     2005 (Public Law 109-164; 119 Stat. 3558).
       (2) Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 
     7101 et seq.).
       (3) Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 13001 et 
     seq.).
       (4) Runaway and Homeless Youth Act (42 U.S.C. 5701 et 
     seq.).
       (5) Missing Children's Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5771 et 
     seq.).
       (b) Report.--Not later than 180 days after the date of 
     enactment of this Act, the Comptroller General of the United 
     States shall submit to the Committee on the Judiciary of the 
     Senate and the Committee on the Judiciary of the House of 
     Representatives a report on the study conducted under 
     subsection (a), which shall include--
       (1) a description of the cost of any duplicative program or 
     initiative studied under subsection (a); and
       (2) recommendations on how to achieve cost savings with 
     respect to each duplicative program or initiative studied 
     under subsection (a).


                           Amendment No. 308

(Purpose: To provide for the development and dissemination of evidence-
based best practices for health care professionals to recognize victims 
    of a severe form of trafficking and respond to such individuals 
                 appropriately, and for other purposes)

       At the appropriate place, insert the following:

        TITLE __--TRAFFICKING AWARENESS TRAINING FOR HEALTH CARE

     SEC. _01. SHORT TITLE.

       This title may be cited as the ``Trafficking Awareness 
     Training for Health Care Act of 2015''.

     SEC. __02. DEVELOPMENT OF BEST PRACTICES.

       (a) Grant or Contract for Development of Best Practices.--
       (1) In general.--Not later than 1 year after the date of 
     enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Health and Human 
     Services acting through the Administrator of the Health 
     Resources and Services Administration, and in consultation 
     with the Administration on Children and Families and other 
     agencies with experience in serving victims of human 
     trafficking, shall award, on a competitive basis, a grant or 
     contract to an eligible entity to train health care 
     professionals to recognize and respond to victims of a severe 
     form of trafficking.
       (2) Development of evidence-based best practices.--An 
     entity receiving a grant under paragraph (1) shall develop 
     evidence-based best practices for health care professionals 
     to recognize and respond to victims of a severe form of 
     trafficking, including--
       (A) consultation with law enforcement officials, social 
     service providers, health professionals, experts in the field 
     of human trafficking, and other experts, as appropriate, to 
     inform the development of such best practices;
       (B) the identification of any existing best practices or 
     tools for health professionals to recognize potential victims 
     of a severe form of trafficking; and
       (C) the development of educational materials to train 
     health care professionals on the best practices developed 
     under this subsection.
       (3) Requirements.--Best practices developed under this 
     subsection shall address--
       (A) risk factors and indicators to recognize victims of a 
     severe form of trafficking;
       (B) patient safety and security;
       (C) the management of medical records of patients who are 
     victims of a severe form of trafficking;
       (D) public and private social services available for 
     rescue, food, clothing, and shelter referrals;
       (E) the hotlines for reporting human trafficking maintained 
     by the National Human Trafficking Resource Center and the 
     Department of Homeland Security;
       (F) validated assessment tools for the identification of 
     victims of a severe form of trafficking; and
       (G) referral options and procedures for sharing information 
     on human trafficking with a patient and making referrals for 
     legal and social services as appropriate.
       (4) Pilot program.--An entity receiving a grant under 
     paragraph (1) shall design and implement a pilot program to 
     test the best practices and educational materials identified 
     or developed with respect to the recognition of victims of 
     human trafficking by health professionals at health care 
     sites located near an established anti-human trafficking task 
     force initiative in each of the 10 administrative regions of 
     the Department of Health and Human Services.
       (5) Analysis and report.--Not later than 24 months after 
     the date on which an entity

[[Page S2335]]

     implements a pilot program under paragraph (4), the entity 
     shall--
       (A) analyze the results of the pilot programs, including 
     through an assessment of--
       (i) changes in the skills, knowledge, and attitude of 
     health care professionals resulting from the implementation 
     of the program;
       (ii) the number of victims of a severe form of trafficking 
     who were identified under the program;
       (iii) of those victims identified, the number who received 
     information or referrals for services offered; and
       (iv) of those victims who received such information or 
     referrals--

       (I) the number who participated in follow up services; and
       (II) the type of follow up services received;

       (B) determine, using the results of the analysis conducted 
     under subparagraph (A), the extent to which the best 
     practices developed under this subsection are evidence-based; 
     and
       (C) submit to the Secretary of Health and Human Services a 
     report concerning the pilot program and the analysis of the 
     pilot program under subparagraph (A), including an 
     identification of the best practices that were identified as 
     effective and those that require further review.
       (b) Dissemination.--Not later than 30 months after date on 
     which a grant is awarded to an eligible entity under 
     subsection (a), the Secretary of Health and Human Services 
     shall--
       (1) collaborate with appropriate professional associations 
     and health care professional schools to disseminate best 
     practices identified or developed under subsection (a) for 
     purposes of recognizing potential victims of a severe form of 
     trafficking; and
       (2) post on the public website of the Department of Health 
     and Human Services the best practices that are identified by 
     the as effective under subsection (a)(5).

     SEC. _03. DEFINITIONS.

       In this title:
       (1) The term ``eligible entity'' means an accredited school 
     of medicine or nursing with experience in the study or 
     treatment of victims of a severe form of trafficking.
       (2) The term ``eligible site'' means a health center that 
     is receiving assistance under section 330, 399Z-1, or 1001 of 
     the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 254b, 280h-5, and 
     300).
       (3) The term ``health care professional'' means a person 
     employed by a health care provider who provides to patients 
     information (including information not related to medical 
     treatment), scheduling, services, or referrals.
       (4) The term ``HIPAA privacy and security law'' has the 
     meaning given to such term in section 3009 of the Public 
     Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 300jj-19).
       (5) The term ``victim of a severe form of trafficking'' has 
     the meaning given to such term in section 103 of the 
     Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 7102).

     SEC. _04. NO ADDITIONAL AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

       No additional funds are authorized to be appropriated to 
     carry out this title, and this title shall be carried out 
     using amounts otherwise available for such purpose.


                           Amendment No. 1128

  (Purpose: To amend the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act to 
     enable State child protective services systems to improve the 
identification and assessment of child victims of sex trafficking, and 
                          for other purposes)

       At the appropriate place, insert the following:

     TITLE IV--BETTER RESPONSE FOR VICTIMS OF CHILD SEX TRAFFICKING

     SEC. 401. SHORT TITLE.

       This title may be cited as the ``Ensuring a Better Response 
     for Victims of Child Sex Trafficking''.

     SEC. 402. CAPTA AMENDMENTS.

       (a) In General.--The amendments to the Child Abuse 
     Prevention and Treatment Act (42 U.S.C. 5101 et seq.) made by 
     this section shall take effect 2 years after the date of the 
     enactment of this Act.
       (b) State Plans.--Section 106 of the Child Abuse Prevention 
     and Treatment Act (42 U.S.C. 5106a) is amended--
       (1) in subsection (b)(2)(B)--
       (A) in clause (xxii), by striking ``and'' at the end; and
       (B) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(xxiv) provisions and procedures requiring identification 
     and assessment of all reports involving children known or 
     suspected to be victims of sex trafficking (as defined in 
     section 103(10) of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 
     2000 (22 U.S.C. 7102 (10)); and
       ``(xxv) provisions and procedures for training child 
     protective services workers about identifying, assessing, and 
     providing comprehensive services for children who are sex 
     trafficking victims, including efforts to coordinate with 
     State law enforcement, juvenile justice, and social service 
     agencies such as runaway and homeless youth shelters to serve 
     this population;''; and
       (2) in subsection (d), by adding at the end the following:
       ``(17) The number of children determined to be victims 
     described in subsection (b)(2)(B)(xxiv).''.
       (c) Special Rule.--
       (1) In general.--Section 111 of the Child Abuse Prevention 
     and Treatment Act (42 U.S.C. 5106g) is amended--
       (A) by striking ``For purposes'' and inserting the 
     following:
       ``(a) Definitions.--For purposes''; and
       (B) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(b) Special Rule.--
       ``(1) In general.--For purposes of section 3(2) and 
     subsection (a)(4), a child shall be considered a victim of 
     `child abuse and neglect' and of `sexual abuse' if the child 
     is identified, by a State or local agency employee of the 
     State or locality involved, as being a victim of sex 
     trafficking (as defined in paragraph (10) of section 103 of 
     the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 
     7102)) or a victim of severe forms of trafficking in persons 
     described in paragraph (9)(A) of that section.
       ``(2) State option.--Notwithstanding the definition of 
     `child' in section 3(1), a State may elect to define that 
     term for purposes of the application of paragraph (1) to 
     section 3(2) and subsection (a)(4) as a person who has not 
     attained the age of 24.''.
       (2) Conforming amendment.--Section 3(2) of the Child Abuse 
     Prevention and Treatment Act (42 U.S.C. 5101 note) is amended 
     by inserting ``(including sexual abuse as determined under 
     section 111)'' after ``sexual abuse or exploitation''.
       (3) Technical correction.--Paragraph (5)(C) of subsection 
     (a), as so designated, of section 111 of the Child Abuse 
     Prevention and Treatment Act (42 U.S.C. 5106g) is amended by 
     striking ``inhumane;'' and inserting ``inhumane.''.


                           Amendment No. 310

    (Purpose: To allow grants under the victim-centered child human 
trafficking deterrence block grant program to be used for assisting law 
      enforcement agencies in finding homeless and runaway youth)

       On page 57, between lines 2 and 3, insert the following:
       ``(3) activities of law enforcement agencies to find 
     homeless and runaway youth, including salaries and associated 
     expenses for retired Federal law enforcement officers 
     assisting the law enforcement agencies in finding homeless 
     and runaway youth; and


                           Amendment No. 312

 (Purpose: To amend the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 to 
    expand the training for Federal Government personnel related to 
            trafficking in persons, and for other purposes)

       At the end of title II, add the following:

                     Subtitle D--Expanded Training

     SEC. 231. EXPANDED TRAINING RELATING TO TRAFFICKING IN 
                   PERSONS.

       Section 105(c)(4) of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act 
     of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 7105(c)(4)) is amended--
       (1) by striking ``Appropriate personnel'' and inserting the 
     following:
       ``(A) In general.--Appropriate personnel'';
       (2) in subparagraph (A), as redesignated, by inserting ``, 
     including members of the Service (as such term is defined in 
     section 103 of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 
     3903))'' after ``Department of State''; and
       (3) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(B) Training components.--Training under this paragraph 
     shall include--
       ``(i) a distance learning course on trafficking-in-persons 
     issues and the Department of State's obligations under this 
     Act, which shall be designed for embassy reporting officers, 
     regional bureaus' trafficking-in-persons coordinators, and 
     their superiors;
       ``(ii) specific trafficking-in-persons briefings for all 
     ambassadors and deputy chiefs of mission before such 
     individuals depart for their posts; and
       ``(iii) at least annual reminders to all personnel referred 
     to in clauses (i) and (ii), including appropriate personnel 
     from other Federal departments and agencies, at each 
     diplomatic or consular post of the Department of State 
     located outside the United States of--

       ``(I) key problems, threats, methods, and warning signs of 
     trafficking in persons specific to the country or 
     jurisdiction in which each such post is located; and
       ``(II) appropriate procedures to report information that 
     any such personnel may acquire about possible cases of 
     trafficking in persons.''.


                           Amendment No. 1122

    (Purpose: To direct the Secretary of Homeland Security to train 
  Department of Homeland Security personnel how to effectively deter, 
  detect, disrupt, and prevent human trafficking during the course of 
               their primary roles and responsibilities)

       At the end of the bill, add the following:

TITLE IV--ANTI-TRAFFICKING TRAINING FOR DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY 
                               PERSONNEL

     SEC. 401. DEFINITIONS.

       In this title:
       (1) Department.--The term ``Department'' means the 
     Department of Homeland Security.
       (2) Human trafficking.--The term ``human trafficking'' 
     means an act or practice described in paragraph (9) or (10) 
     of section 103 of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 
     2000 (22 U.S.C. 7102).
       (3) Secretary.--The term ``Secretary'' means the Secretary 
     of Homeland Security.

     SEC. 402. TRAINING FOR DEPARTMENT PERSONNEL TO IDENTIFY HUMAN 
                   TRAFFICKING.

       (a) In General.--Not later than 180 days after the date of 
     the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall implement a 
     program to--

[[Page S2336]]

       (1) train and periodically retrain relevant Transportation 
     Security Administration, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, 
     and other Department personnel that the Secretary considers 
     appropriate, with respect to how to effectively deter, 
     detect, and disrupt human trafficking, and, where 
     appropriate, interdict a suspected perpetrator of human 
     trafficking, during the course of their primary roles and 
     responsibilities; and
       (2) ensure that the personnel referred to in paragraph (1) 
     regularly receive current information on matters related to 
     the detection of human trafficking, including information 
     that becomes available outside of the Department's initial or 
     periodic retraining schedule, to the extent relevant to their 
     official duties and consistent with applicable information 
     and privacy laws.
       (b) Training Described.--The training referred to in 
     subsection (a) may be conducted through in-class or virtual 
     learning capabilities, and shall include--
       (1) methods for identifying suspected victims of human 
     trafficking and, where appropriate, perpetrators of human 
     trafficking;
       (2) for appropriate personnel, methods to approach a 
     suspected victim of human trafficking, where appropriate, in 
     a manner that is sensitive to the suspected victim and is not 
     likely to alert a suspected perpetrator of human trafficking;
       (3) training that is most appropriate for a particular 
     location or environment in which the personnel receiving such 
     training perform their official duties;
       (4) other topics determined by the Secretary to be 
     appropriate; and
       (5) a post-training evaluation for personnel receiving the 
     training.
       (c) Training Curriculum Review.--The Secretary shall 
     annually reassess the training program established under 
     subsection (a) to ensure it is consistent with current 
     techniques, patterns, and trends associated with human 
     trafficking.

     SEC. 403. CERTIFICATION AND REPORT TO CONGRESS.

       (a) Certification.--Not later than 1 year after the date of 
     the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall certify to 
     Congress that all personnel referred to in section 402(a) 
     have successfully completed the training required under that 
     section.
       (b) Report to Congress.--Not later than 1 year after the 
     date of the enactment of this Act and annually thereafter, 
     the Secretary shall report to Congress with respect to the 
     overall effectiveness of the program required by this title, 
     the number of cases reported by Department personnel in which 
     human trafficking was suspected, and, of those cases, the 
     number of cases that were confirmed cases of human 
     trafficking.

     SEC. 404. ASSISTANCE TO NON-FEDERAL ENTITIES.

       The Secretary may provide training curricula to any State, 
     local, or tribal government or private organization to assist 
     the government or organization in establishing a program of 
     training to identify human trafficking, upon request from the 
     government or organization.

     SEC. 405. EXPANDED USE OF DOMESTIC TRAFFICKING VICTIMS' FUND.

       Section 3014(e)(1) of title 18, United States Code, as 
     added by section 101 of this Act, is amended--
       (1) in subparagraph (B), by striking ``and'' at the end;
       (2) in subparagraph (C), by striking the period at the end 
     and inserting ``; and''; and
       (3) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(D) section 106 of the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 
     (42 U.S.C. 17616).''.


                           Amendment No. 303

       (Purpose: To aid human trafficking victims' recovery and 
                            rehabilitation)

       At the end, add the following:

    TITLE __--HUMAN TRAFFICKING SURVIVORS RELIEF AND EMPOWERMENT ACT

     SECTION _01. SHORT TITLE.

       This title may be cited as the ``Human Trafficking 
     Survivors Relief and Empowerment Act of 2015''.

     SEC. _02. PROTECTIONS FOR HUMAN TRAFFICKING SURVIVORS.

