Text: S.2532 — 102nd Congress (1991-1992)All Bill Information (Except Text)

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--S.2532--
S.2532
One Hundred Second Congress of the United States of America
AT THE SECOND SESSION
Begun and held at the City of Washington on Friday, the third day of January,
one thousand nine hundred and ninety-two
An Act
To support freedom and open markets in the independent states of the former
Soviet Union, and for other purposes.
  Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United
  States of America in Congress assembled,
SECTION 1. SHORT TITLES.
  This Act may be cited as the `Freedom for Russia and Emerging Eurasian
  Democracies and Open Markets Support Act of 1992' or the `FREEDOM Support
  Act'.
SEC. 2. TABLE OF CONTENTS.
  The table of contents for this Act is as follows:
Sec. 1. Short titles.
Sec. 2. Table of contents.
Sec. 3. Definition of independent states.
TITLE I--GENERAL PROVISIONS
Sec. 101. Findings.
Sec. 102. Program coordination, implementation, and oversight.
Sec. 103. Report on overall assistance and economic cooperation strategy.
Sec. 104. Annual report.
TITLE II--BILATERAL ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE ACTIVITIES
Sec. 201. Support for economic and democratic development in the independent
states.
Sec. 202. Ineligibility for assistance of institutions withholding certain
documents of United States nationals.
TITLE III--BUSINESS AND COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT
Sec. 301. American Business Centers.
Sec. 302. Business and Agriculture Advisory Council.
Sec. 303. Funding for export promotion activities and capital projects.
Sec. 304. Interagency working group on energy of the Trade Promotion
Coordinating Committee.
Sec. 305. Reports to Congress.
Sec. 306. Policy on combatting tied aid practices.
Sec. 307. Technical assistance for the Russian Far East.
Sec. 308. Funding for OPIC programs.
TITLE IV--THE DEMOCRACY CORPS.
Sec. 401. Authorization for establishment of the Democracy Corps.
TITLE V--NONPROLIFERATION AND DISARMAMENT PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES
Sec. 501. Findings.
Sec. 502. Eligibility.
Sec. 503. Nonproliferation and disarmament activities in the independent
states.
Sec. 504. Nonproliferation and disarmament fund.
Sec. 505. Limitations on defense conversion authorities.
Sec. 506. Soviet weapons destruction.
Sec. 507. Waiver of certain provisions.
Sec. 508. Notice and reports to Congress.
Sec. 509. International nonproliferation initiative.
Sec. 510. Report on special nuclear materials.
Sec. 511. Research and development foundation.
TITLE VI--SPACE TRADE AND COOPERATION
Sec. 601. Facilitating discussions regarding the acquisition of space hardware,
technology, and services from the former Soviet Union.
Sec. 602. Office of Space Commerce.
Sec. 603. Report to Congress.
Sec. 604. Definitions
TITLE VII--AGRICULTURAL TRADE
Sec. 701. Food for Progress Act.
Sec. 702. Definitions for Agricultural Trade Act of 1978.
Sec. 703. Assistance for private voluntary organizations.
Sec. 704. Distribution of aid to the independent states of the former
Soviet Union.
Sec. 705. Agricultural fellowship program for middle income countries and
emerging democracies.
Sec. 706. Promotion of agricultural exports to emerging democracies.
Sec. 707. Direct credit sales.
Sec. 708. Export credit guarantees.
Sec. 709. Export promotion programs amendments.
TITLE VIII--UNITED STATES INFORMATION AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF STATE, AND
RELATED AGENCIES AND ACTIVITIES
Sec. 801. Designation of Edmund S. Muskie Fellowship Program.
Sec. 802. New diplomatic posts in the independent states.
Sec. 803. Occupancy of new chancery buildings.
Sec. 804. Certain positions at United States missions.
Sec. 805. International Development Law Institute.
Sec. 806. Certain Board for International Broadcasting construction activities.
Sec. 807. Exchanges and training and similar programs.
TITLE IX--OTHER PROVISIONS
Sec. 901. Foreign Assistance Act list of communist countries.
Sec. 902. Johnson Act.
Sec. 903. Support for East European Democracy (SEED) Act.
Sec. 904. Peace Corps volunteer training requirements.
Sec. 905. Establishing categories of aliens for purposes of refugee
determinations; adjustment of status for certain Soviet and Indochinese
parolees.
Sec. 906. Eligibility of Baltic states for nonlethal defense articles.
Sec. 907. Restriction on assistance to Azerbaijan.
TITLE X--INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS
Sec. 1001. International Monetary Fund quota increase.
Sec. 1002. International Monetary Fund policy changes.
Sec. 1003. Reduction of military spending and promotion of long-term
sustainable economic growth by developing nations.
Sec. 1004. Support for macroeconomic stabilization in the independent states
of the former Soviet Union.
Sec. 1005. Role of the International Finance Corporation in supporting
economic restructuring in the independent states of the former Soviet Union.
Sec. 1006. Authority to agree to amendments to the Articles of Agreement of
the International Finance Corporation.
Sec. 1007. Report on debt of the former Soviet Union held by commercial
financial institutions.
Sec. 1008. Human rights.
Sec. 1009. Multilateral investment guarantees for the independent states of
the former Soviet Union.
SEC. 3. DEFINITION OF INDEPENDENT STATES.
  For purposes of this Act, the terms `independent states of the former Soviet
  Union' and `independent states' mean the following: Armenia, Azerbaijan,
  Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Russia, Tajikistan,
  Turkmenistan, Ukraine, and Uzbekistan.
TITLE I--GENERAL PROVISIONS
SEC. 101. FINDINGS.
  The Congress finds that--
  (1) recent developments in Russia and the other independent states of the
  former Soviet Union present an historic opportunity for a transition to
  a peaceful and stable international order and the integration of the
  independent states of the former Soviet Union into the community of
  democratic nations;
  (2) the entire international community has a vital interest in the success
  of this transition, and the dimension of the problems now faced in the
  independent states of the former Soviet Union makes it imperative for donor
  countries and institutions to provide the expertise and support necessary
  to ensure continued progress on economic and political reforms;
  (3) the United States is especially well-positioned because of its heritage
  and traditions to make a substantial contribution to this transition by
  building on current technical cooperation, medical, and food assistance
  programs, by assisting in the development of democratic institutions,
  and by fostering conditions that will encourage the United States business
  community to engage in trade and investment;
  (4) failure to meet the opportunities presented by these developments could
  threaten United States national security interests and jeopardize substantial
  savings in United States defense that these developments have made possible;
  (5) the independent states of the former Soviet Union face unprecedented
  environmental problems that jeopardize the quality of life and the very
  existence of not only their own peoples but also the peoples of other
  countries, and it is incumbent on the international community to assist
  the independent states in addressing these problems and in promoting
  sustainable use of resources and development;
  (6) the success of United States assistance for the independent states of
  the former Soviet Union depends on--
  (A) effective coordination of United States efforts with similar activities
  of friendly and allied donor countries and of international financial
  institutions, and
  (B) reciprocal commitments by the governments of the independent states
  to work toward the creation of democratic institutions and an environment
  hospitable to foreign investment based upon the rule of law, including
  negotiation of bilateral and multilateral agreements on open trade and
  investment, adoption of commercial codes, establishment of transparency
  in regulatory and other governmental decision making, and timely payment
  of obligations carried over from previous governmental entities; and
  (7) trade and investment opportunities in the independent states of the
  former Soviet Union will generate employment and other economic benefits
  for the United States as the economies of the independent states of the
  former Soviet Union begin to realize their enormous potential as both
  customers and suppliers.
SEC. 102. PROGRAM COORDINATION, IMPLEMENTATION, AND OVERSIGHT.
  (a) COORDINATION- The President shall designate, within the Department of
  State, a coordinator who shall be responsible for--
  (1) designing an overall assistance and economic cooperation strategy for
  the independent states of the former Soviet Union;
  (2) ensuring program and policy coordination among agencies of the United
  States Government in carrying out the policies set forth in this Act
  (including the amendments made by this Act);
  (3) pursuing coordination with other countries and international
  organizations with respect to assistance to independent states;
  (4) ensuring that United States assistance programs for the independent
  states are consistent with this Act (including the amendments made by
  this Act);
  (5) ensuring proper management, implementation, and oversight by agencies
  responsible for assistance programs for the independent states; and
  (6) resolving policy and program disputes among United States Government
  agencies with respect to United States assistance for the independent states.
  (b) EXPORT PROMOTION ACTIVITIES- Consistent with subsection (a), coordination
  of activities related to the promotion of exports of United States goods
  and services to the independent states of the former Soviet Union shall
  continue to be primarily the responsibility of the Secretary of Commerce, in
  the Secretary's role as Chair of the Trade Promotion Coordination Committee.
  (c) INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC ACTIVITIES- Consistent with subsection (a),
  coordination of activities relating to United States participation
  in international financial institutions and relating to organization
  of multilateral efforts aimed at currency stabilization, currency
  convertibility, debt reduction, and comprehensive economic reform programs
  shall continue to be primarily the responsibility of the Secretary of the
  Treasury, in the Secretary's role as Chair of the National Advisory Council
  on International Monetary and Financial Policies and as the United States
  Governor of the international financial institutions.
  (d) ACCOUNTABILITY FOR FUNDS- Any agency managing and implementing an
  assistance program for the independent states of the former Soviet Union
  shall be accountable for any funds made available to it for such program.
SEC. 103. REPORT ON OVERALL ASSISTANCE AND ECONOMIC COOPERATION STRATEGY.
  (a) REQUIREMENT FOR SUBMISSION- As soon as practicable after the date of
  enactment of this Act, the coordinator designated pursuant to section 102(a)
  shall submit to the Congress a report on the overall assistance and economic
  cooperation strategy for the independent states of the former Soviet Union
  that is required to be developed pursuant to paragraph (1) of that section.
  (b) ASSISTANCE PLAN- The report submitted pursuant to subsection (a)
  shall include a plan specifying--
  (1) the amount of the funds authorized to be appropriated for fiscal year
  1993 by chapter 11 of part I of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 proposed
  to be allocated for each of the categories of activities authorized by
  section 498 of that Act and to carry out section 301 of this Act (relating
  to American Business Centers), section 303 of this Act (relating to export
  promotion activities and capital projects), and title IV of this Act
  (relating to the Democracy Corps);
  (2) the amount of other funds made available for fiscal year 1993 to
  carry out the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 proposed to be allocated for
  assistance under that Act for the independent states of the former Soviet
  Union; and
  (3) the amount of funds available for fiscal year 1993 under the Foreign
  Assistance Act of 1961 that are proposed to be made to each agency to
  carry out activities for the independent states under that Act or this Act.
SEC. 104. ANNUAL REPORT.
  Not later than January 31 of each year, the President shall submit to the
  Congress a report on United States assistance for the independent states
  of the former Soviet Union under this Act or other provisions of law. Each
  such report shall include--
  (1) an assessment of the progress each independent state has made in meeting
  the standards set forth in section 498A of the Foreign Assistance Act of
  1961, including  a description of the steps each independent state has taken
  or is taking toward meeting those standards and a discussion of additional
  steps that each independent state could take to meet those standards;
  (2) a description of the United States assistance for each independent
  state that was provided during the preceding fiscal year, is planned
  for the current fiscal year, and is proposed for the coming fiscal year,
  specifying the extent to which such assistance for the preceding fiscal
  year and for current fiscal year has actually been delivered;
  (3) an assessment of the effectiveness of United States assistance in
  achieving its purposes; and
  (4) an evaluation of the manner in which the `notwithstanding' authority
  provided in section 498B(j)(1) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961,
  and the `notwithstanding' authority provided in any other provision of
  law with respect to assistance for the independent states, has been used
  and why the use of that authority was necessary.
TITLE II--BILATERAL ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE ACTIVITIES
SEC. 201. SUPPORT FOR ECONOMIC AND DEMOCRATIC DEVELOPMENT IN THE INDEPENDENT
STATES.
  Part I of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 is amended by adding after
  chapter 10 the following:
`CHAPTER 11--SUPPORT FOR THE ECONOMIC AND DEMOCRATIC DEVELOPMENT OF THE
INDEPENDENT STATES OF THE FORMER SOVIET UNION
`SEC. 498. ASSISTANCE FOR THE INDEPENDENT STATES.
  `The President is authorized to provide assistance to the independent states
  of the former Soviet Union under this chapter for the following activities:
  `(1) URGENT HUMANITARIAN NEEDS- Meeting urgent humanitarian needs (including
  those arising from the health effects of exposure to radiation in the
  Chernobyl region), in particular--
  `(A) meeting needs for medicine, medical supplies and equipment, and food,
  including the nutritional needs of infants such as processed baby food; and
  `(B) continuing efforts to rebuild from the earthquake in Armenia.
  `(2) DEMOCRACY- Establishing a democratic and free society by fostering--
  `(A) political, social, and economic pluralism;
  `(B) respect for internationally recognized human rights and the rule of law;
  `(C) the development of institutions of democratic governance, including
  electoral and legislative processes;
  `(D) the institution and improvement of public administration at the
  national, intergovernmental, regional, and local level;
  `(E) the development of a free and independent media;
  `(F) the development of effective control by elected civilian officials
  over, and the development of a nonpolitical officer corps in, the military
  and security forces; and
  `(G) strengthened administration of justice through programs and activities
  carried out in accordance with section 498B(e).
