Text: H.Con.Res.178 — 104th Congress (1995-1996)All Information (Except Text)

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Enrolled Bill

 
[Congressional Bills 104th Congress]
[From the U.S. Government Printing Office]
[H. Con. Res. 178 Enrolled Bill (ENR)]

        H.Con. Res.178
                                                 Agreed to June 13, 1996

                       One Hundred Fourth Congress

                                 of the

                        United States of America


                          AT THE SECOND SESSION

         Begun and held at the City of Washington on Wednesday,
   the third day of January, one thousand nine hundred and ninety-six


                          Concurrent Resolution


 
 Establishing the congressional budget for the United States Government 
for fiscal year 1997 and setting forth appropriate budgetary levels for 
             fiscal years 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, and 2002.

    Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate concurring),

SECTION 1. CONCURRENT RESOLUTION ON THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1997.

    The Congress determines and declares that the concurrent resolution 
on the budget for fiscal year 1997 is hereby established and that the 
appropriate budgetary levels for fiscal years 1998 through 2002 are 
hereby set forth.

SEC. 2. TABLE OF CONTENTS.

    The table of contents for this concurrent resolution is as follows:

Sec. 1. Concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal year 1997.
Sec. 2. Table of contents.

                       TITLE I--LEVELS AND AMOUNTS

Sec. 101. Recommended levels and amounts.
Sec. 102. Debt increase.
Sec. 103. Social security.
Sec. 104. Major functional categories.

                   TITLE II--RECONCILIATION DIRECTIONS

Sec. 201. Reconciliation in the House of Representatives.
Sec. 202. Reconciliation in the Senate.

                      TITLE III--BUDGET ENFORCEMENT

Sec. 301. Discretionary spending limits.
Sec. 302. Budgetary treatment of the sale of Government assets.
Sec. 303. Budgetary treatment of direct student loans.
Sec. 304. Superfund reserve fund.
Sec. 305. Tax reserve fund in the Senate.
Sec. 306. Exercise of rulemaking powers.
Sec. 307. Government shutdown prevention allowance.

        TITLE IV--SENSE OF CONGRESS, HOUSE, AND SENATE PROVISIONS

Sec. 401. Sense of Congress on baselines.
Sec. 402. Sense of Congress on loan sales.
Sec. 403. Sense of Congress on changes in medicaid.
Sec. 404. Sense of Congress on impact of legislation on children.
Sec. 405. Sense of Congress on debt repayment.
Sec. 406. Sense of Congress on commitment to a balanced budget by fiscal 
          year 2002.
Sec. 407. Sense of Congress that tax reductions should benefit working 
          families.
Sec. 408. Sense of Congress on a bipartisan commission on the solvency 
          of medicare.
Sec. 409. Sense of Congress on medicare transfers.
Sec. 410. Sense of Congress regarding changes in the medicare program.
Sec. 411. Sense of Congress regarding revenue assumptions.
Sec. 412. Sense of Congress regarding domestic violence.
Sec. 413. Sense of Congress regarding student loans.
Sec. 414. Sense of Congress regarding additional charges under the 
          medicare program.
Sec. 415. Sense of Congress regarding requirements that welfare 
          recipients be drug-free.
Sec. 416. Sense of Congress on an accurate index for inflation.
Sec. 417. Sense of Congress that the 1993 income tax increase on social 
          security benefits should be repealed.
Sec. 418. Sense of Congress regarding the Administration's practice 
          regarding the prosecution of drug smugglers.
Sec. 419. Sense of Congress on corporate subsidies.
Sec. 420. Sense of Congress regarding welfare reform.
Sec. 421. Sense of Congress on FCC spectrum auctions.
Sec. 422. Sense of the House on emergencies.
Sec. 423. Sense of the Senate on funding to assist youth at risk.
Sec. 424. Sense of the Senate on long-term trends in budget estimates.
Sec. 425. Sense of the Senate on repeal of the gas tax.
Sec. 426. Sense of the Senate regarding the use of budgetary savings.
Sec. 427. Sense of the Senate regarding the transfer of excess 
          Government computers to public schools.
Sec. 428. Sense of the Senate on Federal retreats.
Sec. 429. Sense of the Senate regarding the essential air service 
          program of the Department of Transportation.
Sec. 430. Sense of the Senate regarding equal retirement savings for 
          homemakers.
Sec. 431. Sense of the Senate on the National Institutes of Health 
          funding for anti-addiction drugs.
Sec. 432. Sense of the Senate regarding the extension of the employer 
          education assistance exclusion under section 127 of the 
          Internal Revenue Code of 1986.
Sec. 433. Sense of the Senate regarding the Economic Development 
          Administration placing high priority on maintaining field-
          based economic development representatives.
Sec. 434. Sense of the Senate on LIHEAP.
Sec. 435. Sense of the Senate on Davis-Bacon.
Sec. 436. Sense of the Senate on reimbursement of the United States for 
          operations Southern Watch and Provide Comfort.
Sec. 437. Sense of the Senate on solvency of the Medicare Trust Fund.
Sec. 438. Sense of the Senate on the Presidential Election Campaign 
          Fund.
Sec. 439. Sense of the Senate regarding the funding of Amtrak.

                      TITLE I--LEVELS AND AMOUNTS

SEC. 101. RECOMMENDED LEVELS AND AMOUNTS.

    The following budgetary levels are appropriate for the fiscal years 
1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, and 2002:
        (1) Federal revenues.--For purposes of the enforcement of this 
    resolution:
            (A) The recommended levels of Federal revenues are as 
        follows:
                Fiscal year 1997: $1,083,728,000,000.
                Fiscal year 1998: $1,130,269,000,000.
                Fiscal year 1999: $1,177,467,000,000.
                Fiscal year 2000: $1,231,178,000,000.
                Fiscal year 2001: $1,290,661,000,000.
                Fiscal year 2002: $1,359,046,000,000.
            (B) The amounts by which the aggregate levels of Federal 
        revenues should be changed are as follows:
                Fiscal year 1997: -$16,627,000,000.
                Fiscal year 1998: -$18,280,000,000.
                Fiscal year 1999: -$20,890,000,000.
                Fiscal year 2000: -$20,620,000,000.
                Fiscal year 2001: -$20,436,000,000.
                Fiscal year 2002: -$14,849,000,000.
            (C) The amounts for Federal Insurance Contributions Act 
        revenues for hospital insurance within the recommended levels 
        of Federal revenues are as follows:
                Fiscal year 1997: $108,053,000,000.
                Fiscal year 1998: $113,226,000,000.
                Fiscal year 1999: $119,361,000,000.
                Fiscal year 2000: $125,737,000,000.
                Fiscal year 2001: $131,641,000,000.
                Fiscal year 2002: $138,131,000,000.
        (2) New budget authority.--For purposes of the enforcement of 
    this resolution, the appropriate levels of total new budget 
    authority are as follows:
            Fiscal year 1997: $1,314,760,000,000.
            Fiscal year 1998: $1,362,075,000,000.
            Fiscal year 1999: $1,392,403,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2000: $1,433,371,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2001: $1,453,873,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2002: $1,496,063,000,000.
        (3) Budget outlays.--For purposes of the enforcement of this 
    resolution, the appropriate levels of total budget outlays are as 
    follows:
            Fiscal year 1997: $1,311,011,000,000.
            Fiscal year 1998: $1,354,668,000,000.
            Fiscal year 1999: $1,383,872,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2000: $1,416,493,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2001: $1,432,423,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2002: $1,462,900,000,000.
        (4) Deficits.--For purposes of the enforcement of this 
    resolution, the amounts of the deficits are as follows:
            Fiscal year 1997: $227,283,000,000.
            Fiscal year 1998: $224,399,000,000.
            Fiscal year 1999: $206,405,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2000: $185,315,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2001: $141,762,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2002: $103,854,000,000.
        (5) Public debt.--The appropriate levels of the public debt are 
    as follows:
            Fiscal year 1997: $5,435,700,000,000.
            Fiscal year 1998: $5,702,200,000,000.
            Fiscal year 1999: $5,945,300,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2000: $6,165,000,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2001: $6,338,400,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2002: $6,468,400,000,000.
        (6) Direct loan obligations.--The appropriate levels of total 
    new direct loan obligations are as follows:
            Fiscal year 1997: $41,353,000,000.
            Fiscal year 1998: $36,358,000,000.
            Fiscal year 1999: $36,455,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2000: $36,535,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2001: $36,600,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2002: $36,624,000,000.
        (7) Primary loan guarantee commitments.--The appropriate levels 
    of new primary loan guarantee commitments are as follows:
            Fiscal year 1997: $267,284,000,000.
            Fiscal year 1998: $269,467,000,000.
            Fiscal year 1999: $268,601,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2000: $268,489,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2001: $270,244,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2002: $270,948,000,000.

SEC. 102. DEBT INCREASE.

    The amounts of the increase in the public debt subject to 
limitation are as follows:
        Fiscal year 1997: $279,500,000,000.
        Fiscal year 1998: $266,500,000,000.
        Fiscal year 1999: $243,100,000,000.
        Fiscal year 2000: $219,700,000,000.
        Fiscal year 2001: $173,400,000,000.
        Fiscal year 2002: $130,000,000,000.

SEC. 103. SOCIAL SECURITY.

    (a) Social Security Revenues.--For purposes of Senate enforcement 
under sections 302, 602, and 311 of the Congressional Budget Act of 
1974, the amounts of revenues of the Federal Old-Age and Survivors 
Insurance Trust Fund and the Federal Disability Insurance Trust Fund 
are as follows:
        Fiscal year 1997: $385,010,000,000.
        Fiscal year 1998: $402,282,000,000.
        Fiscal year 1999: $423,420,000,000.
        Fiscal year 2000: $445,102,000,000.
        Fiscal year 2001: $465,155,000,000.
        Fiscal year 2002: $487,344,000,000.
    (b) Social Security Outlays.--For purposes of Senate enforcement 
under sections 302, 602, and 311 of the Congressional Budget Act of 
1974, the amounts of outlays of the Federal Old-Age and Survivors 
Insurance Trust Fund and the Federal Disability Insurance Trust Fund 
are as follows:
        Fiscal year 1997: $357,596,000,000.
        Fiscal year 1998: $374,931,000,000.
        Fiscal year 1999: $393,137,000,000.
        Fiscal year 2000: $412,438,000,000.
        Fiscal year 2001: $433,311,000,000.
        Fiscal year 2002: $455,165,000,000.

SEC. 104. MAJOR FUNCTIONAL CATEGORIES.

