Text: H.R.3024 — 104th Congress (1995-1996)All Information (Except Text)

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Reported in House (09/18/1996)

 
[Congressional Bills 104th Congress]
[From the U.S. Government Printing Office]
[H.R. 3024 Reported in House (RH)]





                                                 Union Calendar No. 442

104th CONGRESS

  2d Session

                               H. R. 3024

                  [Report No. 104-713, Parts I and II]

_______________________________________________________________________

                                 A BILL

 To provide a process leading to full self-government for Puerto Rico.

_______________________________________________________________________

                           September 18, 1996

 Reported from the Committee on Rules with an amendment, committed to 
the Committee of the Whole House on the State of the Union, and ordered 
                             to be printed
                                                 Union Calendar No. 442
104th CONGRESS
  2d Session
                                H. R. 3024

                  [Report No. 104-713, Parts I and II]

 To provide a process leading to full self-government for Puerto Rico.


_______________________________________________________________________


                    IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

                             March 6, 1996

   Mr. Young of Alaska (for himself, Mr. Gallegly, Mr. Gingrich, Mr. 
 Serrano, Mr. Kennedy of Rhode Island, Mr. Rahall, Mr. Romero-Barcelo, 
  Mr. Gilman, Mr. Burton of Indiana, Mr. Underwood, Mr. Calvert, Mr. 
     Longley, Mr. Gene Green of Texas, Mr. Deutsch, and Mr. Klink) 
 introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on 
 Resources, and in addition to the Committee on Rules, for a period to 
      be subsequently determined by the Speaker, in each case for 
consideration of such provisions as fall within the jurisdiction of the 
                          committee concerned

                             July 26, 1996

       Reported from the Committee on Resources with an amendment
 [Strike out all after the enacting clause and insert the part printed 
                               in italic]

                             July 26, 1996

  Referral to Rules extended July 26, 1996 for a period no later than 
                           September 18, 1996

                           September 18, 1996

Additional sponsors: Mr. Bishop, Mr. Clyburn, Mr. Williams, Mr. Owens, 
 Ms. Norton, Mr. Wynn, Mr. Hastings of Florida, Mr. Frazer, Mr. Engel, 
 Mr. Hall of Ohio, Mr. Hinchey, Mr. Payne of New Jersey, Mr. Ackerman, 
 Mr. Filner, Mr. Ortiz, Mr. Lewis of Georgia, Mr. Davis, Ms. Woolsey, 
 Mr. Hyde, Mr. Gibbons, Mr. Barcia, Mr. Farr of California, Mr. Pombo, 
    Mr. Stump, Mr. Forbes, Mr. Sawyer, Mr. Torres, Ms. Lofgren, Ms. 
  Slaughter, Mr. Gilchrest, Mr. Richardson, Mr. Kim, Mr. Pickett, Mr. 
  Doyle, Mr. de la Garza, Mr. Hansen, Mr. Fattah, Mr. Livingston, Mr. 
 Skeen, Mr. Torkildsen, Ms. Pelosi, Mr. Montgomery, Mr. Thompson, Mr. 
                      Funderburk, and Mr. Flanagan
 Deleted sponsors: Ms. McKinney (added April 17, 1996; deleted May 23, 
  1996), and Mr. Towns (added April 17, 1996; deleted April 25, 1996)

                           September 18, 1996

 Reported from the Committee on Rules with an amendment, committed to 
the Committee of the Whole House on the State of the Union, and ordered 
                             to be printed
 [Omit the part struck through in brackets and insert the part printed 
                           in boldface roman]

_______________________________________________________________________

                                 A BILL


 
 To provide a process leading to full self-government for Puerto Rico.

    Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the 
United States of America in Congress assembled,

<DELETED>SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE; TABLE OF CONTENTS.</DELETED>

<DELETED>    (a) Short Title.--This Act may be cited as the ``United 
States-Puerto Rico Political Status Act''.</DELETED>
<DELETED>    (b) Table of Contents.--The table of contents for this Act 
is as follows:</DELETED>

<DELETED>Sec. 1. Short title.
<DELETED>Sec. 2. Findings.
<DELETED>Sec. 3. Policy.
<DELETED>Sec. 4. Process for Puerto Rican full self-government, 
                            including the initial decision stage, 
                            transition stage, and implementation stage.
<DELETED>Sec. 5. Requirements relating to referenda, including 
                            inconclusive referendum and applicable 
                            laws.
<DELETED>Sec. 6. Congressional procedures for consideration of 
                            legislation.
<DELETED>Sec. 7. Availability of funds for the referenda.

<DELETED>SEC. 2. FINDINGS.</DELETED>

<DELETED>    The Congress finds the following:</DELETED>
        <DELETED>    (1) Puerto Rico is an unincorporated and locally 
        self-governing territory of the United States, ceded to the 
        United States and under this Nation's sovereignty pursuant to 
        the Treaty of Paris ending the Spanish-American War in 1898. 
        Article IX of the Treaty of Paris expressly recognizes the 
        authority of Congress to provide for the political status of 
        the inhabitants of the territory.</DELETED>
        <DELETED>    (2) United States citizenship was extended to 
        Puerto Rico in 1917, as well as partial application of the 
        United States Constitution.</DELETED>
        <DELETED>    (3) In the period 1950-1952, Congress authorized, 
        amended, and then approved a constitution for Puerto Rico's 
        local government, which is now called the ``Commonwealth of 
        Puerto Rico'', without altering the territory's fundamental 
        economic, political, and legal relationship with the United 
        States.</DELETED>
        <DELETED>    (4) In the 1989 State of the Union Message, 
        President George Bush urged the Congress to take the necessary 
        steps to authorize a federally recognized process allowing the 
        people of Puerto Rico, for the first time since the Treaty of 
        Paris entered into force, to freely express their wishes 
        regarding their future political status in a congressionally 
        recognized referendum, a step in the process of self-
        determination which the Congress has yet to 
        authorize.</DELETED>
        <DELETED>    (5) In November of 1993, the Government of Puerto 
        Rico conducted a plebiscite initiated under local law on Puerto 
        Rico's political status. In that vote none of the three status 
        propositions received a majority of the votes cast. The results 
        of that vote were: 48.6 percent commonwealth, 46.3 percent 
        statehood, and 4.4 percent independence.</DELETED>
        <DELETED>    (6) In 1994, President William Jefferson Clinton 
        established the Executive Branch Interagency Working Group on 
        Puerto Rico to coordinate the review, development, and 
        implementation of executive branch administrative policy 
        concerning Puerto Rico in light of the November 1993 plebiscite 
        in the islands.</DELETED>
        <DELETED>    (7) There have been inconsistent and conflicting 
        interpretations of the 1993 plebiscite results, and under the 
        Territorial Clause of the Constitution (article IV, section 3, 
        clause 2), Congress has the authority and responsibility to 
        determine Federal policy and clarify status issues in order to 
        advance the self-determination process in Puerto 
        Rico.</DELETED>
        <DELETED>    (8) On December 14, 1994, the Puerto Rico 
        Legislature enacted Concurrent Resolution 62, which requested 
        the 104th Congress to respond to the results of the 1993 Puerto 
        Rico Status Plebiscite and to indicate the next steps in 
        resolving Puerto Rico's political status.</DELETED>
        <DELETED>    (9) Nearly 4,000,000 United States citizens live 
        in the islands of Puerto Rico, which have been within the 
        American political system and the United States customs 
        territory for almost 100 years, making Puerto Rico the oldest, 
        largest, and most populous United States island territory at 
        the southeastern-most boundary of our Nation, located astride 
        the strategic shipping lanes of the Atlantic Ocean and 
        Caribbean Sea.</DELETED>
        <DELETED>    (10) Full self-government for Puerto Rico is 
        attainable only through establishment of a political status 
        either without or within United States sovereignty, under which 
        Puerto Rico is no longer an unincorporated territory subject to 
        the plenary authority of Congress arising from the Territorial 
        Clause.</DELETED>

