Amendment Text: S.Amdt.188 — 115th Congress (2017-2018)

Shown Here:
Amendment as Proposed (01/11/2017)

This Amendment appears on page S262 in the following article from the Congressional Record.


[Pages S260-S272]
From the Congressional Record Online through the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]





                            amendment no. 83

  The PRESIDING OFFICER. There is now 2minutes of debate prior to the 
vote on the Menendez amendment No. 83.
  The Senator from New Jersey.
  Mr. MENENDEZ. Madam President, my amendment is to protect the health 
insurance of 11 million low-income men, women,and children who are 
currently benefiting from the Affordable Care Act's Medicaid expansion.
  This amendment establishes apoint of order requiring the CBO to 
certify that no legislation increases the overall number of uninsured, 
decreases enrollmentin Medicaid in expansion States, or increases State 
spending on Medicaid.
  There are currently 32 States that have expandedMedicaid, half of 
those States with Republican Governors. These Republican Governors--
from Louisiana to Nevada, to Arkansas,Iowa, and even my own State of 
New Jersey, to name a few--understand that not only is Medicaid 
expansion a literal lifesaver tomillions of children and families, but 
it has resulted in substantial economic growth and budget savings, a 
reality thatdirectly contradicts the outcries from Republicans who seek 
to destroy Medicaid and strip coverage away from 11 million of themost 
vulnerable among us.
  I urge my colleagues to vote ``yes'' to protect those 11 million 
Americans.
  The PRESIDINGOFFICER. The Senator from Wyoming.
  Mr. ENZI. Madam President, the Congressional Budget Actrequires that 
amendments to a budget resolution be germane. Since this amendment does 
not meet the standard required by budgetlaw, a point of order lies 
against it.
  I am compelled, as chairman of the Committee on the Budget, to raise 
a point of orderagainst the amendment under section 305(b)(2) of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senatorfrom Vermont.
  Mr. SANDERS. Madam President, pursuant to section 904 of the 
Congressional BudgetAct of 1974, I move to waive all applicable 
sections of that act for purposes of the pending amendment, and I ask 
for the yeasand nays.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there a sufficient second?
  There appears to be a sufficient second.
  The questionis on agreeing to the motion to waive.
  The clerk will call the roll.
  The senior assistant legislative clerk called theroll.
  Mr. CORNYN. The following Senator is necessarily absent:The Senator 
from Alabama (Mr. Sessions).
  Mr. DURBIN. I announce that the Senator fromCalifornia (Mrs. 
Feinstein) is necessarily absent.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Are there any other Senators in the 
Chamberdesiring to vote?
  The yeas and nays resulted--yeas 48, nays 50, as follows:

                      [Rollcall Vote No. 18 Leg.]

                                YEAS--48

     Baldwin
     Bennet
     Blumenthal
     Booker
     Brown
     Cantwell
     Cardin
     Carper
     Casey
     Coons
     Cortez Masto
     Donnelly
     Duckworth
     Durbin
     Franken
     Gillibrand
     Harris
     Hassan
     Heinrich
     Heitkamp
     Heller
     Hirono
     Kaine
     King
     Klobuchar
     Leahy
     Manchin
     Markey
     McCaskill
     Menendez
     Merkley
     Murphy
     Murray
     Nelson
     Peters
     Reed
     Sanders
     Schatz
     Schumer
     Shaheen
     Stabenow
     Tester
     Udall
     VanHollen
     Warner
     Warren
     Whitehouse
     Wyden

                                NAYS--50

     Alexander
     Barrasso
     Blunt
     Boozman
     Burr
     Capito
     Cassidy
     Cochran
     Collins
     Corker
     Cornyn
     Cotton
     Crapo
     Cruz
     Daines
     Enzi
     Ernst
     Fischer
     Flake
     Gardner
     Graham
     Grassley
     Hatch
     Hoeven
     Inhofe
     Isakson
     Johnson
     Kennedy
     Lankford
     Lee
     McCain
     McConnell
     Moran
     Murkowski
     Paul
     Perdue
     Portman
     Risch
     Roberts
     Rounds
     Rubio
     Sasse
     Scott
     Shelby
     Sullivan
     Thune
     Tillis
     Toomey
     Wicker
     Young

                             NOT VOTING--2

     Feinstein
     Sessions
       
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. On this vote, the yeas are 48, the nays are 
50.
  Three-fifths of theSenators duly chosen and sworn not having voted in 
the affirmative, the motion is rejected.
  The point of order is sustainedand the amendment falls.
  The Senator from Tennessee.


                           Amendment No. 174

  Mr. ALEXANDER. Madam President, this amendment is an amendment I 
believe almost every Senator will want tovote for because this is an 
amendment that guarantees that when you walk into the local drugstore, 
your medicine is safe becauseyou know that it has been approved by the 
Food and Drug Administration.
  This amendment clarifies the current law, which saysthat if you sell 
a prescription drug in the United States, it has to be approved by the 
Food and Drug Administration. It may bemade overseas--and many are, and 
they are sold here--but they are approved by the Food and Drug 
Administration.
  I have theprivilege of being the chairman of the HELP Committee, and 
I can't tell you the number of impassioned speeches I have heard frommy 
Democratic friends about the importance of drug safety and the gold 
standard for the Food and Drug Administration. So if youare for the 
gold standard of the Food and Drug Administration, if you are for 
making prescription drugs approved by the FDA,vote yes. If you are 
against it, vote no.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Does the Senator wish to call up his 
amendment?
  Mr. ALEXANDER. Madam President, I call up my amendment No. 174 and 
ask unanimous consent thatit be reported by number.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Without objection, the clerk will report the 
amendment by number.
  Thelegislative clerk read as follows:

       The Senator from Tennessee [Mr. Alexander] proposes 
     anamendment numbered 174.

  The amendment is as follows:

 (Purpose: To strengthen Social Security and Medicare without raiding 
   them to pay for new government programs, likeObamacare, that have 
failed Americans by increasing premiums and reducing affordable health 
care options, to reform Medicaidwithout prioritizing able-bodied adults 
over the disabled, and to ensure that any importation does not increase 
  risk to publichealth according to the Secretary of Health and Human 
                               Services)

       At the end of title III, add thefollowing:

     SEC. 3___. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO 
                   PERMITTINGIMPORTATION OF PRESCRIPTION DRUGS 
                   ONLY UNDER CERTAIN CIRCUMSTANCES.

       The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of theSenate 
     may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
     aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution 
     forone or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, 
     amendments between

[[Page S261]]

     the Houses, motions, or conference reports relatingto 
     permitting the importation of prescription drugs, which may 
     include certifying public health and safety, strengthening 
     SocialSecurity and Medicare, and improving Medicaid, by the 
     amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
     provided thatsuch legislation would not increase the deficit 
     over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2017 
     through 2021 or theperiod of the total of fiscal years 2017 
     through 2026.

  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senatorfrom Vermont.
  Mr. SANDERS. Madam President, people in the United States pay by far 
the highestprices in the world for prescription drugs.
  I live 50 miles away from Canada, and in many cases they pay 50 
percent less forthe same exact medicine that we buy in Vermont or in 
America, and we all know the reason why. The power and wealth of 
thepharmaceutical industry and their 1300 lobbyists and unlimited sums 
of money have bought the U.S. Congress. Let's be clear aboutit.
  Today Mr. Trump--a guy I don't quote very often--said that pharma 
gets away with murder. That is what Trump said. He isright. Year after 
year, the same old, same old takes place. We get amendments like 
Senator Alexander's, and thepharmaceutical industry makes more and more 
money, and the American people pay higher and higher prices.
  The time has comefor us to stand up to the drug companies. Let's do 
it tonight. Let's defeat the Alexander amendment. Let's support 
theKlobuchar-Sanders amendment.
  Madam President, I raise a point of order that the pending amendment 
is not germane to theunderlying resolution and therefore violates 
section 305(b)(2) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974.
  The PRESIDINGOFFICER. The Senator from Tennessee.
  Mr. ALEXANDER. Madam President, pursuant to section 904of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 and the waiver provisions of 
applicable budget resolutions, I move to waive allapplicable sections 
of that act and applicable budget resolutions for the purposes of the 
pending Alexander amendment No. 174,and I ask for the yeas and nays.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there a sufficient second?
  There appears to be a sufficientsecond.
  The question is on agreeing to the motion to waive.
  The clerk will call the roll.
  The legislative clerkcalled the roll.
  Mr. CORNYN. The following Senator is necessarilyabsent: the Senator 
from Alabama (Mr. Sessions).
  Mr. DURBIN. I announce that the Senatorfrom California (Mrs. 
Feinstein) is necessarily absent.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER (Mr. Perdue). Are there any otherSenators in 
the Chamber desiring to vote?
  The yeas and nays resulted--yeas 49, nays 49, as follows:

                      [Rollcall Vote No. 19 Leg.]

                                YEAS--49

     Alexander
     Barrasso
     Blunt
     Boozman
     Burr
     Capito
     Cassidy
     Cochran
     Collins
     Corker
     Cornyn
     Cotton
     Crapo
     Cruz
     Daines
     Enzi
     Ernst
     Fischer
     Flake
     Gardner
     Graham
     Heller
     Hoeven
     Inhofe
     Isakson
     Johnson
     Kennedy
     Lankford
     Lee
     McCain
     McConnell
     Moran
     Murkowski
     Paul
     Perdue
     Portman
     Risch
     Roberts
     Rounds
     Rubio
     Sasse
     Scott
     Shelby
     Sullivan
     Thune
     Tillis
     Toomey
     Wicker
     Young

                                NAYS--49

     Baldwin
     Bennet
     Blumenthal
     Booker
     Brown
     Cantwell
     Cardin
     Carper
     Casey
     Coons
     Cortez Masto
     Donnelly
     Duckworth
     Durbin
     Franken
     Gillibrand
     Grassley
     Harris
     Hassan
     Hatch
     Heinrich
     Heitkamp
     Hirono
     Kaine
     King
     Klobuchar
     Leahy
     Manchin
     Markey
     McCaskill
     Menendez
     Merkley
     Murphy
     Murray
     Nelson
     Peters
     Reed
     Sanders
     Schatz
     Schumer
     Shaheen
     Stabenow
     Tester
     Udall
     Van Hollen
     Warner
     Warren
     Whitehouse
     Wyden

                             NOT VOTING--2

     Feinstein
     Sessions
       
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. On this vote, the yeas are 49, the nays are 
49.
  Three-fifths ofthe Senators duly chosen and sworn not having voted in 
the affirmative, the motion is rejected.
  The point of order issustained and the amendment falls.
  The Senator from Minnesota.


                           Amendment No. 178

  Ms. KLOBUCHAR. Mr. President, I call up amendment No. 178 and ask 
unanimous consent that itbe reported by number.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Without objection, the clerk will report the 
amendment by number.
  Thelegislative clerk read as follows:

       The Senator from Minnesota [Ms. Klobuchar] proposes 
     anamendment numbered 178.

  The amendment is as follows:

   (Purpose: To establish a deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
lowering prescription drug prices for Americansby importing drugs from 
                                Canada)

       At the end of title III, add the following:

     SEC.3___. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO LOWERING 
                   PRESCRIPTION DRUG PRICES FOR AMERICANS BY 
                   IMPORTING DRUGS FROMCANADA

       The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
     may revise the allocations of a committee or 
     committees,aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this 
     resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, 
     amendments, amendmentsbetween the Houses, motions, or 
     conference reports relating to lowering prescription drug 
     prices, including through theimportation of safe and 
     affordable prescription drugs from Canada by American 
     pharmacists, wholesalers, and individuals with avalid 
     prescription from a provider licensed to practice in the 
     United States, by the amounts provided in such legislation 
     forthose purposes, provided that such legislation would not 
     increase the deficit over either the period of the total of 
     fiscalyears 2017 through 2021 or the period of the total of 
     fiscal years 2017 through 2026.

  ThePRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Minnesota.
  Ms. KLOBUCHAR. Mr. President, I come to thefloor to ask that my 
colleagues support this very important amendment with Senator Sanders. 
I will match his passion withnumbers.
  The price of insulin, as our colleagues know, has tripled in the last 
decade. The antibiotic doxycycline went from$20 a bottle to nearly 
$2,000 a bottle in 6 months. Naloxone, the drug used to help with 
overdose, went from $690 to $4,500 todate. We cannot sit here and do 
nothing. We have an opportunity, for those who believe in the free 
market, to allow incompetition--competition from the safe country of 
Canada, our neighbors to the north. In Minnesota, we can see Canada 
from ourporch, and we want to see that competition come in and save our 
constituents' lives.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator fromVermont.
  Mr. SANDERS. Mr. President, last year the five major drug companies 
made $50 billionin profit, while one out of five Americans cannot 
afford the medicine they need. Please don't tell me that we can import 
fishfrom all over the world, but we can't bring medicine in from 
Canada.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The time for the Senator fromVermont has 
expired.
  The Senator from Wyoming.
  Mr. ENZI. Mr. President, this discussion willbe a little different 
than any we have had because in a bipartisan way we have been defeating 
this for at least 14 years. ByronDorgan used to head it up on that 
side, and I used to oppose it from this side, but it has always been 
bipartisan, and that isbecause we are not sure about the safety of the 
prescription drugs that come in online.
  People who drive over the border andgo to a pharmacist are probably 
getting good drugs there, but we are told that for up to 85 percent of 
what comes in online, wecan't tell what country it came from. So we can 
specify Canada, but it may be from another country altogether, 
particularly theMiddle East. If we want to assure we have the safety of 
our drugs, being able to get it online from even Canada doesn't have 
thekind of assurance we need. We have always asked that the Secretary 
of Health and Human Services specify that the safety is inplace. No one 
has been willing to do that.
  I ask that we vote against this amendment.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Thequestion is on agreeing to the amendment.
  Mr. SANDERS. I ask for the yeas and nays.
  ThePRESIDING OFFICER. Is there a sufficient second?
  There appears to be a sufficient second.

[[Page S262]]

  The clerk will call theroll.
  The bill clerk called the roll.
  Mr. CORNYN. Thefollowing Senator is necessarily absent: the Senator 
from Alabama (Mr. Sessions).
  Mr.DURBIN. I announce that the Senator from California (Mrs. 
Feinstein) is necessarily absent.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Arethere any other Senators in the Chamber 
desiring to vote?
  The result was announced--yeas 46, nays 52, asfollows:

                      [Rollcall Vote No. 20 Leg.]

                                YEAS--46

     Baldwin
     Blumenthal
     Boozman
     Brown
     Cardin
     Collins
     Cortez Masto
     Cruz
     Duckworth
     Durbin
     Flake
     Franken
     Gillibrand
     Grassley
     Harris
     Hassan
     Heller
     Hirono
     Kaine
     Kennedy
     King
     Klobuchar
     Leahy
     Lee
     Manchin
     Markey
     McCain
     McCaskill
     Merkley
     Murkowski
     Murphy
     Nelson
     Paul
     Peters
     Reed
     Sanders
     Schatz
     Schumer
     Shaheen
     Stabenow
     Thune
     Udall
     Van Hollen
     Warren
     Whitehouse
     Wyden

                                NAYS--52

     Alexander
     Barrasso
     Bennet
     Blunt
     Booker
     Burr
     Cantwell
     Capito
     Carper
     Casey
     Cassidy
     Cochran
     Coons
     Corker
     Cornyn
     Cotton
     Crapo
     Daines
     Donnelly
     Enzi
     Ernst
     Fischer
     Gardner
     Graham
     Hatch
     Heinrich
     Heitkamp
     Hoeven
     Inhofe
     Isakson
     Johnson
     Lankford
     McConnell
     Menendez
     Moran
     Murray
     Perdue
     Portman
     Risch
     Roberts
     Rounds
     Rubio
     Sasse
     Scott
     Shelby
     Sullivan
     Tester
     Tillis
     Toomey
     Warner
     Wicker
     Young

                              NOTVOTING--2

     Feinstein
     Sessions
       
  The amendment (No. 178) was rejected.
  The PRESIDINGOFFICER. The Senator from Oregon.


                           Amendment No. 188

  Mr.WYDEN. Mr. President, I call up amendment No. 188 and ask 
unanimous consent that it be reported by number.
  The PRESIDINGOFFICER. Without objection, the clerk will report the 
amendment by number.
  The legislative clerk read as follows:

       The Senator from Oregon [Mr. Wyden] proposes an amendment 
     numbered 188.

  Theamendment is as follows:

 (Purpose: To create a point oforder against legislation that does not 
                           lower drug prices)

       At the end of title IV, add the following:

     SEC. 4__. POINT OF ORDER AGAINST LEGISLATION THAT DOES NOT 
                   LOWER DRUG PRICES.

       (a)Findings.--The Senate finds the following:
       (1) Total annual drug spending in the United States is 
     projected to reachmore than $500,000,000,000 by 2018.
       (2) One out of five Americans age 19 to 64 cannot afford to 
     fill theirprescriptions.
       (3) Spending on prescription drugs in the United States 
     grew by 12 percent in 2014, faster than in any yearsince 
     2002.
       (4) Medicare part D drug spending was $90,000,000,000 in 
     2015, and is expected to increase to $216,000,000,000by 2025.
       (5) Medicare part B drug spending also more than doubled 
     between 2005 and 2015, increasing from $9,000,000,000 in2005 
     to $22,000,000,000 in 2015.
       (6) In 2014, prescription drug spending in Medicaid 
     increased by 24 percent.
       (7) Duringthe Presidential campaign, the President-elect 
     said, ``When it comes time to negotiate the cost of drugs, 
     we're going tonegotiate like crazy, folks'' and his campaign 
     website said that, ``allowing consumers access to imported, 
     safe and dependabledrugs from overseas will bring more 
     options to consumers.''.
       (8) After being elected, the President-elect said, ``I'm 
     goingto bring down drug prices. I don't like what's happened 
     with drug prices.''.
       (9) On January 11, 2017, the President-electsaid, ``We have 
     to create new bidding procedures for the drug industry, 
     because they are getting away with murder.''.
       (b)Point of Order.--It shall not be in order in the Senate 
     to consider a bill or joint resolution reported pursuant to 
     section2001 or 2002, or an amendment to, motion on, 
     conference report on, or amendment between the Houses in 
     relation to such a bill orjoint resolution that does not, as 
     promised by the President-elect, lower drug prices, as 
     certified by the Congressional BudgetOffice.
       (c) Waiver and Appeal.--Subsection (b) may be waived or 
     suspended in the Senate only by an affirmative vote ofthree-
     fifths of the Members, duly chosen and sworn. An affirmative 
     vote of three-fifths of the Members of the Senate, dulychosen 
     and sworn, shall be required to sustain an appeal of the 
     ruling of the Chair on a point of order raised under 
     subsection(b).

  Mr. WYDEN. Mr. President and colleagues, this amendment is 
supportedby a number of Senators because, as the Senate majority plows 
ahead with a scheme that I call repeal and run, it is putting tensof 
millions of Americans in danger of losing their health insurance, and 
Americans are waiting for Congress to step up and adoptsmart policies 
that will drive down the cost of prescription medicine.
  We understand this is an era of miracle cures andtreatments. There 
are drugs on the market today that were science fiction not very long 
ago. With drug prices rising, thequestion is whether Americans are 
going to be able to afford them. This is a growing source of 
inequality, and it cannot gounchecked.
  Here is my bottom line.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator's time has expired.
  Mr. WYDEN. In a country as rich and strong as ours, cures have to be 
available for everyone, not just the wealthy.
  I urge support for this amendment.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Wyoming.
  Mr.ENZI. Mr. President, the Congressional Budget Act does require 
that the amendments to the budget resolution be germane. Sincethis 
amendment does not meet the standard required by budget law, a point of 
order would lie. So I raise a point of orderagainst this amendment 
under section 305(b)(2) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senatorfrom Oregon.
  Mr. WYDEN. Mr. President, pursuant to section 904 of the 
Congressional Budget Act of1974, I move to waive section 305(b)(2) of 
that act for purposes of the pending amendment, and I ask for the yeas 
and nays.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there a sufficient second?
  There appears to be a sufficient second.
  The clerk will callthe roll.
  The legislative clerk called the roll.
  Mr. CORNYN. The following Senator is necessarily absent: the Senator 
from Alabama (Mr. Sessions).
  Mr. DURBIN. I announce that the Senator from California (Mrs. 
Feinstein) is necessarilyabsent.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Are there any other Senators in the Chamber 
desiring to vote?
  The yeas and naysresulted--yeas 47, nays 51, as follows:

                      [Rollcall Vote No. 21 Leg.]

                                YEAS--47

     Baldwin
     Bennet
     Blumenthal
     Booker
     Brown
     Cantwell
     Cardin
     Carper
     Casey
     Coons
     CortezMasto
     Donnelly
     Duckworth
     Durbin
     Franken
     Gillibrand
     Harris
     Hassan
     Heinrich
     Heitkamp
     Hirono
     Kaine
     King
     Klobuchar
     Leahy
     Manchin
     Markey
     McCaskill
     Menendez
     Merkley
     Murphy
     Murray
     Nelson
     Peters
     Reed
     Sanders
     Schatz
     Schumer
     Shaheen
     Stabenow
     Tester
     Udall
     Van Hollen
     Warner
     Warren
     Whitehouse
     Wyden

                                NAYS--51

     Alexander
     Barrasso
     Blunt
     Boozman
     Burr
     Capito
     Cassidy
     Cochran
     Collins
     Corker
     Cornyn
     Cotton
     Crapo
     Cruz
     Daines
     Enzi
     Ernst
     Fischer
     Flake
     Gardner
     Graham
     Grassley
     Hatch
     Heller
     Hoeven
     Inhofe
     Isakson
     Johnson
     Kennedy
     Lankford
     Lee
     McCain
     McConnell
     Moran
     Murkowski
     Paul
     Perdue
     Portman
     Risch
     Roberts
     Rounds
     Rubio
     Sasse
     Scott
     Shelby
     Sullivan
     Thune
     Tillis
     Toomey
     Wicker
     Young

                             NOT VOTING--2

     Feinstein
     Sessions
  The PRESIDINGOFFICER. On this vote, the yeas are 47, the nays are 51.
  Three-fifths of the Senators duly chosen and sworn not having votedin 
the affirmative, the motion is rejected.
  The point of order is sustained and the amendment falls.
  The Senator fromWyoming.
  Mr. ENZI. Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that the Senate vote 
in relation to thefollowing amendments in the order listed, with all 
other provisions of the previous order remaining in effect; further 
thatthere be no second-degree amendments in order to the amendments 
listed: Fischer 184, Gillibrand 82, Hatch 180, Brown 86; Ifurther ask 
that the pending amendments, aside from these listed, be withdrawn; 
that no further amendments be in order, and thatfollowing disposition 
of the Brown amendment, the Senate vote on adoption of the resolution, 
as amended, if amended.