    The Congress determines and declares that the appropriate levels of 
new budget authority, budget outlays, new direct loan obligations, and 
new primary loan guarantee commitments for fiscal years 1997 through 
2002 for each major functional category are:
        (1) National Defense (050):
            Fiscal year 1997:
                (A) New budget authority, $265,583,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $264,146,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, 
            $800,000,000.
            Fiscal year 1998:
                (A) New budget authority, $268,198,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $263,018,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, 
            $200,000,000.
            Fiscal year 1999:
                (A) New budget authority, $270,797,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $266,289,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, 
            $192,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2000:
                (A) New budget authority, $273,337,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $269,961,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, 
            $187,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2001:
                (A) New budget authority, $275,961,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $269,025,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, 
            $185,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2002:
                (A) New budget authority, $278,821,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $268,962,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, 
            $183,000,000.
        (2) International Affairs (150):
            Fiscal year 1997:
                (A) New budget authority, $14,308,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $15,201,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $4,333,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, 
            $18,110,000,000.
            Fiscal year 1998:
                (A) New budget authority, $12,120,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $13,519,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $4,342,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, 
            $18,262,000,000.
            Fiscal year 1999:
                (A) New budget authority, $11,095,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $12,520,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $4,358,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, 
            $18,311,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2000:
                (A) New budget authority, $11,556,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $11,235,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $4,346,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, 
            $18,311,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2001:
                (A) New budget authority, $11,664,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $11,022,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $4,395,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, 
            $18,409,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2002:
                (A) New budget authority, $11,864,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $10,896,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $4,387,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, 
            $18,409,000,000.
        (3) General Science, Space, and Technology (250):
            Fiscal year 1997:
                (A) New budget authority, $16,788,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $16,865,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 1998:
                (A) New budget authority, $16,249,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $16,421,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 1999:
                (A) New budget authority, $16,012,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $16,053,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 2000:
                (A) New budget authority, $15,775,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $15,805,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 2001:
                (A) New budget authority, $15,700,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $15,717,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 2002:
                (A) New budget authority, $15,573,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $15,611,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
        (4) Energy (270):
            Fiscal year 1997:
                (A) New budget authority, $3,728,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $3,080,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $1,033,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 1998:
                (A) New budget authority, $2,830,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $2,328,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $1,039,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 1999:
                (A) New budget authority, $2,512,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $1,758,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $1,045,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 2000:
                (A) New budget authority, $2,272,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $1,351,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $1,036,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 2001:
                (A) New budget authority, $2,385,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $1,329,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $1,000,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 2002:
                (A) New budget authority, $2,069,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $874,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $1,031,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
        (5) Natural Resources and Environment (300):
            Fiscal year 1997:
                (A) New budget authority, $20,879,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $21,707,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $37,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 1998:
                (A) New budget authority, $18,862,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $19,698,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $41,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 1999:
                (A) New budget authority, $19,787,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $20,515,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $38,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 2000:
                (A) New budget authority, $18,604,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $19,125,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $38,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 2001:
                (A) New budget authority, $19,170,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $19,418,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $38,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 2002:
                (A) New budget authority, $19,098,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $19,169,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $38,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
        (6) Agriculture (350):
            Fiscal year 1997:
                (A) New budget authority, $12,811,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $10,985,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $7,794,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, 
            $5,870,000,000.
            Fiscal year 1998:
                (A) New budget authority, $12,122,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $10,220,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $9,346,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, 
            $6,637,000,000.
            Fiscal year 1999:
                (A) New budget authority, $11,799,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $9,898,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $10,743,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, 
            $6,586,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2000:
                (A) New budget authority, $11,146,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $9,268,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $10,736,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, 
            $6,652,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2001:
                (A) New budget authority, $10,015,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $8,229,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $10,595,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, 
            $6,641,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2002:
                (A) New budget authority, $9,627,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $7,822,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $10,570,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, 
            $6,709,000,000.
        (7) Commerce and Housing Credit (370):
            Fiscal year 1997:
                (A) New budget authority, $8,186,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, -$2,307,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $1,856,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, 
            $197,340,000,000.
            Fiscal year 1998:
                (A) New budget authority, $9,561,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $5,746,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $1,787,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, 
            $196,750,000,000.
            Fiscal year 1999:
                (A) New budget authority, $10,575,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $6,109,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $1,763,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, 
            $196,253,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2000:
                (A) New budget authority, $12,543,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $7,414,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $1,759,000,000
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, 
            $195,883,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2001:
                (A) New budget authority, $11,363,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $7,377,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $1,745,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, 
            $195,375,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2002:
                (A) New budget authority, $11,695,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $7,312,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $1,740,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, 
            $194,875,000,000.
        (8) Transportation (400):
            Fiscal year 1997:
                (A) New budget authority, $42,635,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $39,311,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $15,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 1998:
                (A) New budget authority, $43,427,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $37,306,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $15,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 1999:
                (A) New budget authority, $43,904,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $35,886,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $15,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 2000:
                (A) New budget authority, $43,798,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $34,678,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $15,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 2001:
                (A) New budget authority, $44,104,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $34,121,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $15,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 2002:
                (A) New budget authority, $44,518,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $33,624,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $15,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
        (9) Community and Regional Development (450):
            Fiscal year 1997:
                (A) New budget authority, $8,218,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $10,321,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $1,231,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, 
            $2,133,000,000.
            Fiscal year 1998:
                (A) New budget authority, $6,651,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $8,982,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $1,257,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, 
            $2,133,000,000.
            Fiscal year 1999:
                (A) New budget authority, $6,611,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $8,111,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $1,287,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, 
            $1,171,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2000:
                (A) New budget authority, $6,656,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $7,267,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $1,365,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, 
            $1,171,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2001:
                (A) New budget authority, $6,466,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $6,819,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $1,404,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, 
            $2,202,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2002:
                (A) New budget authority, $6,367,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $6,334,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $1,430,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, 
            $2,202,000,000.
        (10) Education, Training, Employment, and Social Services 
    (500):
            Fiscal year 1997:
                (A) New budget authority, $48,983,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $49,964,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $16,219,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, 
            $17,469,000,000.
            Fiscal year 1998:
                (A) New budget authority, $47,428,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $47,758,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $16,219,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, 
            $19,760,000,000.
            Fiscal year 1999:
                (A) New budget authority, $48,197,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $47,761,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $16,219,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, 
            $20,854,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2000:
                (A) New budget authority, $48,931,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $48,319,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $16,219,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, 
            $21,589,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2001:
                (A) New budget authority, $49,686,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $48,953,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $16,219,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, 
            $23,319,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2002:
                (A) New budget authority, $50,409,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $49,629,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $16,219,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, 
            $25,085,000,000.
        (11) Health (550):
            Fiscal year 1997:
                (A) New budget authority, $133,228,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $133,172,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, 
            $187,000,000.
            Fiscal year 1998:
                (A) New budget authority, $140,343,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $140,728,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, 
            $94,000,000.
            Fiscal year 1999:
                (A) New budget authority, $146,103,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $146,246,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 2000:
                (A) New budget authority, $152,405,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $152,317,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 2001:
                (A) New budget authority, $158,848,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $158,509,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 2002:
                (A) New budget authority, $164,380,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $163,912,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
        (12) Medicare (570):
            Fiscal year 1997:
                (A) New budget authority, $192,835,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $191,151,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 1998:
                (A) New budget authority, $207,412,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $205,687,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 1999:
                (A) New budget authority, $218,091,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $215,819,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 2000:
                (A) New budget authority, $230,596,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $228,847,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 2001:
                (A) New budget authority, $243,192,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $241,458,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 2002:
                (A) New budget authority, $253,649,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $251,248,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
        (13) Income Security (600):
            Fiscal year 1997:
                (A) New budget authority, $230,233,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $239,737,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 1998:
                (A) New budget authority, $241,766,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $244,694,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 1999:
                (A) New budget authority, $246,842,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $253,422,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 2000:
                (A) New budget authority, $265,119,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $265,209,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 2001:
                (A) New budget authority, $264,868,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $268,404,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 2002:
                (A) New budget authority, $283,450,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $280,388,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
        (14) Social Security (650):
            Fiscal year 1997:
                (A) New budget authority, $7,813,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $11,001,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 1998:
                (A) New budget authority, $8,476,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $11,213,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 1999:
                (A) New budget authority, $9,219,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $11,922,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 2000:
                (A) New budget authority, $9,979,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $12,662,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 2001:
                (A) New budget authority, $10,775,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $13,458,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 2002:
                (A) New budget authority, $11,607,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $14,290,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
        (15) Veterans Benefits and Services (700):
            Fiscal year 1997:
                (A) New budget authority, $38,463,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $39,561,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $935,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, 
            $26,362,000,000.
            Fiscal year 1998:
                (A) New budget authority, $38,552,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $39,313,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $962,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, 
            $25,925,000,000.
            Fiscal year 1999:
                (A) New budget authority, $38,179,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $38,644,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $987,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, 
            $25,426,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2000:
                (A) New budget authority, $38,186,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $39,886,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $1,021,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, 
            $24,883,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2001:
                (A) New budget authority, $38,382,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $37,265,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $1,189,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, 
            $24,298,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2002:
                (A) New budget authority, $39,318,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $39,602,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $1,194,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, 
            $23,668,000,000.
        (16) Administration of Justice (750):
            Fiscal year 1997:
                (A) New budget authority, $20,924,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $19,540,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 1998:
                (A) New budget authority, $22,320,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $21,397,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 1999:
                (A) New budget authority, $23,264,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $22,331,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 2000:
                (A) New budget authority, $23,278,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $22,966,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 2001:
                (A) New budget authority, $20,330,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $20,281,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 2002:
                (A) New budget authority, $20,315,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $20,267,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
        (17) General Government (800):
            Fiscal year 1997:
                (A) New budget authority, $12,353,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $12,186,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 1998:
                (A) New budget authority, $14,097,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $14,275,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 1999:
                (A) New budget authority, $13,288,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $13,461,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 2000:
                (A) New budget authority, $13,609,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $13,675,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 2001:
                (A) New budget authority, $13,262,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $13,185,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 2002:
                (A) New budget authority, $13,209,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $12,831,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
        (18) Net Interest (900):
            Fiscal year 1997:
                (A) New budget authority, $282,591,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $282,591,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 1998:
                (A) New budget authority, $289,121,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $289,121,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 1999:
                (A) New budget authority, $292,939,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $292,939,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 2000:
                (A) New budget authority, $294,426,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $294,426,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 2001:
                (A) New budget authority, $298,531,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $298,531,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 2002:
                (A) New budget authority, $302,932,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, $302,932,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
        (19) Allowances (920):
            Fiscal year 1997:
                (A) New budget authority, -$465,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, -$1,867,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 1998:
                (A) New budget authority, -$1,921,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, -$1,217,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 1999:
                (A) New budget authority, -$2,084,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, -$1,085,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 2000:
                (A) New budget authority, -$2,340,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, -$1,413,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 2001:
                (A) New budget authority, -$2,552,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, -$2,401,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 2002:
                (A) New budget authority, -$2,898,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, -$2,863,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
        (20) Undistributed Offsetting Receipts (950):
            Fiscal year 1997:
                (A) New budget authority, -$45,334,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, -$45,334,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $7,900,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 1998:
                (A) New budget authority, -$35,539,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, -$35,539,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $1,350,000,000.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 1999:
                (A) New budget authority, -$34,727,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, -$34,727,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 2000:
                (A) New budget authority, -$36,505,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, -$36,505,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 2001:
                (A) New budget authority, -$38,277,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, -$38,277,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.
            Fiscal year 2002:
                (A) New budget authority, -$39,940,000,000.
                (B) Outlays, -$39,940,000,000.
                (C) New direct loan obligations, $0.
                (D) New primary loan guarantee commitments, $0.