       Section 1701(c) of title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and 
     Safe Streets Act of 1968 (42 U.S.C. 3796dd(c)) is amended by 
     striking ``where feasible'' and all that follows, and 
     inserting the following: ``where feasible, to an 
     application--
       ``(1) for hiring and rehiring additional career law 
     enforcement officers that involves a non-Federal contribution 
     exceeding the 25 percent minimum under subsection (g); or
       ``(2) from an applicant in a State that has in effect a 
     law--
       ``(A) that--
       ``(i) provides a process by which an individual who is a 
     human trafficking survivor can move to vacate any arrest or 
     conviction records for a non-violent offense committed as a 
     direct result of human trafficking, including prostitution or 
     lewdness;
       ``(ii) establishes a rebuttable presumption that any arrest 
     or conviction of an individual for an offense associated with 
     human trafficking is a result of being trafficked, if the 
     individual--

       ``(I) is a person granted nonimmigrant status pursuant to 
     section 101(a)(15)(T)(i) of the Immigration and Nationality 
     Act (8 U.S.C. 1101(a)(15)(T)(i));
       ``(II) is the subject of a certification by the Secretary 
     of Health and Human Services under section 107(b)(1)(E) of 
     the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 
     7105(b)(1)(E)); or
       ``(III) has other similar documentation of trafficking, 
     which has been issued by a Federal, State, or local agency; 
     and

       ``(iii) protects the identity of individuals who are human 
     trafficking survivors in public and court records; and
       ``(B) that does not require an individual who is a human 
     trafficking survivor to provide official documentation as 
     described in subclause (I), (II), or (III) of subparagraph 
     (A)(ii) in order to receive protection under the law.''.

  Mr. CORNYN. Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that Senators 
Sullivan, Cassidy, Wicker, Klobuchar, and Portman each be recognized to 
speak for 1 minute.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there objection?
  Without objection, it is so ordered.
  The Senator from Alaska.


                           Amendment No. 279

  Mr. SULLIVAN. Mr. President, I rise in support of amendment No. 279, 
the Mann Act cooperation amendment. This is a simple amendment with 
strong bipartisan support.
  I appreciate the cosponsors, Senators Murkowski, Ayotte, Heitkamp, 
and Gillibrand.
  What this amendment will do, it will increase prosecutions of human 
trafficking without an increase in cost. It allows and encourages 
Federal prosecutors to work with State officials to prosecute Mann Act 
violations and increases transparency.
  The key goal of this amendment is to enable the resources and 
cooperation between State and Federal prosecutors to ensure all cases 
of human trafficking are pursued and victims have justice.
  I encourage my colleagues to support this amendment.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Mississippi.


                           Amendment No. 1126

  Mr. WICKER. Mr. President, I rise in strong support of the underlying 
bill. I thank the leadership on both sides for coming to a bipartisan 
agreement, and I thank the leadership for agreeing to take the Wicker 
amendment by a voice vote.
  My amendment does two things. Simply, it extends the statute of 
limitations to allow child victims to file civil lawsuits against 
perpetrators up to 10 years after they reach the age of 18, rather than 
10 years after the cause of action arises. Secondly, my amendment 
creates a Department of Justice data base for education and outreach. 
Trafficking is a complex issue, and it will take a comprehensive 
approach to facility adequate support for victims.
  That is what the Wicker amendment does.
  I urge an ``aye'' vote when we take it by voice.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Ohio.


                           Amendment No. 1128

  Mr. PORTMAN. Mr. President, I rise to express strong support for the 
underlying bill and also my appreciation to the managers of the bill 
for including the en bloc amendments. One I offered is entitled the 
``Ensuring a Better Response for Victims of Child Sex Trafficking,'' 
part of a larger bill we passed last year.
  This one ensures all children who are sex-trafficked will be 
classified as child abuse victims for purposes of the Child Abuse 
Prevention and Treatment Act.
  Currently, sex trafficking of a minor is not considered child abuse 
unless a parent or caregiver was directly involved in the child's 
exploitation. This amendment clarifies that a child victim of sex 
trafficking is a victim of child abuse and, therefore, can be eligible 
for the services as they recover.
  Over the past couple of days, we have made some great progress, 
including putting aside partisan divides in coming together to combat 
human trafficking, a heinous criminal industry that all of us want to 
stop.
  I am proud my bringing missing children home legislation with Senator 
Schumer, as well as my Combat Human Trafficking Act with Senator 
Feinstein is on the floor and have been included in the underlying 
bill. We have made a lot of progress, and we are a few steps closer to 
actually ending trafficking for once and for all.
  I particularly congratulate Senator Cornyn and Senator Klobuchar for 
their hard work in bringing this to the floor and doing something 
important to fight human trafficking.

[[Page S2337]]

  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Minnesota.


                           Amendment No. 296

  Ms. KLOBUCHAR. Mr. President, I am speaking in favor of the 
Klobuchar-Cornyn amendment No. 296. This is a very important policy 
amendment.
  It basically encourages States across the country--we already have 15 
States doing this--not to prosecute victims of sex trafficking and to 
treat them as victims--not as criminals--so they don't end up in jail.
  It also sets forth a national sex-trafficking strategy. It also 
qualifies these victims for job training programs. Then, finally, it 
includes a very important bill that Senator Whitehouse and Senator 
Sessions had that helps Federal marshals to track down victims of sex 
trafficking.
  I thank my coauthor and all 26 cosponsors of this amendment. Senator 
Cornyn--I know we will talk later about the underlying bill, but this 
is a bipartisan effort from beginning to end and a very important 
policy bill.
  I yield the floor.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Louisiana.


                           Amendment No. 308

  Mr. CASSIDY. Mr. President, I rise in favor of the Cassidy-Peters 
amendment.
  I am a physician who has been working in a public hospital for 30 
years. I am aware the following is true: 90 percent of victims in a 
recent survey saw a nurse or doctor or other health care professional 
while being held captive.
  If those health care workers had the training and tools to identify 
the signs and symptoms of those being trafficked, they can make the 
appropriate referral and help them escape that terrible existence.
  This amendment will provide for the development of best practices to 
enable health care workers to recognize and assist victims of human 
trafficking.
  If passed today, this will help women and children in Louisiana, 
Michigan, and across the Nation rebuild their lives.
  I thank Senator Peters for joining this effort, and I urge my 
colleagues to support this bipartisan amendment.
  Mr. President, I yield back the remainder of my time.


                       Vote on Amendment No. 296

  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Under the previous order, the question is on 
agreeing to the Klobuchar amendment No. 296.
  The amendment (No. 296) was agreed to.


                 Vote on Amendment No. 299, as Modified

  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The question is on agreeing to the Hoeven 
amendment No. 299, as modified.
  The amendment (No. 299), as modified, was agreed to.


                       Vote on Amendment No. 279

  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The question is on agreeing to the Sullivan 
amendment No. 279.
  The amendment (No. 279) was agreed to.


                       Vote on Amendment No. 1126

  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The question is on agreeing to the Wicker 
amendment No. 1126.
  The amendment (No. 1126) was agreed to.


                       Vote on Amendment No. 294

  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The question is on agreeing to the Flake 
amendment No. 294.
  The amendment (No. 294) was agreed to.


                       Vote on Amendment No. 308

  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The question is on agreeing to the Cassidy 
amendment No. 308.
  The amendment (No. 308) was agreed to.


                       Vote on Amendment No. 1128

  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The question is on agreeing to the Portman 
amendment No. 1128.
  The amendment (No. 1128) was agreed to.


                       Vote on Amendment No. 310

  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The question is on agreeing to the Brown 
amendment No. 310.
  The amendment (No. 310) was agreed to.


                       Vote on Amendment No. 312

  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The question is on agreeing to the Brown 
amendment No. 312.
  The amendment (No. 312) was agreed to.


                       Vote on Amendment No. 1122

  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The question is on agreeing to the Heller 
amendment No. 1122.
  The amendment (No. 1122) was agreed to.


                       Vote on Amendment No. 303

  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The question is on agreeing to the Shaheen 
amendment No. 303.
  The amendment (No. 303) was agreed to.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senate majority whip.
  Mr. CORNYN. Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that the Senator 
from Minnesota and I be permitted to speak for up to 1 minute each 
prior to the vote on final passage.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there objection?
  Without objection, it is so ordered.
  The Senator from Minnesota.
  Ms. KLOBUCHAR. Mr. President, I first of all want to thank Senator 
Cornyn. We have been working on these bills for over 1 year. I want to 
thank Senator Leahy and Senator Grassley for their leadership on the 
Judiciary Committee, Senator Murray for her work in negotiating this 
agreement and working with us, as well as so many other people who have 
been involved in working on this bill.
  Through the last month, I think every so often people have forgotten 
what this really is about. This is about victims of sex trafficking, 
with an average age of 12 years old--not even old enough to get their 
own driver's license, not even old enough to go to a high school prom. 
Yet this is happening all over the country, from the oil patches of 
North Dakota to the suburbs of Minneapolis.
  What this bill does and what this Senate is doing today is saying we 
want to be there in our country for these victims. We are going to pay 
for services. We are actually going to change some policies so that 
when we go to the rest of the world and look at something that is now 
the third biggest international criminal enterprise in the world, when 
we look at what Boko Haram is doing in Nigeria and in other countries, 
we can hold our heads up high and say that in the Senate we are finally 
doing something about this and our country is united across party lines 
against this practice.
  Again, I thank Senator Cornyn for what he has done.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The majority whip.
  Mr. CORNYN. Mr. President, Winston Churchill supposedly once said: 
The Americans always do the right thing after they exhaust every other 
possibility. And you might say the same thing about the Senate when it 
comes to the Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act. This has been a 
long strange journey here to final passage, but here we are. And we 
have kept our focus all along on the victims--typically, a girl of 12 
to 14 years old who has been sex trafficked and who has been treated as 
a common object and enslaved.
  This is a terrible, heinous crime, but one that most of us don't see 
because it operates outside of our vision and our experience. We are 
throwing a lifeline to these victims of human trafficking by providing 
them real resources to help them--to help first to rescue them and then 
to help them heal.
  This is a good day for the Senate because we are doing the right 
thing for people who have no voice. We are their voice, and we are 
going to get this done in a way that provides them some real help.
  I want to thank all of our colleagues here on a bipartisan basis. It 
was a rocky trip here. But we got here. That is what counts, because we 
are providing necessary and needed help for these victims of human 
trafficking.
  I yield the floor.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Under the previous order, the committee-
reported substitute amendment, as amended, to S. 178 is agreed to.
  The bill was ordered to be engrossed for a third reading and was read 
the third time.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Under the previous order, the bill having been 
read the third time, the question is, Shall it pass?
  Mr. JOHNSON. I ask for the yeas and nays.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there a sufficient second?
  There is a sufficient second.
  The clerk will call the roll.

[[Page S2338]]

  The senior assistant legislative clerk called the roll.
  Mr. CORNYN. The following Senator is necessarily absent: the Senator 
from Texas (Mr. Cruz).
  The result was announced--yeas 99, nays 0, as follows:

                      [Rollcall Vote No. 163 Leg.]

                                YEAS--99

     Alexander
     Ayotte
     Baldwin
     Barrasso
     Bennet
     Blumenthal
     Blunt
     Booker
     Boozman
     Boxer
     Brown
     Burr
     Cantwell
     Capito
     Cardin
     Carper
     Casey
     Cassidy
     Coats
     Cochran
     Collins
     Coons
     Corker
     Cornyn
     Cotton
     Crapo
     Daines
     Donnelly
     Durbin
     Enzi
     Ernst
     Feinstein
     Fischer
     Flake
     Franken
     Gardner
     Gillibrand
     Graham
     Grassley
     Hatch
     Heinrich
     Heitkamp
     Heller
     Hirono
     Hoeven
     Inhofe
     Isakson
     Johnson
     Kaine
     King
     Kirk
     Klobuchar
     Lankford
     Leahy
     Lee
     Manchin
     Markey
     McCain
     McCaskill
     McConnell
     Menendez
     Merkley
     Mikulski
     Moran
     Murkowski
     Murphy
     Murray
     Nelson
     Paul
     Perdue
     Peters
     Portman
     Reed
     Reid
     Risch
     Roberts
     Rounds
     Rubio
     Sanders
     Sasse
     Schatz
     Schumer
     Scott
     Sessions
     Shaheen
     Shelby
     Stabenow
     Sullivan
     Tester
     Thune
     Tillis
     Toomey
     Udall
     Vitter
     Warner
     Warren
     Whitehouse
     Wicker
     Wyden

                             NOT VOTING--1

       
     Cruz
       
  The bill (S. 178), as amended, was passed, as follows:

                                 S. 178

       Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of 
     the United States of America in Congress assembled,

     SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE; TABLE OF CONTENTS.

       (a) Short Title.--This Act may be cited as the ``Justice 
     for Victims of Trafficking Act of 2015''.
       (b) Table of Contents.--The table of contents for this Act 
     is as follows:

Sec. 1. Short title; table of contents.

              TITLE I--JUSTICE FOR VICTIMS OF TRAFFICKING

Sec. 101. Domestic Trafficking Victims' Fund.
Sec. 102. Clarifying the benefits and protections offered to domestic 
              victims of human trafficking.
Sec. 103. Victim-centered child human trafficking deterrence block 
              grant program.
Sec. 104. Direct services for victims of child pornography.
Sec. 105. Increasing compensation and restitution for trafficking 
              victims.
Sec. 106. Streamlining human trafficking investigations.
Sec. 107. Enhancing human trafficking reporting.
Sec. 108. Reducing demand for sex trafficking.
Sec. 109. Sense of Congress.
Sec. 110. Using existing task forces and components to target offenders 
              who exploit children.
Sec. 111. Targeting child predators.
Sec. 112. Monitoring all human traffickers as violent criminals.
Sec. 113. Crime victims' rights.
Sec. 114. Combat Human Trafficking Act.
Sec. 115. Survivors of Human Trafficking Empowerment Act.
Sec. 116. Bringing Missing Children Home Act.
Sec. 117. Grant accountability.
Sec. 118. SAVE Act.
Sec. 119. Education and outreach to trafficking survivors.
Sec. 120. Expanded statute of limitations for civil actions by child 
              trafficking survivors.
Sec. 121. GAO study and report.

                 TITLE II--COMBATING HUMAN TRAFFICKING

  Subtitle A--Enhancing Services for Runaway and Homeless Victims of 
                           Youth Trafficking

Sec. 201. Amendments to the Runaway and Homeless Youth Act.

 Subtitle B--Improving the Response to Victims of Child Sex Trafficking

Sec. 211. Response to victims of child sex trafficking.

  Subtitle C--Interagency Task Force to Monitor and Combat Trafficking

Sec. 221. Victim of trafficking defined.
Sec. 222. Interagency task force report on child trafficking primary 
              prevention.
Sec. 223. GAO Report on intervention.
Sec. 224. Provision of housing permitted to protect and assist in the 
              recovery of victims of trafficking.

                     Subtitle D--Expanded Training

Sec. 231. Expanded training relating to trafficking in persons.

                          TITLE III--HERO ACT

Sec. 301. Short title.
Sec. 302. HERO Act.
Sec. 303. Transportation for illegal sexual activity and related 
              crimes.

                 TITLE IV--RAPE SURVIVOR CHILD CUSTODY

Sec. 401. Short title.
Sec. 402. Definitions.
Sec. 403. Findings.
Sec. 404. Increased funding for formula grants authorized.
Sec. 405. Application.
Sec. 406. Grant increase.
Sec. 407. Period of increase.
Sec. 408. Allocation of increased formula grant funds.
Sec. 409. Authorization of appropriations.

                TITLE V--MILITARY SEX OFFENDER REPORTING

Sec. 501. Short title.
Sec. 502. Registration of sex offenders released from military 
              corrections facilities or upon conviction.

          TITLE VI--STOPPING EXPLOITATION THROUGH TRAFFICKING

Sec. 601. Safe Harbor Incentives.
Sec. 602. Report on restitution paid in connection with certain 
              trafficking offenses.
Sec. 603. National human trafficking hotline.
Sec. 604. Job corps eligibility.
Sec. 605. Clarification of authority of the United States Marshals 
              Service.
Sec. 606. Establishing a national strategy to combat human trafficking.

       TITLE VII--TRAFFICKING AWARENESS TRAINING FOR HEALTH CARE

Sec. 701. Short title.
Sec. 702. Development of best practices.
Sec. 703. Definitions.
Sec. 704. No additional authorization of appropriations.