[[Page S263]]

  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Without objection, it is so ordered.
  Mr. ENZI. Mr. President, Iask unanimous consent that the listed 
amendments be called up and reported by number.
  Mr.SCHUMER. Mr. President, will my friend from Wyoming yield for a 
question?
  Mr. ENZI. Sure.
  Mr. SCHUMER. Since the amendment by Senator Coons from Delaware is 
not going to beoffered, I believe that the Hatch amendment was a side-
by-side to Coons and we don't need that. Is that true?
  Mr. ENZI. Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that my previous 
unanimous consent request be vitiated.
  ThePRESIDING OFFICER. Without objection, it is so ordered.
  Mr. ENZI. Mr. President, I ask unanimousconsent that the Senate vote 
in relation to the following amendments in the order listed with all 
other provisions of theprevious order remaining in effect; further, 
that there be no second-degree amendments in order to the amendments 
listed: Thatwould be Fischer 184 and Gillibrand 82.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Without objection, it is so ordered.
  The Senator fromNebraska.


                           Amendment No. 184

  Mrs. FISCHER. Mr. President, Icall up my amendment No. 184.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The clerk will report.
  The bill clerk read as follows:

       The Senator from Nebraska [Mrs. Fischer] proposes an 
     amendment numbered 184.

  Theamendment is as follows:

   (Purpose: Toestablish a deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
   strengthening Social Security or health care for women, which may 
   includestrengthening community health centers, and repealing and 
                          replacing Obamacare)

       At the appropriate place, add thefollowing:

     SEC. ___. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO SOCIAL 
                   SECURITYOR WOMEN'S HEALTH.

       The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
     may revise the allocations of a committee orcommittees, 
     aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution 
     for one or more bills, joint resolutions, 
     amendments,amendments between the Houses, motions, or 
     conference reports, relating to strengthening Social Security 
     or health care forwomen, which may include strengthening 
     community health centers, and repealing and replacing the 
     Patient Protection andAffordable Care Act, by the amounts 
     provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided 
     that such legislation would notincrease the deficit over 
     either the period of the total of fiscal years 2017 through 
     2021 or the period of the total of fiscalyears 2017 through 
     2026.

  Mrs. FISCHER. Mr. President, this amendmentwould strengthen community 
health centers across this country. In Nebraska we have 7 federally 
qualified health centers and 40clinic sites that have served over 
75,000 people. These centers provide quality personalized health care 
that women need anddeserve.
  Last year I had the opportunity to visit one of these in Omaha, the 
Charles Drew Medical Clinic. I saw firsthandthe comprehensive, 
compassionate care that they provide to Nebraskans. Many times, women 
are the ones who make health caredecisions for their families, but with 
higher costs and fewer choices, ObamaCare has hurt, not helped, women 
in this country.
  They have seen their premiums go up, they have had a hard time 
finding the doctors that they trust, and they have had tosign up for 
plans that they don't like. With this amendment, we can alleviate this 
frustration. We can help ensure that theyreceive quality care in their 
communities surrounded by a support system. It would strengthen women's 
health. It would help takecare of our families, our neighbors, and our 
friends.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from New York.
  Mrs. GILLIBRAND. Mr. President, I rise to oppose the amendment of the 
Senator from Nebraska. While we allsupport community health centers, 
and they are very useful in the State of New York as well, this is just 
another attempt to endthe protections the Affordable Care Act provides 
for women.
  Nothing in this amendment will say that you cannot charge womenmore 
for health care just because they are women. Nothing in this amendment 
will say that you cannot charge women for healthcare or drop their 
coverage when they become pregnant. Nothing in this amendment provides 
for any restrictions ondiscrimination.
  It does not provide the mammograms, the preventive care services, the 
contraception care, and otheraffordable cancer screenings that women 
need. This amendment does not protect women's health care. They will 
still bediscriminated against, charged more, and drop coverage as soon 
as they become pregnant. It is not acceptable.
  I raise apoint of order that the pending amendment is not germane to 
the underlying resolution and therefore violates section 305(b)(2)of 
the Congressional Budget Act of 1974.
  Mrs. FISCHER. Mr. President, pursuant to section 904of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 and the waiver provisions of 
applicable budget resolutions, I move to waive allapplicable sections 
of that act and applicable budget resolutions for purposes of my 
amendment, and I ask for the yeas and nays.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there a sufficient second?
  There appears to be a sufficient second.
  The yeas and nays wereordered.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Wyoming.
  Mr. ENZI. Mr. President, I askunanimous consent to reinstate my 
previous unanimous consent which would be: Fischer 184, then Gillibrand 
82, Hatch 180, Brown86; further, that the pending amendments, aside 
from these listed, be withdrawn, that no further amendments be in 
order, andthat following disposition of the Brown amendment, the Senate 
vote on adoption of the resolution, as amended, if amended.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Without objection, it is so ordered.
  Mr. ENZI. I ask unanimous consentthat the list of amendments be 
called up and reported by number.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Without objection, it is so ordered.


                           Amendment No. 180

  The clerk will report the amendment by number.
  The seniorassistant legislative clerk read as follows:

       The Senator from Wyoming [Mr. Enzi], for Mr.Hatch, proposes 
     an amendment numbered 180.

  The amendment is as follows:

    (Purpose: To establish a deficit-neutral reserve fund relating 
tostrengthening Social Security and repealing and replacing Obamacare, 
  which has increased health care costs, raised taxes onmiddle-class 
 families, reduced access to high quality care, created disincentives 
  for work, and caused tens of thousands ofAmericans to lose coverage 
   they had and liked, and replacing it with reforms that strengthen 
      Medicaid and the Children's HealthInsurance Program without 
prioritizing able-bodied adults over the disabled or children and lead 
to patient-centered, step-by-step health reforms that provide access to 
quality, affordable private health care coverage for all Americans and 
    their familiesby increasing competition, State flexibility, and 
     individual choice, and safeguarding consumer protections that 
                           Americanssupport)

       At the end of title III, add the following:

     SEC. 3___. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO 
                   STRENGTHENING SOCIAL SECURITY AND REPEALING AND 
                   REPLACING OBAMACARE.

       The Chairman of theCommittee on the Budget of the Senate 
     may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
     aggregates, and other appropriatelevels in this resolution 
     for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, 
     amendments between the Houses, motions, orconference reports 
     relating to strengthening Social Security and repealing and 
     replacing Obamacare, which may include reformsthat strengthen 
     Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program without 
     prioritizing able-bodied adults over the disabledor children 
     and lead to step-by-step reforms providing access to quality, 
     affordable coverage for all Americans, andsafeguarding 
     consumer protections, without raising new revenue, by the 
     amounts provided in such legislation for those 
     purposes,provided that such legislation would not increase 
     the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal 
     years 2017 through2021 or the period of the total of fiscal 
     years 2017 through 2026.

                       Vote on Amendment No. 184

  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The question is on agreeing to the motion to 
waive.
  Theyeas and nays have been ordered.
  The clerk will call the roll.
  The bill clerk called the roll.
  Mr. CORNYN. The following Senator is necessarily absent: the Senator 
fromAlabama (Mr. Sessions).
  Mr. DURBIN. I announce that the Senator from California 
(Mrs.Feinstein) is necessarily absent.

[[Page S264]]

  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Are there any other Senators in the Chamber 
desiring tovote?
  The yeas and nays resulted--yeas 52, nays 46, as follows:

                      [Rollcall Vote No. 22 Leg.]

                                YEAS--52

     Alexander
     Barrasso
     Blunt
     Boozman
     Burr
     Capito
     Cassidy
     Cochran
     Collins
     Corker
     Cornyn
     Cotton
     Crapo
     Cruz
     Daines
     Enzi
     Ernst
     Fischer
     Flake
     Gardner
     Graham
     Grassley
     Hatch
     Heller
     Hoeven
     Inhofe
     Isakson
     Johnson
     Kennedy
     Lankford
     Lee
     Manchin
     McCain
     McConnell
     Moran
     Murkowski
     Paul
     Perdue
     Portman
     Risch
     Roberts
     Rounds
     Rubio
     Sasse
     Scott
     Shelby
     Sullivan
     Thune
     Tillis
     Toomey
     Wicker
     Young

                                NAYS--46

     Baldwin
     Bennet
     Blumenthal
     Booker
     Brown
     Cantwell
     Cardin
     Carper
     Casey
     Coons
     Cortez Masto
     Donnelly
     Duckworth
     Durbin
     Franken
     Gillibrand
     Harris
     Hassan
     Heinrich
     Heitkamp
     Hirono
     Kaine
     King
     Klobuchar
     Leahy
     Markey
     McCaskill
     Menendez
     Merkley
     Murphy
     Murray
     Nelson
     Peters
     Reed
     Sanders
     Schatz
     Schumer
     Shaheen
     Stabenow
     Tester
     Udall
     Van Hollen
     Warner
     Warren
     Whitehouse
     Wyden

                             NOT VOTING--2

     Feinstein
     Sessions
  ThePRESIDING OFFICER. On this vote, the yeas are 52, the nays are 46.
  Three-fifths of the Senators duly chosen and sworn nothaving voted in 
the affirmative, the motion is rejected.
  The point of order is sustained and the amendment falls.
  TheSenator from New York.


                            Amendment No. 82

  Mrs. GILLIBRAND.Mr. President, I rise to speak in favor of amendment 
No. 82. This amendment protects women's health care.
  Under theAffordable Care Act, we made many changes that made a huge 
difference in the lives of everyday American families. It said towomen 
in America: You can't be charged more just because you are a woman. It 
said: You can't be dropped from coverage when youbecome pregnant.
  Imagine becoming pregnant and having your insurer drop your coverage 
because you no longer are economic oryou cost too much money. Imagine 
being a cancer survivor and then having your coverage dropped because 
you survived cancer andyou cost too much money.
  In the Affordable Care Act, we made sure contraception, preventive 
care service, health carescreenings, and mammograms were affordable and 
accessible. If we take that away, these families are left without the 
basic carethey need to survive.
  So if you love women and you love your mothers and daughters and 
wives, please do not unwind theAffordable Care Act. We need women's 
health protected, and that is what this amendment does.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. TheSenator from Wyoming.
  Mr. ENZI. Mr. President, the Congressional Budget Act requires 
thatamendments to a budget resolution be germane. Since this amendment 
does not meet the standard required by budget law, a point oforder 
would lie.
  So I raise a point of order against this amendment under section 
305(b)(2) of the Congressional Budget Actof 1974.
  Mrs. GILLIBRAND. Mr. President, pursuant to section 904 of the 
Congressional BudgetAct of 1974, I move to waive section 305(b)(2) of 
that act for the purposes of the pending amendment, and I ask for the 
yeas andnays.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there a sufficient second?
  There appears to be a sufficient second.
  The question ison agreeing to the motion to waive.
  The clerk will call the roll.
  The legislative clerk called the roll.
  Mr. CORNYN. The following Senator is necessarily absent: the 
Senatorfrom Alabama (Mr. Sessions).
  Mr. DURBIN. I announce that the Senator from California 
(Mrs.Feinstein) is necessarily absent.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Are there any other Senators in the Chamber 
desiring to vote?
  The yeas and nays resulted--yeas 49, nays 49, as follows:

                      [Rollcall Vote No. 23 Leg.]