<DELETED>SEC. 3. POLICY.</DELETED>

<DELETED>    In recognition of the significant level of local self-
government which has been attained by Puerto Rico, and the desire by 
both the United States and Puerto Rico to enable the people of the 
territory to achieve full self-government through a self-determination 
process consistent with United States and internationally recognized 
standards, this Act is adopted with a commitment to encourage the 
mutual development and implementation of procedures to determine the 
political status of Puerto Rico.</DELETED>

<DELETED>SEC. 4. PROCESS FOR PUERTO RICAN FULL SELF-GOVERNMENT, 
              INCLUDING THE INITIAL DECISION STAGE, TRANSITION STAGE, 
              AND IMPLEMENTATION STAGE.</DELETED>

<DELETED>    (a) Initial Decision Stage.--A referendum on Puerto Rico's 
political status shall be held not later than December 31, 1998. The 
referendum shall be held in accordance with the applicable provisions 
of Puerto Rico's electoral law and other relevant statutes, and 
approval must be by a majority of the valid votes cast. The referendum 
shall be on the following question:</DELETED>
<DELETED>    ``Which path leading to full self-government for Puerto 
Rico do you prefer to be developed through a transition plan enacted by 
the Congress and approved by the people of Puerto Rico?</DELETED>
        <DELETED>    ``(1) A path of separate Puerto Rican sovereignty 
        leading to independence or free association, in which--
        </DELETED>
                <DELETED>    ``(A) Puerto Rico is a sovereign nation 
                with full authority and responsibility for its internal 
                and external affairs, exercising in its own name and 
                right the powers of government with respect to its 
                territory and population, language and culture, and 
                determining its own relations and participation in the 
                community of nations;</DELETED>
                <DELETED>    ``(B) a negotiated treaty of friendship 
                and cooperation or an international bilateral pact of 
                free association terminable at will by either Puerto 
                Rico or the United States, defines future relations 
                between Puerto Rico and the United States, providing 
                for cooperation and assistance in matters of shared 
                interest as agreed and approved by Puerto Rico and the 
                United States pursuant to this Act and their respective 
                constitutional processes;</DELETED>
                <DELETED>    ``(C) a constitution democratically 
                instituted by the people of Puerto Rico, establishing a 
                republican form of full self-government and securing 
                the rights of citizens of the Puerto Rican nation, is 
                the supreme law, and the Constitution and laws of the 
                United States no longer apply in Puerto Rico;</DELETED>
                <DELETED>    ``(D) Puerto Rico exercises the sovereign 
                power to determine and control its own nationality and 
                citizenship, and United States nationality and 
                citizenship conferred on the people of Puerto Rico 
                based upon birth in the territory during the period in 
                which the United States exercised sovereignty and 
                jurisdiction over Puerto Rico is withdrawn in favor of 
                Puerto Rican nationality and citizenship, and the 
                United States Congress has authority to prescribe 
                criteria for affected individuals to establish 
                eligibility for retention of United States nationality 
                and citizenship or naturalization in the United States 
                on a basis which does not create an exception to the 
                establishment and preservation of separate United 
                States and Puerto Rican nationality and 
                citizenship;</DELETED>
                <DELETED>    ``(E) upon recognition of Puerto Rico by 
                the United States as a sovereign nation and 
                establishment of government-to-government relations on 
                the basis of comity and reciprocity, Puerto Rico's 
                representation to the United States is accorded full 
                diplomatic status;</DELETED>
                <DELETED>    ``(F) Puerto Rico is eligible for United 
                States assistance provided on a government-to-
                government basis, including foreign aid or programmatic 
                assistance, at levels determined at the discretion of 
                Congress and the President;</DELETED>
                <DELETED>    ``(G) property rights and previously 
                acquired rights vested by employment in Puerto Rico or 
                the United States are honored, and where determined 
                necessary such rights are promptly adjusted and settled 
                consistent with government-to-government agreements 
                implementing the separation of sovereignty; 
                and</DELETED>
                <DELETED>    ``(H) Puerto Rico is outside the customs 
                territory of the United States, and trade between the 
                United States and Puerto Rico is based on a 
                treaty.</DELETED>
        <DELETED>    ``(2) A path under United States sovereignty 
        leading to statehood, in which--</DELETED>
                <DELETED>    ``(A) the people of Puerto Rico are fully 
                self-governing with their rights secured under the 
                United States Constitution, which is the supreme law 
                and has the same force and effect as in the other 
                States of the Union;</DELETED>
                <DELETED>    ``(B) the sovereign State of Puerto Rico 
                is in permanent union with the United States, and 
                powers not delegated to the Federal Government or 
                prohibited to the States by the United States 
                Constitution are reserved to the people of Puerto Rico 
                or the State Government;</DELETED>
                <DELETED>    ``(C) United States citizenship of those 
                born in Puerto Rico is guaranteed and protected to the 
                same extent as those born in the several 
                States;</DELETED>
                <DELETED>    ``(D) residents of Puerto Rico have equal 
                rights and benefits as well as equal duties and 
                responsibilities of citizenship, including payment of 
                Federal taxes, as those in the several 
                States;</DELETED>
                <DELETED>    ``(E) Puerto Rico is represented in the 
                United States Senate and the House of Representatives 
                proportionate to the population;</DELETED>
                <DELETED>    ``(F) Puerto Rico is enfranchised to vote 
                for United States presidential and vice-presidential 
                electors proportionate to the population; and</DELETED>
                <DELETED>    ``(G) Puerto Rico adheres to the same 
                language requirement as in the several 
                States.''.</DELETED>
<DELETED>    (b) Transition Stage.--</DELETED>
        <DELETED>    (1) Plan.--Within 180 days of the receipt of the 
        results of the referendum from the Government of Puerto Rico 
        certifying approval of a ballot choice in a referendum held 
        pursuant to subsection (a), the President shall submit to 
        Congress legislation for a transition plan of 10 years minimum 
        which leads to full self-government for Puerto Rico consistent 
        with the terms of this Act and in full consultation with 
        leaders of the three branches of the Government of Puerto Rico, 
        the principal political parties of Puerto Rico, and other 
        interested persons as may be appropriate.</DELETED>
        <DELETED>    (2) Congressional consideration.--The plan shall 
        be considered by the Congress in accordance with section 
        6.</DELETED>
        <DELETED>    (3) Puerto rican approval.--</DELETED>
                <DELETED>    (A) Not later than 180 days after 
                enactment of an Act pursuant to paragraph (1) providing 
                for the transition to full self-government for Puerto 
                Rico as approved in the initial decision referendum 
                held under subsection (a), a referendum shall be held 
                under the applicable provisions of Puerto Rico's 
                electoral law on the question of approval of the 
                transition plan.</DELETED>
                <DELETED>    (B) Approval must be by a majority of the 
                valid votes cast. The results of the referendum shall 
                be certified to the President of the United States by 
                the Government of Puerto Rico.</DELETED>
        <DELETED>    (4) Effective date for transition plan.--Upon 
        receipt of the results of the referendum under this subsection 
        certifying approval of the transition plan, the President of 
        the United States shall issue a proclamation announcing the 
        effective date of the transition plan to full self-government 
        for Puerto Rico.</DELETED>
<DELETED>    (c) Implementation Stage.--</DELETED>
        <DELETED>    (1) Presidential recommendation.--Not less than 
        two years prior to the end of the period of the transition 
        provided for in the transition plan approved under subsection 
        (b), the President shall submit to Congress legislation with a 
        recommendation for the implementation of full self-government 
        for Puerto Rico consistent with the ballot choice approved 
        under subsection (a).</DELETED>
        <DELETED>    (2) Congressional consideration.--The plan shall 
        be considered by the Congress in accordance with section 
        6.</DELETED>
        <DELETED>    (3) Puerto rican approval.--</DELETED>
                <DELETED>    (A) Within 180 days after enactment of the 
                terms of implementation for full self-government for 
                Puerto Rico, a referendum shall be held under the 
                applicable provisions of Puerto Rico's electoral laws 
                on the question of the approval of the terms of 
                implementation for full self-government for Puerto 
                Rico.</DELETED>
                <DELETED>    (B) Approval must be by a majority of the 
                valid votes cast. The results of the referendum shall 
                be certified to the President of the United States by 
                the Government of Puerto Rico.</DELETED>
        <DELETED>    (4) Effective date of full self-government.--The 
        President of the United States shall issue a proclamation 
        announcing the date of implementation of full self-government 
        for Puerto Rico, upon receipt of the results of the referendum 
        certifying approval of the terms of implementation.</DELETED>