                  TITLE II--RECONCILIATION DIRECTIONS

SEC. 201. RECONCILIATION IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

    (a) Submissions.--
        (1) Welfare and medicaid reform and tax relief.--Not later than 
    June 13, 1996, the House committees named in subsection (b) shall 
    submit their recommendations to provide direct spending and 
    revenues to the Committee on the Budget of the House of 
    Representatives. After receiving those recommendations, the 
    Committee on the Budget shall report to the House a reconciliation 
    bill carrying out all such recommendations without any substantive 
    revision.
        (2) Medicare preservation.--Not later than July 18, 1996, the 
    House committees named in subsection (c) shall submit their 
    recommendations to provide direct spending to the Committee on the 
    Budget of the House of Representatives. After receiving those 
    recommendations, the Committee on the Budget shall report to the 
    House a reconciliation bill carrying out all such recommendations 
    without any substantive revision.
        (3) Tax and miscellaneous direct spending reforms.--Not later 
    than September 6, 1996, the House committees named in subsection 
    (d) shall submit their recommendations to provide direct spending, 
    deficit reduction, and revenues to the Committee on the Budget of 
    the House of Representatives. After receiving those 
    recommendations, the Committee on the Budget shall report to the 
    House a reconciliation bill carrying out all such recommendations 
    without any substantive revision.
    (b) Instructions for Welfare and Medicaid Reform and Tax Relief.--
        (1) Committee on agriculture.--The House Committee on 
    Agriculture shall report changes in laws within its jurisdiction 
    that provide direct spending such that the total level of direct 
    spending for that committee does not exceed: $35,609,000,000 in 
    outlays for fiscal year 1997, $36,625,000,000 in outlays for fiscal 
    year 2002, and $216,316,000,000 in outlays in fiscal years 1997 
    through 2002.
        (2) Committee on commerce.--The House Committee on Commerce 
    shall report changes in laws within its jurisdiction that provide 
    direct spending such that the total level of direct spending for 
    that committee does not exceed: $326,354,000,000 in outlays for 
    fiscal year 1997, $473,718,000,000 in outlays for fiscal year 2002, 
    and $2,395,231,000,000 in outlays in fiscal years 1997 through 
    2002.
        (3) Committee on economic and educational opportunities.--The 
    House Committee on Economic and Educational Opportunities shall 
    report changes in laws within its jurisdiction that provide direct 
    spending such that the total level of direct spending for that 
    committee does not exceed: $15,808,000,000 in outlays for fiscal 
    year 1997, $19,670,000,000 in outlays for fiscal year 2002, and 
    $105,331,000,000 in outlays in fiscal years 1997 through 2002.
        (4) Committee on ways and means.--(A) The House Committee on 
    Ways and Means shall report changes in laws within its jurisdiction 
    that provide direct spending such that the total level of direct 
    spending for that committee does not exceed: $381,199,000,000 in 
    outlays for fiscal year 1997, $563,607,000,000 in outlays for 
    fiscal year 2002, and $2,810,569,000,000 in outlays in fiscal years 
    1997 through 2002.
        (B) The House Committee on Ways and Means shall report changes 
    in laws within its jurisdiction sufficient to reduce revenues by 
    not more than $122,400,000,000 for fiscal years 1997 through 2002.
    (c) Instructions for Medicare Preservation.--
        (1) Committee on commerce.--The House Committee on Commerce 
    shall report changes in laws within its jurisdiction that provide 
    direct spending such that the total level of direct spending for 
    that committee does not exceed: $319,554,000,000 in outlays for 
    fiscal year 1997, $420,915,000,000 in outlays for fiscal year 2002, 
    and $2,237,231,000,000 in outlays in fiscal years 1997 through 
    2002.
        (2) Committee on ways and means.--The House Committee on Ways 
    and Means shall report changes in laws within its jurisdiction that 
    provide direct spending such that the total level of direct 
    spending for that committee does not exceed: $374,399,000,000 in 
    outlays for fiscal year 1997, $510,804,000,000 in outlays for 
    fiscal year 2002, and $2,652,569,000,000 in outlays in fiscal years 
    1997 through 2002.
    (d) Instructions for Tax and Miscellaneous Direct Spending 
Reforms.--
        (1) Committee on agriculture.--The House Committee on 
    Agriculture shall report changes in laws within its jurisdiction 
    that provide direct spending such that the total level of direct 
    spending for that committee does not exceed: $35,599,000,000 in 
    outlays for fiscal year 1997, $36,614,000,000 in outlays for fiscal 
    year 2002, and $216,251,000,000 in outlays in fiscal years 1997 
    through 2002.
        (2) Committee on banking and financial services.--(A) The House 
    Committee on Banking and Financial Services shall report changes in 
    laws within its jurisdiction that provide direct spending such that 
    the total level of direct spending for that committee does not 
    exceed: -$12,645,000,000 in outlays for fiscal year 1997, 
    -$5,775,000,000 in outlays for fiscal year 2002, and 
    -$41,639,000,000 in outlays in fiscal years 1997 through 2002.
        (B) The House Committee on Banking and Financial Services shall 
    report changes in laws within its jurisdiction that would reduce 
    the deficit by: $0 in fiscal year 1997, $115,000,000 for fiscal 
    year 2002, and $305,000,000 in fiscal years 1997 through 2002.
        (3) Committee on commerce.--The House Committee on Commerce 
    shall report changes in laws within its jurisdiction that provide 
    direct spending such that the total level of direct spending for 
    that committee does not exceed: $318,054,000,000 in outlays for 
    fiscal year 1997, $415,290,000,000 in outlays for fiscal year 2002, 
    and $2,216,885,000,000 in outlays in fiscal years 1997 through 
    2002.
        (4) Committee on economic and educational opportunities.--The 
    House Committee on Economic and Educational Opportunities shall 
    report changes in laws within its jurisdiction that provide direct 
    spending such that the total level of direct spending for that 
    committee does not exceed: $15,025,000,000 in outlays for fiscal 
    year 1997, $18,963,000,000 in outlays for fiscal year 2002, and 
    $101,660,000,000 in outlays in fiscal years 1997 through 2002.
        (5) Committee on government reform and oversight.--(A) The 
    House Committee on Government Reform and Oversight shall report 
    changes in laws within its jurisdiction that provide direct 
    spending such that the total level of direct spending for that 
    committee does not exceed: $65,164,000,000 in outlays for fiscal 
    year 1997, $82,594,000,000 in outlays for fiscal year 2002, and 
    $442,230,000,000 in outlays in fiscal years 1997 through 2002.
        (B) The House Committee on Government Reform and Oversight 
    shall report changes in laws within its jurisdiction that would 
    reduce the deficit by: $201,000,000 in fiscal year 1997, 
    $590,000,000 for fiscal year 2002, and $2,837,000,000 in fiscal 
    years 1997 through 2002.
        (6) Committee on international relations.--The House Committee 
    on International Relations shall report changes in laws within its 
    jurisdiction that provide direct spending such that the total level 
    of direct spending for that committee does not exceed: 
    $13,025,000,000 in outlays for fiscal year 1997, $10,311,000,000 in 
    outlays for fiscal year 2002, and $67,953,000,000 in outlays in 
    fiscal years 1997 through 2002.
        (7) Committee on the judiciary.--The House Committee on the 
    Judiciary shall report changes in laws within its jurisdiction that 
    provide direct spending such that the total level of direct 
    spending for that committee does not exceed: $2,784,000,000 in 
    outlays for fiscal year 1997, $4,586,000,000 in outlays for fiscal 
    year 2002, and $26,482,000,000 in outlays in fiscal years 1997 
    through 2002.
        (8) Committee on national security.--The House Committee on 
    National Security shall report changes in laws within its 
    jurisdiction that provide direct spending such that the total level 
    of direct spending for that committee does not exceed: 
    $39,787,000,000 in outlays for fiscal year 1997, $49,774,000,000 in 
    outlays for fiscal year 2002, and $271,815,000,000 in outlays in 
    fiscal years 1997 through 2002.
        (9) Committee on resources.--The House Committee on Resources 
    shall report changes in laws within its jurisdiction that provide 
    direct spending such that the total level of direct spending for 
    that committee does not exceed: $2,115,000,000 in outlays for 
    fiscal year 1997, $2,048,000,000 in outlays for fiscal year 2002, 
    and $11,652,000,000 in outlays in fiscal years 1997 through 2002.
        (10) Committee on science.--The House Committee on Science 
    shall report changes in laws within its jurisdiction that provide 
    direct spending such that the total level of direct spending for 
    that committee does not exceed: $40,000,000 in outlays for fiscal 
    year 1997, $46,000,000 in outlays for fiscal year 2002, and 
    $242,000,000 in outlays in fiscal years 1997 through 2002.
        (11) Committee on transportation and infrastructure.--The House 
    Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure shall report changes 
    in laws within its jurisdiction that provide direct spending such 
    that the total level of direct spending for that committee does not 
    exceed: $18,315,000,000 in outlays for fiscal year 1997, 
    $18,001,000,000 in outlays for fiscal year 2002, and 
    $107,328,000,000 in outlays in fiscal years 1997 through 2002.
        (12) Committee on veterans' affairs.--The House Committee on 
    Veterans' Affairs shall report changes in laws within its 
    jurisdiction that provide direct spending such that the total level 
    of direct spending for that committee does not exceed: 
    $21,375,000,000 in outlays for fiscal year 1997, $22,217,000,000 in 
    outlays for fiscal year 2002, and $130,468,000,000 in outlays in 
    fiscal years 1997 through 2002.
        (13) Committee on ways and means.--(A) The House Committee on 
    Ways and Means shall report changes in laws within its jurisdiction 
    that provide direct spending such that the total level of direct 
    spending for that committee does not exceed: $372,342,000,000 in 
    outlays for fiscal year 1997, $508,107,000,000 in outlays for 
    fiscal year 2002, and $2,638,057,000,000 in outlays in fiscal years 
    1997 through 2002.
        (B)(i) The House Committee on Ways and Means shall report 
    changes in laws within its jurisdiction sufficient to reduce 
    revenues by not more than $113,838,000,000 in fiscal years 1997 
    through 2002.
        (ii) If a reconciliation bill referred to in subsection (a)(1) 
    is enacted into law, then the revenue amount set forth in clause 
    (i) shall be adjusted to reflect the revenue provisions of that 
    Act.
    (e) Definition.--For purposes of this section, the term ``direct 
spending'' has the meaning given to such term in section 250(c)(8) of 
the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.

SEC. 202. RECONCILIATION IN THE SENATE.

    (a) First Reconciliation Instructions.--Not later than June 21, 
1996, the committees named in this subsection shall submit their 
recommendations to the Committee on the Budget of the Senate. After 
receiving those recommendations, the Committee on the Budget shall 
report to the Senate a reconciliation bill carrying out all such 
recommendations without any substantive revision.
        (1) Committee on agriculture, nutrition, and forestry.--The 
    Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry shall 
    report changes in laws within its jurisdiction that provide direct 
    spending (as defined in section 250(c)(8) of the Balanced Budget 
    and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985) to reduce outlays 
    $1,974,000,000 in fiscal year 1997, $26,169,000,000 for the period 
    of fiscal years 1997 through 2002, and $5,967,000,000 in fiscal 
    year 2002.
        (2) Committee on finance.--(A) The Senate Committee on Finance 
    shall report changes in laws within its jurisdiction that provide 
    direct spending (as defined in section 250(c)(8) of the Balanced 
    Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985) to reduce outlays 
    $260,000,000 in fiscal year 1997, $98,321,000,000 for the period of 
    fiscal years 1997 through 2002, and $36,578,000,000 in fiscal year 
    2002.
        (B) The Committee on Finance shall report changes in laws 
    within its jurisdiction necessary to reduce revenues by not more 
    than $122,400,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 1997 through 
    2002.
    (b) Second Reconciliation Instructions.--No later than July 24, 
1996, the Committee on Finance shall report to the Senate a 
reconciliation bill proposing changes in laws within its jurisdiction 
that provide direct spending (as defined in section 250(c)(8) of the 
Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985) to reduce 
outlays $6,800,000,000 in fiscal year 1997, $158,000,000,000 for the 
period of fiscal years 1997 through 2002, and $52,803,000,000 in fiscal 
year 2002.
    (c) Third Reconciliation Instructions.--No later than September 18, 
1996, the committees named in this subsection shall submit their 
recommendations to the Committee on the Budget of the Senate. After 
receiving those recommendations, the Committee on the Budget shall 
report to the Senate a reconciliation bill carrying out all such 
recommendations without any substantive revision.
        (1) Committee on agriculture, nutrition, and forestry.--The 
    Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry shall 
    report changes in laws within its jurisdiction that provide direct 
    spending (as defined in section 250(c)(8) of the Balanced Budget 
    and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985) to reduce outlays 
    $10,000,000 in fiscal year 1997, $65,000,000 for the period of 
    fiscal years 1997 through 2002, and $11,000,000 in fiscal year 
    2002.
        (2) Committee on armed services.--The Senate Committee on Armed 
    Services shall report changes in laws within its jurisdiction that 
    provide direct spending (as defined in section 250(c)(8) of the 
    Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985) to 
    reduce outlays $79,000,000 in fiscal year 1997, $649,000,000 for 
    the period of fiscal years 1997 through 2002, and $166,000,000 in 
    fiscal year 2002.
        (3) Committee on banking, housing, and urban affairs.--The 
    Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs shall 
    report changes in laws within its jurisdiction that reduce the 
    deficit by $3,628,000,000 in fiscal year 1997, $3,605,000,000 for 
    the period of fiscal years 1997 through 2002, and $462,000,000 in 
    fiscal year 2002.
        (4) Committee on commerce, science, and transportation.--The 
    Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation shall 
    report changes in laws within its jurisdiction that provide direct 
    spending (as defined in section 250(c)(8) of the Balanced Budget 
    and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985) to reduce outlays 
    $19,396,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 1997 through 2002, 
    and $5,649,000,000 in fiscal year 2002.
        (5) Committee on energy and natural resources.--The Senate 
    Committee on Energy and Natural Resources shall report changes in 
    laws within its jurisdiction that provide direct spending (as 
    defined in section 250(c)(8) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
    Deficit Control Act of 1985) to reduce outlays $90,000,000 in 
    fiscal year 1997, $1,512,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 
    1997 through 2002, and $72,000,000 in fiscal year 2002.
        (6) Committee on environment and public works.--The Senate 
    Committee on Environment and Public Works shall report changes in 
    laws within its jurisdiction that provide direct spending (as 
    defined in section 250(c)(8) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
    Deficit Control Act of 1985) to reduce outlays $87,000,000 in 
    fiscal year 1997, $2,184,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 
    1997 through 2002, and $392,000,000 in fiscal year 2002.
        (7) Committee on finance.--(A) The Senate Committee on Finance 
    shall report changes in laws within its jurisdiction that reduce 
    the deficit by $3,639,000,000 in fiscal year 1997, $23,184,000,000 
    for the period of fiscal years 1997 through 2002, and 
    $4,121,000,000 in fiscal year 2002.
        (B) The Committee on Finance shall report changes in laws 
    within its jurisdiction to reduce revenues for the period of fiscal 
    years 1997 through 2002 by not more than the amount specified in 
    subsection (a)(2)(B) reduced by the amount that legislation enacted 
    pursuant to subsection (a) reduced revenues for that period of 
    fiscal years.
        (8) Committee on governmental affairs.--The Senate Committee on 
    Governmental Affairs shall report changes in laws within its 
    jurisdiction that reduce the deficit $1,101,000,000 in fiscal year 
    1997, $8,801,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 1997 through 
    2002, and $1,492,000,000 in fiscal year 2002.
        (9) Committee on the judiciary.--The Senate Committee on the 
    Judiciary shall report changes in laws within its jurisdiction that 
    provide direct spending (as defined in section 250(c)(8) of the 
    Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985) to 
    reduce outlays $476,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 1997 
    through 2002 and $119,000,000 in fiscal year 2002.
        (10) Committee on labor and human resources.--The Senate 
    Committee on Labor and Human Resources shall report changes in laws 
    within its jurisdiction that provide direct spending (as defined in 
    section 250(c)(8) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
    Control Act of 1985) to reduce outlays $783,000,000 in fiscal year 
    1997, $3,671,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 1997 through 
    2002, and $707,000,000 in fiscal year 2002.
        (11) Committee on veterans' affairs.--The Senate Committee on 
    Veterans' Affairs shall report changes in laws within its 
    jurisdiction that provide direct spending (as defined in section 
    250(c)(8) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act 
    of 1985) to reduce outlays $126,000,000 in fiscal year 1997, 
    $5,271,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 1997 through 2002, 
    and $1,418,000,000 in fiscal year 2002.
    (d) Treatment of Reconciliation Bills for Prior Surplus.--For 
purposes of section 202 of House Concurrent Resolution 67 (104th 
Congress), legislation which reduces revenues pursuant to a 
reconciliation instruction contained in subsection (c) shall be taken 
together with all other legislation enacted pursuant to the 
reconciliation instructions contained in this resolution when 
determining the deficit effect of such legislation.

