Text: H.R.5162 — 102nd Congress (1991-1992)All Information (Except Text)

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HR 5162 IH
102d CONGRESS
2d Session
 H. R. 5162
To promote implementation of the sustainable development agenda of the United
Nations Conference on Environment and Development.
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
MAY 13, 1992
Mr. OWENS of Utah (for himself, Mr. GILMAN, Mr. MCDERMOTT, Mr. ATKINS,
Mr. ANDREWS of New Jersey, Mr. PENNY, and Mr. RICHARDSON) introduced the
following bill; which was referred jointly to the Committees on Foreign
Affairs, Banking, Finance and Urban Affairs, Ways and Means, and Energy
and Commerce
A BILL
To promote implementation of the sustainable development agenda of the United
Nations Conference on Environment and Development.
  Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United
  States of America in Congress assembled,
SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.
  This Act may be cited as the `Earth Summit Leadership Act of 1992'.
SEC. 2. FINDINGS REGARDING THE SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT AGENDA OF THE UNITED
NATIONS CONFERENCE ON ENVIRONMENT AND DEVELOPMENT.
  The Congress finds that--
  (1) protection of the global environment and the reduction of global
  poverty are critical to the well-being of the people of the United States;
  (2) economic stagnation in the developing world cost the United States over
  $350 billion in export earnings and over 1.5 million jobs in the 1980s,
  according to the congressional Arms Control and Foreign Policy Caucus;
  (3) a principle cause of environmental degradation around the world is
  the persistence of poverty;
  (4) bilateral development assistance that is channeled directly to
  nongovernmental organizations and community groups, especially those which
  are indigenous to developing countries, has been found to be extremely
  effective in promoting sustainable development and democracy;
  (5) the United Nations system has an important role to play in promoting
  and coordinating sustainable development programs in the world;
  (6) the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development is an
  historic opportunity to enhance global commitment and cooperation with
  regard to sustainable development;
  (7) leadership on the part of the United States at the United Nations
  Conference on Environment and Development will be critical if the Conference
  is to achieve its purpose; and
  (8) to implement the sustainable development agenda of the United Nations
  Conference on Environment and Development, action is needed in at least
  these four related areas--reform of bilateral development assistance, reform
  of bilateral security assistance, reform of multilateral institutions,
  and changes in domestic environmental policies.
TITLE I--FOUNDATION FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT
SEC. 101. FINDINGS REGARDING THE FOUNDATION FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT.
  The Congress finds that--
  (1) social and economic development ultimately depends on the active
  participation of individuals within a society and on the enhancement of
  opportunities of those individuals:
  (2) the development of individuals and institutions in developing countries
  can benefit by the provision of support for community-based self-help
  activities;
  (3) enhancing the economic productivity of the poor, especially in their
  capacity as small producers of environmentally sustainable goods and
  services, is essential to reducing poverty and protecting natural resources;
  (4) the Inter-American Foundation, established by Congress in the Foreign
  Assistance Act of 1969 to support the efforts of the people of Latin America
  and the Caribbean to solve their development problems, has demonstrated
  a successful approach to development; and
  (5) the African Development Foundation, established by Congress in the
  Foreign Assistance Act of 1980 to support the efforts of the people
  of Africa to solve their development problems, has also demonstrated a
  successful approach to development;
  (6) Appropriate Technology International, established in response to
  a congressional initiative in 1976, offers essential support to a large
  network of organizations in the developing world who assist small producers
  at overcoming poverty in a sustainable manner;
  (7) an increasing number of innovative solutions are emerging at the
  local level to combat environmental degradation and poverty, and there
  is an increasing role for the use of United States bilateral development
  assistance to disseminate widely information about, and where appropriate
  replicate, these successes;
  (8) the convening of the United Nations Conference on Environment and
  Development at a time of reduced military threats and increased ecological
  threats to the United States calls for new initiatives to promote sustainable
  and equitable development in the world;
  (9) a Foundation for Sustainable Development, based on the principles
  of the Inter-American Foundation, the African Development Foundation,
  and Appropriate Technology International and operating on a global scale
  to assist participatory, environmentally sustainable community-based
  development strategies, can complement current United States development
  programs in the developing world; and
  (10) there is a need to focus development resources on community
  organizations in countries where there are a large number of people living
  in absolute poverty and in countries where there are critically endangered
  ecosystems.