<DELETED>SEC. 5. REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO REFERENDA, INCLUDING 
              INCONCLUSIVE REFERENDUM AND APPLICABLE LAWS.</DELETED>

<DELETED>    (a) Applicable Laws.--</DELETED>
        <DELETED>    (1) Referenda under puerto rican laws.--The 
        referenda held under this Act shall be conducted in accordance 
        with the laws of Puerto Rico, and voter eligibility for 
        residents and nonresidents shall be determined by the Puerto 
        Rico State Election Commission.</DELETED>
        <DELETED>    (2) Federal laws.--The Federal laws applicable to 
        the election of the Resident Commissioner of Puerto Rico shall, 
        as appropriate, also apply to the referenda. Any reference in 
        such Federal laws to elections shall be considered, as 
        appropriate, to be a reference to the referenda, unless it 
        would frustrate the purposes of this Act.</DELETED>
<DELETED>    (b) Certification of Referenda Results.--The results of 
each referendum held under this Act shall be certified to the President 
of the United States and the Senate and House of Representatives of the 
United States by the Government of Puerto Rico.</DELETED>
<DELETED>    (c) Consultation and Recommendations for Inconclusive 
Referendum.--</DELETED>
        <DELETED>    (1) In general.--If a referendum provided in this 
        Act does not result in approval of a fully self-governing 
        status, the President, in full consultation with leaders of the 
        three branches of the Government of Puerto Rico, the principal 
        political parties of Puerto Rico, and other interested persons 
        as may be appropriate, shall make recommendations to the 
        Congress within 180 days of receipt of the results of the 
        referendum.</DELETED>
        <DELETED>    (2) Existing structure to remain in effect.--If 
        the inhabitants of the territory do not achieve full self-
        governance through either integration into the Union or 
        separate sovereignty in the form of independence or free 
        association, Puerto Rico will remain an unincorporated 
        territory of the United States, subject to the authority of 
        Congress under Article IV, Section 3, Clause 2 of the United 
        States Constitution. In that event, the existing Commonwealth 
        of Puerto Rico structure for local self-government will remain 
        in effect, subject to such other measures as may be adopted by 
        Congress in the exercise of it's Territorial Clause powers to 
        determine the disposition of the territory and status of it's 
        inhabitants.</DELETED>

[<DELETED>SEC. 6. CONGRESSIONAL PROCEDURES FOR CONSIDERATION OF 
              LEGISLATION.

</DELETED>    [<DELETED>(a) In General</DELETED>.--<DELETED>The 
Chairman of the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources shall 
introduce legislation providing for the transition plan under section 
4(b) and the implementation recommendation under section 4(c), as 
appropriate, in the United States Senate and the Chairman of the 
Committee on Resources shall introduce such legislation in the United 
States House of Representatives, providing adequate time for the 
consideration of the legislation pursuant to the following provisions:
        </DELETED>    [<DELETED>(1) At any time after the close of the 
        180th calendar day beginning after the date of introduction of 
        such legislation, it shall be in order for any Member of the 
        United States House of Representatives or the United States 
        Senate to move to discharge any committee of that House from 
        further consideration of the legislation. A motion to discharge 
        shall be highly privileged, and debate thereon shall be limited 
        to not more than two hours, to be divided equally between those 
        supporting and those opposing the motion. An amendment to the 
        motion shall not be in order, and it shall not be in order to 
        move to reconsider the vote by which the motion was agreed to 
        or disagreed to.
        </DELETED>    [<DELETED>(2) At any time after the close of the 
        14th legislative day beginning after the last committee of that 
        House has reported or been discharged from further 
        consideration of such legislation, it shall be in order for any 
        Member of that House to move to proceed to the immediate 
        consideration of the legislation (such motion not being 
        debatable), and such motion is hereby made of high privilege. 
        An amendment to the motion shall not be in order, and it shall 
        not be in order to move to reconsider the vote by which the 
        motion was agreed to or disagreed to. For the purposes of this 
        paragraph, the term ``legislative day'' means a day on which 
        the United States House of Representatives or the United States 
        Senate, as appropriate, is in session.
</DELETED>    [<DELETED>(b) Commitment of Congress</DELETED>.--
<DELETED>Enactment of this section constitutes a commitment that the 
United States Congress will vote on legislation establishing 
appropriate mechanisms and procedures to implement the political status 
selected by the people of Puerto Rico.
</DELETED>    [<DELETED>(c) Exercise of Rulemaking Power</DELETED>.--
<DELETED>The provisions of this section are enacted by the Congress--
        </DELETED>    [<DELETED>(1) as an exercise of the rulemaking 
        power of the Senate and the House of Representatives and, as 
        such, shall be considered as part of the rules of each House 
        and shall supersede other rules only to the extent that they 
        are inconsistent therewith; and
        </DELETED>    [<DELETED>(2) with full recognition of the 
        constitutional right of either House to change the rules (so 
        far as they relate to the procedures of that House) at any 
        time, in the same manner, and to the same extent as in the case 
        of any other rule of that House.</DELETED>]