                                YEAS--49

     Baldwin
     Bennet
     Blumenthal
     Booker
     Brown
     Cantwell
     Cardin
     Carper
     Casey
     Collins
     Coons
     Cortez Masto
     Donnelly
     Duckworth
     Durbin
     Franken
     Gillibrand
     Harris
     Hassan
     Heinrich
     Heitkamp
     Heller
     Hirono
     Kaine
     King
     Klobuchar
     Leahy
     Manchin
     Markey
     McCaskill
     Menendez
     Merkley
     Murphy
     Murray
     Nelson
     Peters
     Reed
     Sanders
     Schatz
     Schumer
     Shaheen
     Stabenow
     Tester
     Udall
     Van Hollen
     Warner
     Warren
     Whitehouse
     Wyden

                                NAYS--49

     Alexander
     Barrasso
     Blunt
     Boozman
     Burr
     Capito
     Cassidy
     Cochran
     Corker
     Cornyn
     Cotton
     Crapo
     Cruz
     Daines
     Enzi
     Ernst
     Fischer
     Flake
     Gardner
     Graham
     Grassley
     Hatch
     Hoeven
     Inhofe
     Isakson
     Johnson
     Kennedy
     Lankford
     Lee
     McCain
     McConnell
     Moran
     Murkowski
     Paul
     Perdue
     Portman
     Risch
     Roberts
     Rounds
     Rubio
     Sasse
     Scott
     Shelby
     Sullivan
     Thune
     Tillis
     Toomey
     Wicker
     Young

                             NOT VOTING--2

     Feinstein
     Sessions
  ThePRESIDING OFFICER. On this vote, the yeas are 49, the nays are 49.
  Three-fifths of the Senators duly chosen and sworn nothaving voted in 
the affirmative, the motion is rejected.
  The point of order is sustained and the amendment falls.
  TheSenator from Utah.


                           Amendment No. 180

  Mr. HATCH. Mr.President, as I stated, ObamaCare came along when 
States were already facing difficult fiscal choices, and, sadly, made 
thingsworse. ObamaCare's Medicaid expansion exacerbated the pressure on 
States without even addressing the numerous quality issues inthe 
program. Republicans are still committed to working with interested 
parties, including our State governments, to reformMedicaid and ensure 
its long-term sustainability. That is the purpose of my amendment here 
tonight.
  My amendment wouldcreate a deficit-neutral reserve fund to allow for 
reforms to Medicaid as well as the Children's Health Insurance Program 
and toensure the programs have the right priorities.
  I urge my colleagues to vote for myamendment and against the Brown 
amendment, which is simply designed to prevent the repeal of ObamaCare 
and enshrine its flawedapproach to Medicaid in a budget point of order.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Ohio.
  Mr. BROWN. Mr. President, I rise in opposition to the Hatch 
amendment.
  Because of the Affordable Care Act, morethan 2 million children have 
health insurance today that did not have it prior to the Affordable 
Care Act.
  In my State,Governor Kasich, a Republican, who is a friend of mine 
and of many of us in this Chamber, has said that he has admonished 
hisRepublican colleagues to not repeal the Affordable Care Act without 
an immediate replacement. Governor Kasich expanded Medicaid.As a 
result, 700,000 Ohioans were provided insurance because he expanded 
Medicaid. He asked the question: What happens to these700,000 people in 
my State--just in Medicaid expansion alone--what happens to them if the 
Hatch amendment passes or if theAffordable Care Act is repealed?
  I ask my colleagues to vote no on the amendment.
  Mr. President, I raise a point oforder that the pending amendment is 
not germane to the underlying resolution. It violates section 305(b)(2) 
of the CongressionalBudget Act of 1974.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Utah.
  Mr. HATCH. Mr. President, Imove to waive the applicable provisions of 
the Budget Act for purposes of the pending amendment, and I ask for the 
yeas andnays.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there a sufficient second?
  There appears to be a sufficient second.
  The question ison agreeing to the motion to waive.
  The clerk will call the roll.
  The bill clerk called the roll.
  Mr. CORNYN. The following Senator is necessarily absent: the Senator 
fromAlabama (Mr. Sessions).

[[Page S265]]

  

  Mr. DURBIN. I announce that the Senator from California(Mrs. 
Feinstein) is necessarily absent.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER (Mr. Gardner). Are there any other Senators in 
theChamber desiring to vote?
  The yeas and nays resulted--yeas 51, nays 47, as follows:

                      [Rollcall Vote No. 24 Leg.]

                                YEAS--51

     Alexander
     Barrasso
     Blunt
     Boozman
     Burr
     Capito
     Cassidy
     Cochran
     Collins
     Corker
     Cornyn
     Cotton
     Crapo
     Cruz
     Daines
     Enzi
     Ernst
     Fischer
     Flake
     Gardner
     Graham
     Grassley
     Hatch
     Heller
     Hoeven
     Inhofe
     Isakson
     Johnson
     Kennedy
     Lankford
     Lee
     McCain
     McConnell
     Moran
     Murkowski
     Paul
     Perdue
     Portman
     Risch
     Roberts
     Rounds
     Rubio
     Sasse
     Scott
     Shelby
     Sullivan
     Thune
     Tillis
     Toomey
     Wicker
     Young

                                NAYS--47

     Baldwin
     Bennet
     Blumenthal
     Booker
     Brown
     Cantwell
     Cardin
     Carper
     Casey
     Coons
     Cortez Masto
     Donnelly
     Duckworth
     Durbin
     Franken
     Gillibrand
     Harris
     Hassan
     Heinrich
     Heitkamp
     Hirono
     Kaine
     King
     Klobuchar
     Leahy
     Manchin
     Markey
     McCaskill
     Menendez
     Merkley
     Murphy
     Murray
     Nelson
     Peters
     Reed
     Sanders
     Schatz
     Schumer
     Shaheen
     Stabenow
     Tester
     Udall
     VanHollen
     Warner
     Warren
     Whitehouse
     Wyden

                             NOT VOTING--2

     Feinstein
     Sessions
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. On this vote, the yeas are 51, the nays are 
47.
  Three-fifths of the Senatorsduly chosen and sworn not having voted in 
the affirmative, the motion is rejected.
  The point of order is sustained and theamendment falls.
  The Senator from Ohio.


                            Amendment No. 86

  Mr. BROWN. Mr. President, I call for amendment No. 86.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The amendment is pending.
  Mr. BROWN. Mr. President, thanks to Medicaid and the Children's 
Health Insurance Program,CHIP--two programs made stronger by the 
Affordable Care Act--95 percent of children in America now have 
affordable, comprehensivehealth insurance that covers annual physicals, 
dental care, and hospital stays. Why would we want to move backward 
instead ofbuilding on that 95 percent?
  Amendment No. 86 creates a budget point of order against any 
legislation that would decreasecoverage, reduce benefits, or raise 
costs when it comes to children's health insurance. Rather than ripping 
away coverage fromchildren, we should be building on that 95 percent 
number; we should build on that progress; we should work to get 100 
percentof our Nation's children covered.
  I urge my colleagues to support this amendment.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senatorfrom Wyoming.
  Mr. ENZI. Mr. President, the Congressional Budget Act requires that 
amendments to abudget resolution be germane. Since this amendment does 
not meet the standard required by budget law, I raise a point of 
orderagainst this amendment under section 305(b)(2) of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senatorfrom Ohio.
  Mr. BROWN. Mr. President, pursuant to section 904 of the 
Congressional Budget Act of1974, I move to waive section 305(b)(2) of 
that act for purposes of the pending amendment, and I ask for the yeas 
and nays.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there a sufficient second?
  There appears to be a sufficient second.
  The question is onagreeing to the motion to waive.
  The clerk will call the roll.
  The senior assistant legislative clerk called the roll.
  Mr. CORNYN. The following Senator is necessarilyabsent: the Senator 
from Alabama (Mr. Sessions).
  Mr. DURBIN. I announce that the Senatorfrom California (Mrs. 
Feinstein) is necessarily absent.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Are there any other Senators in theChamber 
desiring to vote?
  The yeas and nays resulted--yeas 49, nays 49, as follows:

                      [Rollcall Vote No. 25 Leg.]

                                YEAS--49

     Baldwin
     Bennet
     Blumenthal
     Booker
     Brown
     Cantwell
     Cardin
     Carper
     Casey
     Collins
     Coons
     Cortez Masto
     Donnelly
     Duckworth
     Durbin
     Franken
     Gillibrand
     Harris
     Hassan
     Heinrich
     Heitkamp
     Heller
     Hirono
     Kaine
     King
     Klobuchar
     Leahy
     Manchin
     Markey
     McCaskill
     Menendez
     Merkley
     Murphy
     Murray
     Nelson
     Peters
     Reed
     Sanders
     Schatz
     Schumer
     Shaheen
     Stabenow
     Tester
     Udall
     Van Hollen
     Warner
     Warren
     Whitehouse
     Wyden

                                NAYS--49

     Alexander
     Barrasso
     Blunt
     Boozman
     Burr
     Capito
     Cassidy
     Cochran
     Corker
     Cornyn
     Cotton
     Crapo
     Cruz
     Daines
     Enzi
     Ernst
     Fischer
     Flake
     Gardner
     Graham
     Grassley
     Hatch
     Hoeven
     Inhofe
     Isakson
     Johnson
     Kennedy
     Lankford
     Lee
     McCain
     McConnell
     Moran
     Murkowski
     Paul
     Perdue
     Portman
     Risch
     Roberts
     Rounds
     Rubio
     Sasse
     Scott
     Shelby
     Sullivan
     Thune
     Tillis
     Toomey
     Wicker
     Young

                             NOT VOTING--2

     Feinstein
     Sessions
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. On this vote, the yeas are 49, the nays are 
49.
  Three-fifths of theSenators duly chosen and sworn not having voted in 
the affirmative, the motion is rejected.
  The point of order is sustainedand the amendment falls.
  The Senator from Wyoming.
  Mr. ENZI. Mr. President, I ask unanimousconsent there be 2 minutes of 
debate, equally divided in the usual form, prior to the vote on 
adoption of S. Con. Res. 3.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there objection?
  Without objection, it is so ordered.
  Mr. ENZI.Mr. President, the repeal resolution we have been debating 
in the Senate this week will complete the first step toward reducingthe 
Federal Government's role that has prevented Americans from pursuing 
affordable and accessible health care that meets theirneeds without 
emptying their wallets. After we complete our repeal work, the Senate 
can then vigorously pursue putting theNation on a more responsible and 
sustainable fiscal path and address government's out-of-control 
spending and mammoth nationaldebt when we begin our work on the fiscal 
year 2018 budget.
  This resolution will set the stage for true legislative relieffrom 
ObamaCare that Americans have long demanded while ensuring a stable 
transition in which those with insurance will not loseaccess to health 
care coverage. This will allow us to move step-by-step on a new set of 
reforms, listening carefully to theadvice of millions of Americans 
affected or as Senator Alexander of Tennessee--the chairman of the 
Health, Education, Labor,and Pensions Committee--put it, the ObamaCare 
bridge is collapsing, and we are sending in a rescue team. We will then 
build newbridges to better health care, and finally, when these new 
bridges are finished, we will close the old bridge.
  The PRESIDINGOFFICER. The Senator from Vermont.
  Mr. SANDERS. Mr. President, the adoption of this budgetresolution 
will allow Republicans to come back to the floor of the Senate with a 
budget reconciliation package which will repealthe ACA with a simple 
majority. If they do that, up to 30 million Americans will lose their 
health care, with many thousandsdying as a result. Because if you have 
no health insurance and you can't go to a doctor or a hospital, you 
die.
  Medicarewill be converted into a voucher program. Medicaid will be 
decimated. Rural hospitals will be closed, and they have noalternative 
proposition. They want to kill ACA, but they have no idea about how 
they are going to bring forth a substituteproposal. This is not what 
the American people want. This is irresponsible. This is dangerous. 
This should be defeated.
  Mr. McCONNELL. I ask for the yeas and nays.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there asufficient second?
  There appears to be a sufficient second.
  The question is on adoption of S. Con. Res. 3.
  The clerkwill call the roll.