SEC. 102. ESTABLISHMENT OF FOUNDATION.
  There is established a body corporate to be known as the `Foundation for
  Sustainable Development' (hereinafter in this title referred to as the
  `Foundation').
SEC. 103. PURPOSES OF FOUNDATION.
  (a) IN GENERAL- In recognition of the clear linkage between the prosperity
  and security of the United States and the developing world and the need
  to empower the poorest people in the world and to safeguard the natural
  resources which are crucial to global prosperity, the purposes of the
  Foundation shall be--
  (1) to encourage the growth of, and where appropriate the establishment
  of, development institutions indigenous to developing countries which
  effectively respond to the needs and aspirations of the poor (especially
  women) in those countries and which promote environmental protection and
  conservation of natural resources;
  (2) to support efforts to increase the productivity of the poor, particularly
  in their role as small producers of environmentally sustainable goods and
  services for local consumption;
  (3) to support self-help activities at the local level designed to enlarge
  opportunities for community development;
  (4) to support efforts at community-based, environmentally sustainable
  management of natural resources;
  (5) to stimulate and assist the process of people, especially women,
  participating in the processes that affect their lives, including resource
  allocation, decision-making at the local governmental level, and other
  processes essential to their well-being;
  (6) to replicate in other regions of the world successful projects promoting
  sustainable and equitable development funded by the Inter-American
  Foundation, the African Development Foundation, Appropriate Technology
  International, the Asia Foundation, private foundations, and other groups;
  and
  (7) to disseminate insights gained in the process of the Foundation's work
  to the American public and to citizens and organizations in developing
  countries.
  (b) INDIGENOUS ORGANIZATIONS- The Foundation shall carry out the purposes
  specified in subsection (a) in cooperation with, and in response to,
  organizations indigenous to developing countries which are representative
  of the needs and aspirations of the poor in the developing world. In
  carrying out its purposes, the Foundation shall, to the extent possible,
  coordinate its development assistance activities with other activities
  of the United States Government and with activities of private, regional,
  and international organizations.
SEC. 104. FUNCTIONS OF THE FOUNDATION.
  (a) IN GENERAL- In order to carry out the purposes set forth in section
  103(a), the Foundation may provide grant assistance to any private group,
  association, or other entity that is either indigenous to a developing
  country or working in partnership with organizations indigenous to a
  developing country. Such assistance shall be provided--
  (1) to foster local institutions and support efforts to promote sustainable
  development and resource conservation that are initiated by communities
  themselves;
  (2) to develop self-evaluation techniques by participants in projects
  supported under this section, for the purpose of transferring experience
  gained in such projects to similar development activities;
  (3) to support development research by people of developing countries,
  and the transfer of development resources, expertise, and knowledge within
  the developing and developed worlds;
  (4) to support, and where appropriate help to establish, foundations or other
  organizations in developing countries which provide support for purposes
  consistent with those described in section 103(a) and whose governing bodies
  contain a majority of representatives of nongovernmental organizations;
  (5) to support the procurement of local technical skills and assistance
  and other assistance deemed appropriate by the recipient of such assistance
  to carry out the purposes set forth in section 103(a);
  (6) to support the work of United States private and voluntary organizations
  to strengthen the capacity of indigenous nongovernmental organizations to
  promote sustainable development programs and policies;
  (7) to increase access for the poor to technology, at an affordable cost,
  which will assist them in increasing their productivity in an environmentally
  sustainable manner; and
  (8) to support other projects that would carry out the purposes set forth
  in section 103(a).
  (b) ASSISTANCE LEVEL- The total amount of assistance that may be provided
  under this section for a project may not exceed $1,000,000. Under most
  circumstances, however, the amount of assistance for a project should not
  exceed $250,000.