    TITLE VIII--BETTER RESPONSE FOR VICTIMS OF CHILD SEX TRAFFICKING

Sec. 801. Short title.
Sec. 802. CAPTA amendments.

TITLE IX--ANTI-TRAFFICKING TRAINING FOR DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY 
                               PERSONNEL

Sec. 901. Definitions.
Sec. 902. Training for Department personnel to identify human 
              trafficking.
Sec. 903. Certification and report to Congress.
Sec. 904. Assistance to non-Federal entities.
Sec. 905. Expanded use of Domestic Trafficking Victims' Fund.

    TITLE X--HUMAN TRAFFICKING SURVIVORS RELIEF AND EMPOWERMENT ACT

Sec. 1001. Short title.
Sec. 1002. Protections for human trafficking survivors.

              TITLE I--JUSTICE FOR VICTIMS OF TRAFFICKING

     SEC. 101. DOMESTIC TRAFFICKING VICTIMS' FUND.

       (a) In General.--Chapter 201 of title 18, United States 
     Code, is amended by adding at the end the following:

     ``Sec. 3014. Additional special assessment

       ``(a) In General.--Beginning on the date of enactment of 
     the Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act of 2015 and ending 
     on September 30, 2019, in addition to the assessment imposed 
     under section 3013, the court shall assess an amount of 
     $5,000 on any non-indigent person or entity convicted of an 
     offense under--
       ``(1) chapter 77 (relating to peonage, slavery, and 
     trafficking in persons);
       ``(2) chapter 109A (relating to sexual abuse);
       ``(3) chapter 110 (relating to sexual exploitation and 
     other abuse of children);
       ``(4) chapter 117 (relating to transportation for illegal 
     sexual activity and related crimes); or
       ``(5) section 274 of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 
     U.S.C. 1324) (relating to human smuggling), unless the person 
     induced, assisted, abetted, or aided only an individual who 
     at the time of such action was the alien's spouse, parent, 
     son, or daughter (and no other individual) to enter the 
     United States in violation of law.
       ``(b) Satisfaction of Other Court-Ordered Obligations.--An 
     assessment under subsection (a) shall not be payable until 
     the person subject to the assessment has satisfied all 
     outstanding court-ordered fines, orders of restitution, and 
     any other obligation related to victim-compensation arising 
     from the criminal convictions on which the special assessment 
     is based.
       ``(c) Establishment of Domestic Trafficking Victims' 
     Fund.--There is established in the Treasury of the United 
     States a fund, to be known as the `Domestic Trafficking 
     Victims' Fund' (referred to in this section as the `Fund'), 
     to be administered by the Attorney General, in consultation 
     with the Secretary of Homeland Security and the Secretary of 
     Health and Human Services.
       ``(d) Transfers.--In a manner consistent with section 
     3302(b) of title 31, there shall be transferred to the Fund 
     from the General Fund of the Treasury an amount equal to the 
     amount of the assessments collected under this section, which 
     shall remain available until expended.
       ``(e) Use of Funds.--
       ``(1) In general.--From amounts in the Fund, in addition to 
     any other amounts available, and without further 
     appropriation, the Attorney General, in coordination with the 
     Secretary of Health and Human Services shall, for each of 
     fiscal years 2016 through 2019, use amounts available in the 
     Fund to award grants or enhance victims' programming under--
       ``(A) section 204 of the Trafficking Victims Protection 
     Reauthorization Act of 2005 (42 U.S.C. 14044c);

[[Page S2339]]

       ``(B) subsections (b)(2) and (f) of section 107 of the 
     Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 7105); 
     and
       ``(C) section 214(b) of the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 
     1990 (42 U.S.C. 13002(b)).
       ``(2) Limitation.--Except as provided in subsection (h)(2), 
     none of the amounts in the Fund may be used to provide health 
     care or medical items or services.
       ``(f) Collection Method.--The amount assessed under 
     subsection (a) shall, subject to subsection (b), be collected 
     in the manner that fines are collected in criminal cases.
       ``(g) Duration of Obligation.--Subject to section 3613(b), 
     the obligation to pay an assessment imposed on or after the 
     date of enactment of the Justice for Victims of Trafficking 
     Act of 2015 shall not cease until the assessment is paid in 
     full.
       ``(h) Health or Medical Services.--
       ``(1) Transfer of funds.--From amounts appropriated under 
     section 10503(b)(1)(E) of the Patient Protection and 
     Affordable Care Act (42 U.S.C. 254b-2(b)(1)(E)), as amended 
     by section 221 of the Medicare Access and CHIP 
     Reauthorization Act of 2015, there shall be transferred to 
     the Fund an amount equal to the amount transferred under 
     subsection (d) for each fiscal year, except that the amount 
     transferred under this paragraph shall not be less than 
     $5,000,000 or more than $30,000,000 in each such fiscal year, 
     and such amounts shall remain available until expended.
       ``(2) Use of funds.--The Attorney General, in coordination 
     with the Secretary of Health and Human Services, shall use 
     amounts transferred to the Fund under paragraph (1) to award 
     grants that may be used for the provision of health care or 
     medical items or services to victims of trafficking under--
       ``(A) sections 202, 203, and 204 of the Trafficking Victims 
     Protection Reauthorization Act of 2005 (42 U.S.C. 14044a, 
     14044b, and 14044c);
       ``(B) subsections (b)(2) and (f) of section 107 of the 
     Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 7105); 
     and
       ``(C) section 214(b) of the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 
     1990 (42 U.S.C. 13002(b)).
       ``(3) Grants.--Of the amounts in the Fund used under 
     paragraph (1), not less than $2,000,000, if such amounts are 
     available in the Fund during the relevant fiscal year, shall 
     be used for grants to provide services for child pornography 
     victims under section 214(b) of the Victims of Child Abuse 
     Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 13002(b)).
       ``(4) Application of provision.--The application of the 
     provisions of section 221(c) of the Medicare Access and CHIP 
     Reauthorization Act of 2015 shall continue to apply to the 
     amounts transferred pursuant to paragraph (1).''.
       (b) Technical and Conforming Amendment.--The table of 
     sections for chapter 201 of title 18, United States Code, is 
     amended by inserting after the item relating to section 3013 
     the following:

``3014. Additional special assessment.''.

     SEC. 102. CLARIFYING THE BENEFITS AND PROTECTIONS OFFERED TO 
                   DOMESTIC VICTIMS OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING.

       Section 107(b)(1) of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act 
     of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 7105(b)(1)) is amended--
       (1) by redesignating subparagraphs (F) and (G) as 
     subparagraphs (G) and (H), respectively;
       (2) by inserting after subparagraph (E) the following:
       ``(F) No requirement of official certification for united 
     states citizens and lawful permanent residents.--Nothing in 
     this section may be construed to require United States 
     citizens or lawful permanent residents who are victims of 
     severe forms of trafficking to obtain an official 
     certification from the Secretary of Health and Human Services 
     in order to access any of the specialized services described 
     in this subsection or any other Federal benefits and 
     protections to which they are otherwise entitled.''; and
       (3) in subparagraph (H), as redesignated, by striking 
     ``subparagraph (F)'' and inserting ``subparagraph (G)''.

     SEC. 103. VICTIM-CENTERED CHILD HUMAN TRAFFICKING DETERRENCE 
                   BLOCK GRANT PROGRAM.

       (a) In General.--Section 203 of the Trafficking Victims 
     Protection Reauthorization Act of 2005 (42 U.S.C. 14044b) is 
     amended to read as follows:

     ``SEC. 203. VICTIM-CENTERED CHILD HUMAN TRAFFICKING 
                   DETERRENCE BLOCK GRANT PROGRAM.

       ``(a) Grants Authorized.--The Attorney General may award 
     block grants to an eligible entity to develop, improve, or 
     expand domestic child human trafficking deterrence programs 
     that assist law enforcement officers, prosecutors, judicial 
     officials, and qualified victims' services organizations in 
     collaborating to rescue and restore the lives of victims, 
     while investigating and prosecuting offenses involving child 
     human trafficking.
       ``(b) Authorized Activities.--Grants awarded under 
     subsection (a) may be used for--
       ``(1) the establishment or enhancement of specialized 
     training programs for law enforcement officers, first 
     responders, health care officials, child welfare officials, 
     juvenile justice personnel, prosecutors, and judicial 
     personnel to--
       ``(A) identify victims and acts of child human trafficking;
       ``(B) address the unique needs of child victims of human 
     trafficking;
       ``(C) facilitate the rescue of child victims of human 
     trafficking;
       ``(D) investigate and prosecute acts of human trafficking, 
     including the soliciting, patronizing, or purchasing of 
     commercial sex acts from children, as well as training to 
     build cases against complex criminal networks involved in 
     child human trafficking; and
       ``(E) utilize, implement, and provide education on safe 
     harbor laws enacted by States, aimed at preventing the 
     criminalization and prosecution of child sex trafficking 
     victims for prostitution offenses, and other laws aimed at 
     the investigation and prosecution of child human trafficking;
       ``(2) the establishment or enhancement of dedicated anti-
     trafficking law enforcement units and task forces to 
     investigate child human trafficking offenses and to rescue 
     victims, including--
       ``(A) funding salaries, in whole or in part, for law 
     enforcement officers, including patrol officers, detectives, 
     and investigators, except that the percentage of the salary 
     of the law enforcement officer paid for by funds from a grant 
     awarded under this section shall not be more than the 
     percentage of the officer's time on duty that is dedicated to 
     working on cases involving child human trafficking;
       ``(B) investigation expenses for cases involving child 
     human trafficking, including--
       ``(i) wire taps;
       ``(ii) consultants with expertise specific to cases 
     involving child human trafficking;
       ``(iii) travel; and
       ``(iv) other technical assistance expenditures;
       ``(C) dedicated anti-trafficking prosecution units, 
     including the funding of salaries for State and local 
     prosecutors, including assisting in paying trial expenses for 
     prosecution of child human trafficking offenders, except that 
     the percentage of the total salary of a State or local 
     prosecutor that is paid using an award under this section 
     shall be not more than the percentage of the total number of 
     hours worked by the prosecutor that is spent working on cases 
     involving child human trafficking;
       ``(D) the establishment of child human trafficking victim 
     witness safety, assistance, and relocation programs that 
     encourage cooperation with law enforcement investigations of 
     crimes of child human trafficking by leveraging existing 
     resources and delivering child human trafficking victims' 
     services through coordination with--
       ``(i) child advocacy centers;
       ``(ii) social service agencies;
       ``(iii) State governmental health service agencies;
       ``(iv) housing agencies;
       ``(v) legal services agencies; and
       ``(vi) nongovernmental organizations and shelter service 
     providers with substantial experience in delivering wrap-
     around services to victims of child human trafficking; and
       ``(E) the establishment or enhancement of other necessary 
     victim assistance programs or personnel, such as victim or 
     child advocates, child-protective services, child forensic 
     interviews, or other necessary service providers;
       ``(3) activities of law enforcement agencies to find 
     homeless and runaway youth, including salaries and associated 
     expenses for retired Federal law enforcement officers 
     assisting the law enforcement agencies in finding homeless 
     and runaway youth; and
       ``(4) the establishment or enhancement of problem solving 
     court programs for trafficking victims that include--
       ``(A) mandatory and regular training requirements for 
     judicial officials involved in the administration or 
     operation of the court program described under this 
     paragraph;
       ``(B) continuing judicial supervision of victims of child 
     human trafficking, including case worker or child welfare 
     supervision in collaboration with judicial officers, who have 
     been identified by a law enforcement or judicial officer as a 
     potential victim of child human trafficking, regardless of 
     whether the victim has been charged with a crime related to 
     human trafficking;
       ``(C) the development of a specialized and individualized, 
     court-ordered treatment program for identified victims of 
     child human trafficking, including--
       ``(i) State-administered outpatient treatment;
       ``(ii) life skills training;
       ``(iii) housing placement;
       ``(iv) vocational training;
       ``(v) education;
       ``(vi) family support services; and
       ``(vii) job placement;
       ``(D) centralized case management involving the 
     consolidation of all of each child human trafficking victim's 
     cases and offenses, and the coordination of all trafficking 
     victim treatment programs and social services;
       ``(E) regular and mandatory court appearances by the victim 
     during the duration of the treatment program for purposes of 
     ensuring compliance and effectiveness;
       ``(F) the ultimate dismissal of relevant non-violent 
     criminal charges against the victim, where such victim 
     successfully complies with the terms of the court-ordered 
     treatment program; and
       ``(G) collaborative efforts with child advocacy centers, 
     child welfare agencies, shelters, and nongovernmental 
     organizations with substantial experience in delivering wrap-
     around services to victims of child human trafficking to 
     provide services to victims and encourage cooperation with 
     law enforcement.
       ``(c) Application.--

[[Page S2340]]