[[Page S266]]

  The bill clerk called the roll.
  Mr. DURBIN. I announce that the Senator from California (Mrs. 
Feinstein) is necessarily absent.
  Mr. SCHUMER. Mr. President, on behalf of the tens of millions of 
Americans whowill have their costs go up--
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Debate is not in order during a rollcall vote.
  Mr. SCHUMER.--whetherthey are in the exchange or not, if ACA is 
repealed, I vote no.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Democratic leader is not inorder.
  Debate is not in order during a vote.
  The Senator from Illinois.
  Mr. DURBIN. Howam I recorded?
  On behalf of the downstate hospitals of Illinois, I vote no.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Debate is not inorder during a vote.
  Mrs. MURRAY. For those who have a preexisting condition, I vote no.
  ThePRESIDING OFFICER. Debate is not in order during a vote.
  Ms. STABENOW. On behalf of the peopleof Michigan--
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Debate is not in order during a vote.
  Ms. STABENOW.--I vote no.
  The PRESIDINGOFFICER. The Senate will be in order.
  Mr. SANDERS. How am I recorded?
  On behalf of elderlypeople who cannot afford higher prescription 
drugs, I vote no.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Debate is not in order during a vote.
  The Senate will be in order.
  Mr. LEAHY. Mr. President, how am I recorded?
  The PRESIDINGOFFICER. The Senator is not recorded.
  Mr. LEAHY. I join my colleague from Vermont, and I vote no.
  Mr. NELSON. I vote no.
  Mrs. McCASKILL. Because there isno replace, I vote no.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Debate is not allowed during a vote.
  Mr.CARDIN. Mr. President, on behalf of the people of Maryland, I vote 
no.
  Mr. BROWN. How am Irecorded?
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator is not recorded.
  Mr. BROWN. On behalf of 700,000Ohioans losing their insurance, I vote 
no.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Debate is not allowed during a vote.
  Ms. CANTWELL. How am I recorded?
  This is not business as usual.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Debate is notallowed during a vote.
  The Senate will be in order.
  Ms. CANTWELL. You are stealing healthcare from Americans. I vote no.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senate will be in order.
  Mr.KAINE. Madam Clerk, when I was sick, you visited me. I vote no.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Debate is not allowed during a vote.
  The Senate will be in order.
  Mrs. SHAHEEN. Madam Clerk, how am I recorded?
  ThePRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator is not recorded.
  Mrs. SHAHEEN. On behalf of hundreds ofthousands of New Hampshire--
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senate will be in order.
  Debate is not allowed during a vote.
  Mrs. SHAHEEN.--patients who need health care, I vote no.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Debate is not allowed during a vote.
  Mr. HEINRICH. Madam Clerk, how am I recorded?
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator is notrecorded.
  Mr. HEINRICH. On behalf of all the children of New Mexico--
  The PRESIDING OFFICER.Debate is not allowed during a vote.
  The Senate will be in order.
  Mr. HEINRICH.--who gained coverage from Medicaidexpansion, I vote no.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senate will be in order.
  Mr. DONNELLY.Madam Clerk, how am I recorded?
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator is not recorded.
  Mr.DONNELLY. On behalf of the people of Indiana, I vote no.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Debate is not allowed during a vote.
  TheSenate will be in order.
  Ms. KLOBUCHAR. Madam Clerk, how am I recorded?
  The PRESIDINGOFFICER. The Senator is not recorded.
  Ms. KLOBUCHAR. Because there is no plan in thealternative, I vote no.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Debate is not allowed during a vote.
  The Senate will be in order.
  Ms. BALDWIN. Madam Clerk, how am I recorded?
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. TheSenator is not recorded.
  Ms. BALDWIN. I vote no because--
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Debate isnot allowed during a vote.
  The Senate will be in order.
  Ms. BALDWIN.--the people of Wisconsin did not send me here totake 
away their health care.
  Mr. MERKLEY. Madam Clerk, how am I recorded?
  The PRESIDINGOFFICER. The Senator is not recorded.
  Mr. MERKLEY. Because repeal and run will hurt hundreds ofthousands of 
Oregonians--
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Debate is not allowed during a vote.
  The Senate will be in order.
  Mr.MERKLEY.--I vote no.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senate will be in order.
  Mr. COONS. MadamClerk, how am I recorded?
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator is not recorded.
  Mr. COONS. Onbehalf of the many Delawareans who will be without 
health care through repeal without replace--
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Debateis not allowed during a vote.
  The Senate will be in order.
  Mr. COONS.--I vote no.
  Mr.TESTER. Madam Clerk, how am I recorded?
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator is not recorded.
  Mr. TESTER. On behalf of the 69 hospitals in Montana--
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Debate is not allowed during a vote.
  The Senate will be in order.
  Mr. TESTER.--I vote no.
  Ms. DUCKWORTH. Madam Clerk, howam I recorded?
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator is not recorded.
  Ms. DUCKWORTH. Onbehalf of the 1.2 million Illinoisans--
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Debate is not allowed during a vote.
  The Senate will be inorder.
  Ms. DUCKWORTH.--who will lose health insurance with this repeal of 
the ACA and for all those with preexistingconditions, I stand on 
prosthetic legs to vote no.
  Mr. CASEY. Madam Clerk, how am I recorded?
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator is not recorded.
  Mr. CASEY. I vote no--
  The PRESIDINGOFFICER. Debate is not allowed during a vote.
  The Senate will be in order.
  Mr. CASEY.--on behalf of the children ofPennsylvania.
  Ms. CORTEZ MASTO. Madam Clerk, how am I recorded?
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. TheSenator is not recorded.
  Ms. CORTEZ MASTO. On behalf of the thousands of Nevadans--
  ThePRESIDING OFFICER. Debate is not allowed during a vote.
  The Senate will be in order.
  Ms.CORTEZ MASTO.--who will lose health care, I vote no.
  Mr. SCHATZ. Madam Clerk, how am I recorded?
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator is not recorded.
  Mr. SCHATZ. I vote no on behalf of thepeople who need mental health 
care.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Debate is not allowed during a vote.
  Mrs. GILLIBRAND. Madam Clerk, how am I recorded?
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator is not recorded.
  Mrs. GILLIBRAND. I vote no--
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Debate is not allowed during a vote.
  The Senate will be in order.
  Mrs. GILLIBRAND.--on behalf of all the women who need health care.
  Mr. MURPHY. Madam Clerk, how am I recorded?
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator is not recorded.
  Mr. MURPHY. This is cruel and inhumane.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Debate is not allowed during a vote.
  TheSenate will be in order.
  Mr. MURPHY. I vote no.
  Ms. HASSAN.Madam Clerk, how am I recorded?
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator is not recorded.

[[Page S267]]

  

  Ms. HASSAN. On behalf of the thousands of New Hampshire residents--
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Debate is not allowedduring a vote.
  The Senate will be in order.
  Ms. HASSAN.--who will lose treatment, I vote no.
  Ms. HIRONO. Madam Clerk, how am I recorded?
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator is not recorded.
  Ms. HIRONO. On behalf of the 200,000 seniors in Hawaii on Medicare--
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Debate is notallowed during a vote.
  The Senate will be in order.
  Ms. HIRONO.--I vote no.
  Mr. WARNER.Madam Clerk, how am I recorded?
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator is not recorded.
  Mr.WARNER. On behalf of the children of the Commonwealth of Virginia 
I vote no.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Debate is not allowedduring a vote.
  The Senate will be in order.
  Mr. BLUMENTHAL. Madam Clerk, how am Irecorded?
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator is not recorded.
  Mr. BLUMENTHAL. MadamClerk, on behalf of all the people mentioned 
here tonight--
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Debate is not allowed during a vote.
  The Senate will be in order.
  Mr. BLUMENTHAL.--and all who will be mentioned, and on behalf of the 
people of Connecticut,I vote no.
  Mr. WYDEN. Madam Clerk, because health care--
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Debate is notallowed during a vote.
  The Senate will be in order.
  Mr. WYDEN.--should not just be for the healthy and wealthy, I voteno.
  Mr. WHITEHOUSE. Madam Clerk, how am I recorded?
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senatoris not recorded.
  Mr. WHITEHOUSE. On behalf of 14-year-old Charlie, in Woonsocket, RI, 
whosuffers from neurofibromatosis and can stay on his parents' policy 
until he is 26--
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Debate is notallowed during a vote.
  The Senate will be in order.
  Mr. WHITEHOUSE.--and cannot be denied health care for his 
preexistingcondition, I vote no.
  Mr. REED. Madam Clerk, for the people of Rhode Island I vote no.
  ThePRESIDING OFFICER. Debate is not allowed during a vote.
  The Senate will come to order.
  Mr.FRANKEN. Madam Clerk, how am I recorded?
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator is not recorded.
  Mr. FRANKEN. I vote no--
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Debate is not allowed during a vote.
  The Senate will be inorder.
  The clerk will continue to call the roll.
  Mr. FRANKEN.--on behalf of the more than 2.3 million Minnesotans who 
canno longer be discriminated against because of the ACA.
  Ms. WARREN. Madam Clerk, how am Irecorded?
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator is not recorded.
  Ms. WARREN. Madam Clerk, onbehalf of the Republicans and Democrats--
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Debate is not allowed during a vote.
  The Senator is outof order.
  The Senator may vote.
  Ms. WARREN.--who worked for a decade in Massachusetts to bring health 
care to 97 percentof our people, I vote no.
  Mr. KING. Madam Clerk, how am I recorded?
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. TheSenator is not recorded.
  Mr. KING. My conscience compels me to vote no.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER.Debate is not allowed during a vote.
  The Senate will be in order.
  Ms. HARRIS. Madam Clerk,how am I recorded?
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator is not recorded.
  Ms. HARRIS. On behalfof the 5 million Californians--
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Debate is not allowed during a vote.
  The Senate will be in order.
  The Senator may vote.
  Ms. HARRIS.--who will be stripped of their right to have health care, 
my vote is no.
  The clerkwill continue to call the roll.
  Mr. MANCHIN. Mr. President, on behalf of the great people ofWest 
Virginia, I vote no.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Debate is not in order during a vote.
  The Senate will be in order.
  Mr. PETERS. Mr. President, how am I recorded?
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator is notrecorded.
  Mr. PETERS. Mr. President, on behalf of the people of Michigan--
  The PRESIDINGOFFICER. Debate is not allowed during a vote.
  The Senate will come to order.
  Mr. PETERS.--the over 800,000 who will behaving their insurance 
repealed--I vote no.
  Mr. UDALL. Mr. President, how am I recorded?
  ThePRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator is not recorded.
  Mr. UDALL. I vote no--
  The PRESIDING OFFICER.Debate is not allowed during a vote.
  The Senate will be in order.
  Mr. UDALL.--because this will hurt the citizens of NewMexico and the 
Republicans have no plan--no plan.
  Mr. VAN HOLLEN. Mr. President, how am I recorded?
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator is not recorded.
  Mr. VAN HOLLEN. Because it is wrong torepeal and run--
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Debate is not allowed during a vote.
  The Senate will be in order.
  The Senatorwill suspend.
  Mr. VAN HOLLEN.--I vote no.
  Mr. MARKEY. Madam Clerk,how am I recorded?
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator is not recorded.
  Mr. MARKEY. MadamClerk, I wish to be recorded no for the millions--
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Debate is not allowed during a vote.
  The Senatewill come to order.
  Mr. MARKEY.--who will lose opioid coverage for their addiction.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senatorwill suspend debate.
  Mr. BENNET. Mr. President, how am I recorded?
  The PRESIDING OFFICER.The Senator is not recorded.
  Mr. BENNET. Thank you, Mr. President. I vote no on behalf of 
thechildren--
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Debate is not allowed during a vote.
  The Senate will be in order.
  Mr. BENNET.--ofColorado.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Colorado will suspend.
  Ms. HEITKAMP. Mr.President, how am I recorded?
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator is not recorded.
  Ms.HEITKAMP. On behalf of the thousands of people--
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator will suspend.
  Debate it not allowedduring a vote.
  The Senate will be in order.
  Ms. HEITKAMP.--who receive health care in my State in rural hospitals 
who donot know how they are going to get health care if this passes 
without a replacement, I vote no.
  Mr. CARPER. Mr. President, how am I recorded?
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator is not recorded.
  Mr. CARPER. On behalf of the people--
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Debate is not allowed during a vote.
  TheSenate will be in order.
  Mr. CARPER.--in the State of Delaware, I vote no.
  Mr. MENENDEZ.Mr. President, how am I recorded?
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator is not recorded.
  Mr.MENENDEZ. I am not recorded. No to no protections.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Debate is not allowed during a vote.
  TheSenate will be in order.
  The Senator from New Jersey.
  Mr. BOOKER. Mr. President, how am Irecorded?
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator is not recorded.
  Mr. BOOKER. I vote no for NewJersey.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Are there any other Senators in the 
Chamberdesiring to vote?
  The result was announced--yeas 51, nays 48, as follows:

[[Page S268]]

  


                      [Rollcall Vote No. 26 Leg.]