                     TITLE III--BUDGET ENFORCEMENT

SEC. 301. DISCRETIONARY SPENDING LIMITS.

    (a) Definition.--As used in this section and for the purposes of 
allocations made pursuant to section 302(a) or 602(a) of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974, for the discretionary category, the 
term ``discretionary spending limit'' means--
        (1) with respect to fiscal year 1997--
            (A) for the defense category $266,362,000,000 in new budget 
        authority and $264,968,000,000 in outlays; and
            (B) for the nondefense category $230,988,000,000 in new 
        budget authority and $273,644,000,000 in outlays;
        (2) with respect to fiscal year 1998--
            (A) for the defense category $268,971,000,000 in new budget 
        authority and $263,862,000,000 in outlays; and
            (B) for the nondefense category $224,746,000,000 in new 
        budget authority and $263,093,000,000 in outlays;
        (3) with respect to fiscal year 1999, for the discretionary 
    category $491,268,000,000 in new budget authority and 
    $525,485,000,000 in outlays;
        (4) with respect to fiscal year 2000, for the discretionary 
    category $498,589,000,000 in new budget authority and 
    $525,251,000,000 in outlays;
        (5) with respect to fiscal year 2001, for the discretionary 
    category $491,117,000,000 in new budget authority and 
    $516,223,000,000 in outlays; and
        (6) with respect to fiscal year 2002, for the discretionary 
    category $500,592,000,000 in new budget authority and 
    $514,219,000,000 in outlays;

as adjusted for changes in concepts and definitions and emergency 
appropriations.
    (b) Point of Order in the Senate.--
        (1) In general.--Except as provided in paragraph (2), it shall 
    not be in order in the Senate to consider--
            (A) a revision of this resolution or any concurrent 
        resolution on the budget for fiscal year 1998 (or amendment, 
        motion, or conference report on such a resolution) that 
        provides discretionary spending in excess of the sum of the 
        defense and nondefense discretionary spending limits for such 
        fiscal year;
            (B) any concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal year 
        1999, 2000, 2001, or 2002 (or amendment, motion, or conference 
        report on such a resolution) that provides discretionary 
        spending in excess of the discretionary spending limit for such 
        fiscal year; or
            (C) any appropriation bill or resolution (or amendment, 
        motion, or conference report on such appropriation bill or 
        resolution) for fiscal year 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, or 
        2002 that would exceed any of the discretionary spending limits 
        in this section or suballocations of those limits made pursuant 
        to section 602(b) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974.
        (2) Exception.--
            (A) In general.--This section shall not apply if a 
        declaration of war by the Congress is in effect or if a joint 
        resolution pursuant to section 258 of the Balanced Budget and 
        Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 has been enacted.
            (B) Enforcement of discretionary limits in fy 1997.--Until 
        the enactment of reconciliation legislation pursuant to 
        subsections (a), (b), and (c) of section 202 of this resolution 
        and for purposes of the application of paragraph (1), only 
        subparagraph (C) of paragraph (1) shall apply, and it shall 
        apply only for fiscal year 1997.
    (c) Waiver.--This section may be waived or suspended in the Senate 
only by the affirmative vote of three-fifths of the Members, duly 
chosen and sworn.
    (d) Appeals.--Appeals in the Senate from the decisions of the Chair 
relating to any provision of this section shall be limited to 1 hour, 
to be equally divided between, and controlled by, the appellant and the 
manager of the concurrent resolution, bill, or joint resolution, as the 
case may be. An affirmative vote of three-fifths of the Members of the 
Senate, duly chosen and sworn, shall be required in the Senate to 
sustain an appeal of the ruling of the Chair on a point of order raised 
under this section.
    (e) Determination of Budget Levels.--For purposes of subsection 
(b), the levels of new budget authority and outlays for a fiscal year 
shall be determined on the basis of estimates made by the Committee on 
the Budget of the Senate.

SEC. 302. BUDGETARY TREATMENT OF THE SALE OF GOVERNMENT ASSETS.

    (a) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that--
        (1) the prohibition on scoring asset sales has discouraged the 
    sale of assets that can be better managed by the private sector and 
    generate receipts to reduce the Federal budget deficit;
        (2) the President's fiscal year 1997 budget included 
    $3,900,000,000 in receipts from asset sales and proposed a change 
    in the asset sale scoring rule to allow the proceeds from these 
    sales to be scored;
        (3) assets should not be sold if such sale would increase the 
    budget deficit over the long run; and
        (4) the asset sale scoring prohibition should be repealed and 
    consideration should be given to replacing it with a methodology 
    that takes into account the long-term budgetary impact of asset 
    sales.
    (b) Budgetary Treatment.--(1) For the purposes of any concurrent 
resolution on the budget and the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, 
amounts realized from sales of assets shall be scored with respect to 
the level of budget authority, outlays, or revenues.
    (2) For purposes of this section, the term ``sale of an asset'' 
shall have the same meaning as under section 250(c)(21) of the Balanced 
Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.
    (3) For purposes of this section, the sale of loan assets or the 
prepayment of a loan shall be governed by the terms of the Federal 
Credit Reform Act of 1990.

SEC. 303. BUDGETARY TREATMENT OF DIRECT STUDENT LOANS.

    For the purposes of any concurrent resolution on the budget and the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the cost of a direct loan under the 
Federal direct student loan program shall be the net present value, at 
the time when the direct loan is disbursed, of the following cash flows 
for the estimated life of the loan--
        (1) loan disbursements;
        (2) repayments of principal;
        (3) payments of interest and other payments by or to the 
    Government over the life of the loan after adjusting for estimated 
    defaults, prepayments, fees, penalties, and other recoveries; and
        (4) direct expenses, including--
            (A) activities related to credit extension, loan 
        origination, loan servicing, management of contractors, and 
        payments to contractors, other government entities, and program 
        participants;
            (B) collection of delinquent loans; and
            (C) writeoff and closeout of loans.

SEC. 304. SUPERFUND RESERVE FUND.

    (a) Deficit Neutral Adjustments in the House.--
        (1) Committee allocations.--In the House of Representatives--
            (A) after the enactment of a superfund bill that reforms 
        the Superfund program to facilitate the clean up of hazardous 
        waste sites and extends Superfund taxes; and
            (B) upon the reporting of an appropriation measure (or 
        submission of a conference report thereon) that appropriates 
        funds for the Superfund program in excess of $1,302,000,000;

    the chairman of the Committee on the Budget of that House may 
    submit revised allocations, functional levels, budget aggregates, 
    and discretionary spending limits to carry out this section by an 
    amount not to exceed the excess subject to the limitation. These 
    revisions shall be considered for the purposes of the Congressional 
    Budget Act of 1974 as the allocations, levels, aggregates, and 
    limits contained in this resolution.
        (2) Committee suballocations.--The Committee on Appropriations 
    of the House of Representatives may report appropriately revised 
    suballocations pursuant to sections 302(b)(1) and 602(b)(1) of the 
    Congressional Budget Act of 1974 following the revision of 
    allocations to that committee pursuant to paragraph (1).
        (3) Limitations.--The adjustments under this subsection shall 
    not exceed the lesser of--
            (A) the net revenue increase for a fiscal year resulting 
        from the enactment of legislation that extends Superfund taxes; 
        or
            (B) $898,000,000 in budget authority for a fiscal year and 
        the outlays flowing from such budget authority in all fiscal 
        years.
        (3) Readjustments.--In the House of Representatives, any 
    adjustments made under this subsection for any appropriations 
    measure or any conference report thereon may be readjusted if that 
    measure is not enacted into law.
    (b) Deficit Neutral Adjustments in the Senate.--
        (1) In general.--In the Senate, after the enactment of 
    legislation that reforms the Superfund program and extends 
    Superfund taxes, budget authority and outlays allocated to the 
    Committee on Appropriations under sections 302(a) and 602(a) of the 
    Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the appropriate functional 
    levels, the appropriate budget aggregates, and the discretionary 
    spending limits in section 201 of this resolution may be revised to 
    provide additional budget authority and the outlays flowing from 
    that budget authority for the Superfund program, pursuant to this 
    subsection.
        (2) Deficit neutral adjustments.--
            (A) Allocations.--
                (i) Committee allocations.--In the Senate, upon 
            reporting of an appropriations measure, or when a 
            conference committee submits a conference report thereon, 
            that appropriates funds for the Superfund program in excess 
            of $1,302,000,000, the chairman of the Committee on the 
            Budget of the Senate may submit revised allocations, 
            functional levels, budget aggregates, and discretionary 
            spending limits to carry out this section that adds to such 
            allocations, levels, aggregates, and limits an amount that 
            is equal to such excess. These revised allocations, levels, 
            aggregates, and limits shall be considered for the purposes 
            of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 as the allocations, 
            levels, aggregates, and limits contained in this 
            resolution.
                (ii) Committee suballocations.--The Committee on 
            Appropriations of the Senate may report appropriately 
            revised suballocations pursuant to sections 302(b)(1) and 
            602(b)(1) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 following 
            the revision of the allocations pursuant to clause (i).
            (B) Limitations.--The adjustments under this subsection 
        shall not exceed--
                (i) the net revenue increase for a fiscal year 
            resulting from the enactment of legislation that extends 
            Superfund taxes; and
                (ii) $898,000,000 in budget authority for a fiscal year 
            and the outlays flowing from such budget authority in all 
            fiscal years.

