Text: S.Res.128 — 102nd Congress (1991-1992)All Information (Except Text)

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SRES 128 ATS
102d CONGRESS
1st Session
S. RES. 128
Condemning violence in Armenia.
IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES
May 17 (legislative day, APRIL 25), 1991
Mr. LEVIN (for himself, Mr. DOLE, Mr. PRESSLER, Mr. PELL, Mr. SEYMOUR,
Mr. SIMON, Mr. KASTEN, Mr. KENNEDY, Mr. SPECTER, Mr. SARBANES, Mr. WARNER,
Mr. DECONCINI, Mr. RIEGLE, Mr. BRADLEY, and Mr. HELMS) submitted the following
resolution; which was considered and agreed to
RESOLUTION
Condemning violence in Armenia.
Whereas the Government of the Soviet Union and Government of the Azerbaijan
Republic have dramatically escalated their attacks against civilian Armenians
in Nagorno-Karabakh, Azerbaijan, and Armenia itself;
Whereas the Government of the Soviet Union has refused Armenia's request to
convene a special session of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics Supreme
Soviet to resolve the Nagorno-Karabakh crisis;
Whereas Soviet and Azerbaijani forces have destroyed Armenian villages and
depopulated Armenian areas in and around Nagorno-Karabakh in violation of
internationally recognized human rights; and
Whereas armed militia threaten stability and peace in Armenia,
Nagorno-Karabakh, and Azerbaijan: Now, therefore, be it
  Resolved, That it is the sense of the Senate that the Senate--
  (1) condemns the attacks on innocent children, women, and men in Armenian
  areas and communities in and around Nagorno-Karabakh and in Armenia;
  (2) condemns the indiscriminate use of force, including the shelling of
  civilian areas, on Armenia's eastern and southern borders;
  (3) calls for the end to the blockades and other uses of force and
  intimidation directed against Armenia and Nagorno-Karabakh, and calls for the
  withdrawal of Soviet forces newly deployed for the purpose of intimidation;
  (4) calls for dialogue among all parties involved as the only acceptable
  route to achieving a lasting resolution of the conflict; and
  (5) reconfirms the commitment of the United States to the success of
  democracy and self-determination in the Soviet Union and its various
  republics, by expressing its deep concern about any Soviet action of
  retribution, intimidation, or leverage against those Republics and regions
  which have chosen to seek the fulfillment of their political aspirations.