  (c) PRIORITY COUNTRIES- The primary focus in the allocation of funds by
  the Foundation shall be for activities in countries which are defined
  by the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development as having
  `middle income economies', `lower-middle income economies', or `low income
  economies', with particular emphasis on countries where there are a large
  number of people living in absolute poverty and in countries where there
  are critically endangered ecosystems essential to the well-being of the
  poorest sectors of society.
  (d) SUPPORT FOR INDIGENOUS ORGANIZATIONS-
  (1) DIRECT SUPPORT FOR NONGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS- The primary focus
  of the Foundation shall be to support directly indigenous nongovernmental
  organizations.
  (2) COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION- In providing assistance under this section, the
  Foundation shall give priority to projects which community groups undertake
  to foster their own sustainable development and in the initiation, design,
  implementation, and evaluation of which there is the maximum feasible
  participation for the poor.
  (e) DISSEMINATION OF INSIGHTS- The Foundation shall disseminate
  to developing countries, the American public, and United States and
  multilateral development institutions, insights gained from development
  projects assisted under this title.
SEC. 105. MANAGEMENT OF THE FOUNDATION.
  (a) BOARD OF DIRECTORS- The management of the Foundation shall be vested
  in a board of directors (hereinafter in this title referred to as the
  `Board') composed of 9 members as follows:
  (1) 6 members appointed by the President, at least 4 of whom shall be
  appointed from among individuals recommended by the Speaker of the House
  of Representatives (after consultation with the Minority Leader of the
  House) or by the Majority Leader of the Senate (after consultation with
  the Minority Leader of the Senate).
  (2) The president of the African Development Foundation, the president of
  the Inter-American Foundation, and the president of Appropriate Technology
  International or such other individual as the President may appoint in
  lieu of the president of Appropriate Technology International.
In making appointments pursuant to this subsection, the President shall select
members of the Board on the basis of their experience with, understanding
of, and sensitivity to community level development processes, sustainable
natural resource managment strategies, and the role of women in sustainable
development programs.
  (b) TERMS OF BOARD MEMBERS- A member of the Board appointed by the
  President pursuant to subsection (a) shall be appointed for a term of 6
  years, except that of the members first appointed (as designated by the
  President at the time of their appointment) 2 shall be appointed for a
  term of 2 years and 2 shall be appointed for a term of 4 years. A member
  of the Board appointed to fill a vacancy occurring before the expiration
  of the term of which that member's predecessor was appointed shall be
  appointed for the remainder of that term. Upon the expiration of his or
  her term, a member of the Board shall continue to serve on the Board until
  a successor is appointed and shall have qualified. If an individual who is
  an ex officio member of the Board pursuant to subsection (a)(2) ceases to
  be the president of the African Development Foundation, the Inter-American
  Foundation, or Appropriate Technology International (as the case may be),
  that individual shall continue to serve on the Board until a new president
  of that organization takes office.
  (c) CHAIR- The President shall designate one member of the Board to serve
  as Chairperson of the Board and one member to serve as Vice Chairperson
  of the Board.
  (d) COMPENSATION AND EXPENSES- Members of the Board shall serve without
  additional compensation, but may be allowed travel and other expenses in
  accordance with section 5703 of title 5, United States Code, which are
  incurred by them while engaged in their duties on behalf of the Foundation.
  (e) QUORUM- A majority of the Board shall constitute a quorum.
  (f) PRESIDENT OF FOUNDATION- The Board of Directors shall appoint a president
  of the Foundation on such terms as the Board may determine. The president
  of the Foundation shall receive compensation at a rate not to exceed that
  payable for level IV of the Executive Schedule under section 5315 of title
  5, United States Code.
  (g) EXPERTS AND CONSULTANTS- Experts and consultants may be employed by
  the Board as authorized by section 3109 of title 5, United States Code.
  (h) ADVISORY COUNCIL- The Board shall establish an advisory council to
  be composed of individuals selected by the Board from among individuals
  knowledgeable about development activities in developing countries. The
  advisory council may include recipients of assistance under this title. The
  Board shall, at least once each year, consult the advisory council with
  respect to the activities of the Foundation and the achievement of its
  purposes. Members of the advisory council shall receive no compensation for
  their services but may be allowed travel and other expenses in accordance
  with section 5703 of title 5, United States Code, which are incurred by
  them in the performance of their functions under this subsection. The
  termination provisions of section 14 of the Federal Advisory Committee
  Act shall not apply with respect to the advisory council.