                                YEAS--51

     Alexander
     Barrasso
     Blunt
     Boozman
     Burr
     Capito
     Cassidy
     Cochran
     Collins
     Corker
     Cornyn
     Cotton
     Crapo
     Cruz
     Daines
     Enzi
     Ernst
     Fischer
     Flake
     Gardner
     Graham
     Grassley
     Hatch
     Heller
     Hoeven
     Inhofe
     Isakson
     Johnson
     Kennedy
     Lankford
     Lee
     McCain
     McConnell
     Moran
     Murkowski
     Perdue
     Portman
     Risch
     Roberts
     Rounds
     Rubio
     Sasse
     Scott
     Sessions
     Shelby
     Sullivan
     Thune
     Tillis
     Toomey
     Wicker
     Young

                                NAYS--48

     Baldwin
     Bennet
     Blumenthal
     Booker
     Brown
     Cantwell
     Cardin
     Carper
     Casey
     Coons
     Cortez Masto
     Donnelly
     Duckworth
     Durbin
     Franken
     Gillibrand
     Harris
     Hassan
     Heinrich
     Heitkamp
     Hirono
     Kaine
     King
     Klobuchar
     Leahy
     Manchin
     Markey
     McCaskill
     Menendez
     Merkley
     Murphy
     Murray
     Nelson
     Paul
     Peters
     Reed
     Sanders
     Schatz
     Schumer
     Shaheen
     Stabenow
     Tester
     Udall
     Van Hollen
     Warner
     Warren
     Whitehouse
     Wyden

                             NOT VOTING--1

       
     Feinstein
       
  The concurrent resolution (S. Con. Res. 3) was agreed to, as follows:

                             S. Con. Res. 3

       

     CONCURRENTRESOLUTION

       Resolved by the Senate (the House of Representatives 
     concurring),

     SECTION 1. CONCURRENT RESOLUTION ON THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL 
                   YEAR 2017.

       (a) Declaration.--Congress declares that thisresolution is 
     the concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2017 
     and that this resolution sets forth the appropriatebudgetary 
     levels for fiscal years 2018 through 2026.
       (b) Table of Contents.--The table of contents for this 
     concurrentresolution is as follows:

Sec. 1. Concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2017.

                 TITLE I--RECOMMENDEDLEVELS AND AMOUNTS

              Subtitle A--Budgetary Levels in Both Houses

Sec. 1101. Recommended levels andamounts.
Sec. 1102. Major functional categories.

              Subtitle B--Levels and Amounts in the Senate

Sec. 1201. SocialSecurity in the Senate.
Sec. 1202. Postal Service discretionary administrative expenses in the 
              Senate.

                        TITLEII--RECONCILIATION

Sec. 2001. Reconciliation in the Senate.
Sec. 2002. Reconciliation in the House ofRepresentatives.

                        TITLE III--RESERVE FUNDS

Sec. 3001. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for health carelegislation.
Sec. 3002. Reserve fund for health care legislation.

                        TITLE IV--OTHER MATTERS

Sec. 4001. Enforcementfiling.
Sec. 4002. Budgetary treatment of administrative expenses.
Sec. 4003. Application and effect of changes inallocations and 
              aggregates.
Sec. 4004. Exercise of rulemaking powers.

                 TITLEI--RECOMMENDED LEVELS AND AMOUNTS

               Subtitle A--Budgetary Levels in BothHouses

     SEC. 1101. RECOMMENDED LEVELS AND AMOUNTS.

       The following budgetary levels areappropriate for each of 
     fiscal years 2017 through 2026:
       (1) Federal revenues.--For purposes of the enforcement of 
     thisresolution:
       (A) The recommended levels of Federal revenues are as 
     follows:
       Fiscal year 2017:$2,682,088,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018: $2,787,834,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019: $2,884,637,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020:$3,012,645,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021: $3,131,369,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022: $3,262,718,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023:$3,402,888,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024: $3,556,097,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025: $3,727,756,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026:$3,903,628,000,000.
       (B) The amounts by which the aggregate levels of Federal 
     revenues should be changed are asfollows:
       Fiscal year 2017: $0.
       Fiscal year 2018: $0.
       Fiscal year 2019: $0.
       Fiscal year 2020:$0.
       Fiscal year 2021: $0.
       Fiscal year 2022: $0.
       Fiscal year 2023: $0.
       Fiscal year 2024: $0.
       Fiscal year2025: $0.
       Fiscal year 2026: $0.
       (2) New budget authority.--For purposes of the enforcement 
     of this resolution, theappropriate levels of total new budget 
     authority are as follows:
       Fiscal year 2017: $3,308,000,000,000.
       Fiscal year2018: $3,350,010,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019: $3,590,479,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020: $3,779,449,000,000.
       Fiscal year2021: $3,947,834,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022: $4,187,893,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023: $4,336,952,000,000.
       Fiscal year2024: $4,473,818,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025: $4,726,484,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026: $4,961,154,000,000.
       (3) Budgetoutlays.--For purposes of the enforcement of this 
     resolution, the appropriate levels of total budget outlays 
     are asfollows:
       Fiscal year 2017: $3,264,662,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018: $3,329,394,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019:$3,558,237,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020: $3,741,304,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021: $3,916,533,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022:$4,159,803,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023: $4,295,742,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024: $4,419,330,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025:$4,673,813,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026: $4,912,205,000,000.
       (4) Deficits.--For purposes of the enforcement of 
     thisresolution, the amounts of the deficits are as follows:
       Fiscal year 2017: $582,574,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018:$541,560,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019: $673,600,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020: $728,659,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021:$785,164,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022: $897,085,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023: $892,854,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024:$863,233,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025: $946,057,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026: $1,008,577,000,000.
       (5) Publicdebt.--Pursuant to section 301(a)(5) of the 
     Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 632(a)(5)), the 
     appropriate levels ofthe public debt are as follows:
       Fiscal year 2017: $20,034,788,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018:$20,784,183,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019: $21,625,729,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020: $22,504,763,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021:$23,440,271,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022: $24,509,421,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023: $25,605,527,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024:$26,701,273,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025: $27,869,175,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026: $29,126,158,000,000.
       (6) Debt heldby the public.--The appropriate levels of debt 
     held by the public are as follows:
       Fiscal year 2017:$14,593,316,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018: $15,198,740,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019: $15,955,144,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020:$16,791,740,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021: $17,713,599,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022: $18,787,230,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023:$19,901,290,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024: $21,033,163,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025: $22,301,661,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026:$23,691,844,000,000.

     SEC. 1102. MAJOR FUNCTIONAL CATEGORIES.

       Congress determines anddeclares that the appropriate levels 
     of new budget authority and outlays for fiscal years 2017 
     through 2026 for each majorfunctional category are:
       (1) National Defense (050):
       Fiscal year 2017:
       (A) New budget authority,$623,910,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $603,716,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018:
       (A) New budget authority,$618,347,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $601,646,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019:
       (A) New budget authority,$632,742,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $617,943,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020:
       (A) New budget authority,$648,198,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $632,435,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority,$663,703,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $646,853,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022:
       (A) New budget authority,$679,968,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $666,926,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023:
       (A) New budget authority,$696,578,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $678,139,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024:
       (A) New budget authority,$713,664,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $689,531,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025:
       (A) New budget authority,$731,228,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $711,423,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026:
       (A) New budget authority,$750,069,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $729,616,000,000.
       (2) International Affairs (150):
       Fiscal year 2017:
       (A) Newbudget authority, $61,996,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $51,907,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018:
       (A) New budget authority,$60,099,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $53,541,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019:
       (A) New budget authority, $61,097,000,000.
       (B)Outlays, $55,800,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020:
       (A) New budget authority, $60,686,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$57,690,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $61,085,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$58,756,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022:
       (A) New budget authority, $62,576,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$60,205,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023:
       (A) New budget authority, $64,141,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$61,513,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024:
       (A) New budget authority, $65,588,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$62,705,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025:
       (A) New budget authority, $67,094,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$63,915,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026:
       (A) New budget authority, $68,692,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $65,305,000,000.
       (3)General Science, Space, and Technology (250):
       Fiscal year 2017:
       (A) New budget authority, $31,562,000,000.

[[Page S269]]