  `(3) FREE MARKET SYSTEMS- Creating and developing private enterprise
  and free market systems based on the principle of private ownership of
  property, including--
  `(A) the development of private cooperatives, credit unions, and labor
  unions;
  `(B) the improvement in the collection and analysis of statistical
  information;
  `(C) the reform and restructuring of banking and financial systems; and
  `(D) the protection of intellectual property.
  `(4) TRADE AND INVESTMENT- Creating conditions that promote trade and
  investment, and encouraging participation of the United States private
  sector in the development of the private sector in the independent states
  of the former Soviet Union.
  `(5) FOOD DISTRIBUTION AND PRODUCTION- Promoting market-based mechanisms
  for the distribution of the inputs necessary to agricultural production
  and for the handling, marketing, storage, and processing of agricultural
  commodities; encouraging policies that provide incentives for agricultural
  production; and creating institutions that provide technical and financial
  support for the agricultural sector.
  `(6) HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES- Promoting programs to strengthen and build
  institutions that provide quality health care and voluntary family planning
  services, housing, and other services and policies that are components
  of a social safety net, particularly for infants, children, and people
  with disabilities.
  `(7) EDUCATION AND EDUCATIONAL TELEVISION- Promoting broad-based educational
  reform at all levels, in particular--
  `(A) by assisting the development of curricula and by making available
  textbooks, other educational materials, and appropriate telecommunications
  technologies for the delivery of educational and instructional programming;
  and
  `(B) by assisting the development of the skills necessary to produce
  educational television programs aimed at promoting basic skills and the
  human values associated with a democratic society and a free market economy.
  `(8) ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND PRODUCTION- Promoting market-based pricing
  policies and the transfer of technologies that reduce energy wastage and
  harmful emissions; supporting developmentally sound capital energy projects
  that utilize United States advanced coal technologies; and promoting
  efficient production, use, and transportation of oil, gas, coal, and other
  sources of energy.
  `(9) CIVILIAN NUCLEAR REACTOR SAFETY- Implementing--
  `(A) a program of short-term safety upgrade of civilian nuclear power
  plants, including the training of power plant personnel, implementation
  of improved procedures for nuclear power plant operation, the development
  of effective and independent regulatory authorities, and cost-effective
  hardware upgrades; and
  `(B) a program to retire those civilian nuclear power plants whose capacity
  could be more cost-effectively replaced through energy efficiency.
  `(10) ENVIRONMENT- Enhancing the human and natural environment and conserving
  environmental resources, including through--
  `(A) facilitation of the adoption of environmentally-sound policies and
  technologies, environmental restoration, and sustainable use of natural
  resources;
  `(B) promotion of the provision of environmental technology, education,
  and training by United States businesses, not-for-profit organizations,
  and institutions of higher education; and
  `(C) promotion of cooperative research efforts to validate and improve
  environmental monitoring of protracted radiation exposure.
  `(11) TRANSPORTATION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS- Improving transportation and
  telecommunications infrastructure and management, including intermodal
  transportation systems to ensure the safe and efficient movement of people,
  products, and materials.
  `(12) DRUG EDUCATION, INTERDICTION, AND ERADICATION- Promoting drug
  education, interdiction, and eradication programs.
  `(13) MIGRATION- Protecting and caring for refugees, displaced persons, and
  other migrants; addressing the root causes of migration; and promoting the
  development of appropriate immigration and emigration laws and procedures.
`SEC. 498A. CRITERIA FOR ASSISTANCE TO GOVERNMENTS OF THE INDEPENDENT STATES.
  `(a) IN GENERAL- In providing assistance under this chapter for the
  government of any independent state of the former Soviet Union, the
  President shall take into account not only relative need but also the
  extent to which that independent state is acting to--
  `(1) make significant progress toward, and is committed to the comprehensive
  implementation of, a democratic system based on principles of the rule of
  law, individual freedoms, and representative government determined by free
  and fair elections;
  `(2) make significant progress in, and is committed to the comprehensive
  implementation of, economic reform based on market principles, private
  ownership, and integration into the world economy, including implementation
  of the legal and policy frameworks necessary for such reform (including
  protection of intellectual property and respect for contracts);
  `(3) respect internationally recognized human rights, including the rights
  of minorities and the rights to freedom of religion and emigration;
  `(4) respect international law and obligations and adhere to the Helsinki
  Final Act of the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe and the
  Charter of Paris, including the obligations to refrain from the threat or
  use of force and to settle disputes peacefully;
  `(5) cooperate in seeking peaceful resolution of ethnic and regional
  conflicts;
  `(6) implement responsible security policies, including--
  `(A) adhering to arms control obligations derived from agreements signed
  by the former Soviet Union;
  `(B) reducing military forces and expenditures to a level consistent with
  legitimate defense requirements;
  `(C) not proliferating nuclear, biological, or chemical weapons, their
  delivery systems, or related technologies; and
  `(D) restraining conventional weapons transfers;
  `(7) take constructive actions to protect the international environment,
  prevent significant transborder pollution, and promote sustainable use of
  natural resources;
  `(8) deny support for acts of international terrorism;
  `(9) accept responsibility for paying an equitable portion of the
  indebtedness to United States firms incurred by the former Soviet Union;
  `(10) cooperate with the United States Government in uncovering all evidence
  regarding Americans listed as prisoners-of-war, or otherwise missing during
  American operations, who were detained in the former Soviet Union during
  the Cold War; and
  `(11) terminate support for the communist regime in Cuba, including removal
  of troops, closing of military facilities, and ceasing trade subsidies
  and economic, nuclear, and other assistance.
  `(b) INELIGIBILITY FOR ASSISTANCE- The President shall not provide assistance
  under this chapter--
  `(1) for the government of any independent state that the President
  determines is engaged in a consistent pattern of gross violations of
  internationally recognized human rights or of international law;
  `(2) for the government of any independent state that the President
  determines has failed to take constructive actions to facilitate the
  effective implementation of applicable arms control obligations derived
  from agreements signed by the former Soviet Union;
  `(3) for the government of any independent state that the President
  determines has, on or after the date of enactment of this chapter, knowingly
  transferred to another country--
  `(A) missiles or missile technology inconsistent with the guidelines and
  parameters of the Missile Technology Control Regime; or
  `(B) any material, equipment, or technology that would contribute
  significantly to the ability of such country to manufacture any weapon of
  mass destruction (including nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons)
  if the President determines that the material, equipment, or technology
  was to be used by such country in the manufacture of such weapon;
  `(4) for the government of any independent state that is prohibited from
  receiving such assistance by section 669 or 670 of this Act or sections
  306(a)(1) and 307 of the Chemical and Biological Weapons Control and
  Warfare Elimination Act of 1991; or
  `(5) for the Government of Russia if it has failed to make significant
  progress on the removal of Russian or Commonwealth of Independent States
  troops from Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania or if it has failed to undertake
  good faith efforts, such as negotiations, to end other military practices
  that violate the sovereignty of the Baltics states.
  `(c) EXCEPTIONS TO INELIGIBILITY- Assistance prohibited by subsection (b)
  or any similar provision of law, other than assistance prohibited by the
  provisions referred to in subsection (b)(4), may be furnished under any
  of the following circumstances:
  `(1) The President determines that furnishing such assistance is important
  to the national interest of the United States.
  `(2) The President determines that furnishing such assistance will foster
  respect for internationally recognized human rights and the rule of law
  or the development of institutions of democratic governance.
  `(3) The assistance is furnished for the alleviation of suffering resulting
  from a natural or man-made disaster.
The President shall immediately report to the Congress any determination under
paragraph (1) or (2) or any decision to provide assistance under paragraph (3).
`SEC. 498B. AUTHORITIES RELATING TO ASSISTANCE AND OTHER PROVISIONS.
  `(a) ASSISTANCE THROUGH GOVERNMENTS AND NONGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS-
  Assistance under this chapter may be provided to governments or through
  nongovernmental organizations.
  `(b) TECHNICAL AND MANAGERIAL ASSISTANCE- Technical assistance under this
  chapter shall, to the maximum extent feasible, be provided on a long term,
  on-site basis and shall emphasize the provision of practical, management
  and other problem-solving advice, particularly advice on private enterprise
  provided by United States business volunteers.
  `(c) ENTERPRISE FUNDS- Activities supported pursuant to this chapter may
  include the establishment of and the provision of support for one or more
  enterprise funds for the independent states of the former Soviet Union. If
  the President determines that an enterprise fund should be established
  and supported under this chapter, the provisions contained in section 201
  of the Support for East European Democracy (SEED) Act of 1989 (excluding
  the authorizations of appropriations provided in subsection (b) of that
  section) shall be deemed to apply with respect to such enterprise fund
  and to funds made available to such enterprise fund pursuant to this chapter.
  `(d) COOPERATIVE DEVELOPMENT AND RESEARCH PROJECTS- Assistance under this
  chapter may include support for cooperative development projects, including
  cooperative development research projects, among the United States, other
  countries, and independent states of the former Soviet Union.
  `(e) ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE PROGRAMS- In order to strengthen the
  administration of justice in the independent states of the former Soviet
  Union under paragraph (2)(G) of section 498, the President may exercise the
  same authorities as are available under section 534 of this Act, subject
  to the limitations and requirements of that section, other than subsection
  (c) and the last two sentences of subsection (e).
  `(f) USE OF ECONOMIC SUPPORT FUNDS- Any funds that have been allocated under
  chapter 4 of part II for assistance for the independent states of the former
  Soviet Union may be used in accordance with the provisions of this chapter.
  `(g) USE OF SEED AGENCY FUNDS AND ADMINISTRATIVE AUTHORITIES- The President
  may authorize any agency of the United States Government that has authority
  to conduct activities under the Support for East European Democracy (SEED)
  Act of 1989 to use--
  `(1) any funds that are available to it for activities related to
  international affairs outside Eastern Europe, and
  `(2) any administrative authorities that are available to it for activities
  with respect to Eastern Europe,
to conduct activities authorized by section 498 with respect to the independent
states of the former Soviet Union.
  `(h) PROCUREMENT RESTRICTIONS- Funds made available for assistance under
  this chapter may be used for procurement--
  `(1) in the United States, the independent states of the former Soviet
  Union, or a developing country; or
  (2) in any other country but only if--
  `(A) the provision of such assistance requires commodities or services of
  a type that are not produced in and available for purchase in any country
  specified in paragraph (1); or
  `(B) the President determines, on a case-by-case basis, that procurement
  in such other country is necessary--
  `(i) to meet unforseen circumstances, such as emergency situations, where it
  is important to permit procurement in a country not specified in paragraph
  (1), or
  `(ii) to promote efficiency in the use of United States foreign assistance
  resources, including to avoid impairment of foreign assistance objectives.
  `(i) TERMS AND CONDITIONS- Assistance under this chapter shall be provided
  on such terms and conditions as the President may determine, consistent with
  applicable provisions of law (except as otherwise provided in subsection
  (j)).
  `(j) WAIVER OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS-
  `(1) IN GENERAL- Funds authorized to be appropriated for fiscal year 1993 by
  this chapter, and any other funds appropriated for fiscal year 1993 that are
  used under the authority of subsection (f) or (g), may be used to provide
  assistance under this chapter notwithstanding any other provision of law,
  except for--
  `(A) this chapter;
  `(B) section 634A of this Act and comparable notification requirements
  contained in sections of the annual foreign operations, export financing,
  and related programs Act;
  `(C) sections 669 and 670 of this Act and sections 306 and 307 of the
  Chemical and Biological Weapons Control and Warfare Elimination Act of 1961,
  to the extent that they apply to assistance to governments; and
  `(D) section 1341 of title 31, United States Code (commonly referred to
  as the `Anti-Deficiency Act'), the Congressional Budget and Impoundment
  Control Act of 1974, the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control
  Act of 1985, and the Budget Enforcement Act of 1990.
  `(2) NUCLEAR REACTOR SAFETY AND RELATED ACTIVITIES- Any provision that
  corresponds to section 510 of the Foreign Operations, Export Financing,
  and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 1991 (relating to the prohibition
  on financing exports of nuclear equipment, fuel, and technology) shall
  not apply with respect to funds used pursuant to this chapter.
  `(k) DEFINITIONS-
  `(1) APPROPRIATE CONGRESSIONAL COMMITTEES- As used in this chapter, the
  term `appropriate congressional committees' means the Committee on Foreign
  Affairs and the Committee on Appropriations of the House of Representatives
  and the Committee on Foreign Relations and the Committee on Appropriations
  of the Senate.
  `(2) INDEPENDENT STATES OF THE FORMER SOVIET UNION- As used in this
  chapter, the terms `independent states of the former Soviet Union' and
  `independent states' have the meaning given those terms by section 3 of
  the Freedom for Russia and Emerging Eurasian Democracies and Open Markets
  Support Act of 1992.
`SEC. 498C. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.
  `(a) IN GENERAL- To carry out this chapter, there are authorized to
  be appropriated to the President for fiscal year 1993 $410,000,000, in
  addition to amounts otherwise available for assistance for the independent
  states of the former Soviet Union. Amounts appropriated pursuant to this
  subsection are authorized to remain available until expended.
  `(b) OPERATING EXPENSES-
  `(1) AUTHORITY TO TRANSFER PROGRAM FUNDS- Subject to paragraph (2), funds
  made available under subsection (a)  may be transferred to, and merged with,
  funds appropriated for `Operating Expenses of the Agency for International
  Development'. Funds so transferred may be expended for administrative costs
  in carrying out this chapter, including reimbursement of the Department
  of State for its incremental costs associated with assistance provided
  under this chapter.