SEC. 106. POWERS OF THE FOUNDATION.
  (a) IN GENERAL- The Foundation, as a corporation--
  (1) shall have perpetual succession unless dissolved by an Act of Congress;
  (2) may sue and be sued, complain, and defend, in its corporate name in
  any court of competent jurisdiction;
  (3) may adopt, alter, and use a seal, which shall be judicially noticed;
  (4) may prescribe, amend, and repeal such rules and regulations as may be
  necessary for carrying out the functions of the Foundation;
  (5) may make and perform such contracts and other agreements with any
  individual, corporation, or other private or public entity, however
  designated and wherever situated, as may be necessary for carrying out
  the functions of the Foundation;
  (6) may determine and prescribe the manner in which its obligations shall
  be incurred and its expenses allowed and paid, including expenses for
  representation not exceeding $10,000 in any fiscal year;
  (7) may lease, purchase, or otherwise acquire, own, hold, improve, use,
  or otherwise deal in and with such property (real, personal, or mixed) or
  any interest therein, wherever situated, as may be necessary for carrying
  out the functions of the Foundation;
  (8) may accept gifts or donations of services or property (real, personal,
  or mixed), tangible or intangible, in furtherance of the purposes of
  the Foundation;
  (9) may use the United States mails in the same manner and on the same
  conditions as the executive departments of the Government;
  (10) may, with the consent of any agency of the United States, use the
  information, services, facilities, and personnel of that agency in carrying
  out this title; and
  (11) shall have such other powers as may be necessary and incident to
  carrying out this title.
  (b) NONPROFIT STATUS- The Foundation shall be a not-for-profit corporation
  and shall have no capital. No part of its revenue, earnings, or other income
  or property shall inure to the benefit of any of its directors, officers,
  or employees, and such revenue, earnings, or other income or property shall
  only be used to carry out the purposes of the Foundation. No director,
  officer, or employee of the corporation shall in any manner directly
  or indirectly participate in the deliberation upon or the determination
  of any question affecting his or her personal interest or the interests
  of any corporation, partnership, or organization in which he or she is
  directly or indirectly interested.
  (c) TERMINATION- Upon termination of the corporate life of the Foundation,
  its assets shall be liquidated and, unless otherwise provided by the
  Congress, shall be transferred to the United States Treasury as the property
  of the United States.
SEC. 107. GOVERNMENT CORPORATION CONTROL ACT.
  The Foundation shall be subject to the provisions of chapter 91 of title
  31, United States Code, that are applicable to wholly-owned Government
  corporations.
SEC. 108. BUDGET ACT REQUIREMENTS.
  Any authority provided by this title involving the expenditure of funds
  (other than the funds made available pursuant to section 109) shall be
  effective for a fiscal year only to such extent or in such amounts as are
  provided in advance in appropriation Acts.
SEC. 109. AUTHORIZATIONS OF APPROPRIATIONS.
  There are authorized to be appropriated to carry out this title, in addition
  to amounts otherwise available for that purpose, $150,000,000 for fiscal
  year 1993 and $200,000,000 for fiscal year 1994. Funds appropriated under
  this section are authorized to remain available until expended.
TITLE II--REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATIONS
SEC. 201. INTER--AMERICAN FOUNDATION.
  The first sentence of section 401(s)(1) of the Foreign Assistance Act of
  1969 is amended by striking out `and $31,000,000 for fiscal year 1993'
  and inserting in lieu thereof `,  $35,000,000 for fiscal year 1993, and
  $40,000,000 for fiscal year 1994'.
SEC. 202. AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION.
  The first sentence of section 510 of the African Development Foundation
  Act is amended by striking out all that follows `purpose,' and inserting in
  lieu thereof `$20,000,000 for fiscal year 1993 and $25,000,000 for fiscal
  year 1994.'.