       (B)Outlays, $30,988,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018:
       (A) New budget authority, $32,787,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$32,225,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019:
       (A) New budget authority, $33,476,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$32,978,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020:
       (A) New budget authority, $34,202,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$33,645,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $34,961,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$34,313,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022:
       (A) New budget authority, $35,720,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$35,038,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023:
       (A) New budget authority, $36,516,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$35,812,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024:
       (A) New budget authority, $37,318,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$36,580,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025:
       (A) New budget authority, $38,151,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$37,393,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026:
       (A) New budget authority, $39,021,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $38,238,000,000.
       (4)Energy (270):
       Fiscal year 2017:
       (A) New budget authority, $4,773,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $3,455,000,000.
       Fiscalyear 2018:
       (A) New budget authority, $4,509,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $3,495,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019:
       (A) Newbudget authority, $4,567,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $4,058,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020:
       (A) New budget authority,$4,975,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $4,456,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $5,109,000,000.
       (B)Outlays, $4,523,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022:
       (A) New budget authority, $5,019,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$4,332,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023:
       (A) New budget authority, $4,083,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $3,337,000,000.
       Fiscalyear 2024:
       (A) New budget authority, $3,590,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $2,796,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025:
       (A) Newbudget authority, $3,608,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $2,755,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026:
       (A) New budget authority,$5,955,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $5,124,000,000.
       (5) Natural Resources and Environment (300):
       Fiscal year 2017:
       (A)New budget authority, $41,264,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $42,254,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018:
       (A) New budget authority,$43,738,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $44,916,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019:
       (A) New budget authority, $44,486,000,000.
       (B)Outlays, $45,425,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020:
       (A) New budget authority, $46,201,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$46,647,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $47,126,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$47,457,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022:
       (A) New budget authority, $48,203,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$48,388,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023:
       (A) New budget authority, $49,403,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$49,536,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024:
       (A) New budget authority, $50,497,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$50,055,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025:
       (A) New budget authority, $51,761,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$51,164,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026:
       (A) New budget authority, $53,017,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $51,915,000,000.
       (6)Agriculture (350):
       Fiscal year 2017:
       (A) New budget authority, $25,214,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$24,728,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018:
       (A) New budget authority, $26,148,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$24,821,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019:
       (A) New budget authority, $23,483,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$21,927,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020:
       (A) New budget authority, $22,438,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$21,751,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $22,834,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$22,179,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022:
       (A) New budget authority, $22,600,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$21,984,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023:
       (A) New budget authority, $23,037,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$22,437,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024:
       (A) New budget authority, $23,018,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$22,409,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025:
       (A) New budget authority, $23,343,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$22,714,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026:
       (A) New budget authority, $23,812,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $23,192,000,000.
       (7)Commerce and Housing Credit (370):
       Fiscal year 2017:
       (A) New budget authority, $14,696,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$666,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018:
       (A) New budget authority, $16,846,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $1,378,000,000.
       Fiscalyear 2019:
       (A) New budget authority, $18,171,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $5,439,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020:
       (A) Newbudget authority, $15,799,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $2,666,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority,$14,821,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $915,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022:
       (A) New budget authority, $15,408,000,000.
       (B)Outlays, $674,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023:
       (A) New budget authority, $15,739,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,-$840,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024:
       (A) New budget authority, $16,143,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, -$1,688,000,000.
       Fiscalyear 2025:
       (A) New budget authority, $17,889,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, -$2,003,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026:
       (A) Newbudget authority, $17,772,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, -$2,238,000,000.
       (8) Transportation (400):
       Fiscal year 2017:
       (A)New budget authority, $92,782,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $91,684,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018:
       (A) New budget authority,$94,400,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $93,214,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019:
       (A) New budget authority, $96,522,000,000.
       (B)Outlays, $95,683,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020:
       (A) New budget authority, $91,199,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$97,992,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $92,154,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$99,772,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022:
       (A) New budget authority, $93,111,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$101,692,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023:
       (A) New budget authority, $94,118,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$103,431,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024:
       (A) New budget authority, $95,143,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$105,313,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025:
       (A) New budget authority, $96,209,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$107,374,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026:
       (A) New budget authority, $97,323,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$109,188,000,000.
       (9) Community and Regional Development (450):
       Fiscal year 2017:
       (A) New budget authority,$19,723,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $22,477,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018:
       (A) New budget authority, $19,228,000,000.
       (B)Outlays, $21,277,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019:
       (A) New budget authority, $19,457,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$20,862,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020:
       (A) New budget authority, $19,941,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$20,011,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $20,384,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$21,048,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022:
       (A) New budget authority, $20,825,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$19,831,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023:
       (A) New budget authority, $21,288,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$19,535,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024:
       (A) New budget authority, $21,756,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$19,787,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025:
       (A) New budget authority, $22,245,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$19,285,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026:
       (A) New budget authority, $22,751,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $20,037,000,000.
       (10)Education, Training, Employment, and Social Services 
     (500):
       Fiscal year 2017:
       (A) New budget authority,$104,433,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $104,210,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018:
       (A) New budget authority,$108,980,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $112,802,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019:
       (A) New budget authority,$112,424,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $110,765,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020:
       (A) New budget authority,$114,905,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $113,377,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority,$116,921,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $115,591,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022:
       (A) New budget authority,$119,027,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $117,545,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023:
       (A) New budget authority,$121,298,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $119,761,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024:
       (A) New budget authority,$123,621,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $122,001,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025:
       (A) New budget authority,$126,016,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $124,359,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026:
       (A) New budget authority,$128,391,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $126,748,000,000.
       (11) Health (550):
       Fiscal year 2017:
       (A) New budget authority,$562,137,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $560,191,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018:
       (A) New budget authority,$583,006,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $593,197,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019:
       (A) New budget authority,$615,940,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $618,089,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020:
       (A) New budget authority,$655,892,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $645,814,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority,$677,902,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $676,781,000,000.

[[Page S270]]

       Fiscal year 2022:
       (A) New budget authority,$711,176,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $709,301,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023:
       (A) New budget authority,$744,335,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $742,568,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024:
       (A) New budget authority,$780,899,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $778,293,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025:
       (A) New budget authority,$818,388,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $815,246,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026:
       (A) New budget authority,$857,176,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $853,880,000,000.
       (12) Medicare (570):
       Fiscal year 2017:
       (A) New budgetauthority, $600,857,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $600,836,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018:
       (A) New budget authority,$600,832,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $600,762,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019:
       (A) New budget authority,$667,638,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $667,571,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020:
       (A) New budget authority,$716,676,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $716,575,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority,$767,911,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $767,814,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022:
       (A) New budget authority,$862,042,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $861,941,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023:
       (A) New budget authority,$886,515,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $886,407,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024:
       (A) New budget authority,$903,861,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $903,750,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025:
       (A) New budget authority,$1,007,624,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $1,007,510,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026:
       (A) New budget authority,$1,085,293,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $1,085,173,000,000.
       (13) Income Security (600):
       Fiscal year 2017:
       (A) Newbudget authority, $518,181,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $511,658,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018:
       (A) New budget authority,$524,233,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $511,612,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019:
       (A) New budget authority,$542,725,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $534,067,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020:
       (A) New budget authority,$558,241,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $549,382,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority,$571,963,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $563,481,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022:
       (A) New budget authority,$590,120,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $587,572,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023:
       (A) New budget authority,$599,505,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $592,338,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024:
       (A) New budget authority,$609,225,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $597,287,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025:
       (A) New budget authority,$630,433,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $619,437,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026:
       (A) New budget authority,$646,660,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $641,957,000,000.
       (14) Social Security (650):
       Fiscal year 2017:
       (A) New budgetauthority, $37,199,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $37,227,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018:
       (A) New budget authority,$40,124,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $40,141,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019:
       (A) New budget authority, $43,373,000,000.
       (B)Outlays, $43,373,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020:
       (A) New budget authority, $46,627,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$46,627,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $50,035,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$50,035,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022:
       (A) New budget authority, $53,677,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$53,677,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023:
       (A) New budget authority, $57,540,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$57,540,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024:
       (A) New budget authority, $61,645,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$61,645,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025:
       (A) New budget authority, $66,076,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$66,076,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026:
       (A) New budget authority, $70,376,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $70,376,000,000.
       (15)Veterans Benefits and Services (700):
       Fiscal year 2017:
       (A) New budget authority, $177,448,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$182,448,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018:
       (A) New budget authority, $178,478,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$179,109,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019:
       (A) New budget authority, $193,088,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$192,198,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020:
       (A) New budget authority, $199,907,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$198,833,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $206,700,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$205,667,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022:
       (A) New budget authority, $223,542,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$222,308,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023:
       (A) New budget authority, $221,861,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$220,563,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024:
       (A) New budget authority, $219,382,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$218,147,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025:
       (A) New budget authority, $237,641,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$236,254,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026:
       (A) New budget authority, $245,565,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$244,228,000,000.
       (16) Administration of Justice (750):
       Fiscal year 2017:
       (A) New budget authority,$64,519,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $58,662,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018:
       (A) New budget authority, $62,423,000,000.
       (B)Outlays, $63,800,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019:
       (A) New budget authority, $62,600,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$66,596,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020:
       (A) New budget authority, $64,168,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$69,555,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $65,134,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$68,538,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022:
       (A) New budget authority, $66,776,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$67,691,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023:
       (A) New budget authority, $68,489,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$68,466,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024:
       (A) New budget authority, $70,227,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$69,976,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025:
       (A) New budget authority, $72,023,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$71,615,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026:
       (A) New budget authority, $79,932,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $80,205,000,000.
       (17)General Government (800):
       Fiscal year 2017:
       (A) New budget authority, $25,545,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$24,318,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018:
       (A) New budget authority, $27,095,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$25,884,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019:
       (A) New budget authority, $27,620,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$26,584,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020:
       (A) New budget authority, $28,312,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$27,576,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $29,046,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$28,366,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022:
       (A) New budget authority, $29,787,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$29,149,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023:
       (A) New budget authority, $30,519,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$29,886,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024:
       (A) New budget authority, $31,101,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$30,494,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025:
       (A) New budget authority, $31,942,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$31,248,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026:
       (A) New budget authority, $32,789,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $32,071,000,000.
       (18)Net Interest (900):
       Fiscal year 2017:
       (A) New budget authority, $393,295,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$393,295,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018:
       (A) New budget authority, $453,250,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$453,250,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019:
       (A) New budget authority, $526,618,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$526,618,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020:
       (A) New budget authority, $590,571,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$590,571,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $645,719,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$645,719,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022:
       (A) New budget authority, $698,101,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$698,101,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023:
       (A) New budget authority, $755,288,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$755,288,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024:
       (A) New budget authority, $806,202,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$806,202,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025:
       (A) New budget authority, $854,104,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$854,104,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026:
       (A) New budget authority, $903,443,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$903,443,000,000.
       (19) Allowances (920):
       Fiscal year 2017:
       (A) New budget authority, -$3,849,000,000.
       (B)Outlays, $7,627,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018:
       (A) New budget authority, -$56,166,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,-$39,329,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019:
       (A) New budget authority, -$55,423,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,-$47,614,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020:
       (A) New budget authority, -$58,021,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,-$52,831,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, -$61,491,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,-$57,092,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022:
       (A) New budget authority, -$63,493,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,-$60,260,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023:
       (A) New budget authority, -$65,783,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,-$62,457,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024:
       (A) New budget authority, -$67,817,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,-$64,708,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025:
       (A) New budget authority, -$70,127,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,-$66,892,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026:
       (A) New budget authority, -$69,097,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,-$68,467,000,000.
       (20) Undistributed Offsetting Receipts (950):

[[Page S271]]

       Fiscal year 2017:
       (A) New budget authority,-$87,685,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, -$87,685,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018:
       (A) New budget authority,-$88,347,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, -$88,347,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019:
       (A) New budget authority,-$80,125,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, -$80,125,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020:
       (A) New budget authority,-$81,468,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, -$81,468,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority,-$84,183,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, -$84,183,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022:
       (A) New budget authority,-$86,292,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, -$86,292,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023:
       (A) New budget authority,-$87,518,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, -$87,518,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024:
       (A) New budget authority,-$91,245,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, -$91,245,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025:
       (A) New budget authority,-$99,164,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, -$99,164,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026:
       (A) New budget authority,-$97,786,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, -$97,786,000,000.

              Subtitle B--Levels and Amounts in theSenate

     SEC. 1201. SOCIAL SECURITY IN THE SENATE.

       (a) Social Security Revenues.--Forpurposes of Senate 
     enforcement under sections 302 and 311 of the Congressional 
     Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 633 and 642), theamounts of 
     revenues of the Federal Old-Age and Survivors Insurance Trust 
     Fund and the Federal Disability Insurance Trust Fundare as 
     follows:
       Fiscal year 2017: $826,048,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018: $857,618,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019:$886,810,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020: $918,110,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021: $950,341,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022:$984,537,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023: $1,020,652,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024: $1,058,799,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025:$1,097,690,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026: $1,138,243,000,000.
       (b) Social Security Outlays.--For purposes of 
     Senateenforcement under sections 302 and 311 of the 
     Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 633 and 642), the 
     amounts of outlays ofthe Federal Old-Age and Survivors 
     Insurance Trust Fund and the Federal Disability Insurance 
     Trust Fund are asfollows:
       Fiscal year 2017: $805,366,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018: $857,840,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019:$916,764,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020: $980,634,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021: $1,049,127,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022:$1,123,266,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023: $1,200,734,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024: $1,281,840,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025:$1,369,403,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026: $1,463,057,000,000.
       (c) Social Security Administrative Expenses.--In theSenate, 
     the amounts of new budget authority and budget outlays of the 
     Federal Old-Age and Survivors Insurance Trust Fund and 
     theFederal Disability Insurance Trust Fund for administrative 
     expenses are as follows:
       Fiscal year 2017:
       (A) New budgetauthority, $5,663,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $5,673,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018:
       (A) New budget authority,$6,021,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $5,987,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019:
       (A) New budget authority, $6,205,000,000.
       (B)Outlays, $6,170,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020:
       (A) New budget authority, $6,393,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$6,357,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $6,589,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $6,552,000,000.
       Fiscalyear 2022:
       (A) New budget authority, $6,787,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $6,750,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023:
       (A) Newbudget authority, $6,992,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $6,953,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024:
       (A) New budget authority,$7,206,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $7,166,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025:
       (A) New budget authority, $7,428,000,000.
       (B)Outlays, $7,387,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026:
       (A) New budget authority, $7,659,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$7,615,000,000.