       ``(1) In general.--An eligible entity shall submit an 
     application to the Attorney General for a grant under this 
     section in such form and manner as the Attorney General may 
     require.
       ``(2) Required information.--An application submitted under 
     this subsection shall--
       ``(A) describe the activities for which assistance under 
     this section is sought;
       ``(B) include a detailed plan for the use of funds awarded 
     under the grant;
       ``(C) provide such additional information and assurances as 
     the Attorney General determines to be necessary to ensure 
     compliance with the requirements of this section; and
       ``(D) disclose--
       ``(i) any other grant funding from the Department of 
     Justice or from any other Federal department or agency for 
     purposes similar to those described in subsection (b) for 
     which the eligible entity has applied, and which application 
     is pending on the date of the submission of an application 
     under this section; and
       ``(ii) any other such grant funding that the eligible 
     entity has received during the 5-year period ending on the 
     date of the submission of an application under this section.
       ``(3) Preference.--In reviewing applications submitted in 
     accordance with paragraphs (1) and (2), the Attorney General 
     shall give preference to grant applications if--
       ``(A) the application includes a plan to use awarded funds 
     to engage in all activities described under paragraphs (1) 
     through (3) of subsection (b); or
       ``(B) the application includes a plan by the State or unit 
     of local government to continue funding of all activities 
     funded by the award after the expiration of the award.
       ``(4) Eligible entities soliciting data on child human 
     trafficking.--No eligible entity shall be disadvantaged in 
     being awarded a grant under subsection (a) on the grounds 
     that the eligible entity has only recently begun soliciting 
     data on child human trafficking.
       ``(d) Duration and Renewal of Award.--
       ``(1) In general.--A grant under this section shall expire 
     3 years after the date of award of the grant.
       ``(2) Renewal.--A grant under this section shall be 
     renewable not more than 2 times and for a period of not 
     greater than 2 years.
       ``(e) Evaluation.--The Attorney General shall--
       ``(1) enter into a contract with a nongovernmental 
     organization, including an academic or nonprofit 
     organization, that has experience with issues related to 
     child human trafficking and evaluation of grant programs to 
     conduct periodic evaluations of grants made under this 
     section to determine the impact and effectiveness of programs 
     funded with grants awarded under this section;
       ``(2) instruct the Inspector General of the Department of 
     Justice to review evaluations issued under paragraph (1) to 
     determine the methodological and statistical validity of the 
     evaluations; and
       ``(3) submit the results of any evaluation conducted 
     pursuant to paragraph (1) to--
       ``(A) the Committee on the Judiciary of the Senate; and
       ``(B) the Committee on the Judiciary of the House of 
     Representatives.
       ``(f) Mandatory Exclusion.--An eligible entity awarded 
     funds under this section that is found to have used grant 
     funds for any unauthorized expenditure or otherwise 
     unallowable cost shall not be eligible for any grant funds 
     awarded under the block grant for 2 fiscal years following 
     the year in which the unauthorized expenditure or unallowable 
     cost is reported.
       ``(g) Compliance Requirement.--An eligible entity shall not 
     be eligible to receive a grant under this section if within 
     the 5 fiscal years before submitting an application for a 
     grant under this section, the grantee has been found to have 
     violated the terms or conditions of a Government grant 
     program by utilizing grant funds for unauthorized 
     expenditures or otherwise unallowable costs.
       ``(h) Administrative Cap.--The cost of administering the 
     grants authorized by this section shall not exceed 5 percent 
     of the total amount expended to carry out this section.
       ``(i) Federal Share.--The Federal share of the cost of a 
     program funded by a grant awarded under this section shall 
     be--
       ``(1) 70 percent in the first year;
       ``(2) 60 percent in the second year; and
       ``(3) 50 percent in the third year, and in all subsequent 
     years.
       ``(j) Authorization of Funding; Fully Offset.--For purposes 
     of carrying out this section, the Attorney General, in 
     consultation with the Secretary of Health and Human Services, 
     is authorized to award not more than $7,000,000 of the funds 
     available in the Domestic Trafficking Victims' Fund, 
     established under section 3014 of title 18, United States 
     Code, for each of fiscal years 2016 through 2020.
       ``(k) Definitions.--In this section--
       ``(1) the term `child' means a person under the age of 18;
       ``(2) the term `child advocacy center' means a center 
     created under subtitle A of the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 
     1990 (42 U.S.C. 13001 et seq.);
       ``(3) the term `child human trafficking' means 1 or more 
     severe forms of trafficking in persons (as defined in section 
     103 of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 (22 
     U.S.C. 7102)) involving a victim who is a child; and
       ``(4) the term `eligible entity' means a State or unit of 
     local government that--
       ``(A) has significant criminal activity involving child 
     human trafficking;
       ``(B) has demonstrated cooperation between Federal, State, 
     local, and, where applicable, tribal law enforcement 
     agencies, prosecutors, and social service providers in 
     addressing child human trafficking;
       ``(C) has developed a workable, multi-disciplinary plan to 
     combat child human trafficking, including--
       ``(i) the establishment of a shelter for victims of child 
     human trafficking, through existing or new facilities;
       ``(ii) the provision of trauma-informed, gender-responsive 
     rehabilitative care to victims of child human trafficking;
       ``(iii) the provision of specialized training for law 
     enforcement officers and social service providers for all 
     forms of human trafficking, with a focus on domestic child 
     human trafficking;
       ``(iv) prevention, deterrence, and prosecution of offenses 
     involving child human trafficking, including soliciting, 
     patronizing, or purchasing human acts with children;
       ``(v) cooperation or referral agreements with organizations 
     providing outreach or other related services to runaway and 
     homeless youth;
       ``(vi) law enforcement protocols or procedures to screen 
     all individuals arrested for prostitution, whether adult or 
     child, for victimization by sex trafficking and by other 
     crimes, such as sexual assault and domestic violence; and
       ``(vii) cooperation or referral agreements with State child 
     welfare agencies and child advocacy centers; and
       ``(D) provides an assurance that, under the plan under 
     subparagraph (C), a victim of child human trafficking shall 
     not be required to collaborate with law enforcement officers 
     to have access to any shelter or services provided with a 
     grant under this section.
       ``(l) Grant Accountability; Specialized Victims' Service 
     Requirement.--No grant funds under this section may be 
     awarded or transferred to any entity unless such entity has 
     demonstrated substantial experience providing services to 
     victims of human trafficking or related populations (such as 
     runaway and homeless youth), or employs staff specialized in 
     the treatment of human trafficking victims.''.
       (b) Table of Contents.--The table of contents in section 
     1(b) of the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization 
     Act of 2005 (22 U.S.C. 7101 note) is amended by striking the 
     item relating to section 203 and inserting the following:

``Sec. 203. Victim-centered child human trafficking deterrence block 
              grant program.''.

     SEC. 104. DIRECT SERVICES FOR VICTIMS OF CHILD PORNOGRAPHY.

       The Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 13001 et 
     seq.) is amended--
       (1) in section 212(5) (42 U.S.C. 13001a(5)), by inserting 
     ``, including human trafficking and the production of child 
     pornography'' before the semicolon at the end; and
       (2) in section 214 (42 U.S.C. 13002)--
       (A) by redesignating subsections (b), (c), and (d) as 
     subsections (c), (d), and (e), respectively; and
       (B) by inserting after subsection (a) the following:
       ``(b) Direct Services for Victims of Child Pornography.--
     The Administrator, in coordination with the Director and with 
     the Director of the Office of Victims of Crime, may make 
     grants to develop and implement specialized programs to 
     identify and provide direct services to victims of child 
     pornography.''.

     SEC. 105. INCREASING COMPENSATION AND RESTITUTION FOR 
                   TRAFFICKING VICTIMS.

       (a) Amendments to Title 18.--Section 1594 of title 18, 
     United States Code, is amended--
       (1) in subsection (d)--
       (A) in paragraph (1)--
       (i) by striking ``that was used or'' and inserting ``that 
     was involved in, used, or''; and
       (ii) by inserting ``, and any property traceable to such 
     property'' after ``such violation''; and
       (B) in paragraph (2), by inserting ``, or any property 
     traceable to such property'' after ``such violation'';
       (2) in subsection (e)(1)(A)--
       (A) by striking ``used or'' and inserting ``involved in, 
     used, or''; and
       (B) by inserting ``, and any property traceable to such 
     property'' after ``any violation of this chapter'';
       (3) by redesignating subsection (f) as subsection (g); and
       (4) by inserting after subsection (e) the following:
       ``(f) Transfer of Forfeited Assets.--
       ``(1) In general.--Notwithstanding any other provision of 
     law, the Attorney General shall transfer assets forfeited 
     pursuant to this section, or the proceeds derived from the 
     sale thereof, to satisfy victim restitution orders arising 
     from violations of this chapter.
       ``(2) Priority.--Transfers pursuant to paragraph (1) shall 
     have priority over any other claims to the assets or their 
     proceeds.
       ``(3) Use of nonforfeited assets.--Transfers pursuant to 
     paragraph (1) shall not reduce or otherwise mitigate the 
     obligation of a person convicted of a violation of this 
     chapter to satisfy the full amount of a restitution order 
     through the use of non-forfeited assets or to reimburse the 
     Attorney General for the value of assets or proceeds 
     transferred under this subsection through the use of 
     nonforfeited assets.''.

[[Page S2341]]

       (b) Amendment to Title 28.--Section 524(c)(1)(B) of title 
     28, United States Code, is amended by inserting ``chapter 77 
     of title 18,'' after ``criminal drug laws of the United 
     States or of''.
       (c) Amendments to Title 31.--
       (1) In general.--Chapter 97 of title 31, United States 
     Code, is amended--
       (A) by redesignating section 9703 (as added by section 
     638(b)(1) of the Treasury, Postal Service, and General 
     Government Appropriations Act, 1993 (Public Law 102-393; 106 
     Stat. 1779)) as section 9705; and
       (B) in section 9705(a), as redesignated--
       (i) in paragraph (1)--

       (I) in subparagraph (I)--

       (aa) by striking ``payment'' and inserting ``Payment''; and
       (bb) by striking the semicolon at the end and inserting a 
     period; and

       (II) in subparagraph (J), by striking ``payment'' and 
     inserting ``Payment''; and

       (ii) in paragraph (2)--

       (I) in subparagraph (B)--

       (aa) in clause (iii)--
       (AA) in subclause (I), by striking ``or'' and inserting 
     ``of''; and
       (BB) in subclause (III), by striking ``and'' at the end;
       (bb) in clause (iv), by striking the period at the end and 
     inserting ``; and''; and
       (cc) by inserting after clause (iv) the following:
       ``(v) United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement 
     with respect to a violation of chapter 77 of title 18 
     (relating to human trafficking);'';

       (II) in subparagraph (G), by adding ``and'' at the end; and
       (III) in subparagraph (H), by striking ``; and'' and 
     inserting a period.

       (2) Technical and conforming amendments.--
       (A) Cross references.--
       (i) Title 28.--Section 524(c) of title 28, United States 
     Code, is amended--

       (I) in paragraph (4)(C), by striking ``section 
     9703(g)(4)(A)(ii)'' and inserting ``section 9705(g)(4)(A)'';
       (II) in paragraph (10), by striking ``section 9703(p)'' and 
     inserting ``section 9705(o)''; and
       (III) in paragraph (11), by striking ``section 9703'' and 
     inserting ``section 9705''.

       (ii)  Title 31.--Title 31, United States Code, is amended--

       (I) in section 312(d), by striking ``section 9703'' and 
     inserting ``section 9705''; and
       (II) in section 5340(1), by striking ``section 9703(p)(1)'' 
     and inserting ``section 9705(o)''.

       (iii) Title 39.--Section 2003(e)(1) of title 39, United 
     States Code, is amended by striking ``section 9703(p)'' and 
     inserting ``section 9705(o)''.
       (B) Table of sections.--The table of sections for chapter 
     97 of title 31, United States Code, is amended to read as 
     follows:

``9701. Fees and charges for Government services and things of value.
``9702. Investment of trust funds.
``9703. Managerial accountability and flexibility.
``9704. Pilot projects for managerial accountability and flexibility.
``9705. Department of the Treasury Forfeiture Fund.''.

     SEC. 106. STREAMLINING HUMAN TRAFFICKING INVESTIGATIONS.

       Section 2516 of title 18, United States Code, is amended--
       (1) in paragraph (1)--
       (A) in subparagraph (a), by inserting a comma after 
     ``weapons)'';
       (B) in subparagraph (c)--
       (i) by inserting ``section 1581 (peonage), section 1584 
     (involuntary servitude), section 1589 (forced labor), section 
     1590 (trafficking with respect to peonage, slavery, 
     involuntary servitude, or forced labor),'' before ``section 
     1591'';
       (ii) by inserting ``section 1592 (unlawful conduct with 
     respect to documents in furtherance of trafficking, peonage, 
     slavery, involuntary servitude, or forced labor),'' before 
     ``section 1751'';
       (iii) by inserting a comma after ``virus)'';
       (iv) by striking ``,, section'' and inserting a comma;
       (v) by striking ``or'' after ``misuse of passports),''; and
       (vi) by inserting ``or'' before ``section 555'';
       (C) in subparagraph (j), by striking ``pipeline,)'' and 
     inserting ``pipeline),''; and
       (D) in subparagraph (p), by striking ``documents, section 
     1028A (relating to aggravated identity theft))'' and 
     inserting ``documents), section 1028A (relating to aggravated 
     identity theft)''; and
       (2) in paragraph (2), by inserting ``human trafficking, 
     child sexual exploitation, child pornography production,'' 
     after ``kidnapping''.

     SEC. 107. ENHANCING HUMAN TRAFFICKING REPORTING.

       Section 505 of title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and 
     Safe Streets Act of 1968 (42 U.S.C. 3755) is amended by 
     adding at the end the following:
       ``(i) Part 1 Violent Crimes To Include Human Trafficking.--
     For purposes of this section, the term `part 1 violent 
     crimes' shall include severe forms of trafficking in persons 
     (as defined in section 103 of the Trafficking Victims 
     Protection Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 7102)).''.

     SEC. 108. REDUCING DEMAND FOR SEX TRAFFICKING.

       (a) In General.--Section 1591 of title 18, United States 
     Code, is amended--
       (1) in subsection (a)(1), by striking ``or maintains'' and 
     inserting ``maintains, patronizes, or solicits'';
       (2) in subsection (b)--
       (A) in paragraph (1), by striking ``or obtained'' and 
     inserting ``obtained, patronized, or solicited''; and
       (B) in paragraph (2), by striking ``or obtained'' and 
     inserting ``obtained, patronized, or solicited''; and
       (3) in subsection (c)--
       (A) by striking ``or maintained'' and inserting ``, 
     maintained, patronized, or solicited''; and
       (B) by striking ``knew that the person'' and inserting 
     ``knew, or recklessly disregarded the fact, that the 
     person''.
       (b) Definition Amended.--Section 103(10) of the Trafficking 
     Victims Protection Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 7102(10)) is 
     amended by striking ``or obtaining'' and inserting 
     ``obtaining, patronizing, or soliciting''.
       (c) Purpose.--The purpose of the amendments made by this 
     section is to clarify the range of conduct punished as sex 
     trafficking.

     SEC. 109. SENSE OF CONGRESS.

       It is the sense of Congress that--
       (1) section 1591 of title 18, United States Code, defines a 
     sex trafficker as a person who ``knowingly. . .recruits, 
     entices, harbors, transports, provides, obtains, or maintains 
     by any means a person. . .knowing, or in reckless disregard 
     of the fact, that means of force, threats of force, fraud, 
     coercion. . .or any combination of such means will be used to 
     cause the person to engage in a commercial sex act, or that 
     the person has not attained the age of 18 years and will be 
     caused to engage in a commercial sex act'';
       (2) while use of the word ``obtains'' in section 1591, 
     United States Code, has been interpreted, prior to the date 
     of enactment of this Act, to encompass those who purchase 
     illicit sexual acts from trafficking victims, some confusion 
     persists;
       (3) in United States vs. Jungers, 702 F.3d 1066 (8th Cir. 
     2013), the United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth 
     Circuit ruled that section 1591 of title 18, United States 
     Code, applied to persons who purchase illicit sexual acts 
     with trafficking victims after the United States District 
     Court for the District of South Dakota erroneously granted 
     motions to acquit these buyers in two separate cases; and
       (4) section 108 of this title amends section 1591 of title 
     18, United States Code, to add the words ``solicits or 
     patronizes'' to the sex trafficking statute making absolutely 
     clear for judges, juries, prosecutors, and law enforcement 
     officials that criminals who purchase sexual acts from human 
     trafficking victims may be arrested, prosecuted, and 
     convicted as sex trafficking offenders when this is merited 
     by the facts of a particular case.

     SEC. 110. USING EXISTING TASK FORCES AND COMPONENTS TO TARGET 
                   OFFENDERS WHO EXPLOIT CHILDREN.

       Not later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this 
     Act, the Attorney General shall ensure that--
       (1) all task forces and working groups within the Innocence 
     Lost National Initiative engage in activities, programs, or 
     operations to increase the investigative capabilities of 
     State and local law enforcement officers in the detection, 
     investigation, and prosecution of persons who patronize, or 
     solicit children for sex; and
       (2) all components and task forces with jurisdiction to 
     detect, investigate, and prosecute cases of child labor 
     trafficking engage in activities, programs, or operations to 
     increase the capacity of such components to deter and punish 
     child labor trafficking.

     SEC. 111. TARGETING CHILD PREDATORS.

       (a) Clarifying That Child Pornography Producers Are Human 
     Traffickers.--Section 2423(f) of title 18, United States 
     Code, is amended--
       (1) by striking ``means (1) a'' and inserting the 
     following: ``means--
       ``(1) a'';
       (2) by striking ``United States; or (2) any'' and inserting 
     the following: ``United States;
       ``(2) any''; and
       (3) by striking the period at the end and inserting the 
     following: ``; or
       ``(3) production of child pornography (as defined in 
     section 2256(8)).''.
       (b) Holding Sex Traffickers Accountable.--Section 2423(g) 
     of title 18, United States Code, is amended by striking ``a 
     preponderance of the evidence'' and inserting ``clear and 
     convincing evidence''.

     SEC. 112. MONITORING ALL HUMAN TRAFFICKERS AS VIOLENT 
                   CRIMINALS.

       Section 3156(a)(4)(C) of title 18, United States Code, is 
     amended by inserting ``77,'' after ``chapter''.

     SEC. 113. CRIME VICTIMS' RIGHTS.