  `(2) LIMITATION ON AMOUNT TRANSFERRED- Not more than 2 percent of the funds
  made available for a fiscal year under subsection (a) may be transferred
  pursuant to paragraph (1) unless, at least 15 days before transferring any
  additional amount, the President notifies the appropriate congressional
  committees in accordance with the procedures applicable to reprogramming
  notifications under section 634A of this Act.'.
SEC. 202. INELIGIBILITY FOR ASSISTANCE OF INSTITUTIONS WITHHOLDING CERTAIN
DOCUMENTS OF UNITED STATES NATIONALS.
  (a) PROHIBITION- Except as provided in subsections (b) and (c), an agency,
  instrumentality, or other governmental entity of an independent state of
  the former Soviet Union shall not be eligible to receive assistance under
  chapter 11 of part I of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 if--
  (1) on the date of enactment of this Act, there is outstanding a final
  judgment by a court of competent jurisdiction in that independent state
  that that governmental entity is withholding unlawfully books or other
  documents of religious or historical significance that are the property
  of United States persons; and
  (2) within 90 days of a request by such United States persons, the Secretary
  of State determines that execution of the court's judgment is blocked as
  the result of extrajudicial causes such as any of the following:
  (A) A declared refusal of the defendant to comply.
  (B) The unwillingness or failure of local authorities to enforce compliance.
  (C) The issuance of an administrative decree nullifying a court's judgment
  or forbidding compliance.
  (D) The passage of legislation, after a court's judgment, nullifying that
  judgment or forbidding compliance with that judgment.
  (b) EXCEPTION FOR HUMANITARIAN ASSISTANCE- The prohibition contained in
  subsection (a) shall not apply to the provision of  assistance to alleviate
  suffering resulting from a natural or man-made disaster.
  (c) WAIVER AUTHORITY- The Secretary of State may waive the application of
  subsection (a) whenever the Secretary finds that--
  (1) the court's judgment has been executed; or
  (2) it is important to the national interest of the United States to do so.
  (d) REPORT- Nine months after the date of enactment of this Act,
  the Secretary of State shall report to the Speaker of the House of
  Representatives and the Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Relations of
  the Senate on the status of final judgments described in subsection (a)(1).
  (e) UNITED STATES PERSON- For purposes of this section, the term `United
  States person' means--
  (1) any citizen, national, or permanent resident alien of the United
  States; and
  (2) any corporation, partnership, or other juridical entity which is 50
  percent or more beneficially owned by individuals described in paragraph (1).
TITLE III--BUSINESS AND COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT
SEC. 301. AMERICAN BUSINESS CENTERS.
  (a) ESTABLISHMENT- The President is authorized and encouraged to establish
  American Business Centers in the independent states of the former Soviet
  Union receiving assistance under chapter 11 of part I of the Foreign
  Assistance Act of 1961 where the President determines that such centers
  can be cost-effective in promoting the objectives described in section
  498 of that Act and United States economic interests and in establishing
  commercial partnerships between the people of the United States and the
  peoples of the independent states.
  (b) ENVIRONMENTAL BUSINESS CENTERS AND AGRIBUSINESS CENTERS- For purposes
  of this section, the term `American Business Centers' includes the following:
  (1) Environmental business centers in those independent states that offer
  promising market possibilities for the export of United States environmental
  goods and services. To the maximum extent practicable, these environmental
  business centers should be established as a component of other centers.
  (2) Agribusiness centers that include the participation of private United
  States agribusinesses or agricultural cooperatives, private nonprofit
  organizations, State universities and land grant colleges, and financial
  institutions, that make appropriate contributions of equipment, materials,
  and personnel for the operation of such centers. The purposes of these
  agribusiness centers shall be--
  (A) to enhance the ability of farmers and other agribusiness practitioners
  in the independent states to better meet the needs of the people of the
  independent states;
  (B) to assist the transition from a command and control system in agriculture
  to a free market system; and
  (C) to facilitate the demonstration and use of United States agricultural
  equipment and technology.
  (c) ADDITIONAL POLICY GUIDANCE- To the maximum extent possible, and
  consistent with the particular purposes of the specific types of centers,
  the President should direct that--
  (1) the American Business Centers established pursuant to this section place
  special emphasis on assistance to United States small- and medium-sized
  businesses to facilitate their entry into the commercial markets of the
  independent states;
  (2) such centers offer office space, business facilities, and market
  analysis services to United States firms, trade associations, and State
  economic development offices on a user-fee basis that minimizes the cost
  of operating such centers;
  (3) such centers serve as a repository for commercial, legal, and technical
  information, including environmental and export control information;
  (4) such centers identify existing or potential counterpart businesses or
  organizations that may require specific technical coordination or assistance;
  (5) such centers be established in several sites in the independent
  states; and
  (6) host countries be asked to make appropriate contributions of real
  estate and personnel for the establishment and operation of such centers.
  (d) FUNDING-
  (1) REIMBURSEMENT AGREEMENT- Not later than 90 days after the date of
  enactment of this Act, the Administrator of the Agency for International
  Development shall conclude a reimbursement agreement with the Secretary
  of Commerce for the Department of Commerce's services in establishing and
  operating American Business Centers pursuant to this section.
  (2) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS- Of the amount authorized to be
  appropriated to carry out chapter 11 of part I of the Foreign Assistance
  Act of 1961, up to $12,000,000 for fiscal year 1993 are authorized to be
  appropriated to carry out this section, in addition to amounts otherwise
  available for such purpose.
SEC. 302. BUSINESS AND AGRICULTURE ADVISORY COUNCIL.
  (a) ESTABLISHMENT- The President is authorized to establish an advisory
  council to be known as the Independent States Business and Agriculture
  Advisory Council (hereinafter in this section referred to as the `Council')--
  (1) to consult with and advise the President periodically regarding programs
  of assistance for the independent states of the former Soviet Union; and
  (2) to evaluate, and consult periodically with the President regarding,
  the adequacy of bilateral and multilateral assistance programs that would
  facilitate exports by United States companies to, and investments by United
  States companies in, the independent states.
  (b) MEMBERSHIP- The Council should consist of 15 members, appointed by the
  President, who are drawn from United States companies reflecting diverse
  businesses and perspectives that have experience and expertise in dealing
  with the independent states of the former Soviet Union. The President
  should designate one such member to serve as Chair of the Council. Five
  such members should be appointed upon the recommendation of the Speaker
  and the Minority Leader of the House of Representatives and 5 should
  be appointed upon the recommendation of the Majority Leader and Minority
  Leader of the Senate. Members of the Council shall receive no compensation
  from the United States Government by reason of their service on the Council.
  (c) STAFF- Upon request of the Chair of the Council, the head of any
  United States Government agency may detail, on a nonreimbursable basis,
  any of the personnel of such agency to the Council to assist the Council.
SEC. 303. FUNDING FOR EXPORT PROMOTION ACTIVITIES AND CAPITAL PROJECTS.
  (a) ALLOCATION OF A.I.D. FUNDS- The President is encouraged to use a portion
  of the funds made available for the independent states of the former Soviet
  Union under chapter 11 of part I of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961--
  (1) to fund the export promotion, finance, and related activities carried
  out pursuant to subsection (b)(1), including activities relating to the
  export of intermediary goods; and
  (2) to fund capital projects, including projects for telecommunications,
  environmental cleanup, power production, and energy related projects.
  (b) EXPORT PROMOTION, FINANCE, AND RELATED ACTIVITIES- The Secretary of
  Commerce, as Chair of the Trade Promotion Coordination Committee, should,
  in conjunction with other members of that committee, design and implement
  programs to provide adequate commercial and technical assistance to United
  States businesses seeking markets in the independent states of the former
  Soviet Union, including the following:
  (1) Increasing the United States and Foreign Commercial Service presence
  in the independent states, in particular in the Russian Far Eastern cities
  of Vladivostok and Khabarovsk.
  (2) Preparing profiles of export opportunities for United States businesses
  in the independent states and providing other technical assistance.
  (3) Utilizing the Market Development Cooperator Program under section 2303
  of the Export Enhancement Act of 1988 (15 U.S.C. 4723).
  (4) Developing programs specifically for the purpose of assisting small- and
  medium-sized businesses in entering commercial markets of the independent
  states. In carrying out this paragraph, the Secretary of Commerce, to the
  extent possible, should work directly with private sector organizations
  with proven experience in trade and economic relations with the independent
  states.
  (5) Supporting projects undertaken by the United States business community
  on the basis of partnership, joint venture, contractual, or other cooperative
  agreements with appropriate entities in the independent states.
  (6) Supporting export finance programs, feasibility studies, political
  risk insurance, and other related programs through increased funding and
  flexibility in the implementation of such programs.
  (7) Supporting the Business Information Service (BISNIS) and its related
  programs.
SEC. 304. INTERAGENCY WORKING GROUP ON ENERGY OF THE TRADE PROMOTION
COORDINATING COMMITTEE.
  The Trade Promotion Coordinating Committee should utilize its interagency
  working group on energy to assist United States energy sector companies
  to develop a long-term strategy for penetrating the energy market in the
  independent states of the former Soviet Union. The working group should--
  (1) work with officials from the independent states in creating an
  environment conducive to United States energy investment;
  (2) help to coordinate assistance to United States companies involved with
  projects to clean up former Soviet nuclear weapons sites and commercial
  nuclear waste; and
  (3) work with representatives from United States business and industry
  involved with the energy sector to help facilitate the identification of
  business opportunities, including the promotion of oil, gas, and clean
  coal technology and products, energy efficiency, and the formation of joint
  ventures between United States companies and companies of the independent
  nations.
SEC. 305. REPORTS TO CONGRESS.
  Not later than January 31 of each year (beginning in 1994), the Secretary
  of Commerce shall submit to the Congress a report--
  (1) describing the implementation of the preceding sections  of this title;
  (2) analyzing the programs of other industrialized nations to assist their
  companies with their efforts to transact business in the independent states
  of the former Soviet Union, and
  (3) examining the trading practices of other Organization for Economic
  Cooperation and Development nations, as well as the pricing practices of
  transitional economies in the independent states, that may disadvantage
  against United States companies.
SEC. 306. POLICY ON COMBATTING TIED AID PRACTICES.
  Should the Secretary of the Treasury determine that foreign countries
  are engaged in tied aid practices with respect to any of the independent
  states of the former Soviet Union that violate the 1991 Helsinki agreement
  of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, the President
  should give priority attention to combatting such practices.
SEC. 307. TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE FOR THE RUSSIAN FAR EAST.
  (a) AUTHORIZATION- The President is authorized to provide technical
  assistance, through an American university in a region which  received
  nonstop air service to and from the Russian Far East as of July 1, 1992,
  to facilitate the development of United States business opportunities,
  free markets, and democratic institutions in the Russian Far East.
  (b) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS- There are authorized to be appropriated
  $2,000,000 to carry out subsection (a).
SEC. 308. FUNDING FOR OPIC PROGRAMS.
  (a) AUTHORITY TO MAKE ADDITIONAL FUNDS AVAILABLE- Funds authorized to be
  appropriated for fiscal year 1993 to carry out chapter 11 of part I of
  the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 may be made available to cover costs
  incurred by the Overseas Private Investment Corporation in carrying out
  programs with respect to the independent states of the former Soviet
  Union under title IV of chapter 2 of part I of that Act (22 U.S.C. 2191
  and following), in addition to amounts otherwise available for that purpose.
  (b) ENACTMENT OF OPIC AUTHORIZATION ACT- The authority of subsection (a)
  shall cease to be effective upon the enactment of the Overseas Private
  Investment Corporation Act Amendments Act of 1992.
TITLE IV--THE DEMOCRACY CORPS
SEC. 401. AUTHORIZATION FOR ESTABLISHMENT OF THE DEMOCRACY CORPS.
  (a) ESTABLISHMENT; PURPOSE- The President is authorized to provide for the
  establishment of the Democracy Corps as a private nonprofit organization,
  incorporated in the District of Columbia, whose purpose shall be to maintain
  a presence in the independent states of the former Soviet Union as described
  in subsection (c).
  (b) BOARD OF DIRECTORS- The Board of Directors of the Democracy Corps shall
  have not more than 10 members, appointed by the President. Individuals
  appointed to the Board--
  (1) shall, individually or through the organizations they represent, have
  experience and expertise appropriate to carrying out the purpose of the
  Democracy Corps, including involvement either with activities of the type
  described in subsection (d) or in the independent states;
  (2) shall be United States citizens; and
  (3) may not be officers or employees of the United States Government or
  Members of Congress.
  (c) GRANTS TO THE DEMOCRACY CORPS; PURPOSE- The Administrator is authorized
  to make an annual grant to the Democracy Corps with the funds made available
  pursuant to this section. The purpose of such grants shall be to enable the
  Democracy Corps to maintain a presence in independent states of the former
  Soviet Union that will assist at the local level in the development of--
  (1) institutions of democratic governance (including judicial, electoral,
  legislative, and administrative processes), and
  (2) the nongovernmental organizations of a civil society (including
  charitable, educational, trade union, business, professional, voluntary,
  community, and other civic organizations),
by mobilizing the expertise of the American people to provide practical
assistance through `on the ground' person-to-person advice, technical
assistance, and small grants to indigenous individuals and indigenous entities,
in accordance with subsection (d).