     SEC. 1202. POSTAL SERVICE DISCRETIONARY ADMINISTRATIVE 
                   EXPENSES IN THESENATE.

       In the Senate, the amounts of new budget authority and 
     budget outlays of the Postal Service for 
     discretionaryadministrative expenses are as follows:
       Fiscal year 2017:
       (A) New budget authority, $274,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$273,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018:
       (A) New budget authority, $283,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $283,000,000.
       Fiscal year2019:
       (A) New budget authority, $294,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $294,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020:
       (A) New budgetauthority, $304,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $304,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority,$315,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $315,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022:
       (A) New budget authority, $326,000,000.
       (B) Outlays,$325,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023:
       (A) New budget authority, $337,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $337,000,000.
       Fiscal year2024:
       (A) New budget authority, $350,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $349,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025:
       (A) New budgetauthority, $361,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $360,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026:
       (A) New budget authority,$374,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $373,000,000.

                        TITLE II--RECONCILIATION

     SEC. 2001. RECONCILIATION IN THE SENATE.

       (a) Committee on Finance.--The Committee on Finance of the 
     Senateshall report changes in laws within its jurisdiction to 
     reduce the deficit by not less than $1,000,000,000 for the 
     period offiscal years 2017 through 2026.
       (b) Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions.--
     The Committee on Health,Education, Labor, and Pensions of the 
     Senate shall report changes in laws within its jurisdiction 
     to reduce the deficit by notless than $1,000,000,000 for the 
     period of fiscal years 2017 through 2026.
       (c) Submissions.--In the Senate, not laterthan January 27, 
     2017, the Committees named in subsections (a) and (b) shall 
     submit their recommendations to the Committee onthe Budget of 
     the Senate. Upon receiving all such recommendations, the 
     Committee on the Budget of the Senate shall report to 
     theSenate a reconciliation bill carrying out all such 
     recommendations without any substantive revision.

     SEC. 2002. RECONCILIATION IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

       (a) Committee on Energy and Commerce.--The Committeeon 
     Energy and Commerce of the House of Representatives shall 
     submit changes in laws within its jurisdiction to reduce 
     thedeficit by not less than $1,000,000,000 for the period of 
     fiscal years 2017 through 2026.
       (b) Committee on Ways andMeans.--The Committee on Ways and 
     Means of the House of Representatives shall submit changes in 
     laws within its jurisdiction toreduce the deficit by not less 
     than $1,000,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2017 
     through 2026.
       (c)Submissions.--In the House of Representatives, not later 
     than January 27, 2017, the committees named in subsections 
     (a) and(b) shall submit their recommendations to the 
     Committee on the Budget of the House of Representatives to 
     carry out thissection.

                        TITLE III--RESERVE FUNDS

     SEC. 3001. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR HEALTH CARE 
                   LEGISLATION.

       The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
     and the Chairmanof the Committee on the Budget of the House 
     of Representatives may revise the allocations of a committee 
     or committees,aggregates, and other appropriate levels in 
     this resolution, and, in the Senate, make adjustments to the 
     pay-as-you-go ledger,for--
       (1) in the Senate, one or more bills, joint resolutions, 
     amendments, amendments between the Houses, conference 
     reports,or motions related to health care by the amounts 
     provided in such legislation for that purpose, provided that 
     such legislationwould not increase the deficit over the 
     period of the total of fiscal years 2017 through 2026; and
       (2) in the House ofRepresentatives, one or more bills, 
     joint resolutions, amendments, or conference reports related 
     to health care by the amountsprovided in such legislation for 
     that purpose, provided that such legislation would not 
     increase the deficit over the period ofthe total of fiscal 
     years 2017 through 2026.

     SEC. 3002. RESERVE FUND FOR HEALTH CARELEGISLATION.

       (a) In General.--The Chairman of the Committee on the 
     Budget of the Senate and the Chairman of theCommittee on the 
     Budget of the House of Representatives may revise the 
     allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, 
     andother appropriate levels in this resolution, and, in the 
     Senate, make adjustments to the pay-as-you-go ledger, for--
       (1) inthe Senate, one or more bills, joint resolutions, 
     amendments, amendments between the Houses, conference 
     reports, or motionsrelated to health care by the amounts 
     necessary to accommodate the budgetary effects of the 
     legislation, provided that the costof such legislation, when 
     combined with the cost of any other measure with respect to 
     which the Chairman has exercised theauthority under this 
     paragraph, does not exceed the difference obtained by 
     subtracting--
       (A) $2,000,000,000; from
       (B) thesum of deficit reduction over the period of the 
     total of fiscal years 2017 through 2026 achieved under any 
     measure or measureswith respect to which the Chairman has 
     exercised the authority under section 3001(1); and
       (2) in the House ofRepresentatives, one or more bills, 
     joint resolutions, amendments, or conference reports related 
     to health care by the amountsnecessary to accommodate the 
     budgetary effects of the legislation, provided that the cost 
     of such legislation, when combinedwith the cost of any other 
     measure with respect to which the Chairman has exercised the 
     authority under this paragraph, does notexceed the difference 
     obtained by subtracting--
       (A) $2,000,000,000; from
       (B) the sum of deficit reduction over the periodof the 
     total of fiscal years 2017 through 2026 achieved under any 
     measure or measures with respect to which the Chairman 
     hasexercised the authority under section 3001(2).

[[Page S272]]

       (b) Exceptions From Certain Provisions.--Section 404(a) of 
     S. Con.Res. 13 (111th Congress), the concurrent resolution on 
     the budget for fiscal year 2010, and section 3101 of S. Con. 
     Res. 11(114th Congress), the concurrent resolution on the 
     budget for fiscal year 2016, shall not apply to legislation 
     for which theChairman of the Committee on the Budget of the 
     applicable House has exercised the authority under 
     subsection(a).

                        TITLE IV--OTHER MATTERS

     SEC. 4001. ENFORCEMENTFILING.

       (a) In the Senate.--If this concurrent resolution on the 
     budget is agreed to by the Senate and House ofRepresentatives 
     without the appointment of a committee of conference on the 
     disagreeing votes of the two Houses, the Chairman ofthe 
     Committee on the Budget of the Senate may submit a statement 
     for publication in the Congressional Record containing--
       (1)for the Committee on Appropriations, committee 
     allocations for fiscal year 2017 consistent with the levels 
     in title I for thepurpose of enforcing section 302 of the 
     Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 633); and
       (2) for all committees otherthan the Committee on 
     Appropriations, committee allocations for fiscal years 2017, 
     2017 through 2021, and 2017 through 2026consistent with the 
     levels in title I for the purpose of enforcing section 302 of 
     the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C.633).
       (b) In the House of Representatives.--In the House of 
     Representatives, if a concurrent resolution on the budgetfor 
     fiscal year 2017 is adopted without the appointment of a 
     committee of conference on the disagreeing votes of the two 
     Houseswith respect to this concurrent resolution on the 
     budget, for the purpose of enforcing the Congressional Budget 
     Act andapplicable rules and requirements set forth in the 
     concurrent resolution on the budget, the allocations provided 
     for in thissubsection shall apply in the House of 
     Representatives in the same manner as if such allocations 
     were in a joint explanatorystatement accompanying a 
     conference report on the budget for fiscal year 2017. The 
     Chairman of the Committee on the Budget ofthe House of 
     Representatives shall submit a statement for publication in 
     the Congressional Record containing--
       (1) for theCommittee on Appropriations, committee 
     allocations for fiscal year 2017 consistent with title I for 
     the purpose of enforcingsection 302 of the Congressional 
     Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 633); and
       (2) for all committees other than the Committee 
     onAppropriations, committee allocations consistent with title 
     I for fiscal year 2017 and for the period of fiscal years 
     2017through 2026 for the purpose of enforcing 302 of the 
     Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 633).

     SEC. 4002. BUDGETARY TREATMENT OF ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES.

       (a) In General.--Notwithstanding section 302(a)(1)of the 
     Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 633(a)(1)), 
     section 13301 of the Budget Enforcement Act of 1990 (2 U.S.C. 
     632note), and section 2009a of title 39, United States Code, 
     the report accompanying this concurrent resolution on the 
     budget, thejoint explanatory statement accompanying the 
     conference report on any concurrent resolution on the budget, 
     or a statement filedunder section 4001 shall include in an 
     allocation under section 302(a) of the Congressional Budget 
     Act of 1974 to the Committeeon Appropriations of the 
     applicable House of Congress amounts for the discretionary 
     administrative expenses of the SocialSecurity Administration 
     and the United States Postal Service.
       (b) Special Rule.--In the Senate and the House 
     ofRepresentatives, for purposes of enforcing section 302(f) 
     of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 633(f)), 
     estimatesof the level of total new budget authority and total 
     outlays provided by a measure shall include any discretionary 
     amountsdescribed in subsection (a).

     SEC. 4003. APPLICATION AND EFFECT OF CHANGES IN ALLOCATIONS 
                   ANDAGGREGATES.

       (a) Application.--Any adjustments of allocations and 
     aggregates made pursuant to this concurrent resolutionshall--
       (1) apply while that measure is under consideration;
       (2) take effect upon the enactment of that measure;and
       (3) be published in the Congressional Record as soon as 
     practicable.
       (b) Effect of Changed Allocations andAggregates.--Revised 
     allocations and aggregates resulting from these adjustments 
     shall be considered for the purposes of theCongressional 
     Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 621 et seq.) as the allocations 
     and aggregates contained in this concurrentresolution.
       (c) Budget Committee Determinations.--For purposes of this 
     concurrent resolution, the levels of new budgetauthority, 
     outlays, direct spending, new entitlement authority, 
     revenues, deficits, and surpluses for a fiscal year or period 
     offiscal years shall be determined on the basis of estimates 
     made by the Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the 
     applicableHouse of Congress.
       (d) Aggregates, Allocations and Application.--In the House 
     of Representatives, for purposes of thisconcurrent resolution 
     and budget enforcement, the consideration of any bill or 
     joint resolution, or amendment thereto orconference report 
     thereon, for which the Chairman of the Committee on the 
     Budget of the House of Representatives makesadjustments or 
     revisions in the allocations, aggregates, and other budgetary 
     levels of this concurrent resolution shall not besubject to 
     the points of order set forth in clause 10 of rule XXI of the 
     Rules of the House of Representatives or section 3101of S. 
     Con. Res. 11 (114th Congress).

     SEC. 4004. EXERCISE OF RULEMAKING POWERS.

       Congressadopts the provisions of this title--
       (1) as an exercise of the rulemaking power of the Senate 
     and the House ofRepresentatives, respectively, and as such 
     they shall be considered as part of the rules of each House 
     or of that House to whichthey specifically apply, and such 
     rules shall supersede other rules only to the extent that 
     they are inconsistent with suchother rules; and
       (2) with full recognition of the constitutional right of 
     either the Senate or the House of Representativesto change 
     those rules (insofar as they relate to that House) at any 
     time, in the same manner, and to the same extent as is 
     thecase of any other rule of the Senate or House of 
     Representatives.

  The PRESIDINGOFFICER. The Senator from Wyoming.

                          ____________________