       (a) In General.--Section 3771 of title 18, United States 
     Code, is amended--
       (1) in subsection (a), by adding at the end the following:
       ``(9) The right to be informed in a timely manner of any 
     plea bargain or deferred prosecution agreement.
       ``(10) The right to be informed of the rights under this 
     section and the services described in section 503(c) of the 
     Victims' Rights and Restitution Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 
     10607(c)) and provided contact information for the Office of 
     the Victims' Rights Ombudsman of the Department of 
     Justice.'';
       (2) in subsection (d)(3), in the fifth sentence, by 
     inserting ``, unless the litigants, with the approval of the 
     court, have stipulated to a different time period for 
     consideration'' before the period; and
       (3) in subsection (e)--
       (A) by striking ``this chapter, the term'' and inserting 
     the following: ``this chapter:

[[Page S2342]]

       ``(1) Court of appeals.--The term `court of appeals' 
     means--
       ``(A) the United States court of appeals for the judicial 
     district in which a defendant is being prosecuted; or
       ``(B) for a prosecution in the Superior Court of the 
     District of Columbia, the District of Columbia Court of 
     Appeals.
       ``(2) Crime victim.--
       ``(A) In general.--The term'';
       (B) by striking ``In the case'' and inserting the 
     following:
       ``(B) Minors and certain other victims.--In the case''; and
       (C) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(3) District court; court.--The terms `district court' 
     and `court' include the Superior Court of the District of 
     Columbia.''.
       (b) Crime Victims Fund.--Section 1402(d)(3)(A)(i) of the 
     Victims of Crime Act of 1984 (42 U.S.C. 10601(d)(3)(A)(i)) is 
     amended by inserting ``section'' before ``3771''.
       (c) Appellate Review of Petitions Relating to Crime 
     Victims' Rights.--
       (1) In general.--Section 3771(d)(3) of title 18, United 
     States Code, as amended by subsection (a)(2) of this section, 
     is amended by inserting after the fifth sentence the 
     following: ``In deciding such application, the court of 
     appeals shall apply ordinary standards of appellate 
     review.''.
       (2) Application.--The amendment made by paragraph (1) shall 
     apply with respect to any petition for a writ of mandamus 
     filed under section 3771(d)(3) of title 18, United States 
     Code, that is pending on the date of enactment of this Act.

     SEC. 114. COMBAT HUMAN TRAFFICKING ACT.

       (a) Short Title.--This section may be cited as the ``Combat 
     Human Trafficking Act of 2015''.
       (b) Definitions.--In this section:
       (1) Commercial sex act; severe forms of trafficking in 
     persons; state; task force.--The terms ``commercial sex 
     act'', ``severe forms of trafficking in persons'', ``State'', 
     and ``Task Force'' have the meanings given those terms in 
     section 103 of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 
     (22 U.S.C. 7102).
       (2) Covered offender.--The term ``covered offender'' means 
     an individual who obtains, patronizes, or solicits a 
     commercial sex act involving a person subject to severe forms 
     of trafficking in persons.
       (3) Covered offense.--The term ``covered offense'' means 
     the provision, obtaining, patronizing, or soliciting of a 
     commercial sex act involving a person subject to severe forms 
     of trafficking in persons.
       (4) Federal law enforcement officer.--The term ``Federal 
     law enforcement officer'' has the meaning given the term in 
     section 115 of title 18, United States Code.
       (5) Local law enforcement officer.--The term ``local law 
     enforcement officer'' means any officer, agent, or employee 
     of a unit of local government authorized by law or by a local 
     government agency to engage in or supervise the prevention, 
     detection, investigation, or prosecution of any violation of 
     criminal law.
       (6) State law enforcement officer.--The term ``State law 
     enforcement officer'' means any officer, agent, or employee 
     of a State authorized by law or by a State government agency 
     to engage in or supervise the prevention, detection, 
     investigation, or prosecution of any violation of criminal 
     law.
       (c) Department of Justice Training and Policy for Law 
     Enforcement Officers, Prosecutors, and Judges.--
       (1) Training.--
       (A) Law enforcement officers.--The Attorney General shall 
     ensure that each anti-human trafficking program operated by 
     the Department of Justice, including each anti-human 
     trafficking training program for Federal, State, or local law 
     enforcement officers, includes technical training on--
       (i) effective methods for investigating and prosecuting 
     covered offenders; and
       (ii) facilitating the provision of physical and mental 
     health services by health care providers to persons subject 
     to severe forms of trafficking in persons.
       (B) Federal prosecutors.--The Attorney General shall ensure 
     that each anti-human trafficking program operated by the 
     Department of Justice for United States attorneys or other 
     Federal prosecutors includes training on seeking restitution 
     for offenses under chapter 77 of title 18, United States 
     Code, to ensure that each United States attorney or other 
     Federal prosecutor, upon obtaining a conviction for such an 
     offense, requests a specific amount of restitution for each 
     victim of the offense without regard to whether the victim 
     requests restitution.
       (C) Judges.--The Federal Judicial Center shall provide 
     training to judges relating to the application of section 
     1593 of title 18, United States Code, with respect to 
     ordering restitution for victims of offenses under chapter 77 
     of such title.
       (2) Policy for federal law enforcement officers.--The 
     Attorney General shall ensure that Federal law enforcement 
     officers are engaged in activities, programs, or operations 
     involving the detection, investigation, and prosecution of 
     covered offenders.
       (d) Minimum Period of Supervised Release for Conspiracy To 
     Commit Commercial Child Sex Trafficking.--Section 3583(k) of 
     title 18, United States Code, is amended by inserting 
     ``1594(c),'' after ``1591,''.
       (e) Bureau of Justice Statistics Report on State 
     Enforcement of Human Trafficking Prohibitions.--The Director 
     of the Bureau of Justice Statistics shall--
       (1) prepare an annual report on--
       (A) the rates of--
       (i) arrest of individuals by State law enforcement officers 
     for a covered offense;
       (ii) prosecution (including specific charges) of 
     individuals in State court systems for a covered offense; and
       (iii) conviction of individuals in State court systems for 
     a covered offense; and
       (B) sentences imposed on individuals convicted in State 
     court systems for a covered offense; and
       (2) submit the annual report prepared under paragraph (1) 
     to--
       (A) the Committee on the Judiciary of the House of 
     Representatives;
       (B) the Committee on the Judiciary of the Senate;
       (C) the Task Force;
       (D) the Senior Policy Operating Group established under 
     section 105(g) of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 
     2000 (22 U.S.C. 7103(g)); and
       (E) the Attorney General.

     SEC. 115. SURVIVORS OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING EMPOWERMENT ACT.

       (a) Short Title.--This section may be cited as the 
     ``Survivors of Human Trafficking Empowerment Act''.
       (b) Establishment.--There is established the United States 
     Advisory Council on Human Trafficking (referred to in this 
     section as the ``Council''), which shall provide advice and 
     recommendations to the Senior Policy Operating Group 
     established under section 105(g) of the Trafficking Victims 
     Protection Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 7103(g)) (referred to in 
     this section as the ``Group'') and the President's 
     Interagency Task Force to Monitor and Combat Trafficking 
     established under section 105(a) of such Act (referred to in 
     this section as the ``Task Force'').
       (c) Membership.--
       (1) Composition.--The Council shall be composed of not less 
     than 8 and not more than 14 individuals who are survivors of 
     human trafficking.
       (2) Representation of survivors.--To the extent 
     practicable, members of the Council shall be survivors of 
     trafficking, who shall accurately reflect the diverse 
     backgrounds of survivors of trafficking, including--
       (A) survivors of sex trafficking and survivors of labor 
     trafficking; and
       (B) survivors who are United States citizens and survivors 
     who are aliens lawfully present in the United States.
       (3) Appointment.--Not later than 180 days after the date of 
     enactment of this Act, the President shall appoint the 
     members of the Council.
       (4) Term; reappointment.--Each member of the Council shall 
     serve for a term of 2 years and may be reappointed by the 
     President to serve 1 additional 2-year term.
       (d) Functions.--The Council shall--
       (1) be a nongovernmental advisory body to the Group;
       (2) meet, at its own discretion or at the request of the 
     Group, not less frequently than annually to review Federal 
     Government policy and programs intended to combat human 
     trafficking, including programs relating to the provision of 
     services for victims and serve as a point of contact for 
     Federal agencies reaching out to human trafficking survivors 
     for input on programming and policies relating to human 
     trafficking in the United States;
       (3) formulate assessments and recommendations to ensure 
     that policy and programming efforts of the Federal Government 
     conform, to the extent practicable, to the best practices in 
     the field of human trafficking prevention; and
       (4) meet with the Group not less frequently than annually, 
     and not later than 45 days before a meeting with the Task 
     Force, to formally present the findings and recommendations 
     of the Council.
       (e) Reports.--Not later than 1 year after the date of 
     enactment of this Act and each year thereafter until the date 
     described in subsection (h), the Council shall submit a 
     report that contains the findings derived from the reviews 
     conducted pursuant to subsection (d)(2) to--
       (1) the chair of the Task Force;
       (2) the members of the Group;
       (3) the Committees on Foreign Affairs, Homeland Security, 
     Appropriations, and the Judiciary of the House of 
     Representatives; and
       (4) the Committees on Foreign Relations, Appropriations, 
     Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs, and the Judiciary 
     of the Senate.
       (f) Employee Status.--Members of the Council--
       (1) shall not be considered employees of the Federal 
     Government for any purpose; and
       (2) shall not receive compensation other than reimbursement 
     of travel expenses and per diem allowance in accordance with 
     section 5703 of title 5, United States Code.
       (g) Nonapplicability of FACA.--The Council shall not be 
     subject to the requirements under the Federal Advisory 
     Committee Act (5 U.S.C. App.).
       (h) Sunset.--The Council shall terminate on September 30, 
     2020.

     SEC. 116. BRINGING MISSING CHILDREN HOME ACT.

       (a) Short Title.--This section may be cited as the 
     ``Bringing Missing Children Home Act''.
       (b) Crime Control Act Amendments.--Section 3702 of the 
     Crime Control Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 5780) is amended--
       (1) in paragraph (2), by striking ``and'' at the end;
       (2) in paragraph (3)--

[[Page S2343]]

       (A) by redesignating subparagraphs (B) and (C) as 
     subparagraphs (C) and (D), respectively; and
       (B) by inserting after subparagraph (A) the following:
       ``(B) a recent photograph of the child, if available;''; 
     and
       (3) in paragraph (4)--
       (A) in the matter preceding subparagraph (A), by striking 
     ``paragraph (2)'' and inserting ``paragraph (3)'';
       (B) in subparagraph (A)--
       (i) by striking ``60 days'' and inserting ``30 days''; and
       (ii) by inserting ``and a photograph taken during the 
     previous 180 days'' after ``dental records'';
       (C) in subparagraph (B), by striking ``and'' at the end;
       (D) by redesignating subparagraph (C) as subparagraph (D);
       (E) by inserting after subparagraph (B) the following:
       ``(C) notify the National Center for Missing and Exploited 
     Children of each report received relating to a child reported 
     missing from a foster care family home or childcare 
     institution;'';
       (F) in subparagraph (D), as redesignated--
       (i) by inserting ``State and local child welfare systems 
     and'' before ``the National Center for Missing and Exploited 
     Children''; and
       (ii) by striking the period at the end and inserting ``; 
     and''; and
       (G) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(E) grant permission to the National Crime Information 
     Center Terminal Contractor for the State to update the 
     missing person record in the National Crime Information 
     Center computer networks with additional information learned 
     during the investigation relating to the missing person.''.

     SEC. 117. GRANT ACCOUNTABILITY.

       (a) Definition.--In this section, the term ``covered 
     grant'' means a grant awarded by the Attorney General under 
     section 203 of the Trafficking Victims Protection 
     Reauthorization Act of 2005 (42 U.S.C. 14044b), as amended by 
     section 103.
       (b) Accountability.--All covered grants shall be subject to 
     the following accountability provisions:
       (1) Audit requirement.--
       (A) In general.--Beginning in the first fiscal year 
     beginning after the date of enactment of this Act, and in 
     each fiscal year thereafter, the Inspector General of the 
     Department of Justice shall conduct audits of recipients of a 
     covered grant to prevent waste, fraud, and abuse of funds by 
     grantees. The Inspector General shall determine the 
     appropriate number of grantees to be audited each year.
       (B) Definition.--In this paragraph, the term ``unresolved 
     audit finding'' means a finding in the final audit report of 
     the Inspector General that the audited grantee has utilized 
     grant funds for an unauthorized expenditure or otherwise 
     unallowable cost that is not closed or resolved within 12 
     months from the date when the final audit report is issued.
       (C) Mandatory exclusion.--A recipient of a covered grant 
     that is found to have an unresolved audit finding shall not 
     be eligible to receive a covered grant during the following 2 
     fiscal years.
       (D) Priority.--In awarding covered grants the Attorney 
     General shall give priority to eligible entities that did not 
     have an unresolved audit finding during the 3 fiscal years 
     prior to submitting an application for a covered grant.
       (E) Reimbursement.--If an entity is awarded a covered grant 
     during the 2-fiscal-year period in which the entity is barred 
     from receiving grants under subparagraph (C), the Attorney 
     General shall--
       (i) deposit an amount equal to the grant funds that were 
     improperly awarded to the grantee into the General Fund of 
     the Treasury; and
       (ii) seek to recoup the costs of the repayment to the fund 
     from the grant recipient that was erroneously awarded grant 
     funds.
       (2) Nonprofit organization requirements.--
       (A) Definition.--For purposes of this paragraph and covered 
     grants, the term ``nonprofit organization'' means an 
     organization that is described in section 501(c)(3) of the 
     Internal Revenue Code of 1986 and is exempt from taxation 
     under section 501(a) of such Code.
       (B) Prohibition.--The Attorney General may not award a 
     covered grant to a nonprofit organization that holds money in 
     offshore accounts for the purpose of avoiding paying the tax 
     described in section 511(a) of the Internal Revenue Code of 
     1986.
       (C) Disclosure.--Each nonprofit organization that is 
     awarded a covered grant and uses the procedures prescribed in 
     regulations to create a rebuttable presumption of 
     reasonableness for the compensation of its officers, 
     directors, trustees and key employees, shall disclose to the 
     Attorney General, in the application for the grant, the 
     process for determining such compensation, including the 
     independent persons involved in reviewing and approving such 
     compensation, the comparability data used, and 
     contemporaneous substantiation of the deliberation and 
     decision. Upon request, the Attorney General shall make the 
     information disclosed under this subsection available for 
     public inspection.
       (3) Conference expenditures.--
       (A) Limitation.--No amounts transferred to the Department 
     of Justice under this title, or the amendments made by this 
     title, may be used by the Attorney General, or by any 
     individual or organization awarded discretionary funds 
     through a cooperative agreement under this title, or the 
     amendments made by this title, to host or support any 
     expenditure for conferences that uses more than $20,000 in 
     Department funds, unless the Deputy Attorney General or such 
     Assistant Attorney Generals, Directors, or principal deputies 
     as the Deputy Attorney General may designate, provides prior 
     written authorization that the funds may be expended to host 
     a conference.
       (B) Written approval.--Written approval under subparagraph 
     (A) shall include a written estimate of all costs associated 
     with the conference, including the cost of all food and 
     beverages, audiovisual equipment, honoraria for speakers, and 
     any entertainment.
       (C) Report.--The Deputy Attorney General shall submit an 
     annual report to the Committee on the Judiciary of the Senate 
     and the Committee on the Judiciary of the House of 
     Representatives on all approved conference expenditures 
     referenced in this paragraph.
       (D) Annual certification.--Beginning in the first fiscal 
     year beginning after the date of enactment of this title, the 
     Attorney General shall submit, to the Committee on the 
     Judiciary and the Committee on Appropriations of the Senate 
     and the Committee on the Judiciary and the Committee on 
     Appropriations of the House of Representatives, an annual 
     certification that--
       (i) all audits issued by the Office of the Inspector 
     General under paragraph (1) have been completed and reviewed 
     by the appropriate Assistant Attorney General or Director;
       (ii) all mandatory exclusions required under paragraph 
     (1)(C) have been issued;
       (iii) all reimbursements required under paragraph (1)(E) 
     have been made; and
       (iv) includes a list of any grant recipients excluded under 
     paragraph (1) from the previous year.
       (4) Prohibition on lobbying activity.--
       (A) In general.--Amounts awarded under this title, or any 
     amendments made by this title, may not be utilized by any 
     grant recipient to--
       (i) lobby any representative of the Department of Justice 
     regarding the award of grant funding; or
       (ii) lobby any representative of a Federal, State, local, 
     or tribal government regarding the award of grant funding.
       (B) Penalty.--If the Attorney General determines that any 
     recipient of a covered grant has violated subparagraph (A), 
     the Attorney General shall--
       (i) require the grant recipient to repay the grant in full; 
     and
       (ii) prohibit the grant recipient from receiving another 
     covered grant for not less than 5 years.

