Text: H.R.1736 — 102nd Congress (1991-1992)All Information (Except Text)

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HR 1736 IH
102d CONGRESS
1st Session
 H. R. 1736
To require that all Federal printing be performed using cost-competitive
inks whose pigment vehicles are made entirely from soybean oil, and for
other purposes.
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
April 11, 1991
Mr. LEACH introduced the following bill; which was referred jointly to the
Committees on Government Operations and House Administration
A BILL
To require that all Federal printing be performed using cost-competitive
inks whose pigment vehicles are made entirely from soybean oil, and for
other purposes.
  Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United
  States of America in Congress assembled,
SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.
  This Act may be cited as the `All-Soy Ink Printing Act of 1991'.
SEC. 2. FINDINGS.
  The Congress finds that--
  (1) replacing petroleum-based newsprint inks used in Federal printing with
  inks whose pigment vehicles are made entirely of soybean oil would--
  (A) help reduce United States use of nonrenewable resources,
  (B) encourage use of a material that is less toxic to workers and less
  damaging to the environment, and
  (C) boost the agricultural sector of the United States;
  (2) black newsprint ink formulas that use soy-based pigment vehicles have
  been developed by the National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research
  of the United States Department of Agriculture, located in Peoria, Illinois;
  (3) these soy-based ink formulas--
  (A) appear to provide superior protection against ink rub-off,
  (B) have better density and coverage characteristics, and
  (C) promise pricing competitive with conventional new inks;
  (4) the National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research has applied
  for a patent on the process for producing these soy-based ink formulas and
  is prepared to license it immediately for commercial production under the
  National Technology Transfer Act of 1988; and
  (5) use of soy-based ink to print Federal newsprint-based publications
  should further develop--
  (A) the commercial viability of the new soy-based ink, which may result
  in a demand, for domestic use alone, for 40,000,000 bushels of soybeans
  annually, and
  (B) a product which could help the United States retain or enlarge its
  share of the world market for newsprint ink.
SEC. 3. FEDERAL PRINTING REQUIREMENTS.
  (a) SOY-BASED PIGMENT VEHICLES- Notwithstanding any other provision of
  law, after the date on which cost-competitive newsprint ink whose pigment
  vehicles are made entirely of soybean oil is commercially available, all
  printing performed by a Federal agency and all printing services procured
  by a Federal agency shall to the extent possible use that ink.
  (b) ALL-SOY INK- Notwithstanding any other provision of law, after the
  date on which cost-competitive newsprint ink made entirely of soybean oil
  is commercially available, all printing performed by a Federal agency and
  all printing services procured by a Federal agency shall to the extent
  possible use that ink.
  (c) DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE- Notwithstanding any other provision of law,
  after 60 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, all printing
  performed by the United States Department of Agriculture and all printing
  services procured by the United States Department of Agriculture shall,
  to the extent possible, use newsprint ink whose pigment vehicles are made
  entirely of soybean ink.