SEC. 6. CONGRESSIONAL PROCEDURES FOR CONSIDERATION OF LEGISLATION.

    (a) In General.--The majority leader of the House of 
Representatives (or his designee) and the majority leader of the Senate 
(or his designee) shall each introduce legislation (by request) 
providing for the transition plan under section 4(b) and the 
implementation recommendation under section 4(c) not later than 5 
legislative days after the date of receipt by Congress of the 
submission by the President under that section, as the case may be.
    (b) Referral.--The legislation shall be referred on the date of 
introduction to the appropriate committee or committees in accordance 
with rules of the respective Houses. The legislation shall be reported 
not later than the 120th calendar day after the date of its 
introduction. If any such committee fails to report the bill within 
that period, that committee shall be automatically discharged from 
consideration of the legislation, and the legislation shall be placed 
on the appropriate calendar.
    (c) Consideration.--
            (1) After the 14th legislative day after the date on which 
        the last committee of the House of Representatives or the 
        Senate, as the case may be, has reported or been discharged 
        from further consideration of such legislation, it is in order 
        after the legislation has been on the calendar for 14 
        legislative days for any Member of that House in favor of the 
        legislation to move to proceed to the consideration of the 
        legislation (after consultation with the presiding officer of 
        that House as to scheduling) to move to proceed to its 
        consideration at any time after the third legislative day on 
        which the Member announces to the respective House concerned 
        the Member's intention to do so. All points of order against 
        the motion to proceed and against consideration of that motion 
        are waived. The motion is highly privileged in the House of 
        Representatives and is privileged in the Senate and is not 
        debatable. The motion is not subject to amendment, or to a 
        motion to postpone, or to a motion to proceed to the 
        consideration of other business. A motion to reconsider the 
        vote by which the motion is agreed to or disagreed to shall not 
        be in order. If a motion to proceed to the consideration of the 
        legislation is agreed to, the respective House shall 
        immediately proceed to consideration of the legislation without 
        intervening motion (exception one motion to adjourn), order, or 
        other business.
            (2)(A) In the House of Representatives, during 
        consideration of the legislation in the Committee of the Whole, 
        the first reading of the legislation shall be dispensed with. 
        General debate shall be confined to the legislation, and shall 
        not exceed 4 hours equally divided and controlled by a 
        proponent and an opponent of the legislation. After general 
        debate, the legislation shall be considered as read for 
        amendment under the five-minute rule. Consideration of the 
        legislation for amendment shall not exceed 4 hours excluding 
        time for recorded votes and quorum calls. At the conclusion of 
        the bill for amendment, the Committee shall rise and report the 
        bill to the House with such amendments as may have been 
        adopted. The previous question shall be considered as ordered 
        on the legislation and amendments thereto to final passage 
        without intervening motion, except one motion to recommit with 
        or without instructions. A motion to reconsider the vote on 
        passage of the legislation shall not be in order.
            (B) In the Senate, debate on the legislation, and all 
        amendments thereto and debatable motions and appeals in 
        connection therewith, shall be limited to not more than 25 
        hours. The time shall be equally divided between, and 
        controlled by, the majority leader and the minority leader or 
        their designees. No amendment that is not germane to the 
        provisions of such legislation shall be received. A motion to 
        further limit debate is not debatable.
            (3) Appeals from the decisions of the Chair relating to the 
        application of the rules of the Senate or the House of 
        Representatives, as the case may be, to the procedure relating 
        to the legislation described in subsection (a) shall be decided 
        without debate.
    (d) Consideration by Other House.--(1) If, before the passage by 
one House of the legislation described in subsection (a) that was 
introduced in that House, that House receives from the other House the 
legislation described in subsection (a)--
            (A) the legislation of the other House shall not be 
        referred to a committee and may not be considered in the House 
        that receives it otherwise than on final passage under 
        subparagraph (B)(ii) or (iii); and
            (B)(i) the procedure in the House that receives such 
        legislation with respect to such legislation that was 
        introduced in that House shall be the same as if no legislation 
        had been received from the other House; but
            (ii) in the case of legislation received from the other 
        House that is identical to the legislation as engrossed by the 
        receiving House, the vote on final passage shall be on the 
        legislation of the other House; or
            (iii) after passage of the legislation, the legislation of 
        the other House shall be considered as amended with the text of 
        the legislation just passed and shall be considered as passed, 
        and that House shall be considered to have insisted on its 
        amendment and requested a conference with the other House.
            (2) Upon disposition of the legislation described in 
        subsection (a) that is received by one House from the other 
        House, it shall no longer be in order to consider such 
        legislation that was introduced in the receiving House.
    (e) Upon receiving from the other House a message in which that 
House insists upon its amendment to the legislation and requests a 
conference with the House of Representatives or the Senate, as the case 
may be, on the disagreeing votes thereon, the House receiving the 
request shall be considered to have disagreed to the amendment of the 
other House and agreed to the conference requested by that House.
    (f) Definition.--For the purposes of this section, the term 
``legislative day'' means a day on which the House of Representatives 
or the Senate, as appropriate, is in session.
    (g) Exercise of Rulemaking Power.--The provisions of this section 
are enacted by the Congress--
            (1) as an exercise of the rulemaking power of the Senate 
        and the House of Representatives and, as such, shall be 
        considered as part of the rules of each House and shall 
        supersede other rules only to the extent that they are 
        inconsistent therewith; and
            (2) with full recognition of the constitutional right of 
        either House to change the rules (so far as they relate to the 
        procedures of that House) at any time, in the same manner, and 
        to the same extent as in the case of any other rule of that 
        House.