     SEC. 118. SAVE ACT.

       (a) Short Title.--This section may be cited as the ``Stop 
     Advertising Victims of Exploitation Act of 2015'' or the 
     ``SAVE Act of 2015''.
       (b) Advertising That Offers Certain Commercial Acts.--
       (1) In general.--Section 1591(a)(1) of title 18, United 
     States Code, as amended by this Act, is further amended by 
     inserting ``advertises,'' after ``obtains,''.
       (2) Mens rea requirement.--Section 1591(a) of title 18, 
     United States Code, is amended in the undesignated matter 
     following paragraph (2), by inserting ``, except where the 
     act constituting the violation of paragraph (1) is 
     advertising,'' after ``knowing, or''.
       (3) Conforming amendments.--Section 1591(b) of title 18, 
     United States Code, as amended by this Act, is further 
     amended--
       (A) in paragraph (1), by inserting ``advertised,'' after 
     ``obtained,''; and
       (B) in paragraph (2), by inserting ``advertised,'' after 
     ``obtained,''.

     SEC. 119. EDUCATION AND OUTREACH TO TRAFFICKING SURVIVORS.

       The Attorney General shall make available, on the website 
     of the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, 
     a database for trafficking victim advocates, crisis hotline 
     personnel, foster parents, law enforcement personnel, and 
     crime survivors that contains information on--
       (1) counseling and hotline resources;
       (2) housing resources;
       (3) legal assistance; and
       (4) other services for trafficking survivors.

     SEC. 120. EXPANDED STATUTE OF LIMITATIONS FOR CIVIL ACTIONS 
                   BY CHILD TRAFFICKING SURVIVORS.

       Section 1595(c) of title 18, United States Code, is amended 
     by striking ``not later than 10 years after the cause of 
     action arose.'' and inserting ``not later than the later of--
       ``(1) 10 years after the cause of action arose; or
       ``(2) 10 years after the victim reaches 18 years of age, if 
     the victim was a minor at the time of the alleged offense.''.

     SEC. 121. GAO STUDY AND REPORT.

       (a) Study.--The Comptroller General of the United States 
     shall conduct a study on each program or initiative 
     authorized under this Act and the following statutes and 
     evaluate whether any program or initiative is duplicative:
       (1) Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 
     2005 (Public Law 109-164; 119 Stat. 3558).
       (2) Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 
     7101 et seq.).
       (3) Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 13001 et 
     seq.).

[[Page S2344]]

       (4) Runaway and Homeless Youth Act (42 U.S.C. 5701 et 
     seq.).
       (5) Missing Children's Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5771 et 
     seq.).
       (b) Report.--Not later than 180 days after the date of 
     enactment of this Act, the Comptroller General of the United 
     States shall submit to the Committee on the Judiciary of the 
     Senate and the Committee on the Judiciary of the House of 
     Representatives a report on the study conducted under 
     subsection (a), which shall include--
       (1) a description of the cost of any duplicative program or 
     initiative studied under subsection (a); and
       (2) recommendations on how to achieve cost savings with 
     respect to each duplicative program or initiative studied 
     under subsection (a).

                 TITLE II--COMBATING HUMAN TRAFFICKING

  Subtitle A--Enhancing Services for Runaway and Homeless Victims of 
                           Youth Trafficking

     SEC. 201. AMENDMENTS TO THE RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH ACT.

       The Runaway and Homeless Youth Act (42 U.S.C. 5701 et seq.) 
     is amended--
       (1) in section 343(b)(5) (42 U.S.C. 5714-23(b)(5))--
       (A) in subparagraph (A) by inserting ``, severe forms of 
     trafficking in persons (as defined in section 103(9) of the 
     Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 
     7102(9))), and sex trafficking (as defined in section 103(10) 
     of such Act (22 U.S.C. 7102(10)))'' before the semicolon at 
     the end;
       (B) in subparagraph (B) by inserting ``, severe forms of 
     trafficking in persons (as defined in section 103(9) of the 
     Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 
     7102(9))), or sex trafficking (as defined in section 103(10) 
     of such Act (22 U.S.C. 7102(10)))'' after ``assault''; and
       (C) in subparagraph (C) by inserting ``, including such 
     youth who are victims of trafficking (as defined in section 
     103(15) of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 (22 
     U.S.C. 7102(15)))'' before the semicolon at the end; and
       (2) in section 351(a) (42 U.S.C. 5714-41(a)) by striking 
     ``or sexual exploitation'' and inserting ``sexual 
     exploitation, severe forms of trafficking in persons (as 
     defined in section 103(9) of the Trafficking Victims 
     Protection Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 7102(9))), or sex 
     trafficking (as defined in section 103(10) of such Act (22 
     U.S.C. 7102(10)))''.

 Subtitle B--Improving the Response to Victims of Child Sex Trafficking

     SEC. 211. RESPONSE TO VICTIMS OF CHILD SEX TRAFFICKING.

       Section 404(b)(1)(P)(iii) of the Missing Children's 
     Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5773(b)(1)(P)(iii)) is amended by 
     striking ``child prostitution'' and inserting ``child sex 
     trafficking, including child prostitution''.

  Subtitle C--Interagency Task Force to Monitor and Combat Trafficking

     SEC. 221. VICTIM OF TRAFFICKING DEFINED.

       In this subtitle, the term ``victim of trafficking'' has 
     the meaning given such term in section 103 of the Trafficking 
     Victims Protection Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 7102).

     SEC. 222. INTERAGENCY TASK FORCE REPORT ON CHILD TRAFFICKING 
                   PRIMARY PREVENTION.

       (a) Review.--The Interagency Task Force to Monitor and 
     Combat Trafficking, established under section 105 of the 
     Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 7103), 
     shall conduct a review that, with regard to trafficking in 
     persons in the United States--
       (1) in consultation with nongovernmental organizations that 
     the Task Force determines appropriate, surveys and catalogs 
     the activities of the Federal Government and State 
     governments--
       (A) to deter individuals from committing trafficking 
     offenses; and
       (B) to prevent children from becoming victims of 
     trafficking;
       (2) surveys academic literature on--
       (A) deterring individuals from committing trafficking 
     offenses;
       (B) preventing children from becoming victims of 
     trafficking;
       (C) the commercial sexual exploitation of children; and
       (D) other similar topics that the Task Force determines to 
     be appropriate;
       (3) identifies best practices and effective strategies--
       (A) to deter individuals from committing trafficking 
     offenses; and
       (B) to prevent children from becoming victims of 
     trafficking; and
       (4) identifies current gaps in research and data that would 
     be helpful in formulating effective strategies--
       (A) to deter individuals from committing trafficking 
     offenses; and
       (B) to prevent children from becoming victims of 
     trafficking.
       (b) Report.--Not later than 1 year after the date of the 
     enactment of this Act, the Interagency Task Force to Monitor 
     and Combat Trafficking shall provide to Congress, and make 
     publicly available in electronic format, a report on the 
     review conducted pursuant to subparagraph (a).

     SEC. 223. GAO REPORT ON INTERVENTION.

       On the date that is 1 year after the date of the enactment 
     of this Act, the Comptroller General of the United States 
     shall submit a report to Congress that includes information 
     on--
       (1) the efforts of Federal and select State law enforcement 
     agencies to combat human trafficking in the United States; 
     and
       (2) each Federal grant program, a purpose of which is to 
     combat human trafficking or assist victims of trafficking, as 
     specified in an authorizing statute or in a guidance document 
     issued by the agency carrying out the grant program.

     SEC. 224. PROVISION OF HOUSING PERMITTED TO PROTECT AND 
                   ASSIST IN THE RECOVERY OF VICTIMS OF 
                   TRAFFICKING.

       Section 107(b)(2)(A) of the Trafficking Victims Protection 
     Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 7105(b)(2)(A)) is amended by inserting 
     ``, including programs that provide housing to victims of 
     trafficking'' before the period at the end.

                     Subtitle D--Expanded Training

     SEC. 231. EXPANDED TRAINING RELATING TO TRAFFICKING IN 
                   PERSONS.

       Section 105(c)(4) of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act 
     of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 7105(c)(4)) is amended--
       (1) by striking ``Appropriate personnel'' and inserting the 
     following:
       ``(A) In general.--Appropriate personnel'';
       (2) in subparagraph (A), as redesignated, by inserting ``, 
     including members of the Service (as such term is defined in 
     section 103 of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 
     3903))'' after ``Department of State''; and
       (3) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(B) Training components.--Training under this paragraph 
     shall include--
       ``(i) a distance learning course on trafficking-in-persons 
     issues and the Department of State's obligations under this 
     Act, which shall be designed for embassy reporting officers, 
     regional bureaus' trafficking-in-persons coordinators, and 
     their superiors;
       ``(ii) specific trafficking-in-persons briefings for all 
     ambassadors and deputy chiefs of mission before such 
     individuals depart for their posts; and
       ``(iii) at least annual reminders to all personnel referred 
     to in clauses (i) and (ii), including appropriate personnel 
     from other Federal departments and agencies, at each 
     diplomatic or consular post of the Department of State 
     located outside the United States of--

       ``(I) key problems, threats, methods, and warning signs of 
     trafficking in persons specific to the country or 
     jurisdiction in which each such post is located; and
       ``(II) appropriate procedures to report information that 
     any such personnel may acquire about possible cases of 
     trafficking in persons.''.

                          TITLE III--HERO ACT

     SEC. 301. SHORT TITLE.

       This title may be cited as the ``Human Exploitation Rescue 
     Operations Act of 2015'' or the ``HERO Act of 2015''.

     SEC. 302. HERO ACT.

       (a) Findings.--Congress finds the following:
       (1) The illegal market for the production and distribution 
     of child abuse imagery is a growing threat to children in the 
     United States. International demand for this material creates 
     a powerful incentive for the rape, abuse, and torture of 
     children within the United States.
       (2) The targeting of United States children by 
     international criminal networks is a threat to the homeland 
     security of the United States. This threat must be fought 
     with trained personnel and highly specialized counter-child-
     exploitation strategies and technologies.
       (3) The United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement 
     of the Department of Homeland Security serves a critical 
     national security role in protecting the United States from 
     the growing international threat of child exploitation and 
     human trafficking.
       (4) The Cyber Crimes Center of the United States 
     Immigration and Customs Enforcement is a vital national 
     resource in the effort to combat international child 
     exploitation, providing advanced expertise and assistance in 
     investigations, computer forensics, and victim 
     identification.
       (5) The returning military heroes of the United States 
     possess unique and valuable skills that can assist law 
     enforcement in combating global sexual and child 
     exploitation, and the Department of Homeland Security should 
     use this national resource to the maximum extent possible.
       (6) Through the Human Exploitation Rescue Operative (HERO) 
     Child Rescue Corps program, the returning military heroes of 
     the United States are trained and hired to investigate crimes 
     of child exploitation in order to target predators and rescue 
     children from sexual abuse and slavery.
       (b) Cyber Crimes Center, Child Exploitation Investigations 
     Unit, and Computer Forensics Unit.--
       (1) In general.--Subtitle H of title VIII of the Homeland 
     Security Act of 2002 (6 U.S.C. 451 et seq.) is amended by 
     adding at the end the following:

     ``SEC. 890A. CYBER CRIMES CENTER, CHILD EXPLOITATION 
                   INVESTIGATIONS UNIT, COMPUTER FORENSICS UNIT, 
                   AND CYBER CRIMES UNIT.

       ``(a) Cyber Crimes Center.--
       ``(1) In general.--The Secretary shall operate, within 
     United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement, a Cyber 
     Crimes Center (referred to in this section as the `Center').
       ``(2) Purpose.--The purpose of the Center shall be to 
     provide investigative assistance, training, and equipment to 
     support United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement's 
     domestic and international investigations of cyber-related 
     crimes.

[[Page S2345]]

       ``(b) Child Exploitation Investigations Unit.--
       ``(1) In general.--The Secretary shall operate, within the 
     Center, a Child Exploitation Investigations Unit (referred to 
     in this subsection as the `CEIU').
       ``(2) Functions.--The CEIU--
       ``(A) shall coordinate all United States Immigration and 
     Customs Enforcement child exploitation initiatives, including 
     investigations into--
       ``(i) child exploitation;
       ``(ii) child pornography;
       ``(iii) child victim identification;
       ``(iv) traveling child sex offenders; and
       ``(v) forced child labor, including the sexual exploitation 
     of minors;
       ``(B) shall, among other things, focus on--
       ``(i) child exploitation prevention;
       ``(ii) investigative capacity building;
       ``(iii) enforcement operations; and
       ``(iv) training for Federal, State, local, tribal, and 
     foreign law enforcement agency personnel, upon request;
       ``(C) shall provide training, technical expertise, support, 
     or coordination of child exploitation investigations, as 
     needed, to cooperating law enforcement agencies and 
     personnel;
       ``(D) shall provide psychological support and counseling 
     services for United States Immigration and Customs 
     Enforcement personnel engaged in child exploitation 
     prevention initiatives, including making available other 
     existing services to assist employees who are exposed to 
     child exploitation material during investigations;
       ``(E) is authorized to collaborate with the Department of 
     Defense and the National Association to Protect Children for 
     the purpose of the recruiting, training, equipping and hiring 
     of wounded, ill, and injured veterans and transitioning 
     service members, through the Human Exploitation Rescue 
     Operative (HERO) Child Rescue Corps program; and
       ``(F) shall collaborate with other governmental, 
     nongovernmental, and nonprofit entities approved by the 
     Secretary for the sponsorship of, and participation in, 
     outreach and training activities.
       ``(3) Data collection.--The CEIU shall collect and maintain 
     data concerning--
       ``(A) the total number of suspects identified by United 
     States Immigration and Customs Enforcement;
       ``(B) the number of arrests by United States Immigration 
     and Customs Enforcement, disaggregated by type, including--
       ``(i) the number of victims identified through 
     investigations carried out by United States Immigration and 
     Customs Enforcement; and
       ``(ii) the number of suspects arrested who were in 
     positions of trust or authority over children;
       ``(C) the number of cases opened for investigation by 
     United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement; and
       ``(D) the number of cases resulting in a Federal, State, 
     foreign, or military prosecution.
       ``(4) Availability of data to congress.--In addition to 
     submitting the reports required under paragraph (7), the CEIU 
     shall make the data collected and maintained under paragraph 
     (3) available to the committees of Congress described in 
     paragraph (7).
       ``(5) Cooperative agreements.--The CEIU is authorized to 
     enter into cooperative agreements to accomplish the functions 
     set forth in paragraphs (2) and (3).
       ``(6) Acceptance of gifts.--
       ``(A) In general.--The Secretary is authorized to accept 
     monies and in-kind donations from the Virtual Global 
     Taskforce, national laboratories, Federal agencies, not-for-
     profit organizations, and educational institutions to create 
     and expand public awareness campaigns in support of the 
     functions of the CEIU.
       ``(B) Exemption from federal acquisition regulation.--Gifts 
     authorized under subparagraph (A) shall not be subject to the 
     Federal Acquisition Regulation for competition when the 
     services provided by the entities referred to in such 
     subparagraph are donated or of minimal cost to the 
     Department.
       ``(7) Reports.--Not later than 1 year after the date of the 
     enactment of the HERO Act of 2015, and annually for the 
     following 4 years, the CEIU shall--
       ``(A) submit a report containing a summary of the data 
     collected pursuant to paragraph (3) during the previous year 
     to--
       ``(i) the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
     Affairs of the Senate;
       ``(ii) the Committee on the Judiciary of the Senate;
       ``(iii) the Committee on Appropriations of the Senate;
       ``(iv) the Committee on Homeland Security of the House of 
     Representatives;
       ``(v) the Committee on the Judiciary of the House of 
     Representatives; and
       ``(vi) the Committee on Appropriations of the House of 
     Representatives; and
       ``(B) make a copy of each report submitted under 
     subparagraph (A) publicly available on the website of the 
     Department.
       ``(c) Computer Forensics Unit.--
       ``(1) In general.--The Secretary shall operate, within the 
     Center, a Computer Forensics Unit (referred to in this 
     subsection as the `CFU').
       ``(2) Functions.--The CFU--
       ``(A) shall provide training and technical support in 
     digital forensics to--
       ``(i) United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement 
     personnel; and
       ``(ii) Federal, State, local, tribal, military, and foreign 
     law enforcement agency personnel engaged in the investigation 
     of crimes within their respective jurisdictions, upon request 
     and subject to the availability of funds;
       ``(B) shall provide computer hardware, software, and 
     forensic licenses for all computer forensics personnel within 
     United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement;
       ``(C) shall participate in research and development in the 
     area of digital forensics, in coordination with appropriate 
     components of the Department; and
       ``(D) is authorized to collaborate with the Department of 
     Defense and the National Association to Protect Children for 
     the purpose of recruiting, training, equipping, and hiring 
     wounded, ill, and injured veterans and transitioning service 
     members, through the Human Exploitation Rescue Operative 
     (HERO) Child Rescue Corps program.
       ``(3) Cooperative agreements.--The CFU is authorized to 
     enter into cooperative agreements to accomplish the functions 
     set forth in paragraph (2).
       ``(4) Acceptance of gifts.--
       ``(A) In general.--The Secretary is authorized to accept 
     monies and in-kind donations from the Virtual Global Task 
     Force, national laboratories, Federal agencies, not-for-
     profit organizations, and educational institutions to create 
     and expand public awareness campaigns in support of the 
     functions of the CFU.
       ``(B) Exemption from federal acquisition regulation.--Gifts 
     authorized under subparagraph (A) shall not be subject to the 
     Federal Acquisition Regulation for competition when the 
     services provided by the entities referred to in such 
     subparagraph are donated or of minimal cost to the 
     Department.
       ``(d) Cyber Crimes Unit.--
       ``(1) In general.--The Secretary shall operate, within the 
     Center, a Cyber Crimes Unit (referred to in this subsection 
     as the `CCU').
       ``(2) Functions.--The CCU--
       ``(A) shall oversee the cyber security strategy and cyber-
     related operations and programs for United States Immigration 
     and Customs Enforcement;
       ``(B) shall enhance United States Immigration and Customs 
     Enforcement's ability to combat criminal enterprises 
     operating on or through the Internet, with specific focus in 
     the areas of--
       ``(i) cyber economic crime;
       ``(ii) digital theft of intellectual property;
       ``(iii) illicit e-commerce (including hidden marketplaces);
       ``(iv) Internet-facilitated proliferation of arms and 
     strategic technology; and
       ``(v) cyber-enabled smuggling and money laundering;
       ``(C) shall provide training and technical support in cyber 
     investigations to--
       ``(i) United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement 
     personnel; and
       ``(ii) Federal, State, local, tribal, military, and foreign 
     law enforcement agency personnel engaged in the investigation 
     of crimes within their respective jurisdictions, upon request 
     and subject to the availability of funds;
       ``(D) shall participate in research and development in the 
     area of cyber investigations, in coordination with 
     appropriate components of the Department; and
       ``(E) is authorized to recruit participants of the Human 
     Exploitation Rescue Operative (HERO) Child Rescue Corps 
     program for investigative and forensic positions in support 
     of the functions of the CCU.
       ``(3) Cooperative agreements.--The CCU is authorized to 
     enter into cooperative agreements to accomplish the functions 
     set forth in paragraph (2).
       ``(e) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are 
     authorized to be appropriated to the Secretary such sums as 
     are necessary to carry out this section.''.
       (2) Table of contents amendment.--The table of contents in 
     section 1(b) of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (6 U.S.C. 
     101 note) is amended by adding after the item relating to 
     section 890 the following:

``Sec. 890A. Cyber crimes center, child exploitation investigations 
              unit, computer forensics unit, and cyber crimes unit.''.
       (c) HERO Corps Hiring.--It is the sense of Congress that 
     Homeland Security Investigations of the United States 
     Immigration and Customs Enforcement should hire, recruit, 
     train, and equip wounded, ill, or injured military veterans 
     (as defined in section 101, title 38, United States Code) who 
     are affiliated with the HERO Child Rescue Corps program for 
     investigative, intelligence, analyst, and forensic positions.
       (d) Investigating Child Exploitation.--Section 307(b)(3) of 
     the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (6 U.S.C. 187(b)(3)) is 
     amended--
       (1) in subparagraph (B), by striking ``and'' at the end;
       (2) in subparagraph (C), by striking the period at the end 
     and inserting ``; and''; and
       (3) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(D) conduct research and development for the purpose of 
     advancing technology for the investigation of child 
     exploitation crimes, including child victim identification, 
     trafficking in persons, and child pornography, and for 
     advanced forensics.''.

     SEC. 303. TRANSPORTATION FOR ILLEGAL SEXUAL ACTIVITY AND 
                   RELATED CRIMES.

       Chapter 117 of title 18, United States Code, is amended by 
     striking section 2421 and inserting the following:

[[Page S2346]]

     ``Sec. 2421. Transportation generally

       ``(a) In General.--Whoever knowingly transports any 
     individual in interstate or foreign commerce, or in any 
     Territory or Possession of the United States, with intent 
     that such individual engage in prostitution, or in any sexual 
     activity for which any person can be charged with a criminal 
     offense, or attempts to do so, shall be fined under this 
     title or imprisoned not more than 10 years, or both.
       ``(b) Requests To Prosecute Violations by State Attorneys 
     General.--
       ``(1) In general.--The Attorney General shall grant a 
     request by a State attorney general that a State or local 
     attorney be cross designated to prosecute a violation of this 
     section unless the Attorney General determines that granting 
     the request would undermine the administration of justice.
       ``(2) Reason for denial.--If the Attorney General denies a 
     request under paragraph (1), the Attorney General shall 
     submit to the State attorney general a detailed reason for 
     the denial not later than 60 days after the date on which a 
     request is received.''.

                 TITLE IV--RAPE SURVIVOR CHILD CUSTODY

     SEC. 401. SHORT TITLE.

       This title may be cited as the ``Rape Survivor Child 
     Custody Act''.

     SEC. 402. DEFINITIONS.

       In this title:
       (1) Covered formula grant.--The term ``covered formula 
     grant'' means a grant under--
       (A) part T of title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe 
     Streets Act of 1968 (42 U.S.C. 3796gg et seq.) (commonly 
     referred to as the ``STOP Violence Against Women Formula 
     Grant Program''); or
       (B) section 41601 of the Violence Against Women Act of 1994 
     (42 U.S.C. 14043g) (commonly referred to as the ``Sexual 
     Assault Services Program'').
       (2) Termination.--
       (A) In general.--The term ``termination'' means, when used 
     with respect to parental rights, a complete and final 
     termination of the parent's right to custody of, guardianship 
     of, visitation with, access to, and inheritance from a child.
       (B) Rule of construction.--Nothing in this paragraph shall 
     be construed to require a State, in order to receive an 
     increase in the amount provided to the State under the 
     covered formula grants under this title, to have in place a 
     law that terminates any obligation of a person who fathered a 
     child through rape to support the child.

     SEC. 403. FINDINGS.

       Congress finds the following:
       (1) Men who father children through rape should be 
     prohibited from visiting or having custody of those children.
       (2) Thousands of rape-related pregnancies occur annually in 
     the United States.
       (3) A substantial number of women choose to raise their 
     child conceived through rape and, as a result, may face 
     custody battles with their rapists.
       (4) Rape is one of the most under-prosecuted serious 
     crimes, with estimates of criminal conviction occurring in 
     less than 5 percent of rapes.
       (5) The clear and convincing evidence standard is the most 
     common standard for termination of parental rights among the 
     50 States, territories, and the District of Columbia.
       (6) The Supreme Court established that the clear and 
     convincing evidence standard satisfies due process for 
     allegations to terminate or restrict parental rights in 
     Santosky v. Kramer (455 U.S. 745 (1982)).
       (7) Currently only 10 States have statutes allowing rape 
     survivors to petition for the termination of parental rights 
     of the rapist based on clear and convincing evidence that the 
     child was conceived through rape.
       (8) A rapist pursuing parental or custody rights causes the 
     survivor to have continued interaction with the rapist, which 
     can have traumatic psychological effects on the survivor, and 
     can make it more difficult for her to recover.
       (9) These traumatic effects on the mother can severely 
     negatively impact her ability to raise a healthy child.
       (10) Rapists may use the threat of pursuing custody or 
     parental rights to coerce survivors into not prosecuting 
     rape, or otherwise harass, intimidate, or manipulate them.

     SEC. 404. INCREASED FUNDING FOR FORMULA GRANTS AUTHORIZED.

       The Attorney General shall increase the amount provided to 
     a State under the covered formula grants in accordance with 
     this title if the State has in place a law that allows the 
     mother of any child that was conceived through rape to seek 
     court-ordered termination of the parental rights of her 
     rapist with regard to that child, which the court is 
     authorized to grant upon clear and convincing evidence of 
     rape.

     SEC. 405. APPLICATION.

       A State seeking an increase in the amount provided to the 
     State under the covered formula grants shall include in the 
     application of the State for each covered formula grant such 
     information as the Attorney General may reasonably require, 
     including information about the law described in section 404.

     SEC. 406. GRANT INCREASE.

       The amount of the increase provided to a State under the 
     covered formula grants under this title shall be equal to not 
     more than 10 percent of the average of the total amount of 
     funding provided to the State under the covered formula 
     grants under the 3 most recent awards to the State.

     SEC. 407. PERIOD OF INCREASE.

       (a) In General.--The Attorney General shall provide an 
     increase in the amount provided to a State under the covered 
     formula grants under this title for a 2-year period.
       (b) Limit.--The Attorney General may not provide an 
     increase in the amount provided to a State under the covered 
     formula grants under this title more than 4 times.

     SEC. 408. ALLOCATION OF INCREASED FORMULA GRANT FUNDS.

       The Attorney General shall allocate an increase in the 
     amount provided to a State under the covered formula grants 
     under this title such that--
       (1) 25 percent the amount of the increase is provided under 
     the program described in section 402(1)(A); and
       (2) 75 percent the amount of the increase is provided under 
     the program described in section 402(1)(B).

     SEC. 409. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

       There is authorized to be appropriated to carry out this 
     title $5,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2015 through 2019.

                TITLE V--MILITARY SEX OFFENDER REPORTING

     SEC. 501. SHORT TITLE.

       This title may be cited as the ``Military Sex Offender 
     Reporting Act of 2015''.

     SEC. 502. REGISTRATION OF SEX OFFENDERS RELEASED FROM 
                   MILITARY CORRECTIONS FACILITIES OR UPON 
                   CONVICTION.

       (a) In General.--The Sex Offender Registration and 
     Notification Act is amended by inserting after section 128 
     (42 U.S.C. 16928) the following:

     ``SEC. 128A. REGISTRATION OF SEX OFFENDERS RELEASED FROM 
                   MILITARY CORRECTIONS FACILITIES OR UPON 
                   CONVICTION.

       ``The Secretary of Defense shall provide to the Attorney 
     General the information described in section 114 to be 
     included in the National Sex Offender Registry and the Dru 
     Sjodin National Sex Offender Public Website regarding 
     persons--
       ``(1)(A) released from military corrections facilities; or
       ``(B) convicted if the sentences adjudged by courts-martial 
     under chapter 47 of title 10, United States Code (the Uniform 
     Code of Military Justice), do not include confinement; and
       ``(2) required to register under this title.''.
       (b) Technical and Conforming Amendment.--The table of 
     contents of the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act is 
     amended by inserting after the item relating to section 128 
     the following:

``Sec. 128A. Registration of sex offenders released from military 
              corrections facilities or upon conviction.''.

          TITLE VI--STOPPING EXPLOITATION THROUGH TRAFFICKING

     SEC. 601. SAFE HARBOR INCENTIVES.

       Part Q of title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe 
     Streets Act of 1968 (42 U.S.C. 3796dd et seq.) is amended--
       (1) in section 1701(c), by striking ``where feasible'' and 
     all that follows, and inserting the following: ``where 
     feasible, to an application--
       ``(1) for hiring and rehiring additional career law 
     enforcement officers that involves a non-Federal contribution 
     exceeding the 25 percent minimum under subsection (g); or
       ``(2) from an applicant in a State that has in effect a law 
     that--
       ``(A) treats a minor who has engaged in, or has attempted 
     to engage in, a commercial sex act as a victim of a severe 
     form of trafficking in persons;
       ``(B) discourages or prohibits the charging or prosecution 
     of an individual described in subparagraph (A) for a 
     prostitution or sex trafficking offense, based on the conduct 
     described in subparagraph (A); and
       ``(C) encourages the diversion of an individual described 
     in subparagraph (A) to appropriate service providers, 
     including child welfare services, victim treatment programs, 
     child advocacy centers, rape crisis centers, or other social 
     services.''; and
       (2) in section 1709, by inserting at the end the following:
       ``(5) `commercial sex act' has the meaning given the term 
     in section 103 of the Victims of Trafficking and Violence 
     Protection Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 7102).
       ``(6) `minor' means an individual who has not attained the 
     age of 18 years.
       ``(7) `severe form of trafficking in persons' has the 
     meaning given the term in section 103 of the Victims of 
     Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 
     7102).''.

     SEC. 602. REPORT ON RESTITUTION PAID IN CONNECTION WITH 
                   CERTAIN TRAFFICKING OFFENSES.

       Section 105(d)(7)(Q) of the Victims of Trafficking and 
     Violence Protection Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 7103(d)(7)(Q)) is 
     amended--
       (1) by inserting after ``1590,'' the following: ``1591,'';
       (2) by striking ``and 1594'' and inserting ``1594, 2251, 
     2251A, 2421, 2422, and 2423'';
       (3) in clause (iv), by striking ``and'' at the end;
       (4) in clause (v), by striking ``and'' at the end; and
       (5) by inserting after clause (v) the following:
       ``(vi) the number of individuals required by a court order 
     to pay restitution in connection with a violation of each 
     offense under title 18, United States Code, the amount of 
     restitution required to be paid under each such order, and 
     the amount of restitution actually paid pursuant to each such 
     order; and

[[Page S2347]]

       ``(vii) the age, gender, race, country of origin, country 
     of citizenship, and description of the role in the offense of 
     individuals convicted under each offense; and''.

     SEC. 603. NATIONAL HUMAN TRAFFICKING HOTLINE.

       Section 107(b)(1)(B) of the Victims of Crime Trafficking 
     and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 7105(b)(1)(B)) 
     is amended--
       (1) by striking ``Subject'' and inserting the following:
       ``(i) In general.--Subject''; and
       (2) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(ii) National human trafficking hotline.--Beginning in 
     fiscal year 2017, and in each fiscal year thereafter, of 
     amounts made available for grants under paragraph (2), the 
     Secretary of Health and Human Services shall make grants for 
     a national communication system to assist victims of severe 
     forms of trafficking in persons in communicating with service 
     providers. The Secretary shall give priority to grant 
     applicants that have experience in providing telephone 
     services to victims of severe forms of trafficking in 
     persons.''.

     SEC. 604. JOB CORPS ELIGIBILITY.

       Section 144(a)(3) of the Workforce Innovation and 
     Opportunity Act (29 U.S.C. 3194(a)(3)) is amended by adding 
     at the end the following:
       ``(F) A victim of a severe form of trafficking in persons 
     (as defined in section 103 of the Victims of Trafficking and 
     Violence Protection Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 7102)). 
     Notwithstanding paragraph (2), an individual described in 
     this subparagraph shall not be required to demonstrate 
     eligibility under such paragraph.''.

     SEC. 605. CLARIFICATION OF AUTHORITY OF THE UNITED STATES 
                   MARSHALS SERVICE.

