Text: H.Con.Res.307 — 102nd Congress (1991-1992)All Information (Except Text)

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HCON 307 IH
102d CONGRESS
2d Session
H. CON. RES. 307
Expressing the sense of the Congress that the President should extend
for a period of one year the 90-day moratorium on new unnecessary Federal
regulations.
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
April 8, 1992
Mr. EWING (for himself, Mr. PENNY, Mr. IRELAND, Mr. WEBER, Mr. ARCHER,
Mr. DELAY, Mr. SOLOMON, Mr. HUNTER, Mr. ROHRABACHER, Mr. PACKARD, Mr. SMITH of
Oregon, Mr. HORTON, Mr. DOOLITTLE, Mr. BOEHNER, Mr. MOORHEAD, Mr. GALLEGLY,
Mr. BURTON of Indiana, Mr. KOLBE, Mr. DUNCAN, Mr. ALLARD, Mr. SUNDQUIST,
Mr. KYL, Mr. LIVINGSTON, Mr. CAMP, Mrs. VUCANOVICH, Mr. ROBERTS, Mr. ALLEN,
Mr. PORTER, Mr. STUMP, Mr. CUNNINGHAM, Mr. TAYLOR of North Carolina,
Mr. STEARNS, Mr. DORNAN of California, Mr. RIGGS, Mr. HASTERT, Mr. ZELIFF,
Mr. LIGHTFOOT, Mr. MCCANDLESS, Mr. JOHNSON of Texas, Mr. BARRETT, Mr. HANCOCK,
Mr. HANSEN, Mr. BEREUTER, Mr. LOWERY of California, Mr. RAVENEL, Mr. HOLLOWAY,
Mr. BAKER, Mr. DICKINSON, Mr. ARMEY, Mr. BROOMFIELD, Mr. COMBEST, Mr. YOUNG
of Alaska, Mr. RITTER, Mr. SKEEN, Mr. NICHOLS, Mr. INHOFE, Mr. DANNEMEYER,
Mr. HYDE, Mr. CRANE, Mr. THOMAS of Wyoming, Mr. LAGOMARSINO, Mr. PAXON,
Mr. MCMILLAN of North Carolina, Mr. LEWIS of Florida, Mr. GRANDY,
Mr. TANNER, Mr. VANDER JAGT, Mr. HOUGHTON, Mr. SCHAEFER, Mr. EMERSON, and
Mr. SENSENBRENNER) introduced the following bill, which was referred to the
Committee on Government Operations
CONCURRENT RESOLUTION
Expressing the sense of the Congress that the President should extend for a
period of one year the provisions of the 90-day moratorium on new unnecessary
Federal regulations.
Whereas the level of Federal regulation of the private sector has dramatically
increased in recent years and there are over 50 Federal regulatory agencies
and nearly 5,000 new regulations are currently being promulgated;
Whereas the Federal Government spends approximately $11 billion per year on
the regulatory program and employs over 122,000 regulators;
Whereas it is estimated that the cost of Federal regulation to the private
sector is $400 billion per year, or over $4,000 per household;
Whereas increasing Federal regulations require private enterprises to expend a
growing level of resources to meet regulatory mandates, rather than investing
in new capital of expanding operations, therefore inhibiting the creation
of new jobs;
Whereas excessive Federal regulations have slowed job creation and economic
expansion and exacerbated the recession which has plagued the United States
economy in 1991 and 1992;
Whereas increased costs to business of Federal regulations has generally
led to an increase in the costs of products to consumers;
Whereas the increased level of Federal regulations of private enterprises
and the costs associated with these regulations have hindered the ability
of American businesses to compete effectively in the international marketplace;
Whereas following the President's 90-day moratorium on unnecessary regulations
there will remain a need to enact a long-term program to reduce the growth
of unnecessary regulations;
Whereas the 90-day moratorium on unnecessary Federal regulations was ordered
by the President to help spur economic activity and thus end the recession,
yet it is likely that the United States economy will still be plagued by
recession at the end of the 90-day moratorium period;
Whereas a deluge of new regulation following the end of the moratorium could
further impair economic activity; and
Whereas a continued moratorium on unnecessary new regulations would further
facilitate private investment, economic growth, and job creation: Now,
therefore, be it;
  Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate concurring), That it
  is the sense of the Congress that the President should extend for a period
  of one year the provisions of the 90-day moratorium on new unnecessary
  regulations ordered in the President's `Memorandum on Reducing the Burden
  of Government Regulations' dated January 28, 1992.

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