  (d) ACTIVITIES- The Democracy Corps shall be required to carry out its
  purpose through the placement within the independent states of teams of
  United States citizens with appropriate expertise and knowledge. Under
  guidelines developed by the Board, these teams shall assist indigenous
  individuals and entities in the independent states that are involved in the
  development of the institutions and organizations referred to in paragraphs
  (1) and (2) of subsection (c) by--
  (1) providing advice and technical assistance;
  (2) making small grants (which in most cases should not exceed $5,000)
  to such individuals and entities to assist the development of those
  institutions and organizations;
  (3) identifying other sources of assistance; and
  (4) operating local centers to serve as information, logistical, and
  educational centers and otherwise encourage cooperation and effectiveness
  by those involved in the development of democratic institutions, a
  market-oriented economy, and a civil society in the independent states.
These local centers may be designated as `Democracy Houses' or given another
appropriate appellation.
  (e) GRANT AGREEMENT- Grants under this section shall be made pursuant to a
  grant agreement requiring the Democracy Corps to comply with the requirements
  specified in this section and with such other terms and conditions as
  the Administrator may require, which shall include requirements regarding
  consultation with the coordinator designated pursuant to section 102(a),
  conflicts of interest, and accountability for funds, including a requirement
  for annual independent audits.
  (f) COORDINATION- The Democracy Corps shall be required to--
  (1) coordinate its activities pursuant to this section with the programs
  and activities of other entities operating in or providing assistance
  to the independent states of the former Soviet Union in support of the
  development of democratic institutions, a market-oriented economy, and a
  civil society; and
  (2) ensure that its activities pursuant to this section are designed to
  avoid duplication with activities carried out under other United States
  Government foreign assistance and international information, educational,
  cultural, and exchange programs.
  (g) PROHIBITION ON CAMPAIGN FINANCING- Funds made available to the
  Democracy Corps under this section may not be expended by the Democracy
  Corps, or any recipient of a grant from the Democracy Corps, to finance
  the campaigns of candidates for public office.
  (h) FREEDOM OF INFORMATION-
  (1) IN GENERAL- Notwithstanding the fact that the Democracy Corps is not
  an agency or establishment of the United States Government, the Democracy
  Corps shall be required to comply fully with all of the provisions of
  section 552 of title 5, United States Code.
  (2) PUBLICATION IN FEDERAL REGISTER- For purposes of complying pursuant to
  paragraph (1) with section 552(a)(1) of title 5, the Democracy Corps shall
  make available to the Administrator such records and other information
  as the Administrator determines may be necessary for such purposes. The
  Administrator shall cause such records and other information to be published
  in the Federal Register.
  (3) AID REVIEW- In the event that the Democracy Corps determines not
  to comply with a request for records under section 552 of title 5, the
  Democracy Corps shall submit a report to the Administrator explaining the
  reasons for not complying with such request. If the Administrator approves
  such determination, the Agency for International Development shall assume
  full responsibility, including financial responsibility, for defending
  the Democracy Corps in any litigation relating to such request. If the
  Administrator disapproves such determination, the Democracy Corps shall
  be required to comply with such request.
  (i) ANNUAL REPORTS- The Board shall be required to submit to the
  Administrator and the Congress, not later than January 31 each year, a
  comprehensive report on the activities of the Democracy Corps. Each such
  report shall list each grant made by the Democracy Corps under subsection
  (d)(2) during the preceding fiscal year, specifying the grantee and the
  amount of the grant.
  (j) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS- Of the amount authorized to be
  appropriated to carry out chapter 11 of part I of the Foreign Assistance
  Act of 1961, up to $15,000,000 for fiscal year 1993 are authorized to
  be appropriated for grants to the Democracy Corps under this section,
  in addition to amounts otherwise available for such purpose.
  (k) SUNSET PROVISION- Grants may not be made to the Democracy Corps under
  this section after the end of fiscal year 1997.
  (l) DEFINITIONS- As used in this section--
  (1) the term `Administrator' means the Administrator of the Agency for
  International Development; and
  (2) the term `Board' means the Board of Directors of the Democracy Corps.
TITLE V--NONPROLIFERATION AND DISARMAMENT PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES
SEC. 501. FINDINGS.
  The Congress finds that it is in the national security interest of the
  United States--
  (1) to facilitate, on a priority basis--
  (A) the transportation, storage, safeguarding, and destruction of nuclear
  and other weapons of mass destruction of the independent states of the
  former Soviet Union;
  (B) the prevention of proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and
  destabilizing conventional weapons of the independent states, and the
  establishment of verifiable safeguards against the proliferation of such
  weapons;
  (C) the prevention of diversion of weapons-related scientific expertise
  of the former Soviet Union to terrorist groups or third countries; and
  (D) other efforts designed to reduce the military threat from the former
  Soviet Union;
  (2) to support the conversion of the massive defense-related industry and
  equipment of the independent states of the former Soviet Union for civilian
  purposes and uses; and
  (3) to expand military-to-military contacts between the United States and
  the independent states.
SEC. 502. ELIGIBILITY.
  Funds may be obligated for a fiscal year for assistance or other programs
  or activities for an independent state of the former Soviet Union under
  sections 503 and 504 only if the President has certified to the Congress,
  during that fiscal year, that such independent state is committed to--
  (1) making a substantial investment of its resources for dismantling or
  destroying such weapons of mass destruction, if that independent state has
  an obligation under a treaty or other agreement to destroy or dismantle
  any such weapons;
  (2) forgoing any military modernization program that exceeds legitimate
  defense requirements and forgoing the replacement of destroyed weapons of
  mass destruction;
  (3) forgoing any use in new nuclear weapons of fissionable or other
  components of destroyed nuclear weapons; and
  (4) facilitating United States verification of any weapons destruction
  carried out under section 503(a) or 504(a) of this Act or section 212 of
  the Soviet Nuclear Threat Reduction Act of 1991 (title II of Public Law
  102-228; 22 U.S.C. 2551 note).
SEC. 503. NONPROLIFERATION AND DISARMAMENT ACTIVITIES IN THE INDEPENDENT
STATES.
  (a) AUTHORIZATION- The President is authorized to promote bilateral and
  multilateral nonproliferation and disarmament activities--
  (1) by supporting the dismantlement and destruction of nuclear, biological,
  and chemical weapons, their delivery systems, and conventional weapons of
  the independent states of the former Soviet Union;
  (2) by supporting bilateral and multilateral efforts to halt the
  proliferation of nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons, their delivery
  systems, related technologies, and other weapons of the independent states,
  including activities such as--
  (A) the storage, transportation, and safeguarding of such weapons, and
  (B) the purchase, barter, or other acquisition of such weapons or materials
  derived from such weapons;
  (3) by establishing programs for safeguarding against the proliferation of
  nuclear, biological, chemical, and other weapons of the independent states;
  (4) by establishing programs for preventing diversion of weapons-related
  scientific and technical expertise of the independent states to terrorist
  groups or to third countries;
  (5) by establishing science and technology centers in the independent
  states for the purpose of engaging weapons scientists and engineers of the
  independent states (in particular those who were previously involved in
  the design and production of nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons)
  in productive, nonmilitary undertakings; and
  (6) by establishing programs for facilitating the conversion of military
  technologies and capabilities and defense industries of the former Soviet
  Union into civilian activities.
  (b) FUNDING PRIORITIES- Priority in carrying out this section shall be given
  to the activities described in paragraphs (1) through (5) of subsection (a).
  (c) USE OF DEFENSE FUNDS-
  (1) AUTHORIZATION- In recognition of the direct contributions to the
  national security interests of the United States of the programs and
  activities authorized by subsection (a), the President is authorized to
  make available for use in carrying out those programs and activities,
  in addition to amounts otherwise available for such purposes, funds made
  available pursuant to sections 108 and 109 of Public Law 102-229 or under
  the amendments made by section 506(a) of this Act.
  (2) LIMITATION- Funds described in paragraph (1) may not be obligated for
  programs and activities under subsection (a) unless the Director of the
  Office of Management and Budget has determined that expenditures during
  fiscal year 1993 pursuant to such obligation shall be counted against the
  defense category of the discretionary spending limits for that fiscal year
  (as defined in section 601(a)(2) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974)
  for purposes of part C of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control
  Act of 1985.
SEC. 504. NONPROLIFERATION AND DISARMAMENT FUND.
  (a) AUTHORIZATION- The President is authorized to promote bilateral and
  multilateral nonproliferation and disarmament activities--
  (1) by supporting the dismantlement and destruction of nuclear, biological,
  and chemical weapons, their delivery systems, and conventional weapons;
  (2) by supporting bilateral and multilateral efforts to halt the
  proliferation of nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons, their delivery
  systems, related technologies, and other weapons, including activities
  such as--
  (A) the storage, transportation, and safeguarding of such weapons, and
  (B) the purchase, barter, or other acquisition of such weapons or materials
  derived from such weapons;
  (3) by establishing programs for safeguarding against the proliferation
  of nuclear, biological, chemical, and other weapons of the independent
  states of the former Soviet Union;
  (4) by establishing programs for preventing diversion of weapons-related
  scientific and technical expertise of the independent states to terrorist
  groups or to third countries;
  (5) by establishing science and technology centers in the independent
  states for the purpose of engaging weapons scientists and engineers of the
  independent states (in particular those who were previously involved in
  the design and production of nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons)
  in productive, nonmilitary undertakings; and
  (6) by establishing programs for facilitating the conversion of military
  technologies and capabilities and defense industries of the former Soviet
  Union into civilian activities.
  (b) FUNDING PRIORITIES- Priority in carrying out this section shall be given
  to the activities described in paragraphs (1) through (5) of subsection (a).
  (c) USE OF SECURITY ASSISTANCE FUNDS-
  (1) AUTHORIZATION- In recognition of the direct contributions to the
  national security interests of the United States of the programs and
  activities authorized by subsection (a), the President is authorized to
  make available for use in carrying out those programs and activities,
  in addition to amounts otherwise available for such purposes, up to
  $100,000,000 of security assistance funds for fiscal year 1993.
  (2) DEFINITION- As used in paragraph (1), the term `security assistance
  funds' means funds made available for assistance under chapter 4 of
  part II of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (relating to the Economic
  Support Fund) or assistance under section 23 of the Arms Export Control Act
  (relating to the `Foreign Military Financing Program').
  (3) EXEMPTION FROM CERTAIN RESTRICTIONS- Section 531(e) of the Foreign
  Assistance Act of 1961, and any provision that corresponds to section
  510 of the Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and Related Programs
  Appropriations Act, 1991 (relating to the prohibition on financing exports
  of nuclear equipment, fuel, and technology), shall not apply with respect
  to funds used pursuant to this subsection.
SEC. 505. LIMITATIONS ON DEFENSE CONVERSION AUTHORITIES.
  Notwithstanding any other provision of law (including any other provision
  of this Act), funds may not be obligated in any fiscal year for purposes
  of facilitating the conversion of military technologies and capabilities
  and defense industries of the former Soviet Union into civilian activities,
  as authorized by sections 503(a)(6) and 504(a)(6) or any other provision of
  law, unless the President has previously obligated in the same fiscal year an
  amount equal to or greater than that amount of funds for defense conversion
  and defense transition activities in the United States. For purposes of this
  section, the term `defense conversion and defense transition activities in
  the United States' means those United States Government funded programs whose
  primary purpose is to assist United States private sector defense workers,
  United States companies that manufacture or otherwise provide defense goods
  or services, or United States communities adversely affected by reductions
  in United States defense spending, such as programs funded through the
  Office of Economic Adjustment in the Department of Defense, through the
  Defense Conversion Adjustment Program (as authorized by the Job Training
  Partnership Act), or through the Economic Development Administration.
SEC. 506. SOVIET WEAPONS DESTRUCTION.
  (a) ADDITIONAL FUNDING-
  (1) AUTHORIZATION AMOUNT- Section 221(a) of the Soviet Nuclear Threat
  Reduction Act of 1991 (title II of Public Law 102-228; 22 U.S.C. 2551 note)
  is amended by striking out `$400,000,000' and inserting in lieu thereof
  `$800,000,000'.
  (2) AUTHORIZATION PERIOD- Section 221(e) of such Act is amended--
  (A) by inserting `for fiscal year 1992 or fiscal year 1993' after `under
  part B';
  (B) by inserting `for that fiscal year' after `for that program'; and
  (C) by striking out `for fiscal year 1992' and inserting in lieu thereof
  `for that fiscal year'.
  (b) TECHNICAL REVISIONS TO PUBLIC LAW 102-229- Public Law 102-229 is
  amended--
  (1) in section 108 (105 Stat. 1708), by striking out `contained in H.R. 3807,
  as passed the Senate on November 25, 1991' and inserting in lieu thereof
  `(title II of Public Law 102-228)'; and
  (2) in section 109 (105 Stat. 1708)--
  (A) by striking out `H.R. 3807, as passed the Senate on November 25, 1991'
  and inserting in lieu thereof `Public Law 102-228 (105 Stat. 1696)'; and
  (B) by striking out `of H.R. 3807'.