SEC. 203. APPROPRIATE TECHNOLOGY INTERNATIONAL.
  In addition to the $5,000,000 made available to Appropriate Technology
  International under its cooperative agreement with the Agency for
  International Development, $3,000,000 of the funds made available for fiscal
  year 1993 to carry out chapter 4 of part II of the Foreign Assistance
  Act of 1961 (relating to the economic support fund) shall be provided to
  Appropriate Technology International to enable it to emphasize large-scale
  replication of successful projects and partnerships with major development
  and financial institutions.
TITLE III--REDUCTION IN INTERNATIONAL SECURITY ASSISTANCE
SEC. 301. FINDINGS REGARDING SECURITY ASSISTANCE.
  The Congress finds that--
  (1) while nations in the developing world have a right to defend themselves
  against aggression, military expenditures consume precious economic and
  human resources that might otherwise be available for economic development,
  satisfaction of basic human needs, and protecting the environment;
  (2) assistance under the Foreign Military Financing Program and other
  security-related assistance is a considerable expense for United States
  taxpayers;
  (3) the end of the Cold War provides a historic opportunity to end regional
  conflicts once fueled by East-West considerations and to promote global
  demilitarization;
  (4) the congressional Arms Control and Foreign Policy Caucus has declared
  that `United States military aid . . . can inadvertently undercut the
  transition to democracy, for example, by strengthening a military that
  maintains its independence from civilian and judicial control after
  elections'; and
  (5) significant savings from reduced military spending would benefit people
  in the United States and the developing world.
SEC. 302. REDUCTIONS IN SECURITY ASSISTANCE.
  (a) FISCAL YEARS 1993 AND 1994- Notwithstanding any other provision of
  law, the total amount of international security assistance provided by
  the United States to all countries--
  (1) for fiscal year 1993, shall not exceed $7,000,000,000; and
  (2) for fiscal year 1994, shall not exceed $6,500,000,000.
  (b) FISCAL YEARS 1995 AND 1996- It is the sense of the Congress that
  international security assistance for fiscal years 1995 and 1996 should
  be further reduced so as to promote global demilitarization and to make
  available additional resources for use for sustainable development programs.
  (c) DEFINITION OF INTERNATIONAL SECURITY ASSISTANCE- As used in this section,
  the term `international security assistance' means any assistance provided
  directly to foreign countries under section 23 of the Arms Export Control
  Act (relating to the `Foreign Military Financing Program'), under chapter 2
  of part II of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (relating to the military
  assistance program), under chapter 4 of part II of the Foreign Assistance
  Act of 1961 (relating to the economic support fund), or under chapter 5 of
  part II of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (relating to international
  military education and training).
TITLE IV--MULTILATERAL ORGANIZATIONS
SEC. 401. MULTILATERAL DEVELOPMENT BANKS.
  (a) PROPOSALS- The Secretary of the Treasury shall instruct the United
  States Executive Director of each specified multilateral development bank
  to promote vigorously that such bank takes action--
  (1) where consistent with the bank's bylaws, to ensure greater public
  accountability in the use of its resources by making fully available to
  the public complete information on physical, institutional, and economic
  details and the environmental, public health, and sociocultural impacts
  of proposed bank operations;
  (2) to ensure that poverty reduction becomes a higher priority, including
  more aggressive encouragement of reduction in military expenditures by
  borrowing countries, annual reviews of the progress of reducing poverty,
  and increases for lending for primary health care and basic education to
  at least 5 percent of the bank's lending;
  (3) to ensure that all structural adjustment loans after July 1993 are
  presented to the bank's executive directors with supporting documentation
  on how those loans will affect the real incomes of the poor, the levels
  of income inequality, and the access by the poor (and women among them)
  to land and other productive assets; the diversification of industrial
  and agricultural production that expands the use of local raw materials,
  goods, and services; the quality and delivery to low-income people of
  essential social and technical services, including programs of primary
  health, nutrition, credit, and training; and the integrity of the natural
  resource base;
  (4) to ensure the development of sustainable energy systems by ensuring
  that all loans in the energy sector be based on, or where necessary
  support development of, `least-cost' investment plans that analyze end-use
  efficiency and nonconventional renewable energy applications, especially
  solar energy technologies;
  (5) to establish a comprehensive water resource policy that will require
  the bank and its national, subnational, and private borrowers to implement
  a least-cost approach to planning for and investing in water resource
  development projects and adopt water policies that use an integrated
  approach to the planning and management of water resources; and
  (6) to purchase on the secondary market commercial debt obligations of
  governments of developing countries and gradually forgive those debts in
  return for adoption of sustainable development policies, such as programs of
  agrarian reform and energy conservation and dissemination of nonconventional,
  renewable energy technologies.