<DELETED>SEC. 7. AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS FOR THE REFERENDA.</DELETED>

<DELETED>    (a) In General.--</DELETED>
        <DELETED>    (1) Availability of amounts derived from tax on 
        foreign rum.--During the period beginning on October 1, 1996, 
        and ending on the date the President determines that all 
        referenda required by this Act have been held, the Secretary of 
        the Treasury, upon request from time to time by the President 
        and in lieu of covering amounts into the treasury of Puerto 
        Rico under section 7652(e)(1) of the Internal Revenue Code of 
        1986, shall make such amounts available to the President for 
        the purposes specified in subsection (b).</DELETED>
        <DELETED>    (2) Use of unexpended amounts.--Following each 
        referendum required by this Act and after the end of the period 
        specified in paragraph (1), the President shall transfer all 
        unobligated and unexpended amounts received by the President 
        under paragraph (1) to the treasury of Puerto Rico for use in 
        the same manner and for the same purposes as all other amounts 
        covered into the treasury of Puerto Rico under such section 
        7652(e)(1).</DELETED>
<DELETED>    (b) Grants for Conducting Referenda and Voter Education.--
From amounts made available under subsection (a)(1), the President 
shall make grants to the State Elections Commission of Puerto Rico for 
referenda held pursuant to the terms of this Act, as follows:</DELETED>
        <DELETED>    (1) 50 percent shall be available only for costs 
        of conducting the referenda.</DELETED>
        <DELETED>    (2) 50 percent shall be available only for voter 
        education funds for the central ruling body of the political 
        party or parties advocating a particular ballot choice. In the 
        case that more than one party is advocating a ballot choice, 
        the 50 percent shall be apportioned equally among the 
        parties.</DELETED>
<DELETED>    (c) Additional Resources.--In addition to amounts made 
available by this Act, the Puerto Rico Legislature may allocate 
additional resources for administrative and voter education costs to 
each party so long as the distribution of funds is consistent with the 
apportionment requirements of subsection (b).</DELETED>

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE; TABLE OF CONTENTS.

    (a) Short Title.--This Act may be cited as the ``United States-
Puerto Rico Political Status Act''.
    (b) Table of Contents.--The table of contents for this Act is as 
follows:

Sec. 1. Short title.
Sec. 2. Findings.
Sec. 3. Policy.
Sec. 4. Process for Puerto Rican full self-government, including the 
                            initial decision stage, transition stage, 
                            and implementation stage.
Sec. 5. Requirements relating to referenda, including inconclusive 
                            referendum and applicable laws.
Sec. 6. Congressional procedures for consideration of legislation.
Sec. 7. Availability of funds for the referenda.

SEC. 2. FINDINGS.

    The Congress finds the following:
            (1) Puerto Rico was ceded to the United States and came 
        under this Nation's sovereignty pursuant to the Treaty of Paris 
        ending the Spanish-American War in 1898. Article IX of the 
        Treaty of Paris expressly recognizes the authority of Congress 
        to provide for the political status of the inhabitants of the 
        territory.
            (2) Consistent with establishment of United States 
        nationality for inhabitants of Puerto Rico under the Treaty of 
        Paris, Congress has exercised its powers under the Territorial 
        Clause of the Constitution (article IV, section 3, clause 2) to 
        provide by statute for the citizenship status of persons born 
        in Puerto Rico, including extension of special statutory United 
        States citizenship from 1917 to the present.
            (3) Consistent with the Territorial Clause and rulings of 
        the United States Supreme Court, partial application of the 
        United States Constitution has been established in the 
        unincorporated territories of the United States including 
        Puerto Rico.
            (4) In 1950 Congress prescribed a procedure for instituting 
        internal self-government for Puerto Rico pursuant to statutory 
        authorization for a local constitution. A local constitution 
        was approved by the people, amended and conditionally approved 
        by Congress, and thereupon given effect in 1952 after 
        acceptance of congressional conditions by the Puerto Rico 
        Constitutional Convention and an appropriate proclamation by 
        the Governor. The approved constitution established the 
        structure for constitutional government in respect of internal 
        affairs without altering Puerto Rico's fundamental political, 
        social, and economic relationship with the United States and 
        without restricting the authority of Congress under the 
        Territorial Clause to determine the application of Federal law 
        to Puerto Rico, resulting in the present ``Commonwealth'' 
        structure for local self-government. The Commonwealth remains 
        an unincorporated territory and does not have the status of 
        ``free association'' with the United States as that status is 
        defined under United States law or international practice.
            (5) In 1953 the United States transmitted to the Secretary-
        General of the United Nations for circulation to its Members a 
        formal notification that the United States no longer would 
        transmit information regarding Puerto Rico to the United 
        Nations pursuant to Article 73(e) of its Charter. The formal 
        United States notification document informed the United Nations 
        that the cessation of information on Puerto Rico was based on 
        the ``new constitutional arrangements'' in the territory, and 
        the United States expressly defined the scope of the ``full 
        measure'' of local self-government in Puerto Rico as extending 
        to matters of ``internal government and administration, subject 
        only to compliance with applicable provisions of the Federal 
        Constitution, the Puerto Rico Federal Relations Act and the 
        acts of Congress authorizing and approving the Constitution, as 
        may be interpreted by judicial decision.''. Thereafter, the 
        General Assembly of the United Nations, based upon consent of 
        the inhabitants of the territory and the United States 
        explanation of the new status as approved by Congress, adopted 
        Resolution 748 (VIII) by a vote of 22 to 18 with 19 
        abstentions, thereby accepting the United States determination 
        to cease reporting to the United Nations on the status of 
        Puerto Rico.
            (6) In 1960 the United Nations General Assembly approved 
        Resolution 1541 (XV), clarifying that under United Nations 
        standards regarding the political status options available to 
        the people of territories yet to complete the process for 
        achieving full self-government, the three established forms of 
        full self-government are national independence, free 
        association based on separate sovereignty, or full integration 
        with another nation on the basis of equality.
            (7) The ruling of the United States Supreme Court in the 
        1980 case Harris v. Rosario (446 U.S. 651) confirmed that 
        Congress continues to exercise authority over Puerto Rico as 
        territory ``belonging to the United States'' pursuant to the 
        Territorial Clause found at Article IV, section 3, clause 2 of 
        the United States Constitution, a judicial interpretation of 
        Puerto Rico's status which is in accordance with the clear 
        intent of Congress that establishment of local constitutional 
        government in 1952 did not alter Puerto Rico's status as an 
        unincorporated United States territory.
            (8) In a joint letter dated January 17, 1989, cosigned by 
        the Governor of Puerto Rico in his capacity as president of one 
        of Puerto Rico's principal political parties and the presidents 
        of the two other principal political parties of Puerto Rico, 
        the United States was formally advised that ``. . . the People 
        of Puerto Rico wish to be consulted as to their preference with 
        regards to their ultimate political status'', and the joint 
        letter stated ``. . . that since Puerto Rico came under the 
        sovereignty of the United States of America through the Treaty 
        of Paris in 1898, the People of Puerto Rico have not been 
        formally consulted by the United States of America as to their 
        choice of their ultimate political status''.
            (9) In the 1989 State of the Union Message, President 
        George Bush urged the Congress to take the necessary steps to 
        authorize a federally recognized process allowing the people of 
        Puerto Rico, for the first time since the Treaty of Paris 
        entered into force, to freely express their wishes regarding 
        their future political status in a congressionally recognized 
        referendum, a step in the process of self-determination which 
        the Congress has yet to authorize.
            (10) In November of 1993, the Government of Puerto Rico 
        conducted a plebiscite initiated under local law on Puerto 
        Rico's political status. In that vote none of the three status 
        propositions received a majority of the votes cast. The results 
of that vote were: 48.6 percent commonwealth, 46.3 percent statehood, 
and 4.4 percent independence.
            (11) In 1994, President William Jefferson Clinton 
        established the Executive Branch Interagency Working Group on 
        Puerto Rico to coordinate the review, development, and 
        implementation of executive branch policy concerning issues 
        affecting Puerto Rico, including the November 1993 plebiscite.
            (12) There have been inconsistent and conflicting 
        interpretations of the 1993 plebiscite results, and under the 
        Territorial Clause of the Constitution, Congress has the 
        authority and responsibility to determine Federal policy and 
        clarify status issues in order to advance the self-
        determination process in Puerto Rico.
            (13) On December 14, 1994, the Puerto Rico Legislature 
        enacted Concurrent Resolution 62, which requested the 104th 
        Congress to respond to the results of the 1993 Puerto Rico 
        Status Plebiscite and to indicate the next steps in resolving 
        Puerto Rico's political status.
            (14) Nearly 4,000,000 United States citizens live in the 
        islands of Puerto Rico, which have been under United States 
        sovereignty and within the United States customs territory for 
        almost 100 years, making Puerto Rico the oldest, largest, and 
        most populous United States island territory at the 
        southeastern-most boundary of our Nation, located astride the 
        strategic shipping lanes of the Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean 
        Sea.
            (15) Full self-government for Puerto Rico is attainable 
        only through establishment of a political status which is based 
        on either separate Puerto Rican sovereignty and nationality or 
        full and equal United States nationality and citizenship 
        through membership in the Union and under which Puerto Rico is 
        no longer an unincorporated territory subject to the plenary 
        authority of Congress arising from the Territorial Clause.