  (c) AVOIDANCE OF DUPLICATIVE AMENDMENTS- The amendments made by this section
  shall not be effective if the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal
  Year 1993 enacts an amendment to section 221(a) of the Soviet Nuclear Threat
  Reduction Act of 1991 that authorizes the transfer of an amount that is
  the same or greater than the amount that is authorized by the amendment
  made by subsection (a)(1) of this section and enacts amendments identical
  to those in subsections (a)(2) and (b) of this section. If that Act enacts
  such amendments, sections 503 and 508 of this Act shall be deemed to apply
  with respect to the funds made available under such amendments.
SEC. 507. WAIVER OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS.
  (a) IN GENERAL- Funds made available for fiscal year 1993 under sections
  503 and 504 to provide assistance or otherwise carry out programs and
  activities with respect to the independent states of the former Soviet
  Union under those sections may be used notwithstanding any other provision
  of law, other than the provisions cited in subsection (b).
  (b) EXCEPTIONS- Subsection (a) does not apply with respect to--
  (1) this title; and
  (2) section 1341 of title 31, United States Code (commonly referred to
  as the `Anti-Deficiency Act'), the Congressional Budget and Impoundment
  Control Act of 1974, the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control
  Act of 1985, and the Budget Enforcement Act of 1990.
SEC. 508. NOTICE AND REPORTS TO CONGRESS.
  (a) NOTICE OF PROPOSED OBLIGATIONS- Not less than 15 days before obligating
  any funds under section 503 or 504 or the amendments made by section 506(a),
  the President shall transmit to the Speaker of the House of Representatives,
  the President Pro Tempore of the Senate, and the appropriate congressional
  committees a report on the proposed obligation. Each such report shall
  specify--
  (1) the account, budget activity, and particular program or programs from
  which the funds proposed to be obligated are to be derived and the amount
  of the proposed obligations; and
  (2) the activities and forms of assistance for which the President plans
  to obligate such funds.
  (b) SEMIANNUAL REPORT- Not later than April 30, 1993, and not later
  than October 30, 1993, the President shall transmit to the Speaker of
  the House of Representatives, the President Pro Tempore of the Senate,
  and the appropriate congressional committees a report on the activities
  carried out under sections 503 and 504 and the amendments made by section
  506(a). Each such report shall set forth, for the preceding 6-month period
  and cumulatively, the following:
  (1) The amounts expended for such activities and the purposes for which
  they were expended.
  (2) The source of the funds obligated for such activities, specified
  by program.
  (3) A description of the participation of all United States Government
  departments and agencies in such activities.
  (4) A description of the activities carried out and the forms of assistance
  provided.
  (5) Such other information as the President considers appropriate to
  fully inform the Congress concerning the operation of the programs and
  activities carried out under sections 503 and 504 and the amendments made
  by section 506(a).
  (c) APPROPRIATE CONGRESSIONAL COMMITTEES- As used in this section--
  (1) the term `appropriate congressional committees' means--
  (A) the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate, the Committee on
  Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives, and the Committees
  on Appropriations of the House and the Senate, wherever the account,
  budget activity, or program is funded from appropriations made under the
  international affairs budget function (150);
  (B) the Committees on Armed Services and the Committees on Appropriations
  of the Senate and the House of Representatives, wherever the account,
  budget activity, or program is funded from appropriations made under the
  national defense budget function (050); and
  (2) the committee to which the specified activities of section 503(a) or
  504(a) or subtitle B of the Soviet Nuclear Threat Reduction Act of 1991
  (as the case may be), if the subject of separate legislation, would be
  referred, under the rules of the respective House of Congress.
SEC. 509. INTERNATIONAL NONPROLIFERATION INITIATIVE.
  (a) ASSISTANCE FOR INTERNATIONAL NONPROLIFERATION ACTIVITIES- Subject to
  the limitations and requirements provided in this section, during fiscal
  year 1993 the Secretary of Defense, under the guidance of the President,
  may provide assistance to support international nonproliferation activities.
  (b) ACTIVITIES FOR WHICH ASSISTANCE MAY BE PROVIDED- Activities for which
  assistance may be provided under this section are activities such as
  the following:
  (1) Activities carried out by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
  that are designed to ensure more effective safeguards against nuclear
  proliferation and more aggressive verification of compliance with the
  Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, done on July 1, 1968.
  (2) Activities of the On-Site Inspection Agency in support of the United
  Nations Special Commission on Iraq.
  (3) Collaborative international nuclear security and nuclear safety projects
  to combat the threat of nuclear theft, terrorism, or accidents, including
  joint emergency response exercises, technical assistance, and training.
  (4) Efforts to improve international cooperative monitoring of nuclear
  proliferation through joint technical projects and improved intelligence
  sharing.
  (c) FORM OF ASSISTANCE- (1) Assistance under this section may include funds
  and in-kind contributions of supplies, equipment, personnel, training,
  and other forms of assistance.
  (2) Assistance under this section may be provided to international
  organizations in the form of funds only if the amount in the `Contributions
  to International Organizations' account of the Department of State is
  insufficient or otherwise unavailable to meet the United States fair share
  of assessments for international nuclear nonproliferation activities.
  (3) No amount may be obligated for an expenditure under this section
  unless the Director of the Office of Management and Budget determines
  that the expenditure will be counted against the defense category of the
  discretionary spending limits for fiscal year 1993 (as defined in section
  601(a)(2) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974) for purposes of part
  C of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.
  (4) No assistance may be furnished under this section unless the Secretary
  of Defense determines and certifies to the Congress 30 days in advance
  that the provision of such assistance--
  (A) is in the national security interest of the United States; and
  (B) will not adversely affect the military preparedness of the United States.
  (5) The authority to provide assistance under this section in the form of
  funds may be exercised only to the extent and in the amounts provided in
  advance in appropriations Act.
  (d) SOURCES OF ASSISTANCE- (1) Funds provided as assistance under this
  section shall be derived from amounts made available to the Department of
  Defense for fiscal year 1993 or from balances in working capital accounts
  of the Department of Defense.
  (2) Supplies and equipment provided as assistance under this section may
  be provided, by loan or donation, from existing stocks of the Department
  of Defense and the Department of Energy.
  (3) The total amount of the assistance provided in the form of funds
  under this section may not exceed $40,000,000. Of such amount, not more
  than $20,000,000 may be used for the activities of the On-Site Inspection
  agency in support of the United Nations Special Commission on Iraq.
  (4) Not less than 30 days before obligating any funds to provide
  assistance under this section, the Secretary of Defense shall transmit
  to the committees of Congress named in subsection (e)(2) a report on the
  proposed obligation. Each such report shall specify--
  (A) the account, budget activity, and particular program or programs from
  which the funds proposed to be obligated are to be derived and the amount
  of the proposed obligation; and
  (B) the activities and forms of assistance for which the Secretary of
  Defense plans to obligate the funds.
  (e) QUARTERLY REPORT- (1) Not later than 30 days after the end of each
  quarter of fiscal year 1993, the Secretary of Defense shall transmit to the
  committees of Congress named in paragraph (2) a report of the activities
  to reduce the proliferation threat carried out under this section. Each
  report shall set forth (for the preceding quarter and cumulatively)--
  (A) the amounts spent for such activities and the purposes for which they
  were spent;
  (B) a description of the participation of the Department of Defense and
  the Department of Energy and the participation of other Government agencies
  in those activities; and
  (C) a description of the activities for which the funds were spent.
  (2) The committees of Congress to which reports under paragraph (1) and
  under subsection (d)(2) are to be transmitted are--
  (A) the Committee on Armed Services, the Committee on Appropriations,
  and the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate; and
  (B) the Committee on Armed Services, the Committee on Appropriations, the
  Committee on Foreign Affairs, and the Committee on Energy and Commerce of
  the House of Representatives.
  (f) AVOIDANCE OF DUPLICATIVE AUTHORIZATIONS- This section shall not apply
  if the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1993 enacts the
  same authorities and requirements as are contained in this section and
  authorizes the appropriation of the same (or a greater) amount to carry
  out such authorities.
SEC. 510. REPORT ON SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIALS.
  Not later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this Act, the
  Secretary of State shall prepare, in consultation with the Secretary of
  Defense and the Secretary of Energy, and shall transmit to the Congress a
  report on the possible alternatives for the ultimate disposition of special
  nuclear materials of the former Soviet Union. This report shall include--
  (1) a cost-benefit analysis comparing (A) the relative merits of the
  indefinite storage and safeguarding of such materials in the independent
  states of the former Soviet Union and (B) its acquisition by the United
  States by purchase, barter, or other means;
  (2) a discussion of relevant issues such as the protection of United States
  uranium producers from dumping, the relative vulnerability of these stocks
  of special nuclear materials to illegal proliferation, and the potential
  electrical and other savings associated with their being made available
  in the fuel cycle in the United States; and
  (3) a discussion of how highly enriched uranium stocks could be diluted
  for reactor fuel.
SEC. 511. RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION.
  (a) ESTABLISHMENT- The Director of the National Science Foundation
  (hereinafter in this section referred to as the `Director') is authorized
  to establish an endowed, nongovernmental, nonprofit foundation (hereinafter
  in this section referred to as the `Foundation') in consultation with the
  Director of the National Institute of Standards and Technology.
  (b) PURPOSES- The purposes of the Foundation shall be the following:
  (1) To provide productive research and development opportunities within
  the independent states of the former Soviet Union that offer scientists
  and engineers alternatives to emigration and help prevent the dissolution
  of the technological infrastructure of the independent states.
  (2) To advance defense conversion by funding civilian collaborative research
  and development projects between scientists and engineers in the United
  States and in the independent states of the former Soviet Union.
  (3) To assist in the establishment of a market economy in the independent
  states of the former Soviet Union by promoting, identifying, and partially
  funding joint research, development, and demonstration ventures between
  United States businesses and scientists, engineers, and entrepreneurs in
  those independent states.
  (4) To provide a mechanism for scientists, engineers, and entrepreneurs in
  the independent states of the former Soviet Union to develop an understanding
  of commercial business practices by establishing linkages to United States
  scientists, engineers, and businesses.
  (5) To provide access for United States businesses to sophisticated new
  technologies, talented researchers, and potential new markets within the
  independent states of the former Soviet Union.
  (c) FUNCTIONS- In carrying out its purposes, the Foundation shall--
  (1) promote and support joint research and development projects for
  peaceful purposes between scientists and engineers in the United States
  and independent states of the former Soviet Union on subjects of mutual
  interest; and
  (2) seek to establish joint nondefense industrial research, development,
  and demonstration activities through private sector linkages which may
  involve participation by scientists and engineers in the university or
  academic sectors, and which shall include some contribution from industrial
  participants.
  (d) FUNDING-
  (1) USE OF CERTAIN DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE FUNDS- (A) To the extent funds
  appropriated to carry out subtitle E of title XIV of the National Defense
  Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1993 (relating to joint research and
  development programs with the independent states of the former Soviet Union)
  are otherwise available for such purpose, such funds may be made available
  to the Director for use by the Director in establishing the endowment of
  the Foundation and otherwise carrying out this section.
  (B) For each fiscal year after fiscal year 1993, not more than 50
  percent of the funds made available to the Foundation by the United States
  Government may be funds appropriated in the national defense budget function
  (function 050).
  (2) CONTRIBUTION TO ENDOWMENT BY PARTICIPATING INDEPENDENT STATES- As a
  condition of participation in the Foundation, an independent state of the
  former Soviet Union must make a minimum contribution to the endowment of
  the Foundation, as determined by the Director, which shall reflect the
  ability of the independent state to make a financial contribution and its
  expected level of participation in the Foundation's programs.
  (3) DEBT CONVERSIONS- To the extent provided in advance by
  appropriations Acts, local currencies or other assets resulting from
  government-to-government debt conversions may be made available to the
  Foundation. For purposes of this paragraph, the term `debt conversion' means
  an agreement whereby a country's government-to-government or commercial
  external debt burden is exchanged by the holder for local currencies,
  policy commitments, other assets, or other economic activities, or for an
  equity interest in an enterprise theretofore owned by the debtor government.
  (4) LOCAL CURRENCIES- In addition to other uses provided by law, and subject
  to agreement with the foreign government, local currencies generated by
  United States assistance programs may be made available to the Foundation.
  (5) INVESTMENT OF GOVERNMENT ASSISTANCE- The Foundation may invest any
  revenue provided to it through United States Government assistance, and
  any interest earned on such investment may be used only for the purpose
  for which the assistance was provided.
  (6) OTHER FUNDS FROM GOVERNMENT AND NONGOVERNMENTAL SOURCES- The Foundation
  may accept such other funds as may be provided to it by Government agencies
  or nongovernmental entities.
TITLE VI--SPACE TRADE AND COOPERATION
SEC. 601. FACILITATING DISCUSSIONS REGARDING THE ACQUISITION OF SPACE HARDWARE,
TECHNOLOGY, AND SERVICES FROM THE FORMER SOVIET UNION.
  (a) EXPEDITED REVIEW- Any request for a license or other approval described
  in subsection (c) that is submitted to any United States Government agency
  by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, any of its contractors,
  or any other person shall be considered on an expedited basis by that agency
  and any other agency involved in an applicable interagency review process.
  (b) NOTICE TO CONGRESS IF LICENSE DENIED- If any United States Government
  agency denies a request for a license or other approval described in
  subsection (c), that agency shall immediately notify the designated
  congressional committees.  Each such notification shall include a statement
  of the reasons for the denial.