  (b) DISCUSSIONS OF PROPOSALS- The Secretary of the Treasury shall instruct
  the United States Executive Director of each specified multilateral
  development bank to initiate discussions with other executive directors
  of the bank regarding the proposals described in subsection (a).
  (c) SPECIFIED MULTILATERAL DEVELOPMENT BANKS- As used in this section,
  the term `specified multilateral development bank' means the International
  Bank for Reconstruction and Development, the International Development
  Association, the International Finance Corporation, the Inter-American
  Development Bank, the African Development Bank, the Asian Development Bank,
  the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, and the Multilateral
  Investment Guarantee Agency.
SEC. 402. THE UNITED NATIONS SYSTEM.
  (a) FINDINGS- The Congress finds that--
  (1) there is an inextricable link between environment, economic development,
  and population issues;
  (2) in order to preserve the global environment and promote sustainable
  development, the United Nations must give a high priority to ongoing
  deliberation on the relationship between environment, development, and
  other cross-cutting issues;
  (3) authority for policymaking, coordination, and oversight of environment
  and development programs is currently fragmented within the United Nations
  system;
  (4) the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (hereinafter
  in this section referred to as `UNCED')  may recommend the establishment of a
  Sustainable Development Commission or similar intergovernmental forum within
  the United Nations to review implementation of the results of UNCED, oversee
  sustainable development activities throughout the United Nations system, and
  continue international deliberations on sustainable development issues, with
  provisions for active involvement of nongovernmental organizations including
  the private sector, the scientific community, and women's groups; and
  (5) current deliberations on United Nations reform, within the General
  Assembly and the Economic and Social Council, provide further opportunities
  to strengthen frameworks for global cooperation on environmental protection
  and sustainable development.
  (b) UNITED NATIONS REFORM INITIATIVE- It is the sense of the Congress that
  the President should follow up United States participation in UNCED by taking
  an active role during the 47th United Nations General Assembly session
  to ensure full implementation of UNCED recommendations on institutional
  issues, including--
  (1) establishment of a Sustainable Development Commission or other high-level
  intergovernmental forum identified by UNCED to enhance and rationalize
  the intergovernmental decisionmaking capacity for the integration of
  environment and development issues and to ensure effective followup to UNCED;
  (2) establishment of a secretariat support structure within the United
  Nations secretariat drawing on, among other things, the expertise gained
  in the UNCED preparatory process to provide support for the work of both
  intergovernmental and interagency coordination mechanisms;
  (3) establishment of improved mechanisms for monitoring compliance
  with international environmental disputes, including greater use of the
  International Court of Justice; and
  (4) establishment, in consultation with nongovernmental organizations and
  the public, of open and effective means to achieve the participation of
  nongovernmental organizations and the public in the review and evaluation of
  the implementation of the results of UNCED and in ongoing decisionmaking on
  sustainable development, including participation in the mechanisms described
  in paragraph (3) and provisions for access to reports and other information,
  regularized input, and accreditation based on the procedures used at UNCED.
  (c) REPORT TO CONGRESS- The President shall submit to the Congress, within
  6 months after the completion of UNCED, a report--
  (1) on expanded functions assigned by UNCED to the United Nations Environment
  Program as the principal environmental body within the United Nations
  system; and
  (2) on the expertise, financial, and other resources which will be required
  in order for the United Nations Environment Program to effectively carry
  out its enhanced roles.