SEC. 305. TAX RESERVE FUND IN THE SENATE.

    (a) In General.--In the Senate, revenue and spending aggregates may 
be reduced and allocations may be revised for legislation that reduces 
revenues by providing family tax relief, fuel tax relief, and 
incentives to stimulate savings, investment, job creation, and economic 
growth if such legislation will not increase the deficit for--
        (1) fiscal year 1997;
        (2) the period of fiscal years 1997 through 2001; or
        (3) the period of fiscal years 2002 through 2006.
    (b) Revised Allocations.--Upon the consideration of legislation 
pursuant to subsection (a), the Chairman of the Committee on the Budget 
of the Senate may file with the Senate appropriately revised 
allocations under sections 302(a) and 602(a) of the Congressional 
Budget Act of 1974 and revised functional levels and aggregates to 
carry out this section. These revised allocations, functional levels, 
and aggregates shall be considered for the purposes of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 as allocations, functional levels, and 
aggregates contained in this resolution.
    (c) Reporting Revised Allocations.--The appropriate committee may 
report appropriately revised allocations pursuant to sections 302(b) 
and 602(b) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 to carry out this 
section.

SEC. 306. EXERCISE OF RULEMAKING POWERS.

    Congress adopts the provisions of this title--
        (1) as an exercise of the rulemaking power of the Senate and 
    the House of Representatives, respectively, and as such they shall 
    be considered as part of the rules of each House, or of that House 
    to which they specifically apply, and such rules shall supersede 
    other rules only to the extent that they are inconsistent 
    therewith; and
        (2) with full recognition of the constitutional right of either 
    House to change those rules (so far as they relate to that House) 
    at any time, in the same manner, and to the same extent as in the 
    case of any other rule of that House.

SEC. 307. GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN PREVENTION ALLOWANCE.

    (a) In General.--In the House of Representatives for consideration 
of a conference report, or in the Senate, the fiscal year 1997 outlay 
allocation made pursuant to sections 302(a) and 602(a) of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 to the Committees on Appropriations, 
the fiscal year 1997 outlay aggregate, the fiscal year 1997 
discretionary limit on nondefense outlays and other appropriate 
aggregates may be increased for a resolution making continuing 
appropriations for fiscal year 1997. These revised allocations, 
aggregates, and limits shall be considered for all purposes of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 as allocations, aggregates, and limits 
contained in this resolution and shall remain in effect for the 
consideration of any fiscal year 1997 appropriations measure.
    (b) Revised Allocations.--In the Senate, upon the consideration of 
a motion to proceed or an agreement to proceed to a resolution making 
continuing appropriations for fiscal year 1997, or in the House of 
Representatives, upon the filing of a conference report thereon, that 
complies with the fiscal year 1997 discretionary limit on nondefense 
budget authority, the Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the 
appropriate House may submit a revised outlay allocation for such 
committee and appropriately revised aggregates and limits to carry out 
this section.
    (c) Committee Suballocations.--The Committee on Appropriations of 
the appropriate House may report appropriately revised suballocations 
pursuant to sections 302(b)(1) and 602(b)(1) of the Congressional 
Budget Act of 1974 following the revision of allocations pursuant to 
this section.
    (d) Limitations.--The adjustments made under this section shall not 
exceed $1,337,000,000 in outlays for fiscal year 1997.

       TITLE IV--SENSE OF CONGRESS, HOUSE, AND SENATE PROVISIONS

SEC. 401. SENSE OF CONGRESS ON BASELINES.

    (a) Findings.--Congress finds that:
        (1) Baselines are projections of future spending if existing 
    policies remain unchanged.
        (2) Under baseline assumptions, spending automatically rises 
    with inflation even if such increases are not mandated under 
    existing law.
        (3) Baseline budgeting is inherently biased against policies 
    that would reduce the projected growth in spending because such 
    policies are depicted as spending reductions from an increasing 
    baseline.
        (4) The baseline concept has encouraged Congress to abdicate 
    its constitutional obligation to control the public purse for those 
    programs which are automatically funded.
    (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that baseline 
budgeting should be replaced with a budgetary model that requires 
justification of aggregate funding levels and maximizes congressional 
accountability for Federal spending.

SEC. 402. SENSE OF CONGRESS ON LOAN SALES.

    (a) Findings.--Congress finds that:
        (1) The House and Senate Appropriations Subcommittees on 
    Treasury, Postal Service, and General Government have stated that 
    ``more consideration should be given to the sale of nonperforming 
    loans held not only by HUD, but by all Federal agencies that 
    provide credit programs'' and directed the Office of Management and 
    Budget to direct Federal agencies to evaluate the value of their 
    credit programs and develop a plan for the privatization of such 
    credit programs.
        (2) The Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Commerce, 
    Justice, State, the Judiciary, and Related Agencies has directed 
    that the Small Business Administration should study and report to 
    Congress on the feasibility of private servicing of SBA loan 
    activities.
        (3) The House Appropriations Subcommittee on Agriculture, Rural 
    Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies 
    previously directed the Farmers Home Administration to ``explore 
    the potential savings that might occur from contract centralized 
    servicing''.
        (4) The Committee on Agriculture of the House has consistently 
    urged the Secretary of Agriculture to explore contracting out loan 
    servicing operations.
        (5) The General Accounting Office has found that ``Allowing the 
    public and private sectors to compete for the centralized servicing 
    (of loans) could mean reaping the benefits of the competitive 
    marketplace--greater efficiency, increased focus on customer needs, 
    increased innovation, and improved morale.''.
        (6) The House Committee on Small Business has recommended 
    ``that 40 percent of the loan servicing portfolio (for Disaster 
    Loans) be privatized''.
        (7) The President's Budget for Fiscal Year 1997 proposes to 
    review options for improving the quality of loan portfolio 
    management including contracting to the private sector.
    (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that the 
appropriate committees of the House and the Senate should report 
legislation authorizing the sale of such loan assets as they deem 
appropriate in order to contribute to Government downsizing, 
administrative cost savings, and improved services to borrowers.

SEC. 403. SENSE OF CONGRESS ON CHANGES IN MEDICAID.

    It is the sense of Congress that any legislation changing the 
medicaid program pursuant to this resolution should--
        (1) guarantee coverage for low-income children, pregnant women, 
    the elderly, and the disabled as described in the National 
    Governors' Association February 6, 1996, policy on reforming 
    medicaid, which was endorsed unanimously by our Nation's Governors;
        (2) maintain the medicaid program as a matching program while 
    providing a fairer and more equitable formula for calculating the 
    matching rate;
        (3) reject any illusory financing schemes;
        (4) continue existing law for Federal minimum quality standards 
    for nursing homes and the enforcement of those standards;
        (5) continue Federal rules that prevent wives or husbands from 
    being required to impoverish themselves in order to obtain and keep 
    medicaid benefits for their spouse requiring nursing home care and 
    continue existing prohibitions against the States requiring the 
    adult children of institutionalized patients from having to 
    contribute to the cost of nursing facility services; and
        (6) provide coverage of medicare premiums and cost-sharing 
    payments for low-income seniors consistent with the unanimous 
    National Governors' Association medicaid policy.

SEC. 404. SENSE OF CONGRESS ON IMPACT OF LEGISLATION ON CHILDREN.

    (a) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that Congress 
should not adopt or enact any legislation that will increase the number 
of children who are hungry, homeless, poor, or medically uninsured.
    (b) Legislative Accountability for Impact on Children.--In the 
event legislation enacted to comply with this resolution results in an 
increase in the number of hungry, homeless, poor, or medically 
uninsured by the end of fiscal year 1997, Congress shall revisit the 
provisions of such legislation which caused such increase and shall, as 
soon as practicable thereafter, adopt legislation which would halt any 
continuation of such increase.

SEC. 405. SENSE OF CONGRESS ON DEBT REPAYMENT.

    It is the sense of Congress that--
        (1) Congress has a basic moral and ethical responsibility to 
    future generations to repay the Federal debt;
        (2) Congress should enact a plan that balances the budget and 
    also develop a regimen for paying off the Federal debt;
        (3) after the budget is balanced, a surplus should be created 
    which can be used to begin paying off the debt; and
        (4) such a plan should be formulated and implemented so that 
    this generation can save future generations from the crushing 
    burdens of the Federal debt.

SEC. 406. SENSE OF CONGRESS ON COMMITMENT TO A BALANCED BUDGET BY 
              FISCAL YEAR 2002.

    It is the sense of Congress that the President and Congress should 
continue to adhere to the statutory commitment made by both parties on 
November 20, 1995, to enact legislation to achieve a balanced budget 
not later than fiscal year 2002 as estimated by the Congressional 
Budget Office.

SEC. 407. SENSE OF CONGRESS THAT TAX REDUCTIONS SHOULD BENEFIT WORKING 
              FAMILIES.

    It is the sense of Congress that this concurrent resolution on the 
budget assumes any reductions in taxes should be structured to benefit 
working families by providing family tax relief and incentives to 
stimulate savings, investment, job creation, and economic growth.

SEC. 408. SENSE OF CONGRESS ON A BIPARTISAN COMMISSION ON THE SOLVENCY 
              OF MEDICARE.

    (a) Findings.--Congress finds that--
        (1) the Trustees of Medicare have concluded that ``the Medicare 
    program is clearly unsustainable in its present form'';
        (2) the Trustees of Medicare concluded in 1995 that ``the 
    Hospital Insurance Trust Fund, which pays inpatient hospital 
    expenses, will be able to pay benefits for only about 7 years and 
    is severely out of financial balance in the long range'';
        (3) preliminary data made available to Congress indicate that 
    the Hospital Insurance Trust Fund will go bankrupt in the year 
    2001, rather than the year 2002, as predicted last year;
        (4) the Public Trustees of Medicare have concluded that ``the 
    Supplementary Medical Insurance Trust Fund shows a rate of growth 
    of costs which is clearly unsustainable'';
        (5) the Bipartisan Commission on Entitlement and Tax Reform 
    concluded that, absent long-term changes in Medicare, projected 
    Medicare outlays will increase from about 4 percent of the payroll 
    tax base today to over 15 percent of the payroll tax base by the 
    year 2030;
        (6) the Bipartisan Commission on Entitlement and Tax Reform 
    recommended, by a vote of 30 to 1, that spending and revenues 
    available for Medicare must be brought into long-term balance; and
        (7) in the most recent Trustees' report, the Public Trustees of 
    Medicare ``strongly recommend that the crisis presented by the 
    financial condition of the Medicare trust funds be urgently 
    addressed on a comprehensive basis, including a review of the 
    program's financing methods, benefit provisions, and delivery 
    mechanisms''.
    (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that in order 
to meet the aggregates and levels in this budget resolution--
        (1) a special bipartisan commission should be established 
    immediately to make recommendations concerning the most appropriate 
    response to the short-term solvency and long-term sustainability 
    issues facing the Medicare program which do not include tax 
    increases in any form, including transfers of spending from the 
    Medicare Part A program to the Part B program; and
        (2) the commission should report to Congress its 
    recommendations prior to the adoption of a concurrent budget 
    resolution for fiscal year 1998 in order that the committees of 
    jurisdiction may consider these recommendations in fashioning an 
    appropriate congressional response.

SEC. 409. SENSE OF CONGRESS ON MEDICARE TRANSFERS.

