Text: H.Con.Res.105 — 102nd Congress (1991-1992)All Information (Except Text)

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HCON 105 IH
102d CONGRESS
1st Session
H. CON. RES. 105
Calling for a United States policy of strengthening and maintaining
indefinitely the current International Whaling Commission moratorium on
the commercial killing of whales, and otherwise expressing the sense of
the Congress with respect to conserving and protecting the world's whale,
dolphin, and porpoise populations.
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
March 21, 1991
Mr. YATRON submitted the following concurrent resolution; which was referred
to the Committee on Foreign Affairs
CONCURRENT RESOLUTION
Calling for a United States policy of strengthening and maintaining
indefinitely the current International Whaling Commission moratorium on
the commercial killing of whales, and otherwise expressing the sense of
the Congress with respect to conserving and protecting the world's whale,
dolphin, and porpoise populations.
Whereas whales, dolphins, and porpoises (cetaceans) are unique marine
resources of great aesthetic and scientific interest and are a vital part
of the marine ecosystem;
Whereas the International Whaling Commission adopted in 1982 an indefinite
moratorium on commercial whaling, which was scheduled to go into effect in
1986, establishing zero global catch limits for eleven species of whales;
Whereas despite the moratorium on commercial whaling, thousands of whales
have been killed since its inception by the commercial whaling nations;
Whereas there remain great uncertainties as to the true status of whale
populations due to the difficulty of studying them, their slow reproductive
rate, and the unpredictability of their recovery even when fully protected;
Whereas the consequences of removing whale populations from the marine
ecosystem are not understood and cannot be predicted;
Whereas whales are subject to increasingly grave environmental threats from
nonhunting causes, such as pollution, loss of habitat, increased shipping,
oil and gas exploration, oil spills, and the use of driftnets and other
nonselective fishing techniques, which underscore the need for special
safeguards for whale protection;
Whereas, in addition, many of the more than 60 species of small cetaceans
known as dolphins and porpoises are subject to a variety of increasing
global threats, which include escalating direct hunts, incidental takes in
purse-seine nets, high seas driftnets, and gear used in local fisheries,
and also wide-spread pollution and habitat destruction;
Whereas powerful moral and ethical questions have been raised regarding the
killing of whales, dolphins, and porpoises for profit;
Whereas there is significant widespread support in the international community
for the view that, for scientific, ecological, and aesthetic reasons, whales,
dolphins and porpoises should no longer be commercially hunted;
Whereas efforts made at the 1990 meeting of the International Whaling
Commission to overturn the moratorium on commercial whaling were defeated; and
Whereas there is concern that some countries will again press at the 1991
International Whaling Commission meeting for an immediate resumption of
commercial whaling on some stocks: Now, therefore, be it
  Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate concurring), That it
  is the sense of the Congress that--
  (1) United States policy should promote the maximum conservation and
  protection of whale, dolphin, and porpoise populations;
  (2) toward that goal, the United States should work to strengthen
  and maintain indefinitely the current International Whaling Commission
  moratorium on the commercial killing of whales;
  (3) the United States should work to strengthen the International Whaling
  Commission by reaffirming its competence to regulate whaling on all species
  of cetaceans, large and small, and should encourage the Commission to utilize
  the expertise of its Scientific Committee in relation to small cetaceans, to
  urgently consider the Committee's recommendations, and, on the basis thereof,
  to take appropriate action through resolutions and schedule provisions,
  where needed, to assure global protection for small cetaceans; and
  (4) in so promoting the conservation and protection of the world's whale,
  dolphin, and porpoise populations, the United States should make the fullest
  use of diplomatic channels, appropriate domestic and international law,
  and all other available means.

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