  (c) DESCRIPTION OF DISCUSSIONS- This section applies to a request for any
  license or other approval that may be necessary to conduct discussions
  with an independent state of the former Soviet Union with respect to the
  possible acquisition of any space hardware, space technology, or space
  service for integration into--
  (1) United States space projects that have been approved by the Congress, or
  (2) commercial space ventures,
including discussions relating to technical evaluation of such hardware,
technology, or service.
SEC. 602. OFFICE OF SPACE COMMERCE.
  (a) TRADE MISSIONS- The Office of Space Commerce of the Department of
  Commerce is authorized and encouraged to conduct one or more trade missions
  to appropriate independent states of the former Soviet Union for the
  purpose of familiarizing United States aerospace industry representatives
  with space hardware, space technologies, and space services that may be
  available from the independent states, and with the business practices
  and overall business climate in the independent states.
  (b) MONITORING NEGOTIATIONS- The Office of Space Commerce--
  (1) shall monitor the progress of any discussions described in section
  601(c)(1) that are being conducted; and
  (2) shall advise the Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space
  Administration as to the impact on United States industry of each potential
  acquisition of space hardware, space technology, or space services from
  the independent states of the former Soviet Union, specifically including
  any anticompetitive issues the Office may observe.
SEC. 603. REPORT TO CONGRESS.
  Within one year after the date of enactment of this title, the President
  shall submit to the designated congressional committees a report describing--
  (1) the opportunities for increased space-related trade with the independent
  states of the former Soviet Union;
  (2) a technology procurement plan for identifying and evaluating  all
  unique space hardware, space technology, and space services available to
  the United States from the independent states;
  (3) specific space hardware, space technology, and space services that have
  been, or could be, the subject of discussions described in section 601(c);
  (4) the trade missions carried out pursuant to section 602(a), including
  the private participation in and the results of such missions;
  (5) any barriers, regulatory or practical, that inhibit space-related
  trade between the United States and independent states, including any such
  barriers in either the United States or the independent states; and
  (6) any anticompetitive issues raised during the course of negotiations,
  as observed pursuant to section 602(b).
SEC. 604. DEFINITIONS.
  For purposes of this title--
  (1) the term `contractor' means a National Aeronautics and Space
  Administration contractor to the extent that the acquisition of space
  hardware, space technology, or space services from the independent states of
  the former Soviet Union may be relevant to the contractor's responsibilities
  under the contract; and
  (2) the term `designated congressional committees' means the Committee
  on Science, Space, and Technology and the Committee on Foreign Affairs
  of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Commerce, Science,
  and Transportation and the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate.
TITLE VII--AGRICULTURAL TRADE
SEC. 701. FOOD FOR PROGRESS ACT.
  Section 1110 of the Food Security Act of 1985 (7 U.S.C. 1736o) is amended--
  (1) in subsection (b)--
  (A) by inserting `(including the independent states of the former Soviet
  Union)' after `such countries';
  (B) by striking `or cooperatives' and inserting `cooperatives, or other
  private entities';
  (C) by inserting `(1)' after `(b)'; and
  (D) by adding at the end the following:
  `(2) The annual tonnage limitation contained in subsection (g) shall not
  apply with respect to commodities furnished to the independent states of
  the former Soviet Union during fiscal year 1993.';
  (2) by amending subsection (f)(1) to read as follows:
  `(f)(1) The Commodity Credit Corporation may provide for--
  `(A) grants, or
  `(B) in the case of the independent states of the former Soviet Union,
  sales on credit terms,
of commodities made available under section 416(b) of the Agricultural Act
of 1949 for use in carrying out this section.'; and
  (3) by adding at the end the following:
  `(m) In carrying out this section with respect to the independent states
  of the former Soviet Union, the President shall approve, as determined
  appropriate by the President, agreements with private voluntary organizations
  and cooperatives that provide for--
  `(1) the sale of commodities, including the marketing  of these commodities
  through the private sector; and
  `(2) the use in the independent states of the proceeds generated in the
  humanitarian and development programs of such private voluntary organizations
  and cooperatives.
  `(n) As used in this section, the term `independent states of the former
  Soviet Union' means the independent states of the former Soviet Union
  as defined in section 102(8) of the Agricultural Trade Act of 1978 (7
  U.S.C. 5602(8)).'.
SEC. 702. DEFINITIONS FOR AGRICULTURAL TRADE ACT OF 1978.
  (a) AGRICULTURAL COMMODITY- Section 102(1) of the Agricultural Trade Act of
  1978 (7 U.S.C. 5602(1)) is amended by striking `feed, or fiber' and inserting
  `feed, fiber, or livestock (including livestock as it is defined in section
  602(2) of the Agricultural Act of 1949 (7 U.S.C. 1471(2)) and insects)'.
  (b) INDEPENDENT STATES OF THE FORMER SOVIET UNION- Section 102 of the
  Agricultural Trade Act of 1978 (7 U.S.C. 5602) is amended by adding at
  the end the following:
  `(8) INDEPENDENT STATES OF THE FORMER SOVIET UNION- The term `independent
  states of the former Soviet Union' means the following: Armenia, Azerbaijan,
  Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Russia, Tajikistan,
  Turkmenistan, Ukraine, and Uzbekistan.'.
SEC. 703. ASSISTANCE FOR PRIVATE VOLUNTARY ORGANIZATIONS.
  The President is encouraged to use funds made available under section 109 of
  Public Law 102-229 (105 Stat. 1708), and funds made available under chapter
  11 of part I of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, to assist private
  voluntary organizations and cooperatives in carrying out food assistance
  programs for the independent states of the former Soviet Union under--
  (1) section 1110 of the Food Security Act of 1985 (7 U.S.C. 1736o);
  (2) section 416 of the Agricultural Act of 1949 (7 U.S.C. 1431); or
  (3) title II of the Agricultural Trade Development and Assistance Act of
  1954 (7 U.S.C. 1721 et seq.).
SEC. 704. DISTRIBUTION OF AID TO THE INDEPENDENT STATES OF THE FORMER
SOVIET UNION.
  It is the sense of Congress that, in order to avoid waste and to ensure
  fair and equitable distribution of food and commodities provided to the
  independent states of the former Soviet Union, the President should, as
  appropriate, when discussing and planning the provision of such food aid,
  whether acting unilaterally or multilaterally with other donor countries,
  encourage the involvement of suitable multinational organizations to
  monitor the transport and distribution of such food aid within such entities.
SEC. 705. AGRICULTURAL FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM FOR MIDDLE INCOME COUNTRIES AND
EMERGING DEMOCRACIES.
  (a) ELIGIBLE COUNTRIES- Section 1543 of the Food, Agriculture, Conservation,
  and Trade Act of 1990 (7 U.S.C. 3293) is amended--
  (1) in subsection (a) by striking `middle income countries and emerging
  democracies' and by inserting `(as determined under subsection (b))' after
  `eligible countries'; and
  (2) in subsection (b)--
  (A) by striking `that meet the following requirements' in the text
  preceding paragraph (1) and inserting `described in any of the following
  paragraphs'; and
  (B) by adding at the end the following:
  `(4) INDEPENDENT STATES OF THE FORMER SOVIET UNION- A country that is an
  independent state of the former Soviet Union (as defined in section 102(8)
  of the Agricultural Trade Act of 1978 (7 U.S.C. 5602(8)), to the extent
  that the Secretary of Agriculture determines that such country should be
  eligible to participate in the program established under this section.'.
  (b) INDIVIDUALS WHO MAY RECEIVE FELLOWSHIPS- Section 1543(d) of the Food,
  Agriculture, Conservation, and Trade Act of 1990 (7 U.S.C. 3293(b)) is
  amended by adding at the end the following: `The Secretary may provide
  fellowships under the program authorized by this section to private
  agricultural producers from eligible countries.'.
SEC. 706. PROMOTION OF AGRICULTURAL EXPORTS TO EMERGING DEMOCRACIES.
  Section 1542 of the Agricultural Development and Trade Act of 1990 (7
  U.S.C. 5622 note) is amended--
  (1) in subsection (a)--
  (A) by inserting `direct credits or' before `export credit';
  (B) by inserting `201 or' before `202'; and
  (C) by inserting `or authorized' after `required';
  (2) in subsection (b)--
  (A) by striking the subsection heading and inserting `(b) FACILITIES AND
  SERVICES- ';
  (B) by striking `for the establishment or improvement by United States
  persons of facilities in emerging democracies' and inserting the following:
  `for--
  `(1) the establishment or improvement of facilities, or
  `(2) the provision of services or United States produced goods,
in emerging democracies by United States persons'; and
  (C) by striking the last sentence and inserting the following: `The
  Commodity Credit Corporation shall give priority under this subsection--
  `(1) to opportunities or projects identified under subsection (d)(1);
  `(2) to projects that encourage the privatization of the agricultural sector
  or that benefit private farms or cooperatives in emerging democracies; and
  `(3) to projects for which nongovernmental persons agree to assume a
  relatively larger share of the costs.';
  (3) in subsection (d)(1)(B)(i), by inserting `, farmers, other persons
  from the private sector,' after `agricultural consultants'; and
  (4) by amending subsection (d)(1)(D) to read as follows:
  `(D) TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE- The Secretary is authorized to provide, or
  pay the necessary costs for, technical assistance to enable individuals
  or other entities to implement the recommendations or to carry out the
  opportunities and projects identified under paragraph (1)(A).'.
SEC. 707. DIRECT CREDIT SALES.
  (a) REQUIRED DETERMINATIONS- Section 201(c) of the Agricultural Trade Act
  of 1978 (7 U.S.C. 5621(c)) is amended by inserting after paragraph (3)
  the following:
`The reference in paragraphs (1) and (2) to `on a long-term basis' shall not
apply in the case of determinations with respect to sales to the independent
states of the former Soviet Union.'.
  (b) ELIGIBLE COUNTRIES- Section 201(d)(1)(C) of the Agricultural Trade
  Act of 1978 (7 U.S.C. 5621(d)(1)(C)) is amended to read as follows:
  `(C) to assist countries in meeting their food and fiber needs,
  particularly--
  `(i) developing countries; and
  `(ii) countries that are emerging democracies that have committed to carry
  out, or are carrying out, policies that promote economic freedom, private
  domestic production of food commodities for domestic consumption, and the
  creation and expansion of efficient domestic markets for the purchase and
  sale of agricultural commodities; and'.
  (c) RESTRICTIONS- Section 201 of the Agricultural Trade Act of 1978 (7
  U.S.C. 5621) is amended by adding at the end the following new subsection:
  `(f) RESTRICTIONS- The Commodity Credit Corporation may not make export
  sales financing authorized under this section available in connection
  with sales of an agricultural commodity to any country that the Secretary
  determines cannot adequately service the debt associated with such sale.'.
  (d) REGULATIONS- The Secretary of Agriculture shall issue final regulations
  to implement section 201 of the Agricultural Trade Act of 1978 (7
  U.S.C. 5621), as amended by this section, not later than 30 days after
  the date of enactment of this Act.
SEC. 708. EXPORT CREDIT GUARANTEES.
  (a) REQUIRED DETERMINATIONS- Section 202(c) of the Agricultural Trade Act
  of 1978 (7 U.S.C. 5622(c)) is amended by inserting after paragraph (3)
  the following:
`The reference in paragraphs (1) and (2) to `on a long-term basis' shall not
apply in the case of determinations with respect to sales to the independent
states of the former Soviet Union.'.
  (b) PURPOSE OF PROGRAM- Section 202(d)(3) of the Agricultural Trade Act
  of 1978 (7 U.S.C. 5622(c)) to read as follows:
  `(3) to assist countries in meeting their food and fiber needs,
  particularly--
  `(A) developing countries; and
  `(B) countries that are emerging democracies that have committed to carry
  out, or are carrying out, policies that promote economic freedom, private
  domestic production of food commodities for domestic consumption, and the
  creation and expansion of efficient domestic markets for the purchase and
  sale of agricultural commodities; and'.
SEC. 709. EXPORT PROMOTION PROGRAMS AMENDMENTS.
  (a) PROCESSED AND HIGH-VALUE AGRICULTURAL PRODUCT EXPORT CREDIT GUARANTEE
  PROGRAM- Section 202 of the Agricultural Trade Act of 1978 (7 U.S.C. 5622)
  is amended--
  (1) in subsections (a) and (b), by inserting `, including processed
  agricultural products and high-value agricultural products,' after
  `agricultural commodities' both places it appears; and
  (2) by adding at the end the following new subsection:
  `(k) SET-ASIDES-
  `(1) IN GENERAL- In issuing export credit guarantees under this section in
  connection with sales to the independent states of the former Soviet Union,
  the Commodity Credit Corporation shall, to the extent practicable and subject
  to paragraph (2), ensure that no less than 35 percent of the total amount of
  credit guarantees issued for a fiscal year are issued to promote the export
  of processed and high-value agricultural products and that the balance
  are issued to promote the export of bulk or raw agricultural commodities.
  `(2) LIMITATION- The 35 percent requirement of paragraph (1) shall
  apply for a fiscal year only to the extent that the percentage of the
  total amount of credit guarantees issued for that fiscal year under this
  section to promote the export to all countries of processed and high-value
  agricultural products is less than 25 percent.'.
