Text: H.Con.Res.386 — 101st Congress (1989-1990)All Information (Except Text)

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HCON 386 IH
101st CONGRESS
2d Session
H. CON. RES. 386
To acknowledge the 100th anniversary of the tragedy at Wounded Knee Creek,
State of South Dakota, December 29, 1890, wherein soldiers of the United
States Army 7th Cavalry killed and wounded approximately 350-375 Indian
men, women, and children of Chief Big Foot's band of the Minneconjou Sioux,
and to recognize the Year of Reconciliation declared by the State of South
Dakota between the citizens of the State and the member bands of the Great
Sioux Nation.
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
October 19, 1990
Mr. JOHNSON of South Dakota submitted the following concurrent resolution;
which was referred to the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs
CONCURRENT RESOLUTION
To acknowledge the 100th anniversary of the tragedy at Wounded Knee Creek,
State of South Dakota, Decem- ber 29, 1890, wherein soldiers of the United
States Army 7th Cavalry killed and wounded approximately 350-375 Indian
men, women, and children of Chief Big Foot's band of the Minneconjou Sioux,
and to recognize the Year of Reconciliation declared by the State of South
Dakota between the citizens of the State and the member bands of the Great
Sioux Nation.
Whereas, in order to promote racial harmony and cultural understanding,
the Governor of the State of South Dakota has declared that 1990 is a Year
of Reconciliation between the citizens of the State of South Dakota and the
member bands of the Great Sioux Nation;
Whereas the Sioux people who are descendants of the victims and survivors of
the Wounded Knee Massacre have been striving to reconcile and, in a culturally
appropriate manner, to bring to an end their 100 years of grieving for the
tragedy of December 29, 1890;
Whereas historians regard the 1890 Wounded Knee Massacre as the last armed
conflict between Indian warriors and the United States Cavalry which brought
to a close an era in the history of this country commonly referred to as
the Indian wars period characterized by an official government policy of
forcibly removing the Indian tribes and bands from the path of westward
expansion and settlement through placement on reservations;
Whereas this era of government policy has been replaced by a more enlightened
policy of Indian self-determination and respect for human rights characterized
by a recognition of the valuable contribution of Indian cultures, traditions,
and values to the history and fabric of American society;
Whereas, on September 25, 1990, hearings were conducted in the  United States
Senate by the Select Committee on Indian Affairs regarding the historical
circumstances surrounding the Wounded Knee Massacre and to receive testimony
regarding a proposed Wounded Knee Memorial and the need to designate the
area an historic site or national monument in order to properly preserve
and maintain the terrain; and
Whereas it is proper and timely for the Congress of the  United States
of America to acknowledge, on the occasion of the impending one hundredth
anniversary of the event, the historic significance of the Massacre at Wounded
Knee Creek, to express its deep regret to the Sioux people and in particular
to the descendants of the victims and survivors for this terrible tragedy,
and to support the reconciliation efforts of the State of South Dakota and
the Wounded Knee Survivors Association: Now, therefore, be it
  Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate concurring), That--
  (1) the Congress, on the occasion of the one hundredth anniversary of
  the Wounded Knee Massacre of December 29, 1890, hereby acknowledges
  the historical significance of this event as the last armed conflict
  of the Indian wars period resulting in the tragic death and injury of
  approximately 350-375 Indian men, women, and children of Chief Big Foot's
  band of Minneconjou Sioux and hereby expresses its deep regret on behalf
  of the  United States to the descendants of the victims and survivors and
  their respective tribal communities;
  (2) the Congress also hereby recognizes and commends the efforts of
  reconciliation initiated by the State of South Dakota and the Wounded Knee
  Survivors Association and expresses its support for the establishment of
  a suitable and appropriate Memorial to those who were so tragically slain
  at Wounded Knee which could inform the American public of the historic
  significance of the events at Wounded Knee and accurately portray the
  heroic and courageous campaign waged by the Sioux people to preserve and
  protect their lands and their way of life during this period; and
  (3) the Congress hereby expresses its commitment to acknowledge and learn
  from our history, including the Wounded Knee Massacre, in order to provide
  a proper foundation for building an ever more humane, enlightened, and
  just society for the future.

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