       Section 566(e)(1) of title 28, United States Code, is 
     amended--
       (1) in subparagraph (B), by striking ``and'' at the end;
       (2) in subparagraph (C), by striking the period at the end 
     and inserting ``; and''; and
       (3) by inserting after subparagraph (C) the following:
       ``(D) assist State, local, and other Federal law 
     enforcement agencies, upon the request of such an agency, in 
     locating and recovering missing children.''.

     SEC. 606. ESTABLISHING A NATIONAL STRATEGY TO COMBAT HUMAN 
                   TRAFFICKING.

       (a) In General.--The Attorney General shall implement and 
     maintain a National Strategy for Combating Human Trafficking 
     (referred to in this section as the ``National Strategy'') in 
     accordance with this section.
       (b) Required Contents of National Strategy.--The National 
     Strategy shall include the following:
       (1) Integrated Federal, State, local, and tribal efforts to 
     investigate and prosecute human trafficking cases, 
     including--
       (A) the development by each United States attorney, in 
     consultation with State, local, and tribal government 
     agencies, of a district-specific strategic plan to coordinate 
     the identification of victims and the investigation and 
     prosecution of human trafficking crimes;
       (B) the appointment of not fewer than 1 assistant United 
     States attorney in each district dedicated to the prosecution 
     of human trafficking cases or responsible for implementing 
     the National Strategy;
       (C) the participation in any Federal, State, local, or 
     tribal human trafficking task force operating in the district 
     of the United States attorney; and
       (D) any other efforts intended to enhance the level of 
     coordination and cooperation, as determined by the Attorney 
     General.
       (2) Case coordination within the Department of Justice, 
     including specific integration, coordination, and 
     collaboration, as appropriate, on human trafficking 
     investigations between and among the United States attorneys, 
     the Human Trafficking Prosecution Unit, the Child 
     Exploitation and Obscenity Section, and the Federal Bureau of 
     Investigation.
       (3) Annual budget priorities and Federal efforts dedicated 
     to preventing and combating human trafficking, including 
     resources dedicated to the Human Trafficking Prosecution 
     Unit, the Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section, the 
     Federal Bureau of Investigation, and all other entities that 
     receive Federal support that have a goal or mission to combat 
     the exploitation of adults and children.
       (4) An ongoing assessment of the future trends, challenges, 
     and opportunities, including new investigative strategies, 
     techniques, and technologies, that will enhance Federal, 
     State, local, and tribal efforts to combat human trafficking.
       (5) Encouragement of cooperation, coordination, and mutual 
     support between private sector and other entities and 
     organizations and Federal agencies to combat human 
     trafficking, including the involvement of State, local, and 
     tribal government agencies to the extent Federal programs are 
     involved.

       TITLE VII--TRAFFICKING AWARENESS TRAINING FOR HEALTH CARE

     SEC. 701. SHORT TITLE.

       This title may be cited as the ``Trafficking Awareness 
     Training for Health Care Act of 2015''.

     SEC. 702. DEVELOPMENT OF BEST PRACTICES.

       (a) Grant or Contract for Development of Best Practices.--
       (1) In general.--Not later than 1 year after the date of 
     enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Health and Human 
     Services acting through the Administrator of the Health 
     Resources and Services Administration, and in consultation 
     with the Administration on Children and Families and other 
     agencies with experience in serving victims of human 
     trafficking, shall award, on a competitive basis, a grant or 
     contract to an eligible entity to train health care 
     professionals to recognize and respond to victims of a severe 
     form of trafficking.
       (2) Development of evidence-based best practices.--An 
     entity receiving a grant under paragraph (1) shall develop 
     evidence-based best practices for health care professionals 
     to recognize and respond to victims of a severe form of 
     trafficking, including--
       (A) consultation with law enforcement officials, social 
     service providers, health professionals, experts in the field 
     of human trafficking, and other experts, as appropriate, to 
     inform the development of such best practices;
       (B) the identification of any existing best practices or 
     tools for health professionals to recognize potential victims 
     of a severe form of trafficking; and
       (C) the development of educational materials to train 
     health care professionals on the best practices developed 
     under this subsection.
       (3) Requirements.--Best practices developed under this 
     subsection shall address--
       (A) risk factors and indicators to recognize victims of a 
     severe form of trafficking;
       (B) patient safety and security;
       (C) the management of medical records of patients who are 
     victims of a severe form of trafficking;
       (D) public and private social services available for 
     rescue, food, clothing, and shelter referrals;
       (E) the hotlines for reporting human trafficking maintained 
     by the National Human Trafficking Resource Center and the 
     Department of Homeland Security;
       (F) validated assessment tools for the identification of 
     victims of a severe form of trafficking; and
       (G) referral options and procedures for sharing information 
     on human trafficking with a patient and making referrals for 
     legal and social services as appropriate.
       (4) Pilot program.--An entity receiving a grant under 
     paragraph (1) shall design and implement a pilot program to 
     test the best practices and educational materials identified 
     or developed with respect to the recognition of victims of 
     human trafficking by health professionals at health care 
     sites located near an established anti-human trafficking task 
     force initiative in each of the 10 administrative regions of 
     the Department of Health and Human Services.
       (5) Analysis and report.--Not later than 24 months after 
     the date on which an entity implements a pilot program under 
     paragraph (4), the entity shall--
       (A) analyze the results of the pilot programs, including 
     through an assessment of--
       (i) changes in the skills, knowledge, and attitude of 
     health care professionals resulting from the implementation 
     of the program;
       (ii) the number of victims of a severe form of trafficking 
     who were identified under the program;
       (iii) of those victims identified, the number who received 
     information or referrals for services offered; and
       (iv) of those victims who received such information or 
     referrals--

       (I) the number who participated in follow up services; and
       (II) the type of follow up services received;

       (B) determine, using the results of the analysis conducted 
     under subparagraph (A), the extent to which the best 
     practices developed under this subsection are evidence-based; 
     and
       (C) submit to the Secretary of Health and Human Services a 
     report concerning the pilot program and the analysis of the 
     pilot program under subparagraph (A), including an 
     identification of the best practices that were identified as 
     effective and those that require further review.
       (b) Dissemination.--Not later than 30 months after date on 
     which a grant is awarded to an eligible entity under 
     subsection (a), the Secretary of Health and Human Services 
     shall--
       (1) collaborate with appropriate professional associations 
     and health care professional schools to disseminate best 
     practices identified or developed under subsection (a) for 
     purposes of recognizing potential victims of a severe form of 
     trafficking; and
       (2) post on the public website of the Department of Health 
     and Human Services the best practices that are identified by 
     the as effective under subsection (a)(5).

     SEC. 703. DEFINITIONS.

       In this title:
       (1) The term ``eligible entity'' means an accredited school 
     of medicine or nursing with experience in the study or 
     treatment of victims of a severe form of trafficking.
       (2) The term ``eligible site'' means a health center that 
     is receiving assistance under section 330, 399Z-1, or 1001 of 
     the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 254b, 280h-5, and 
     300).
       (3) The term ``health care professional'' means a person 
     employed by a health care provider who provides to patients 
     information (including information not related to medical 
     treatment), scheduling, services, or referrals.
       (4) The term ``HIPAA privacy and security law'' has the 
     meaning given to such term in section 3009 of the Public 
     Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 300jj-19).
       (5) The term ``victim of a severe form of trafficking'' has 
     the meaning given to such

[[Page S2348]]

     term in section 103 of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act 
     of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 7102).

     SEC. 704. NO ADDITIONAL AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

       No additional funds are authorized to be appropriated to 
     carry out this title, and this title shall be carried out 
     using amounts otherwise available for such purpose.

    TITLE VIII--BETTER RESPONSE FOR VICTIMS OF CHILD SEX TRAFFICKING

     SEC. 801. SHORT TITLE.

       This title may be cited as the ``Ensuring a Better Response 
     for Victims of Child Sex Trafficking''.

     SEC. 802. CAPTA AMENDMENTS.

       (a) In General.--The amendments to the Child Abuse 
     Prevention and Treatment Act (42 U.S.C. 5101 et seq.) made by 
     this section shall take effect 2 years after the date of the 
     enactment of this Act.
       (b) State Plans.--Section 106 of the Child Abuse Prevention 
     and Treatment Act (42 U.S.C. 5106a) is amended--
       (1) in subsection (b)(2)(B)--
       (A) in clause (xxii), by striking ``and'' at the end; and
       (B) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(xxiv) provisions and procedures requiring identification 
     and assessment of all reports involving children known or 
     suspected to be victims of sex trafficking (as defined in 
     section 103(10) of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 
     2000 (22 U.S.C. 7102 (10)); and
       ``(xxv) provisions and procedures for training child 
     protective services workers about identifying, assessing, and 
     providing comprehensive services for children who are sex 
     trafficking victims, including efforts to coordinate with 
     State law enforcement, juvenile justice, and social service 
     agencies such as runaway and homeless youth shelters to serve 
     this population;''; and
       (2) in subsection (d), by adding at the end the following:
       ``(17) The number of children determined to be victims 
     described in subsection (b)(2)(B)(xxiv).''.
       (c) Special Rule.--
       (1) In general.--Section 111 of the Child Abuse Prevention 
     and Treatment Act (42 U.S.C. 5106g) is amended--
       (A) by striking ``For purposes'' and inserting the 
     following:
       ``(a) Definitions.--For purposes''; and
       (B) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(b) Special Rule.--
       ``(1) In general.--For purposes of section 3(2) and 
     subsection (a)(4), a child shall be considered a victim of 
     `child abuse and neglect' and of `sexual abuse' if the child 
     is identified, by a State or local agency employee of the 
     State or locality involved, as being a victim of sex 
     trafficking (as defined in paragraph (10) of section 103 of 
     the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 
     7102)) or a victim of severe forms of trafficking in persons 
     described in paragraph (9)(A) of that section.
       ``(2) State option.--Notwithstanding the definition of 
     `child' in section 3(1), a State may elect to define that 
     term for purposes of the application of paragraph (1) to 
     section 3(2) and subsection (a)(4) as a person who has not 
     attained the age of 24.''.
       (2) Conforming amendment.--Section 3(2) of the Child Abuse 
     Prevention and Treatment Act (42 U.S.C. 5101 note) is amended 
     by inserting ``(including sexual abuse as determined under 
     section 111)'' after ``sexual abuse or exploitation''.
       (3) Technical correction.--Paragraph (5)(C) of subsection 
     (a), as so designated, of section 111 of the Child Abuse 
     Prevention and Treatment Act (42 U.S.C. 5106g) is amended by 
     striking ``inhumane;'' and inserting ``inhumane.''.

TITLE IX--ANTI-TRAFFICKING TRAINING FOR DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY 
                               PERSONNEL

     SEC. 901. DEFINITIONS.

       In this title:
       (1) Department.--The term ``Department'' means the 
     Department of Homeland Security.
       (2) Human trafficking.--The term ``human trafficking'' 
     means an act or practice described in paragraph (9) or (10) 
     of section 103 of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 
     2000 (22 U.S.C. 7102).
       (3) Secretary.--The term ``Secretary'' means the Secretary 
     of Homeland Security.

     SEC. 902. TRAINING FOR DEPARTMENT PERSONNEL TO IDENTIFY HUMAN 
                   TRAFFICKING.

       (a) In General.--Not later than 180 days after the date of 
     the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall implement a 
     program to--
       (1) train and periodically retrain relevant Transportation 
     Security Administration, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, 
     and other Department personnel that the Secretary considers 
     appropriate, with respect to how to effectively deter, 
     detect, and disrupt human trafficking, and, where 
     appropriate, interdict a suspected perpetrator of human 
     trafficking, during the course of their primary roles and 
     responsibilities; and
       (2) ensure that the personnel referred to in paragraph (1) 
     regularly receive current information on matters related to 
     the detection of human trafficking, including information 
     that becomes available outside of the Department's initial or 
     periodic retraining schedule, to the extent relevant to their 
     official duties and consistent with applicable information 
     and privacy laws.
       (b) Training Described.--The training referred to in 
     subsection (a) may be conducted through in-class or virtual 
     learning capabilities, and shall include--
       (1) methods for identifying suspected victims of human 
     trafficking and, where appropriate, perpetrators of human 
     trafficking;
       (2) for appropriate personnel, methods to approach a 
     suspected victim of human trafficking, where appropriate, in 
     a manner that is sensitive to the suspected victim and is not 
     likely to alert a suspected perpetrator of human trafficking;
       (3) training that is most appropriate for a particular 
     location or environment in which the personnel receiving such 
     training perform their official duties;
       (4) other topics determined by the Secretary to be 
     appropriate; and
       (5) a post-training evaluation for personnel receiving the 
     training.
       (c) Training Curriculum Review.--The Secretary shall 
     annually reassess the training program established under 
     subsection (a) to ensure it is consistent with current 
     techniques, patterns, and trends associated with human 
     trafficking.

     SEC. 903. CERTIFICATION AND REPORT TO CONGRESS.

       (a) Certification.--Not later than 1 year after the date of 
     the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall certify to 
     Congress that all personnel referred to in section 402(a) 
     have successfully completed the training required under that 
     section.
       (b) Report to Congress.--Not later than 1 year after the 
     date of the enactment of this Act and annually thereafter, 
     the Secretary shall report to Congress with respect to the 
     overall effectiveness of the program required by this title, 
     the number of cases reported by Department personnel in which 
     human trafficking was suspected, and, of those cases, the 
     number of cases that were confirmed cases of human 
     trafficking.

     SEC. 904. ASSISTANCE TO NON-FEDERAL ENTITIES.

       The Secretary may provide training curricula to any State, 
     local, or tribal government or private organization to assist 
     the government or organization in establishing a program of 
     training to identify human trafficking, upon request from the 
     government or organization.

     SEC. 905. EXPANDED USE OF DOMESTIC TRAFFICKING VICTIMS' FUND.

       Section 3014(e)(1) of title 18, United States Code, as 
     added by section 101 of this Act, is amended--
       (1) in subparagraph (B), by striking ``and'' at the end;
       (2) in subparagraph (C), by striking the period at the end 
     and inserting ``; and''; and
       (3) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(D) section 106 of the PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008 
     (42 U.S.C. 17616).''.

    TITLE X--HUMAN TRAFFICKING SURVIVORS RELIEF AND EMPOWERMENT ACT

     SEC. 1001. SHORT TITLE.

       This title may be cited as the ``Human Trafficking 
     Survivors Relief and Empowerment Act of 2015''.

     SEC. 1002. PROTECTIONS FOR HUMAN TRAFFICKING SURVIVORS.

       Section 1701(c) of title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and 
     Safe Streets Act of 1968 (42 U.S.C. 3796dd(c)) is amended by 
     striking ``where feasible'' and all that follows, and 
     inserting the following: ``where feasible, to an 
     application--
       ``(1) for hiring and rehiring additional career law 
     enforcement officers that involves a non-Federal contribution 
     exceeding the 25 percent minimum under subsection (g); or
       ``(2) from an applicant in a State that has in effect a 
     law--
       ``(A) that--
       ``(i) provides a process by which an individual who is a 
     human trafficking survivor can move to vacate any arrest or 
     conviction records for a non-violent offense committed as a 
     direct result of human trafficking, including prostitution or 
     lewdness;
       ``(ii) establishes a rebuttable presumption that any arrest 
     or conviction of an individual for an offense associated with 
     human trafficking is a result of being trafficked, if the 
     individual--

       ``(I) is a person granted nonimmigrant status pursuant to 
     section 101(a)(15)(T)(i) of the Immigration and Nationality 
     Act (8 U.S.C. 1101(a)(15)(T)(i));
       ``(II) is the subject of a certification by the Secretary 
     of Health and Human Services under section 107(b)(1)(E) of 
     the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 
     7105(b)(1)(E)); or
       ``(III) has other similar documentation of trafficking, 
     which has been issued by a Federal, State, or local agency; 
     and

       ``(iii) protects the identity of individuals who are human 
     trafficking survivors in public and court records; and
       ``(B) that does not require an individual who is a human 
     trafficking survivor to provide official documentation as 
     described in subclause (I), (II), or (III) of subparagraph 
     (A)(ii) in order to receive protection under the law.''.

  The PRESIDING OFFICER (Mr. Gardner). The majority leader.

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