  (b) PROCESSED AND HIGH-VALUE AGRICULTURAL PRODUCT EXPORT ENHANCEMENT
  PROGRAM- Section 301 of the Agricultural Trade Act of 1978 (7 U.S.C. 5651)
  is amended--
  (1) in subsection (a), by inserting `, including processed agricultural
  products and high-value agricultural products,' after `agricultural
  commodities'; and
  (2) in subsection (e)--
  (A) by striking `The Commodity' and inserting the following:
  `(1) IN GENERAL- The Commodity'; and
  (B) by adding at the end the following new paragraph:
  `(2) SET-ASIDES- (A) For each fiscal year, the Corporation shall, to the
  extent practicable and subject to subparagraph (B), ensure that no less
  than 25 percent of the total of--
  `(i) the funds expended, and
  `(ii) the value of any commodities made available,
under this section in connection with sales of agricultural commodities to
the independent states of the former Soviet Union is used to promote the
export of processed and high-value United States agricultural products and
that the balance of the funds expended and commodities made available under
this section in connection with such sales is used to promote the export of
bulk or raw United States agricultural commodities.
  `(B) The 25 percent requirement of subparagraph (A) shall apply for a
  fiscal year only to the extent that the percentage of the total of--
  `(i) the funds expended, and
  `(ii) the value of commodities made available,
for that fiscal year under this section to promote the export to all countries
of processed and high-value United States agricultural products is less than
15 percent.'.
TITLE VIII--UNITED STATES INFORMATION AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF STATE, AND
RELATED AGENCIES AND ACTIVITIES
SEC. 801. DESIGNATION OF EDMUND S. MUSKIE FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM.
  Section 227 of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years
  1992 and 1993 (22 U.S.C. 2452 note), is amended by adding at the end the
  following new subsection:
  `(f) DESIGNATION OF PROGRAM AND SCHOLARSHIPS-
  `(1) The scholarship program established by this section shall be known
  as the `Edmund S. Muskie Fellowship Program'.
  `(2) Scholarships provided under this section shall be known as `Muskie
  Fellowships'.'.
SEC. 802. NEW DIPLOMATIC POSTS IN THE INDEPENDENT STATES.
  There are authorized to be appropriated for `NEW DIPLOMATIC POSTS'
  for personnel, support, and other expenses, not otherwise provided for,
  for the Department of State and the United States Information Agency to
  establish and operate new diplomatic posts in the independent states of
  former Soviet Union, $25,000,000 for fiscal year 1993, which are authorized
  to remain available until September 30, 1994.
SEC. 803. OCCUPANCY OF NEW CHANCERY BUILDINGS.
  Subsections (f) and (g) of section 132 of the Foreign Relations Authorization
  Act, Fiscal Years 1992 and 1993, are repealed.
SEC. 804. CERTAIN POSITIONS AT UNITED STATES MISSIONS.
  (a) AMENDMENT- Section 1004(a) of the Omnibus Diplomatic Security and
  Anti-Terrorism Act of 1986 is amended by adding at the end the following:
  `Not less than 15 shall be provided during fiscal year 1993.'.
  (b) FUNDING- In addition to the funds made available pursuant to section
  1005(c) of that Act, funds authorized to be appropriated by chapter 11
  of part I of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 may be used in carrying
  out the amendment made by subsection (a) with respect to missions in the
  independent states of the former Soviet Union.
SEC. 805. INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT LAW INSTITUTE.
  For purposes of the International Organizations Immunities Act (22
  U.S.C. 288 and following), the International Development Law Institute
  shall be considered to be a public international organization in which
  the United States participates under the authority of an Act of Congress
  authorizing such participation.
SEC. 806. CERTAIN BOARD FOR INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITIES.
  Section 301(c) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years
  1990 and 1991 (104 Stat. 63), is amended by adding at the end the following:
  `(3) For purposes of the notification requirements of section 634A(c) of the
  Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, any action by the Board for International
  Broadcasting or its agents, after the date of enactment of this paragraph,
  to require or allow the construction authorized by this subsection to proceed
  shall be treated as a reprogramming of funds subject to the notification
  requirements of the annual Departments of Commerce, Justice, and State,
  the Judiciary, and Related Agencies Appropriation Act. Amounts authorized
  to be appropriated under paragraph (1) shall be available for expenditure
  for construction services only in accordance with the procedures applicable
  under that section.'.
SEC. 807. EXCHANGES AND TRAINING AND SIMILAR PROGRAMS.
  (a) FUNDING FOR EXCHANGES AND TRAINING AND SIMILAR PROGRAMS-
  (1) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS- To carry out a broad spectrum of
  exchanges, and of training and similar programs to promote the objectives
  described in section 498 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, between
  the United States and the independent states of the former Soviet Union,
  there are authorized to be appropriated for fiscal year 1993 (in addition
  to amounts otherwise available for such purposes) the following:
  (A) $20,000,000 for exchange programs for secondary school students.
  (B) $30,000,000 for programs for participants other than secondary school
  students, including undergraduate and graduate students, farmers and other
  agribusiness practitioners, and participants in the exchanges carried out
  under paragraph (2).
  (2) LOCAL AND REGIONAL SELF-GOVERNMENT EXCHANGES- The Director of the
  United States Information Agency is authorized to use funds authorized to be
  appropriated by paragraph (1)(B) to conduct exchanges to provide technical
  assistance in local and regional self-government to the independent states.
  (3) REPORT ON PROPOSED FUNDING ALLOCATIONS- Within 45 days after the
  date of the enactment of this Act, the coordinator designated pursuant to
  section 102(a) of this Act shall submit to the Congress a report specifying
  the amount of funds authorized to be appropriated by paragraph (1) that
  is proposed to be allocated for each category of program and for each
  Government agency.
  (4) PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION-
  (A) USIA- Educational, cultural, and any other exchange programs carried
  out under this subsection, including any such programs for secondary school
  students, shall be administered by the United States Information Agency,
  and funds allocated for such programs shall be transferred to that Agency.
  (B) OTHER AGENCIES- Training and other non-exchange programs carried out
  under this subsection shall be administered by the Agency for International
  Development or such other Government agency as has experience and expertise
  in carrying out such programs.
  (5) ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES- Up to 5 percent of the funds made available
  to each Government agency under this subsection may be used by that agency
  for administrative expenses of program implementation.
  (b) ENHANCEMENT OF USIA EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL EXCHANGE PROGRAMS-
  In addition to amounts otherwise available for such purposes, there are
  authorized to be appropriated to the United States Information Agency
  for fiscal year 1993 for enhancement of existing educational and cultural
  exchange programs the following:
  (1) $9,950,000 for Fulbright Academic Exchange Programs.
  (2) $10,850,000 for other programs administered by the Bureau of Educational
  and Cultural Affairs.
  (c) REPEAL- Effective 6 months after the date of enactment of this Act,
  section 225 of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1992
  and 1993, and the item relating to that section in the table of contents
  set forth in section 2 of that Act, are repealed.
  (d) AGRIBUSINESS EXCHANGES-
  (1) AUTHORIZATION- The President is authorized to establish regional
  agribusiness offices at State universities and land grant colleges in the
  United States for the purpose of expanding exchanges between agribusiness
  practitioners in the United States and agribusiness practitioners in the
  independent states of the former Soviet Union.
  (2) LIMITATION ON FUNDING SOURCES- Funds authorized to be appropriated
  by this section or other provisions of this Act (including chapter 11 of
  part I of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961) may not be used to carry
  out this subsection.
TITLE IX--OTHER PROVISIONS
SEC. 901. FOREIGN ASSISTANCE ACT LIST OF COMMUNIST COUNTRIES.
  Paragraph (1) of section 620(f) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22
  U.S.C. 2370(f)(1)) is amended by striking out from the list of countries in
  the last sentence of that paragraph the following: `Czechoslovak Socialist
  Republic.', `Estonia.', `German Democratic Republic.', `Hungarian People's
  Republic.', `Latvia.', `Lithuania.', `People's Republic of Albania.',
  `People's Republic of Bulgaria.', `Polish People's Republic.', `Socialist
  Federal Republic of Yugoslavia.', `Socialist Republic of Romania.', and
  `Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (including its captive constituent
  republics).'.
SEC. 902. JOHNSON ACT.
  Section 955 of title 18, United States Code, shall not apply with respect to
  any obligations of the former Soviet Union, or any of the independent states
  of the former Soviet Union, or any political subdivision, organization,
  or association thereof.
SEC. 903. SUPPORT FOR EAST EUROPEAN DEMOCRACY (SEED) ACT.
  (a) SCOPE OF AUTHORITY- The Support for East European Democracy (SEED) Act of
  1989 is amended by inserting after section 2 (22 U.S.C. 5401) the following:
`SEC. 3. SCOPE OF AUTHORITY.
  `(a) GENERAL AUTHORIZATION- The President is authorized to conduct
  activities for any East European country that are similar to any activity
  authorized by this Act to be conducted in Poland or Hungary (excluding
  those authorized by section 102 or the amendments made by sections 301 and
  304) if such similar activities would effectively promote a transition to
  market-oriented democracy.
  `(b) ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE PROGRAMS- In order to strengthen the
  administration of justice in East European countries, the President
  may exercise the same authorities with respect to those countries as are
  available under section 534 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, subject
  to the limitations and requirements of that section, other than subsection
  (c) and the last two sentences of subsection (e).
  `(c) DEFINITION OF EAST EUROPEAN COUNTRY- For purposes of this Act,
  the term `East European country' includes Albania, Bulgaria, the Czech
  and Slovak Federal Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland,
  Romania, and states that were part of the former Socialist Federal Republic
  of Yugoslavia.'.
  (b) CONFORMING AMENDMENT- The table of contents in section 1 of that Act
  is amended by inserting after the item relating to section 2 insert the
  following:
`Sec. 3. Scope of authority.'.
SEC. 904. PEACE CORPS VOLUNTEER TRAINING REQUIREMENTS.
  Section 8(c) of the Peace Corps Act (22 U.S.C. 2507(c)) is repealed.
SEC. 905. ESTABLISHING CATEGORIES OF ALIENS FOR PURPOSES OF REFUGEE
DETERMINATIONS; ADJUSTMENT OF STATUS FOR CERTAIN SOVIET AND INDOCHINESE
PAROLEES.
  (a) EXTENSION OF PROVISIONS- The Foreign Operations, Export Financing,
  and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 1990 (Public Law 101-167) is
  amended in section 599D (8 U.S.C. 1157 note)--
  (1) in subsection (b)(3), by inserting `and within the number of such
  admissions allocated for each of fiscal years 1993 and 1994 for refugees
  who are nationals of the independent states of the former Soviet Union,
  Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania under such section' after `Act'; and
  (2) in subsection (e), by striking out `October 1, 1992' each place it
  appears and inserting in lieu thereof `October 1, 1994'.
  (b) CORRECTION OF REFERENCES TO SOVIET UNION- That Act is amended--
  (1) in section 599D(b)--
  (A) in paragraphs (1)(A), (2)(A), and (2)(B), by striking out `of the Soviet
  Union' each place it appears and inserting in lieu thereof `of an independent
  state of the former Soviet Union or of Estonia, Latvia, or Lithuania'; and
  (B) in paragraph (1)(A), by striking out `in the Soviet Union' and inserting
  in lieu thereof `in that state'; and
  (2) in section 599E(b)(1), by striking out `of the Soviet Union,' and
  inserting in lieu thereof `of an independent state of the former Soviet
  Union, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania,'.
  (c) REPEAL OF EXECUTED REPORTING REQUIREMENTS- Section 599D of that Act
  is amended by repealing subsection (f).
SEC. 906. ELIGIBILITY OF BALTIC STATES FOR NONLETHAL DEFENSE ARTICLES.
  (a) ELIGIBILITY- Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania shall each be eligible--
  (1) to purchase, or to receive financing for the purchase of, nonlethal
  defense articles--
  (A) under the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2751 et seq.), without
  regard to section 3(a)(1) of that Act, or
  (B) under section 503 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2311),
  without regard to the requirement in subsection (a) of that section for
  a Presidential finding; and
  (2) to receive nonlethal excess defense articles transferred under section
  519 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2321m), without regard
  to the restrictions in subsection (a) of that section.
  (b) DEFINITIONS- As used in this section--
  (1) the term `defense article' has the same meaning given to that term in
  section 47(3) of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2794(3)); and
  (2) the term `excess defense article' has the same meaning given to that term
  in section 644(g) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2403(g)).
SEC. 907. RESTRICTION ON ASSISTANCE TO AZERBAIJAN.
  United States assistance under this or any other Act (other than assistance
  under title V of this Act) may not be provided to the Government of
  Azerbaijan until the President determines, and so reports to the Congress,
  that the Government of Azerbaijan is taking demonstrable steps to cease
  all blockades and other offensive uses of force against Armenia and
  Nagorno-Karabakh.
TITLE X--INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS
SEC. 1001. INTERNATIONAL MONETARY FUND QUOTA INCREASE.
  The Bretton Woods Agreements Act (22 U.S.C. 286 and following) is amended
  by adding at the end the following:
`SEC. 56. QUOTA INCREASE.
  `The United States Governor of the Fund may consent to an increase in
  the quota of the United States in the Fund equivalent to 8,608,500,000
  Special Drawing Rights, limited to such amounts as are provided in advance
  in appropriations Acts.
`SEC. 57. ACCEPTANCE OF AMENDMENTS TO THE ARTICLES OF AGREEMENT OF THE FUND.
  `The United States Governor of the Fund may agree to and accept the
  amendments to the Articles of Agreement of the Fund as proposed in the
  resolution numbered 45-3 of the Board of Governors of the Fund that was
  approved by such Board on June 28, 1990.