    (a) Findings.--Congress finds that--
        (1) home health care provides a broad spectrum of health and 
    social services to approximately 3,500,000 Medicare beneficiaries 
    in the comfort of their homes;
        (2) the President has proposed reimbursing the first 100 home 
    health care visits after a hospital stay through Medicare Part A 
    and reimbursing all other visits through Medicare Part B, shifting 
    responsibility for $55,000,000,000 of spending from the Hospital 
    Insurance Trust Fund to the general revenues that pay for Medicare 
    Part B;
        (3) such a transfer does nothing to control Medicare spending, 
    and is merely a bookkeeping change which artificially extends the 
    solvency of the Hospital Insurance Trust Fund;
        (4) this transfer of funds camouflages the need to make changes 
    in the Medicare program to ensure the long-term solvency of the 
    Hospital Insurance Trust Fund, which the Congressional Budget 
    Office now states will become bankrupt in the year 2001, a year 
    earlier than projected in the 1995 report by the Trustees of the 
    Social Security and Medicare Trust Funds;
        (5) Congress will be breaking a commitment to the American 
    people if it does not act to ensure the solvency of the entire 
    Medicare program in both the short- and long-term;
        (6) the President's proposal would force those in need of 
    chronic care services to rely upon the availability of general 
    revenues to provide financing for these services, making them more 
    vulnerable to benefits changes than under current law; and
        (7) according to the National Association of Home Care, 
    shifting Medicare home care payments from Part A to Part B would 
    deemphasize the importance of home care by eliminating its status 
    as part of the Hospital Insurance Trust Fund, thereby undermining 
    access to the less costly form of care.
    (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that in meeting 
the spending targets specified in the budget resolution, Congress 
should not accept the President's proposal to transfer spending from 
one part of Medicare to another in its efforts to preserve, protect, 
and improve the Medicare program.

SEC. 410. SENSE OF CONGRESS REGARDING CHANGES IN THE MEDICARE PROGRAM.

    (a) Findings.--Congress finds that, in achieving the spending 
levels specified in this resolution--
        (1) the Public Trustees of Medicare have concluded that ``the 
    Medicare program is clearly unsustainable in its present form'';
        (2) the President has said his goal is to keep the Medicare 
    Hospital Insurance Trust Fund solvent for more than a decade, but 
    his budget transfers $55,000,000,000 of home health spending from 
    Medicare Part A to Medicare Part B;
        (3) the transfer of home health spending threatens the delivery 
    of home health services to 3.5 million Medicare beneficiaries;
        (4) such a transfer increases the burden on general revenues, 
    including income taxes paid by working Americans, by 
    $55,000,000,000;
        (5) such a transfer artificially inflates the solvency of the 
    Medicare Hospital Insurance Trust Fund, misleading Congress, 
    Medicare beneficiaries, and working taxpayers;
        (6) the Director of the Congressional Budget Office has 
    certified that, without such a transfer, the President's budget 
    extends the solvency of the Hospital Insurance Trust Fund for only 
    one additional year; and
        (7) without misleading transfers, the President's budget 
    therefore fails to achieve his own stated goal for the Medicare 
    Hospital Insurance Trust Fund.
    (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that, in 
achieving the spending levels specified in this resolution, Congress 
assumes that Congress would--
        (1) keep the Medicare Hospital Insurance Trust Fund solvent for 
    more than a decade, as recommended by the President; and
        (2) accept the President's proposed level of Medicare Part B 
    savings over the period 1997 through 2002; but would
        (3) reject the President's proposal to transfer home health 
    spending from one part of Medicare to another, which threatens the 
    delivery of home health care services to 3.5 million Medicare 
    beneficiaries, artificially inflates the solvency of the Medicare 
    Hospital Insurance Trust Fund, and increases the burden on general 
    revenues, including income taxes paid by working Americans, by 
    $55,000,000,000.

SEC. 411. SENSE OF CONGRESS REGARDING REVENUE ASSUMPTIONS.

    (a) Findings.--Congress finds the following:
        (1) Corporations and individuals have clear responsibility to 
    adhere to environmental laws. When they do not, and environmental 
    damage results, the Federal and State governments may impose fines 
    and penalties, and assess polluters for the cost of remediation.
        (2) Assessment of these costs is important in the enforcement 
    process. They appropriately penalize wrongdoing. They discourage 
    future environmental damage. They ensure that taxpayers do not bear 
    the financial brunt of cleaning up after damages done by polluters.
        (3) In the case of the Exxon Valdez oil spill disaster in 
    Prince William Sound, Alaska, for example, the corporate settlement 
    with the Federal Government totaled $900,000,000.
    (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that 
assumptions in this resolution assume an appropriate amount of revenues 
per year through legislation that will not allow deductions for fines 
and penalties arising from a failure to comply with Federal or State 
environmental or health protection laws.

SEC. 412. SENSE OF CONGRESS REGARDING DOMESTIC VIOLENCE.

    The assumptions underlying functional totals in this budget 
resolution include:
        (1) Findings.--The Senate finds that:
            (A) Violence against women is the leading cause of physical 
        injury to women. The Department of Justice estimates that over 
        1 million violent crimes against women are committed by 
        domestic partners annually.
            (B) Domestic violence dramatically affects the victim's 
        ability to participate in the workforce. A University of 
        Minnesota survey reported that one-quarter of battered women 
        surveyed had lost a job partly because of being abused and that 
        over half of these women had been harassed by their abuser at 
        work.
            (C) Domestic violence is often intensified as women seek to 
        gain economic independence through attending school or job 
        training programs. Batterers have been reported to prevent 
        women from attending such programs or sabotage their efforts at 
        self-improvement.
            (D) Nationwide surveys of service providers prepared by the 
        Taylor Institute of Chicago, document, for the first time, the 
        interrelationship between domestic violence and welfare by 
        showing that between 50 percent and 80 percent of women in 
        welfare-to-work programs are current or past victims of 
        domestic violence.
            (E) The American Psychological Association has reported 
        that violence against women is usually witnessed by their 
        children, who as a result can suffer severe psychological, 
        cognitive and physical damage and some studies have found that 
        children who witness violence in their homes have a greater 
        propensity to commit violent acts in their homes and 
        communities when they become adults.
            (F) Over half of the women surveyed by the Taylor Institute 
        stayed with their batterers because they lacked the resources 
        to support themselves and their children. The surveys also 
        found that the availability of economic support is a critical 
        factor in women's ability to leave abusive situations that 
        threaten themselves and their children.
            (G) Proposals to restructure the welfare programs may 
        impact the availability of the economic support and the safety 
        net necessary to enable poor women to flee abuse without 
        risking homelessness and starvation for their families.
        (2) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that:
            (A) No welfare reform provision should be enacted by 
        Congress unless and until Congress considers whether such 
        welfare reform provisions would exacerbate violence against 
        women and their children, further endanger women's lives, make 
        it more difficult for women to escape domestic violence, or 
        further punish women victimized by violence.
            (B) Any welfare reform measure enacted by Congress should 
        require that any welfare-to-work, education, or job placement 
        programs implemented by the States address the impact of 
        domestic violence on welfare recipients.

SEC. 413. SENSE OF CONGRESS REGARDING STUDENT LOANS.

    (a) Findings.--Congress finds that--
        (1) over the last 60 years, education and advancements in 
    knowledge have accounted for 37 percent of our Nation's economic 
    growth;
        (2) a college degree significantly increases job stability, 
    resulting in an unemployment rate among college graduates less than 
    half that of those with high school diplomas;
        (3) a person with a bachelor's degree will average 50-55 
    percent more in lifetime earnings than a person with a high school 
    diploma;
        (4) education is a key to providing alternatives to crime and 
    violence, and is a cost-effective strategy for breaking cycles of 
    poverty and moving welfare recipients to work;
        (5) a highly educated populace is necessary to the effective 
    functioning of democracy and to a growing economy, and the 
    opportunity to gain a college education helps advance the American 
    ideals of progress and social equality;
        (6) a highly educated and flexible work force is an essential 
    component of economic growth and competitiveness;
        (7) for many families, Federal Student Aid programs make the 
    difference in the ability of students to attend college;
        (8) in 1994, nearly 6 million postsecondary students received 
    some kind of financial assistance to help them pay for the costs of 
    schooling;
        (9) since 1988, college costs have risen by 54 percent, and 
    student borrowing has increased by 219 percent;
        (10) in fiscal year 1996, the Balanced Budget Act achieved 
    savings without reducing student loan limits or increasing fees to 
    students or parents; and
        (11) under this budget resolution student loans will increase 
    from $26.6 billion today to $37.4 billion in 2002; the 
    Congressional Budget Office projects that these are the exact same 
    levels that would occur under President Clinton's student loan 
    policies.
    (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that the 
aggregates and functional levels included in this budget resolution 
assume that savings in student loans can be achieved without any 
program change that would increase costs to students and parents or 
decrease accessibility to student loans.

SEC. 414. SENSE OF CONGRESS REGARDING ADDITIONAL CHARGES UNDER THE 
              MEDICARE PROGRAM.

    (a) Findings.--Congress finds that--
        (1) senior citizens must spend more than 1 dollar in 5 of their 
    limited incomes to purchase the health care they need;
        (2) \2/3\ of spending under the Medicare program under title 
    XVIII of the Social Security Act is for senior citizens with annual 
    incomes of less than $15,000;
        (3) fee-for-service cost increases have forced higher out-of-
    pocket costs for seniors; and
        (4) the current Medicare managed care experience has 
    demonstrated that Medicare HMO enrollees face lower out-of-pocket 
    costs when they join HMO's in competitive markets; also, over one 
    half of these enrollees pay no Medicare premiums and receive extra 
    benefits free of charge, such as prescription drugs and eye 
    glasses, due to competitive market forces.
    (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that any 
reconciliation bill considered during the second session of the 104th 
Congress should maintain Medicare beneficiaries right to remain in the 
current Medicare fee-for-service program and also should maintain the 
existing prohibitions against additional charges by providers under the 
Medicare fee-for-service program under title XVIII of the Social 
Security Act (``balance billing''), and that Medicare beneficiaries 
should be offered the greatest opportunity possible to choose private 
plans that will offer lower out-of-pocket costs than what they 
currently pay in the Medicare fee-for-service program, and to choose a 
health care delivery option that best meets their needs.

SEC. 415. SENSE OF CONGRESS REGARDING REQUIREMENTS THAT WELFARE 
              RECIPIENTS BE DRUG-FREE.

    In recognition of the fact that American workers are required to be 
drug-free in the workplace, it is the sense of Congress that this 
concurrent resolution on the budget assumes that the States may require 
welfare recipients to be drug-free as a condition for receiving such 
benefits and that random drug testing may be used to enforce such 
requirements.

SEC. 416. SENSE OF CONGRESS ON AN ACCURATE INDEX FOR INFLATION.

    (a) Findings.--Congress finds that--
        (1) a significant portion of Federal expenditures and revenues 
    are indexed to measurements of inflation;
        (2) a variety of inflation indices exist which vary according 
    to the accuracy with which such indices measure increases in the 
    cost of living; and
        (3) Federal Government usage of inflation indices which 
    overstate true inflation has the demonstrated effect of 
    accelerating Federal spending, increasing the Federal budget 
    deficit, increasing Federal borrowing, and thereby enlarging the 
    projected burden on future American taxpayers.
    (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that the 
assumptions underlying this budget resolution include that all Federal 
spending and revenues which are indexed for inflation should be 
calibrated by the most accurate inflation indices which are available 
to the Federal Government.

SEC. 417. SENSE OF CONGRESS THAT THE 1993 INCOME TAX INCREASE ON SOCIAL 
              SECURITY BENEFITS SHOULD BE REPEALED.

    (a) Findings.--Congress finds that--
        (1) the fiscal year 1994 budget proposal of President Clinton 
    to raise Federal income taxes on the Social Security benefits of 
    senior citizens with income as low as $25,000, and those provisions 
    of the fiscal year 1994 recommendations of the Budget Resolution 
    and the 1993 Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act in which the One 
    Hundred Third Congress voted to raise Federal income taxes on the 
    Social Security benefits of senior citizens with income as low as 
    $34,000 should be repealed;
        (2) President Clinton has stated that he believes he raised 
    Federal taxes too much in 1993; and
        (3) the budget resolution should react to President Clinton's 
    fiscal year 1997 budget which documents the fact that in the 
    history of the United States, the total tax burden has never been 
    greater than it is today.
    (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that the 
assumptions underlying this resolution include--
        (1) that raising Federal income taxes in 1993 on the Social 
    Security benefits of middle-class individuals with income as low as 
    $34,000 was a mistake;
        (2) that the Federal income tax hike on Social Security 
    benefits imposed in 1993 by the One Hundred Third Congress and 
    signed into law by President Clinton should be repealed; and
        (3) President Clinton should work with Congress to repeal the 
    1993 Federal income tax hike on Social Security benefits in a 
    manner that would not adversely affect the Social Security Trust 
    Fund or the Medicare Part A Trust Fund, and should ensure that such 
    repeal is coupled with offsetting reductions in Federal spending.