TITLE V--DOMESTIC ENVIRONMENTAL POLICIES
SEC. 501. ELIMINATION OF TAX ADVANTAGES FOR NATURAL RESOURCE EXPLOITATION.
  (a) FINDINGS- The Congress finds that--
  (1) the United States cannot exercise leadership in the transition to more
  sustainable economic development worldwide as long as its own consumption
  of natural resources is unsustainable;
  (2) United States laws provide widespread budgetary subsidies and tax
  advantages for the exploitation of natural resources; and
  (3) the United States Government has a significant impact on the pattern
  of resource consumption in the United States through Government purchase
  policies and energy consumption.
  (b) REPORT ON RESOURCE USE- It is the sense of the Congress that--
  (1) in the long-term, all budgetary subsidies and tax advantages for
  unsustainable exploitation of natural resources are not in the best interest
  of the United States and should be eliminated as long as adequate provision
  is made to retrain people displaced by the elimination of subsidies and
  tax advantages and to assist those poor people who are least able to bear
  the cost implied by the elimination of those subsidies and tax advantages;
  (2) in conjunction with submission of the United States Budget for
  fiscal year 1994, the Director of the Office of Management and Budget
  should identify all current budgetary subsidies and tax advantages for
  the exploitation of nonrenewable energy (such as fossil fuels), forest,
  and water resources and should estimate the cost to taxpayers of these
  subsidies and tax advantages, as the basis for future Congressional action
  to gradually eliminate such subsidies and tax advantages; and
  (3) each Federal agency should conduct a survey of cost-effective renewable
  energy technologies which it could adopt for the conduct of its work and
  should begin conversion to those technologies as soon as possible.
SEC. 502. NATIONAL PLAN TO SLOW GLOBAL WARMING.
  (a) FINDINGS- The Congress finds that--
  (1) the United States emits 1.2 billion tons of carbon each year, more
  than 5 tons for each person each year;
  (2) the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, consisting of over 700
  scientists convened by the United Nations Environmental Program and the
  World Meteorological Organization, recently reaffirmed the seriousness of
  the global warming trends and the consequences it would have for people
  worldwide;
  (3) carbon dioxide is a major contributor to the global warming trend;
  (4) technologies now exist to reduce carbon dioxide emissions substantially
  without negatively affecting the economy; and
  (5) the Union of Concerned Scientists, in a recent study with three
  other environmental organizations, estimates that reducing United States
  emissions of carbon dioxide 25 percent by the year 2005 and 70 percent by
  the year 2030 could be done with a net cumulative savings to the United
  States economy of $2.3 trillion.
  (b) PLAN FOR REDUCING CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSIONS- The President, in
  consultation with the Congress and appropriate nongovernmental entities,
  shall design a plan for reducing, by the year 2005, United States
  emissions of carbon dioxide to a level no greater than 80 percent of the
  1990 level. This plan shall include specific reference to how the poorest
  sectors of American society will be shielded from the costs, and benefit
  from the savings, of this endeavor. This plan shall be made public not
  more than 1 year after the date of enactment of this Act.
SEC. 503. NATIONAL STRATEGY FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT.
  (a) FINDINGS- The Congress finds that--
  (1) Agenda 21, the plan of action to be adopted at the United Nations
  Conference on Environment and Development, urges all governments to adopt
  a national strategy for sustainable development, based in part (but not
  limited to) the implementation of decisions made at the Conference;
  (2) the United States has supported the adoption by developing countries
  of national strategies for sustainable development as a necessary measure
  for reconciling their economic development plans with sound environmental
  natural resource management;
  (3) the failure of industrialized countries to adopt such strategies would
  seriously affect future negotiations between industrialized countries and
  developing countries on measures for global sustainable development; and
  (4) national strategies for sustainable development can be useful tools
  for integrating environmental considerations into economic policymaking.
  (b) FORMULATION OF A NATIONAL SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY-
  The President, in consultation with the Congress and appropriate
  nongovernmental entities, shall formulate a national strategy for
  sustainable development. This strategy shall project current trends in
  domestic environmental resource management at least 10 years into the
  future. This plan shall be made public not more than 2 years after the
  date of enactment of this Act.