`SEC. 58. APPROVAL OF FUND PLEDGE TO SELL GOLD TO PROVIDE RESOURCES FOR THE
RESERVE ACCOUNT OF THE ENHANCED STRUCTURAL ADJUSTMENT FACILITY TRUST.
  `The Secretary of the Treasury is authorized to instruct the United States
  Executive Director of the Fund to vote to approve the Fund's pledge to
  sell, if needed, up to 3,000,000 ounces of the Fund's gold, to restore the
  resources of the Reserve Account of the Enhanced Structural Adjustment
  Facility Trust to a level that would be sufficient to meet obligations
  of the Trust payable to lenders which have made loans to the Loan Account
  of the Trust that have been used for the purpose of financing programs to
  Fund members previously in arrears to the Fund.'.
SEC. 1002. INTERNATIONAL MONETARY FUND POLICY CHANGES.
  The Bretton Woods Agreements Act (22 U.S.C. 286 and following) is amended
  by adding after the sections added by section 1001 of this Act the following:
`SEC. 59. FUND POLICY CHANGES.
  `(a) POLICY CHANGES WITHIN THE IMF- The Secretary of the Treasury shall
  instruct the United States Executive Director of the Fund to promote
  regularly and vigorously in program discussions and quota increase
  negotiations the following proposals:
  `(1) POVERTY ALLEVIATION, REDUCTION OF BARRIERS TO ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL
  PROGRESS, AND PROGRESS TOWARD ENVIRONMENTALLY SOUND POLICIES AND PROGRAMS-
  (A)(i) Considerations of poverty alleviation and the reduction of barriers to
  economic and social progress should be incorporated into all Fund programs
  and all consultations under article IV of the Articles of Agreement of
  the Fund.
  `(ii) Preparation of Policy Framework Papers should be extended to all
  nations which have Fund programs and active Bank or International Development
  Association lending programs, and existence of a Policy Framework Paper
  should be a precondition for new lending to such nations by the Fund.
  `(iii) All Policy Framework Papers should articulate the principal poverty,
  economic, and social measures that the borrowing nation needs to address,
  and this portion of the Policy Framework Paper (or a summary thereof that
  includes specific measures and timing) should be made available when the
  Policy Framework Paper is submitted to the Executive Directors of the Bank
  and of the Fund for consideration.
  `(iv) In considering whether to allocate resources of the Fund to a borrower,
  the Fund should take into consideration the nature of the program and
  commitment of the borrower to address the issues referred to in clause (iii).
  `(v) The Fund should establish procedures to enable the Fund to cooperate
  with the Bank in evaluating the effectiveness of the measures referred
  to in clause (iii), at the levels of policy, project design, monitoring,
  and reporting, in the international financial institutions and in the
  borrowing nations.
  `(B)(i) The Fund should be encouraged to make further progress toward
  environmentally sound policies and programs.
  `(ii) The Fund should incorporate environmental considerations into all
  Fund programs, including consultations under article IV of the Articles
  of Agreement of the Fund.
  `(iii) The Fund should be encouraged to support the efforts of nations
  to implement systems of natural resource accounting in their national
  income accounts.
  `(iv) The Fund should be encouraged to assist and cooperate fully
  with the statistical research being undertaken by the Organization for
  Economic Cooperation and Development and by the United Nations in order
  to facilitate development and adoption of a generally applicable system
  for taking account of the depletion or degradation of natural resources
  in national income accounts.
  `(v) The Fund should be encouraged to consider and implement, as appropriate,
  revisions in its national income reporting systems consistent with such
  new systems as are of general applicability.
  `(2) POLICY AUDITS- (A) The Fund should conduct periodic audits to review
  systematically the policy prescriptions recommended and required by the
  Fund in the areas of poverty and the environment.
  `(B) The purposes of such audits would be--
  `(i) to determine whether the Fund's objectives were met; and
  `(ii) to evaluate the social and environmental impacts of the implementation
  of the policy prescriptions.
  `(C) Such audits would have access to all ongoing programs and activities of
  the Fund and the ability to review the effects of Fund-supported programs,
  on a country-by-country basis, with respect to poverty, economic development,
  and environment.
  `(D) Such audits should be made public as appropriate with due respect
  to confidentiality.
  `(3) ENSURING POLICY OPTIONS THAT INCREASE THE PRODUCTIVE PARTICIPATION
  OF THE POOR- The Fund should establish procedures that ensure the focus
  of future economic reform programs approved by the Fund on policy options
  that increase the productive participation of the poor in the economy.
  `(4) PUBLIC ACCESS TO INFORMATION- (A) The Fund should establish procedures
  for public access to information.
  `(B) Such procedures shall seek to ensure access of the public to information
  while paying due regard to appropriate confidentiality.
  `(C) Policy Framework Papers and the supporting documents prepared by the
  Fund's mission to a country are examples of documents that should be made
  public at an appropriate time and in appropriate ways.
  `(b) PROGRESS REPORT- Each annual report of the National Advisory Council on
  International Monetary and Financial Policies shall describe the following:
  `(1) The actions that the United States Executive Director and other
  officials have taken to convince the Fund to adopt the proposals set
  forth in subsection (a) through formal initiatives before the Board and
  management of the Fund, through bilateral discussions with other member
  nations, and through any further quota increase negotiations.
  `(2) The status of the progress being made by the Fund in implementing
  the proposals set forth in subsection (a).
  `(c) STUDY- The Secretary of the Treasury shall instruct the United States
  Executive Director to the Fund to urge the Fund--
  `(1) to explore ways to increase the involvement and participation of
  important ministries, national development experts, environmental experts,
  free-market experts, and other legitimate experts and representatives from
  the loan-recipient country in the development of Fund programs; and
  `(2) to report on the status of Fund efforts in this regard.'.
SEC. 1003. REDUCTION OF MILITARY SPENDING AND PROMOTION OF LONG-TERM
SUSTAINABLE ECONOMIC GROWTH BY DEVELOPING NATIONS.
  The Bretton Woods Agreements Act (22 U.S.C. 286 and following) is amended
  by adding after the sections added by sections 1001 and 1002 of this Act
  the following:
`SEC. 60. MEASURES TO REDUCE MILITARY SPENDING BY DEVELOPING NATIONS.
  `(a) DEVELOPMENT BY THE FUND OF MEANS TO MEASURE MILITARY SPENDING-
  `(1) POSITION OF THE UNITED STATES- The United States Executive Director of
  the Fund shall use the voice and vote of the United States to urge the Fund,
  in consultation with the Bank, to continue to develop an economic methodology
  to measure the level of military spending by each developing country.
  `(2) PROGRESS REPORT TO THE CONGRESS- No later than 1 year after the
  date of the enactment of this section, the Secretary of the Treasury
  shall submit to the Committee on Banking, Finance and Urban Affairs
  of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Banking, Housing,
  and Urban Affairs and the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate a
  report on the status of the development by the Fund of a workable economic
  methodology to measure military spending by developing countries.
  `(b) ANNUAL REPORTS BY FUND ON LEVELS OF MILITARY SPENDING- The United
  States Executive Director of the Fund shall use the voice and vote of
  the United States to urge the Fund, beginning with 1994, to provide the
  Executive Board of the Fund with annual reports stating the estimate by
  the Fund of the level of military spending by each developing country in
  the immediately preceding calendar year (or, with respect to developing
  countries whose fiscal years are not calendar years, in the most recently
  completed fiscal year of the developing country), not later than the date
  of the annual fall Interim and Development Committee meetings.
  `(c) ANALYSIS AND ASSESSMENT OF MILITARY SPENDING TO BE INCLUDED IN ARTICLE
  IV CONSULTATIONS BY THE FUND- The United States Executive Director of the
  Fund shall use the voice and vote of the United States to urge the Fund,
  beginning no later than the date of the first report provided as described
  in subsection (b), to include in every article IV consultation with a
  developing country an analysis of the level of military spending by the
  developing country in the immediately preceding calendar year (or, with
  respect to developing countries whose fiscal years are not calendar years,
  in the most recently completed fiscal year of the developing country).'.
SEC. 1004. SUPPORT FOR MACROECONOMIC STABILIZATION IN THE INDEPENDENT STATES
OF THE FORMER SOVIET UNION.
  (a) IN GENERAL- In order to promote macroeconomic stabilization and the
  integration of the independent states of the former Soviet Union into
  the international financial system, enhance the opportunities for trade,
  improve the climate for foreign investment, and strengthen the process
  of transformation of the former socialist economies into free enterprise
  systems and thereby progressively enhance the well-being of the citizens
  of these states, the United States should in appropriate circumstances
  take a leading role in organizing and supporting multilateral efforts at
  macroeconomic stabilization and debt rescheduling, conditioned on the
  appropriate development and implementation of comprehensive economic
  reform programs.
  (b) CURRENCY STABILIZATION- In furtherance of the purposes and consistent
  with the conditions described in subsection (a), the Congress expresses its
  support for United States participation, in sums of up to $3,000,000,000,
  in a currency stabilization fund or funds for the independent states of
  the former Soviet Union.
  (c) STUDY OF THE NEED FOR AND FEASIBILITY OF A CURRENCY STABILIZATION FUND
  FOR UKRAINE- The Secretary of the Treasury shall instruct the United States
  Executive Director of the International Monetary Fund to use the voice and
  vote of the United States to urge the Fund to conduct a study of the need
  for and feasibility of a currency stabilization fund for Ukraine, and, if
  it is found that such a fund is needed and is feasible, which considers and
  makes recommendations with respect to the economic and policy conditions
  required for the success of such a fund.
SEC. 1005. ROLE OF THE INTERNATIONAL FINANCE CORPORATION IN SUPPORTING
ECONOMIC RESTRUCTURING IN THE INDEPENDENT STATES OF THE FORMER SOVIET UNION.
  The International Finance Corporation Act (22 U.S.C. 282-282k) is amended
  by adding at the end the following:
`SEC. 15. AUTHORITY TO VOTE FOR CAPITAL INCREASES NECESSARY TO SUPPORT
ECONOMIC RESTRUCTURING IN THE INDEPENDENT STATES OF THE FORMER SOVIET UNION.
  `The United States Governor of the Corporation may vote in favor of any
  increase in the capital stock of the Corporation that may be needed to
  accommodate the requirements of the independent states of the former Soviet
  Union (as defined in section 3 of the Freedom for Russia and Emerging
  Eurasian Democracies and Open Markets Support Act of 1992).'.
SEC. 1006. AUTHORITY TO AGREE TO AMENDMENTS TO THE ARTICLES OF AGREEMENT OF
THE INTERNATIONAL FINANCE CORPORATION.
  The International Finance Corporation Act (22 U.S.C. 282-282k) is amended
  by adding after the section added by section 1005 of this Act the following:
`SEC. 16. AUTHORITY TO AGREE TO AMENDMENTS TO THE ARTICLES OF AGREEMENT.
  `The United States Governor of the Corporation is authorized to agree to
  amendments to the Articles of Agreement of the Corporation that would--
  `(1) amend Article II, Section 2(c)(ii), to increase the vote by which the
  Board of Governors of the Corporation may increase the capital stock of
  the Corporation from a three-fourths majority to a four-fifths majority; and
  `(2) amend Article VII(a) to increase the vote by which the Board of
  Governors of the Corporation may amend the Articles of Agreement of the
  Corporation from a four-fifths majority to an eighty-five percent majority.'.
SEC. 1007. REPORT ON DEBT OF THE FORMER SOVIET UNION HELD BY COMMERCIAL
FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS.
  The Secretary of the Treasury, using information available from the
  International Monetary Fund, the International Bank for Reconstruction and
  Development, and other appropriate international financial institutions,
  shall report to the Congress, not later than one year after the date of
  enactment of this Act, on the debt incurred by the former Soviet Union
  that is held by commercial financial institutions outside the independent
  states of the former Soviet Union that are obligated on such debt.
SEC. 1008. HUMAN RIGHTS.
  (a) ADVANCEMENT OF HUMAN RIGHTS THROUGH THE IMF AND EBRD- Section 701(a)
  of the International Financial Institutions Act (22 U.S.C. 262d(a)) is
  amended by striking `and the African Development Bank,' and inserting
  `the African Development Bank, the European Bank for Reconstruction and
  Development, and the International Monetary Fund,'.
  (b) ACCOUNTING FOR AMERICANS MISSING IN ACTION CONSIDERED IN ASSESSING
  HUMAN RIGHTS IN THE INDEPENDENT STATES- Section 701(b)(4) of such Act
  (22 U.S.C. 262d(b)(4)) is amended by inserting `Russia and the other
  independent states of the former Soviet Union (as defined in section 3 of
  the Freedom for Russia and Emerging Eurasian Democracies and Open Markets
  Support Act of 1992),' after `Laos,'.
SEC. 1009. MULTILATERAL INVESTMENT GUARANTEES FOR THE INDEPENDENT STATES OF
THE FORMER SOVIET UNION.
  Not later than 60 days after the date of enactment of this Act, the United
  States Director of the Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency shall
  transmit to the Congress a report analyzing--
  (1) the investments in the independent states of the former Soviet Union
  which have been guaranteed by the Agency; and
  (2) the demand for investment guarantees of the type provided by the Agency
  for investments in the independent states.
Speaker of the House of Representatives.
Vice President of the United States and
President of the Senate.