SEC. 418. SENSE OF CONGRESS REGARDING THE ADMINISTRATION'S PRACTICE 
              REGARDING THE PROSECUTION OF DRUG SMUGGLERS.

    (a) Findings.--Congress finds that--
        (1) drug use is devastating to the Nation, particularly among 
    juveniles, and has led juveniles to become involved in interstate 
    gangs and to participate in violent crime;
        (2) drug use has experienced a dramatic resurgence among our 
    youth;
        (3) the number of youths aged 12-17 using marijuana has 
    increased from 1.6 million in 1992 to 2.9 million in 1994, and the 
    category of ``recent marijuana use'' increased a staggering 200 
    percent among 14- to 15-year-olds over the same period;
        (4) since 1992, there has been a 52 percent jump in the number 
    of high school seniors using drugs on a monthly basis, even as 
    worrisome declines are noted in peer disapproval of drug use;
        (5) 1 in 3 high school students uses marijuana;
        (6) 12- to 17-year-olds who use marijuana are 85 percent more 
    likely to graduate to cocaine than those who abstain from 
    marijuana;
        (7) juveniles who reach 21 without ever having used drugs 
    almost never try them later in life;
        (8) the latest results from the Drug Abuse Warning Network show 
    that marijuana-related episodes jumped 39 percent and are running 
    at 155 percent above the 1990 level, and that methamphetamine cases 
    have risen 256 percent over the 1991 level;
        (9) between February 1993 and February 1995 the retail price of 
    a gram of cocaine fell from $172 to $137, and that of a gram of 
    heroin also fell from $2,032 to $1,278;
        (10) it has been reported that the Department of Justice, 
    through the United States Attorney for the Southern District of 
    California, has adopted a policy of allowing certain foreign drug 
    smugglers to avoid prosecution altogether by being released to 
    Mexico;
        (11) it has been reported that in the past year approximately 
    2,300 suspected narcotics traffickers were taken into custody for 
    bringing illegal drugs across the border, but approximately one in 
    four were returned to their country of origin without being 
    prosecuted;
        (12) it has been reported that the United States Customs 
    Service is operating under guidelines limiting any prosecution in 
    marijuana cases to cases involving 125 pounds of marijuana or more;
        (13) it has been reported that suspects possessing as much as 
    32 pounds of methamphetamine and 37,000 Quaalude tablets were not 
    prosecuted but were, instead, allowed to return to their countries 
    of origin after their drugs and vehicles were confiscated;
        (14) it has been reported that after a seizure of 158 pounds of 
    cocaine, one defendant was cited and released because there was no 
    room at the Federal jail and charges against her were dropped;
        (15) it has been reported that some smugglers have been caught 
    two or more times--even in the same week--yet still were not 
    prosecuted;
        (16) the number of defendants prosecuted for violations of the 
    Federal drug laws has dropped from 25,033 in 1992 to 22,926 in 
    1995;
        (17) this Congress has increased the funding of the Federal 
    Bureau of Prisons by 11.7 percent over the 1995 appropriations 
    level; and
        (18) this Congress has increased the funding of the Immigration 
    and Naturalization Service by 23.5 percent over the 1995 
    appropriations level.
    (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that--
        (1) the function totals and aggregates underlying this 
    resolution assume that the Attorney General should promptly 
    investigate this matter and report, within 30 days, to the Chair of 
    the Senate and House Committees on the Judiciary; and
        (2) the Attorney General should ensure that cases involving the 
    smuggling of drugs into the United States are vigorously 
    prosecuted.

SEC. 419. SENSE OF CONGRESS ON CORPORATE SUBSIDIES.

    It is the sense of Congress that the functional levels and 
aggregates in this budget resolution assume that--
        (1) the Federal budget contains tens of billions of dollars in 
    payments, benefits, and programs that primarily assist profit-
    making enterprises and industries rather than provide a clear and 
    compelling public interest;
        (2) corporate subsidies can provide unfair competitive 
    advantages to certain industries and industry segments;
        (3) at a time when millions of Americans are being asked to 
    sacrifice in order to balance the budget, the corporate sector 
    should bear its share of the burden; and
        (4) Federal payments, benefits, and programs which 
    predominantly benefit a particular industry or segment of an 
    industry, rather than provide a clear and compelling public 
    benefit, should be reformed or terminated in order to provide 
    additional tax relief, deficit reduction, or to achieve the savings 
    necessary to meet this resolution's instructions and levels.

SEC. 420. SENSE OF CONGRESS REGARDING WELFARE REFORM.

    (a) Congress finds that--
        (1) this resolution assumes substantial savings from welfare 
    reform;
        (2) children born out of wedlock are five times more likely to 
    be poor and about ten times more likely to be extremely poor and 
    therefore are more likely to receive welfare benefits than children 
    from two-parent families; and
        (3) high rates of out-of-wedlock births are associated with a 
    host of other social pathologies; for example, children of single 
    mothers are twice as likely to drop out of high school; boys whose 
    fathers are absent are more likely to engage in criminal 
    activities; and girls in single-parent families are three times 
    more likely to have children out of wedlock themselves.
    (b) It is the sense of Congress that any comprehensive legislation 
sent to the President that balances the budget by a certain date and 
that includes welfare reform provisions and that is agreed to by 
Congress and the President shall also contain to the maximum extent 
possible a strategy for reducing the rate of out-of-wedlock births and 
encouraging family formation.

SEC. 421. SENSE OF CONGRESS ON FCC SPECTRUM AUCTIONS.

    It is the sense of Congress that--
        (1) the Congressional Budget Office has scored revenue expected 
    to be raised from the auction of Federal Communications Commission 
    licenses for various services;
        (2) for budget scoring purposes, Congress has assumed that such 
    auctions would occur in a prompt and expeditious manner and that 
    revenue raised by such auctions would flow to the Federal treasury;
        (3) this resolution assumes that the revenue to be raised from 
    auctions totals billions of dollars;
        (4) this resolution makes assumptions that services would be 
    auctioned where the Federal Communications Commission has not yet 
    conducted auctions for such services, such as Local Multipoint 
    Distribution Service (LMDS), licenses for paging services, final 
    broadband PCS licenses, narrow band PCS licenses, licenses for 
    unserved cellular, and Digital Audio Radio (DARS), and other 
    subscription services, revenue from which has been assumed in 
    Congressional budgetary calculations and in determining the level 
    of the deficit; and
        (5) the Commission's service rules can dramatically affect 
    license values and auction revenues and therefore the Commission 
    should act expeditiously and without further delay to conduct 
    auctions of licenses in a manner that maximizes revenue, increases 
    efficiency, and enhances competition.

SEC. 422. SENSE OF THE HOUSE ON EMERGENCIES.

    (a) Findings.--The House of Representatives finds that:
        (1) The Budget Enforcement Act of 1990 exempted from the 
    discretionary spending limits and the Pay-As-You-Go requirements 
    for entitlement and tax legislation funding requirements that are 
    designated by Congress and the President as an emergency.
        (2) Congress and the President have increasingly misused the 
    emergency designation by--
            (A) designating as emergencies funding requirements that 
        are predictable and do not pose a threat to life, property, or 
        national security,
            (B) designating emergencies with the sole purpose of 
        circumventing statutory and congressional spending limitations, 
        and
            (C) adding to emergency legislation controversial items 
        that would not otherwise withstand public scrutiny.
    (b) Sense of the House.--It is the sense of the House of 
Representatives that in order to balance the Federal budget Congress 
should consider alternative approaches to budgeting for emergencies, 
including codifying the definition of an emergency, establishing 
contingency funds to pay for emergencies, and fully offsetting the 
costs of emergencies with rescissions of spending authority that would 
have been obligated but for the rescission.

SEC. 423. SENSE OF THE SENATE ON FUNDING TO ASSIST YOUTH AT RISK.

    (a) Findings.--The Senate finds that--
        (1) there is an increasing prevalence of violence and drug use 
    among this country's youth;
        (2) in recognizing the magnitude of this problem, the Federal 
    Government must continue to maximize efforts in addressing the 
    increasing prevalence of violence and drug use among this country's 
    youth, with necessary adherence to budget guidelines and proven 
    program effectiveness;
        (3) the Federal Bureau of Investigation reports that between 
    1985 and 1994, juvenile arrests for violent crime increased by 75 
    percent nationwide;
        (4) the United States Attorney General reports that 20 years 
    ago, fewer than half our cities reported gang activity and now, a 
    generation later, reasonable estimates indicate that there are more 
    than 500,000 gang members in more than 16,000 gangs on the streets 
    of our cities resulting in more than 580,000 gang-related crimes in 
    1993;
        (5) the Justice Department's Office of Juvenile Justice and 
    Delinquency Prevention reports that in 1994, law enforcement 
    agencies made over 2,700,000 arrests of persons under age 18, with 
    juveniles accounting for 19 percent of all violent crime arrests 
    across the country;
        (6) the Congressional Task Force on National Drug Policy 
    recently set forth a series of recommendations for strengthening 
    the criminal justice and law enforcement effort, including domestic 
    prevention efforts reinforcing the idea that prevention begins at 
    home;
        (7) the Office of National Drug Control Policy reports that 
    between 1991 and 1995, marijuana use among 8th, 10th, and 12th 
    graders has increased and is continuing to spiral upward; and
        (8) the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention reports that in 
    1993, substance abuse played a role in over 70 percent of rapes, 
    over 60 percent of incidents of child abuse, and almost 60 percent 
    of murders nationwide.
    (b) Sense of the Senate.--It is the sense of the Senate that the 
function totals and aggregates underlying this concurrent resolution on 
the budget assume that--
        (1) sufficient funding should be provided to programs of proven 
    program effectiveness which assist youth at risk to reduce illegal 
    drug use and the incidence of youth crime and violence;
        (2) priority should be given to determine ``what works'' 
    through scientifically recognized, independent evaluations of 
    existing programs to maximize the Federal investment and efforts 
    should be made to reform those programs of no proven benefit;
        (3) efforts should be made to ensure coordination and eliminate 
    duplication among federally supported at-risk youth programs; and
        (4) special efforts should be made to increase successful 
    interdiction of the flow of illegal drugs into the United States 
    and into communities nationwide.

SEC. 424. SENSE OF THE SENATE ON LONG-TERM TRENDS IN BUDGET ESTIMATES.

    It is the sense of the Senate that--
        (1) the report accompanying a concurrent resolution on the 
    budget should include an analysis, prepared after consultation with 
    the Director of the Congressional Budget Office, of the concurrent 
    resolution's impact on likely budgetary trends during the next 30 
    fiscal years; and
        (2) the President should include in his budget each year, an 
    analysis of the budget's impact on revenues and outlays for 
    entitlements for the period of 30 fiscal years, and that the 
    President should also include likely budgetary trends during the 
    next 30 fiscal years, and that the President should also include 
    generational accounting information each year in the President's 
    budget.

SEC. 425. SENSE OF THE SENATE ON REPEAL OF THE GAS TAX.