SEC. 3. POLICY.

    In recognition of the significant level of local self-government 
which has been attained by Puerto Rico, and the responsibility of the 
Federal Government to enable the people of the territory to freely 
express their wishes regarding political status and achieve full self-
government, this Act is adopted with a commitment to encourage the 
development and implementation of procedures through which the 
permanent political status of the people of Puerto Rico can be 
determined.

SEC. 4. PROCESS FOR PUERTO RICAN FULL SELF-GOVERNMENT, INCLUDING THE 
              INITIAL DECISION STAGE, TRANSITION STAGE, AND 
              IMPLEMENTATION STAGE.

    (a) Initial Decision Stage.--A referendum on Puerto Rico's 
political status shall be held not later than December 31, 1998. The 
referendum shall be held pursuant to this Act and in accordance with 
the applicable provisions of Puerto Rico's electoral law and other 
relevant statutes consistent with this Act. Approval of a status option 
must be by a majority of the valid votes cast. The referendum shall be 
on the following questions presented on the ballot as options A and B 
in a side-by-side format in Parts I and II:

                                ``Part I

    ``Instructions: Mark the option you choose. Ballots with both 
options marked in Part I will not be counted.
    ``A. Puerto Rico should continue the present Commonwealth structure 
for self-government with respect to internal affairs and 
administration, subject to the provisions of the Constitution and laws 
of the United States which apply to Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico remains a 
locally self-governing unincorporated territory of the United States, 
and continuation or modification of current Federal law and policy to 
Puerto Rico remains within the discretion of Congress. The ultimate 
status of Puerto Rico will be determined through a process authorized 
by Congress which includes self-determination by the people of Puerto 
Rico in periodic referenda. If you agree, mark here ____.
    ``B. Puerto Rico should complete the process leading to full self-
government through separate Puerto Rican sovereignty or United States 
sovereignty as defined in Part II of this ballot. Full self-government 
will be achieved in accordance with a transition plan approved by the 
Congress and the people of Puerto Rico in a later vote. A third vote 
will take place at the end of the transition period in which the people 
of Puerto Rico will be able to approve final implementation of full 
self-government. This will establish a permanent political status under 
the constitutional system chosen by the people. If you agree, mark 
here: ____

                               ``Part II

    ``Instructions: Mark the option you choose. Ballots with both 
options marked in Part II will not be counted.
    ``If full self-government is approved by the majority of voters, 
which path leading to full self-government for Puerto Rico do you 
prefer to be developed through a transition plan enacted by the 
Congress and approved by the people of Puerto Rico?
    ``A. Puerto Rico should become fully self-governing through 
separate sovereignty leading to independence or free association as 
defined below. If you agree, mark here: ____
    ``The path of separate Puerto Rican sovereignty leading to 
independence or free association is one in which--
            ``(1) Puerto Rico is a sovereign nation with full authority 
        and responsibility for its internal and external affairs and 
        has the capacity to exercise in its own name and right the 
        powers of government with respect to its territory and 
        population;
            ``(2) a negotiated treaty of friendship and cooperation, or 
        an international bilateral pact of free association terminable 
        at will by either Puerto Rico or the United States, defines 
        future relations between Puerto Rico and the United States, 
        providing for cooperation and assistance in matters of shared 
        interest as agreed and approved by Puerto Rico and the United 
        States pursuant to this Act and their respective constitutional 
        processes;
            ``(3) a constitution democratically instituted by the 
        people of Puerto Rico, establishing a republican form of full 
        self-government and securing the rights of citizens of the 
        Puerto Rican nation, is the supreme law, and the Constitution 
        and laws of the United States no longer apply in Puerto Rico;
            ``(4) The people of Puerto Rico owe allegiance to the 
        sovereign nation of Puerto Rico and have the nationality, and 
        citizenship thereof; United States sovereignty, nationality, 
        and citizenship in Puerto Rico is ended; birth in Puerto Rico 
        and relationship to persons with statutory United States 
        citizenship by birth in the former territory are not bases for 
        United States nationality or citizenship, except that persons 
        who had such United States citizenship have a statutory right 
        to retain United States nationality and citizenship for life, 
        by entitlement or election as provided by the United States 
        Congress, based on continued allegiance to the United States: 
        Provided, That such persons will not have this statutory United 
        States nationality and citizenship status upon having or 
        maintaining allegiance, nationality, and citizenship rights in 
        any sovereign nation other than the United States;
            ``(5) upon recognition of Puerto Rico by the United States 
        as a sovereign nation and establishment of government-to-
        government relations on the basis of comity and reciprocity, 
        Puerto Rico's representation to the United States is accorded 
        full diplomatic status;
            ``(6) Puerto Rico is eligible for United States assistance 
        provided on a government-to-government basis, including foreign 
        aid or programmatic assistance, at levels subject to agreement 
        by the United States and Puerto Rico;
            ``(7) property rights and previously acquired rights vested 
        by employment under laws of Puerto Rico or the United States 
        are honored, and where determined necessary such rights are 
        promptly adjusted and settled consistent with government-to-
        government agreements implementing the separation of 
        sovereignty; and
            ``(8) Puerto Rico is outside the customs territory of the 
        United States, and trade between the United States and Puerto 
        Rico is based on a treaty.
    ``B. Puerto Rico should become fully self-governing through United 
States sovereignty leading to statehood as defined below. If you agree, 
mark here: ____
    ``The path through United States sovereignty leading to statehood 
is one in which--
            ``(1) the people of Puerto Rico are fully self-governing 
        with their rights secured under the United States Constitution, 
        which is the supreme law and has the same force and effect as 
        in the other States of the Union;
            ``(2) the sovereign State of Puerto Rico is in permanent 
        union with the United States, and powers not delegated to the 
        Federal Government or prohibited to the States by the United 
        States Constitution are reserved to the people of Puerto Rico 
        or the State Government;
            ``(3) United States citizenship of those born in Puerto 
        Rico is guaranteed, protected and secured in the same way it is 
        for all United States citizens born in the other States;
            ``(4) residents of Puerto Rico have equal rights and 
        benefits as well as equal duties and responsibilities of 
        citizenship, including payment of Federal taxes, as those in 
        the several States;
            ``(5) Puerto Rico is represented by two members in the 
        United States Senate and is represented in the House of 
        Representatives proportionate to the population;
            ``(6) United States citizens in Puerto Rico are 
        enfranchised to vote in elections for the President and Vice 
        President of the United States; and
            ``(7) Puerto Rico adheres to the same language requirement 
        as in the several States.''.
    (b) Transition Stage.--
            (1) Plan.--(A) Within 180 days of the receipt of the 
        results of the referendum from the Government of Puerto Rico 
        certifying approval of a ballot choice of full self-government 
        in a referendum held pursuant to subsection (a), the President 
        shall develop and submit to Congress legislation for a 
        transition plan of 10 years minimum which leads to full self-
        government for Puerto Rico consistent with the terms of this 
        Act and in consultation with officials of the three branches of 
        the Government of Puerto Rico, the principal political parties 
        of Puerto Rico, and other interested persons as may be 
        appropriate.
            (B) Additionally, in the event of a vote in favor of 
        separate sovereignty, the Legislature of Puerto Rico, if deemed 
        appropriate, may provide by law for the calling of a 
        constituent convention to formulate, in accordance with 
        procedures prescribed by law, Puerto Rico's proposals and 
        recommendations to implement the referendum results. If a 
        convention is called for this purpose, any proposals and 
        recommendations formally adopted by such convention within time 
        limits of this Act shall be transmitted to Congress by the 
        President with the transition plan required by this section, 
        along with the views of the President regarding the 
        compatibility of such proposals and recommendations with the 
        United States Constitution and this Act, and identifying which, 
        if any, of such proposals and recommendations have been 
        addressed in the President's proposed transition plan.
            (2) Congressional consideration.--The plan shall be 
        considered by the Congress in accordance with section 6.
            (3) Puerto rican approval.--
                    (A) Not later than 180 days after enactment of an 
                Act pursuant to paragraph (1) providing for the 
                transition to full self-government for Puerto Rico as 
                approved in the initial decision referendum held under 
                subsection (a), a referendum shall be held under the 
                applicable provisions of Puerto Rico's electoral law on 
                the question of approval of the transition plan.
                    (B) Approval must be by a majority of the valid 
                votes cast. The results of the referendum shall be 
                certified to the President of the United States.
            (4) Effective date for transition plan.--The President of 
        the United States shall issue a proclamation announcing the 
        effective date of the transition plan to full self-government 
        for Puerto Rico.
    (c) Implementation Stage.--
            (1) Presidential recommendation.--Not less than two years 
        prior to the end of the period of the transition provided for 
        in the transition plan approved under subsection (b), the 
        President shall submit to Congress legislation with a 
        recommendation for the implementation of full self-government 
        for Puerto Rico consistent with the ballot choice approved 
        under subsection (a).
            (2) Congressional consideration.--The plan shall be 
        considered by the Congress in accordance with section 6.
            (3) Puerto rican approval.--
                    (A) Within 180 days after enactment of the terms of 
                implementation for full self-government for Puerto 
                Rico, a referendum shall be held under the applicable 
                provisions of Puerto Rico's electoral laws on the 
                question of the approval of the terms of implementation 
                for full self-government for Puerto Rico.
                    (B) Approval must be by a majority of the valid 
                votes cast. The results of the referendum shall be 
                certified to the President of the United States.
            (4) Effective date of full self-government.--The President 
        of the United States shall issue a proclamation announcing the 
        date of implementation of full self-government for Puerto Rico.

SEC. 5. REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO REFERENDA, INCLUDING INCONCLUSIVE 
              REFERENDUM AND APPLICABLE LAWS.

    (a) Applicable Laws.--
            (1) Referenda under puerto rican laws.--The referenda held 
        under this Act shall be conducted in accordance with the 
        applicable laws of Puerto Rico, including laws of Puerto Rico 
        under which voter eligibility is determined and which require 
        United States citizenship and establish other statutory 
        requirements for voter eligibility of residents and 
        nonresidents.
            (2) Federal laws.--The Federal laws applicable to the 
        election of the Resident Commissioner of Puerto Rico shall, as 
        appropriate and consistent with this Act, also apply to the 
        referenda. Any reference in such Federal laws to elections 
        shall be considered, as appropriate, to be a reference to the 
        referenda, unless it would frustrate the purposes of this Act.
    (b) Certification of Referenda Results.--The results of each 
referendum held under this Act shall be certified to the President of 
the United States and the Senate and House of Representatives of the 
United States by the Government of Puerto Rico.
    (c) Consultation and Recommendations for Inconclusive Referendum.--
            (1) In general.--If a referendum provided in this Act does 
        not result in approval of a fully self-governing status, the 
        President, in consultation with officials of the three branches 
        of the Government of Puerto Rico, the principal political 
        parties of Puerto Rico, and other interested persons as may be 
        appropriate, shall make recommendations to the Congress within 
        180 days of receipt of the results of the referendum.
            (2) Existing structure to remain in effect.--If the 
        inhabitants of the territory do not achieve full self-
        governance through either integration into the Union or 
        separate sovereignty in the form of independence or free 
        association, Puerto Rico will remain an unincorporated 
        territory of the United States, subject to the authority of 
        Congress under Article IV, Section 3, Clause 2 of the United 
        States Constitution. In that event, the existing Commonwealth 
        of Puerto Rico structure for local self-government will remain 
        in effect, subject to such other measures as may be adopted by 
        Congress in the exercise of it's Territorial Clause powers to 
        determine the disposition of the territory and status of it's 
        inhabitants.
            (3) Authority of congress to determine status.--Since 
        current unincorporated territory status of the Commonwealth of 
        Puerto Rico is not a permanent, unalterable or guaranteed 
        status under the Constitution of the United States, Congress 
        retains plenary authority and responsibility to determine a 
        permanent status for Puerto Rico consistent with the national 
        interest. The Congress historically has recognized a commitment 
        to take into consideration the freely expressed wishes of the 
        people of Puerto Rico regarding their future political status. 
        This policy is consistent with respect for the right of self-
        determination in areas which are not fully self-governing, but 
        does not constitute a legal restriction or binding limitation 
        on the Territorial Clause powers of Congress to determine a 
        permanent status of Puerto Rico. Nor does any such restriction 
        or limitation arise from the Puerto Rico Federal Relations Act 
        (48 U.S.C. 731 et seq.).
            (4) Additional referenda.--To ensure that the Congress is 
        able on a continuing basis to exercise its Territorial Clause 
        powers with due regard for the wishes of the people of Puerto 
        Rico respecting resolution of Puerto Rico's permanent future 
        political status, in the event that a referendum conducted 
        under section four is inconclusive as provided in this 
        subsection, or a majority vote to continue the Commonwealth 
        structure as a territory, there shall be another referendum in 
        accordance with this Act prior to the expiration of a period of 
        four years from the date such inconclusive results are 
        certified or determined. This procedure shall be repeated every 
        four years, but not in a general election year, until Puerto 
        Rico's unincorporated territory status is terminated in favor 
        of a recognized form of full self-government in accordance with 
        this Act.

SEC. 6. CONGRESSIONAL PROCEDURES FOR CONSIDERATION OF LEGISLATION.

    (a) In General.--The Chairman of the Committee on Energy and 
Natural Resources shall introduce legislation providing for the 
transition plan under section 4(b) and the implementation 
recommendation under section 4(c), as appropriate, in the United States 
Senate and the Chairman of the Committee on Resources shall introduce 
such legislation in the United States House of Representatives, 
providing adequate time for the consideration of the legislation 
pursuant to the following provisions:
            (1) At any time after the close of the 180th calendar day 
        beginning after the date of introduction of such legislation, 
        it shall be in order for any Member of the United States House 
        of Representatives or the United States Senate to move to 
        discharge any committee of that House from further 
        consideration of the legislation. A motion to discharge shall 
        be highly privileged, and debate thereon shall be limited to 
        not more than two hours, to be divided equally between those 
        supporting and those opposing the motion. An amendment to the 
        motion shall not be in order, and it shall not be in order to 
        move to reconsider the vote by which the motion was agreed to 
        or disagreed to.
            (2) At any time after the close of the 14th legislative day 
        beginning after the last committee of that House has reported 
        or been discharged from further consideration of such 
        legislation, it shall be in order for any Member of that House 
        to move to proceed to the immediate consideration of the 
        legislation (such motion not being debatable), and such motion 
        is hereby made of high privilege. An amendment to the motion 
        shall not be in order, and it shall not be in order to move to 
        reconsider the vote by which the motion was agreed to or 
        disagreed to. For the purposes of this paragraph, the term 
        ``legislative day'' means a day on which the United States 
        House of Representatives or the United States Senate, as 
        appropriate, is in session.
    (b) Commitment of Congress.--Enactment of this section constitutes 
a commitment that the United States Congress will vote on legislation 
establishing appropriate mechanisms and procedures to implement the 
political status selected by the people of Puerto Rico.
    (c) Exercise of Rulemaking Power.--The provisions of this section 
are enacted by the Congress--
            (1) as an exercise of the rulemaking power of the Senate 
        and the House of Representatives and, as such, shall be 
        considered as part of the rules of each House and shall 
        supersede other rules only to the extent that they are 
        inconsistent therewith; and
            (2) with full recognition of the constitutional right of 
        either House to change the rules (so far as they relate to the 
        procedures of that House) at any time, in the same manner, and 
        to the same extent as in the case of any other rule of that 
        House.

SEC. 7. AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS FOR THE REFERENDA.

    (a) In General.--
            (1) Availability of amounts derived from tax on foreign 
        rum.--During the period beginning on October 1, 1996, and 
        ending on the date the President determines that all referenda 
        required by this Act have been held, from the amounts covered 
        into the treasury of Puerto Rico under section 7652(e)(1) of 
        the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, the Secretary of the 
        Treasury--
                    (A) upon request and in the amounts identified from 
                time to time by the President, shall make the amounts 
                so identified available to the treasury of Puerto Rico 
                for the purposes specified in subsection (b); and
                    (B) shall transfer all remaining amounts to the 
                treasury of Puerto Rico, as under current law.
            (2) Report of referenda expenditures.--Within 180 days 
        after each referendum required by this Act, and after the end 
        of the period specified in paragraph (1), the President, in 
        consultation with the Government of Puerto Rico, shall submit a 
        report to the United States Senate and United States House of 
        Representatives on the amounts made available under paragraph 
        (1)(A) and all other amounts expended by the State Elections 
        Commission of Puerto Rico for referenda pursuant to this Act.
    (b) Grants for Conducting Referenda and Voter Education.--From 
amounts made available under subsection (a)(1), the Government of 
Puerto Rico shall make grants to the State Elections Commission of 
Puerto Rico for referenda held pursuant to the terms of this Act, as 
follows:
            (1) 50 percent shall be available only for costs of 
        conducting the referenda.
            (2) 50 percent shall be available only for voter education 
        funds for the central ruling body of the political party, 
        parties, or other qualifying entities advocating a particular 
        ballot choice. The amount allocated for advocating a ballot 
        choice under this paragraph shall be apportioned equally among 
        the parties advocating that choice.
    (c) Additional Resources.--In addition to amounts made available by 
this Act, the Puerto Rico Legislature may allocate additional resources 
for administrative and voter education costs to each party so long as 
the distribution of funds is consistent with the apportionment 
requirements of subsection (b).