    (a) Findings.--The Senate finds that--
        (1) the President originally proposed a $72,000,000,000 energy 
    excise tax (the so-called BTU tax) as part of the Omnibus Budget 
    Reconciliation Act of 1993 (OBRA 93) which included a new tax on 
    transportation fuels;
        (2) in response to opposition in the Senate to the BTU tax, the 
    President and Congress adopted instead a new 4.3 cents per gallon 
    transportation fuels tax as part of OBRA 93, which represented a 30 
    percent increase in the existing motor fuels tax;
        (3) the OBRA 93 transportation fuels tax has cost American 
    motorists an estimated $14,000,000,000 to $15,000,000,000 since it 
    went into effect on October 1, 1993;
        (4) the OBRA 93 transportation fuels tax is regressive, 
    creating a larger financial impact on lower and middle income 
    motorists than on upper income motorists;
        (5) the OBRA 93 transportation fuels tax imposes a 
    disproportionate burden on rural citizens who do not have access to 
    public transportation services, and who must rely on their 
    automobiles and drive long distances, to work, to shop, and to 
    receive medical care;
        (6) the average American faces a substantial tax burden, and 
    the increase of this tax burden through the OBRA 93 transportation 
    fuels tax represented and continues to represent an inappropriate 
    and unwarranted means of reducing the Nation's budget deficit;
        (7) retail gasoline prices in the United States have increased 
    an average of 19 cents per gallon since the beginning of the year 
    to the highest level since the Persian Gulf War, and the OBRA 93 
    transportation fuels tax exacerbates the impact of this price 
    increase on consumers;
        (8) continuation of the OBRA 93 transportation fuels tax will 
    exacerbate the impact on consumers of any future gasoline price 
    spikes that result from market conditions; and
        (9) the fiscal year 1997 budget resolution will assume a net 
    tax cut totaling $122,000,000,000 over six years, which exceeds the 
    revenue impact of a repeal of the OBRA 93 transportation fuels tax, 
    and will establish a reserve fund which may be used to provide 
    other forms of tax relief, including relief from the OBRA 93 
    transportation fuels tax, on a deficit neutral basis.
    (b) Sense of the Senate.--It is the sense of the Senate that the 
revenue levels and procedures in this resolution provide that--
        (1) Congress and the President should immediately approve 
    legislation to repeal the 4.3 cents per gallon transportation fuels 
    tax contained in the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1993 
    through the end of 1996;
        (2) Congress and the President should approve, through the 
    fiscal year 1997 budget process, legislation to permanently repeal 
    the 4.3 cents per gallon transportation fuels tax contained in the 
    Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1993; and
        (3) the savings generated by the repeal of the 4.3 cents per 
    gallon transportation fuels tax contained in OBRA 93 should be 
    fully passed on to consumers.

SEC. 426. SENSE OF THE SENATE REGARDING THE USE OF BUDGETARY SAVINGS.

    (a) Findings.--The Senate finds that--
        (1) in August of 1994, the Bipartisan Commission on Entitlement 
    and Tax Reform issued an Interim Report to the President, which 
    found that, ``To ensure that today's debt and spending commitments 
    do not unfairly burden America's children, the Government must act 
    now. A bipartisan coalition of Congress, led by the President, must 
    resolve the long-term imbalance between the Government's 
    entitlement promises and the funds it will have available to pay 
    for them'';
        (2) unless Congress and the President act together in a 
    bipartisan way, overall Federal spending is projected by the 
    Commission to rise from the current level of slightly over 22 
    percent of the Gross Domestic Product of the United States 
    (hereafter in this section referred as ``GDP'') to over 37 percent 
    of GDP by the year 2030;
        (3) the source of that growth is not domestic discretionary 
    spending, which is approximately the same portion of GDP now as it 
    was in 1969, the last time at which the Federal budget was in 
    balance;
        (4) mandatory spending was only 29.6 percent of the Federal 
    budget in 1963, but is estimated to account for 72 percent of the 
    Federal budget in the year 2003;
        (5) Social Security, Medicare and medicaid, together with 
    interest on the national debt, are the largest sources of the 
    growth of mandatory spending;
        (6) ensuring the long-term future of the Social Security system 
    is essential to protecting the retirement security of the American 
    people;
        (7) the Social Security Trust Fund is projected to begin 
    spending more than it takes in by approximately the year 2013, with 
    Federal budget deficits rising rapidly thereafter unless 
    appropriate policy changes are made;
        (8) ensuring the future of Medicare and medicaid is essential 
    to protecting access to high-quality health care for senior 
    citizens and poor women and children;
        (9) Federal health care expenses have been rising at double 
    digit rates, and are projected to triple to 11 percent of GDP by 
    the year 2030 unless appropriate policy changes are made; and
        (10) due to demographic factors, Federal health care expenses 
    are projected to double by the year 2030, even if health care cost 
    inflation is restrained after 1999, so that costs for each person 
    of a given age grow no faster than the economy.
    (b) Sense of the Senate.--It is the sense of the Senate that budget 
savings in the mandatory spending area should be used--
        (1) to protect and enhance the retirement security of the 
    American people by ensuring the long-term future of the Social 
    Security system;
        (2) to protect and enhance the health care security of senior 
    citizens and poor Americans by ensuring the long-term future of 
    Medicare and medicaid; and
        (3) to restore and maintain Federal budget discipline, to 
    ensure that the level of private investment necessary for long-term 
    economic growth and prosperity is available.

SEC. 427. SENSE OF THE SENATE REGARDING THE TRANSFER OF EXCESS 
              GOVERNMENT COMPUTERS TO PUBLIC SCHOOLS.

    (a) Assumptions.--The figures contained in this resolution are 
based on the following assumptions:
        (1) America's children must obtain the necessary skills and 
    tools needed to succeed in the technologically advanced 21st 
    century;
        (2) Executive Order 12999 outlines the need to make modern 
    computer technology an integral part of every classroom, provide 
    teachers with the professional development they need to use new 
    technologies effectively, connect classrooms to the National 
    Information Infrastructure, and encourage the creation of excellent 
    education software;
        (3) many private corporations have donated educational software 
    to schools, which are lacking the necessary computer hardware to 
    utilize this equipment;
        (4) current inventories of excess Federal Government computers 
    are being conducted in each Federal agency; and
        (5) there is no current communication being made between 
    Federal agencies with this excess equipment and the schools in need 
    of these computers.
    (b) Sense of the Senate.--It is the sense of the Senate that the 
functional totals and aggregates in this budget resolution assume that 
the General Services Administration should place a high priority on 
facilitating direct transfer of excess Federal Government computers to 
public schools and community-based educational organizations.

SEC. 428. SENSE OF THE SENATE ON FEDERAL RETREATS.

    It is the sense of the Senate that the assumptions underlying the 
function totals and aggregates in this resolution assume that all 
Federal agencies will refrain from using Federal funds for expenses 
incurred during training sessions or retreats off Federal property, 
unless Federal property is not available.

SEC. 429. SENSE OF THE SENATE REGARDING THE ESSENTIAL AIR SERVICE 
              PROGRAM OF THE DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION.

    (a) Findings.--The Senate finds that--
        (1) the essential air service program of the Department of 
    Transportation under subchapter II of chapter 417 of title 49, 
    United States Code--
            (A) provides essential airline access to isolated rural 
        communities across the United States;
            (B) is necessary for the economic growth and development of 
        rural communities;
            (C) connects small rural communities to the national air 
        transportation system of the United States;
            (D) is a critical component of the national transportation 
        system of the United States; and
            (E) provides air service to 108 communities in 30 States; 
        and
        (2) the National Commission to Ensure a Strong Competitive 
    Airline Industry established under section 204 of the Airport and 
    Airway Safety, Capacity, Noise Improvement, and Intermodal 
    Transportation Act of 1992 recommended maintaining the essential 
    air service program with a sufficient level of funding to continue 
    to provide air service to small communities.
    (b) Sense of the Senate.--It is the sense of the Senate that the 
essential air service program of the Department of Transportation under 
subchapter II of chapter 417 of title 49, United States Code, should 
receive a sufficient level of funding to continue to provide air 
service to small rural communities that qualify for assistance under 
the program.

SEC. 430. SENSE OF THE SENATE REGARDING EQUAL RETIREMENT SAVINGS FOR 
              HOMEMAKERS.

    (a) Findings.--The Senate finds that the assumptions of this budget 
resolution take into account that--
        (1) by teaching and feeding our children and caring for our 
    elderly, American homemakers are an important, vital part of our 
    society;
        (2) homemakers retirement needs are the same as all Americans, 
    and thus they need every opportunity to save and invest for 
    retirement;
        (3) because they are living on a single income, homemakers and 
    their spouses often have less income for savings;
        (4) individual retirement accounts are provided by Congress in 
    the Internal Revenue Code to assist Americans for retirement 
    savings;
        (5) currently, individual retirement accounts permit workers 
    other than homemakers to make deductible contributions of $2,000 a 
    year, but limit homemakers to deductible contributions of $250 a 
    year; and
        (6) limiting homemakers individual retirement account 
    contributions to an amount less than the contributions of other 
    workers discriminates against homemakers.
    (b) Sense of the Senate.--It is the sense of the Senate that the 
revenue level assumed in this budget resolution provides for 
legislation to make individual retirement account deductible 
contribution limits for homemakers equal to the individual retirement 
account deductible contribution limits for all other American workers, 
and that Congress and the President should immediately approve such 
legislation in the appropriate reconciliation vehicle.

SEC. 431. SENSE OF THE SENATE ON THE NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH 
              FUNDING FOR ANTI-ADDICTION DRUGS.

    It is the sense of the Senate that amounts appropriated for the 
National Institutes of Health should provide funding for additional 
research on an anti-addiction drug to block the craving for illicit 
addictive substances.

SEC. 432. SENSE OF THE SENATE REGARDING THE EXTENSION OF THE EMPLOYER 
              EDUCATION ASSISTANCE EXCLUSION UNDER SECTION 127 OF THE 
              INTERNAL REVENUE CODE OF 1986.

    (a) Findings.--The Senate finds that--
        (1) since 1978, over 7,000,000 American workers have benefited 
    from the employer education assistance exclusion under section 127 
    of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 by being able to improve their 
    education and acquire new skills without having to pay taxes on the 
    benefit;
        (2) American companies have benefited by improving the 
    education and skills of their employees who in turn can contribute 
    more to their company;
        (3) the American economy becomes more globally competitive 
    because an educated workforce is able to produce more and to adapt 
    more rapidly to changing technologies;
        (4) American companies are experiencing unprecedented global 
    competition and the value and necessity of life-long education for 
    their employees has increased;
        (5) the employer education assistance exclusion was first 
    enacted in 1978;
        (6) the exclusion has been extended 7 previous times;
        (7) the last extension expired December 31, 1994; and
        (8) the exclusion has received broad bipartisan support.
    (b) Sense of the Senate.--It is the sense of the Senate that the 
revenue level assumed in the budget resolution accommodate an extension 
of the employer education assistance exclusion under section 127 of the 
Internal Revenue Code of 1986 from January 1, 1995, through December 
31, 1996.

SEC. 433. SENSE OF THE SENATE REGARDING THE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 
              ADMINISTRATION PLACING HIGH PRIORITY ON MAINTAINING 
              FIELD-BASED ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT REPRESENTATIVES.

    (a) Findings.--The Senate makes the following findings:
        (1) The Economic Development Administration plays a crucial 
    role in helping economically disadvantaged regions of the United 
    States develop infrastructure that supports and promotes greater 
    economic activity and growth, particularly in nonurban regions.
        (2) The Economic Development Administration helps to promote 
    industrial park development, business incubators, water and sewer 
    system improvements, vocational and technical training facilities, 
    tourism development strategies, technical assistance and capacity 
    building for local governments, economic adjustment strategies, 
    revolving loan funds, and other projects which the private sector 
    has not generated or will not generate without some assistance from 
    the Government through the Economic Development Administration.
        (3) The Economic Development Administration maintains 6 
    regional offices which oversee staff that are designated field-
    based representatives of the Economic Development Administration, 
    and these field-based representatives provide valuable expertise 
    and counseling on economic planning and development to nonurban 
    communities.
        (4) The Economic Development Administration Regional Centers 
    are located in the urban areas of Austin, Seattle, Denver, Atlanta, 
    Philadelphia, and Chicago.
        (5) Because of a 37-percent reduction in approved funding for 
    salaries and expenses from fiscal year 1995, the Economic 
    Development Administration has initiated staff reductions requiring 
    the elimination of 8 field-based positions. The field-based 
    economic development representative positions that are either being 
    eliminated or not replaced after voluntary retirement and which 
    currently interact with nonurban communities on economic 
    development efforts cover the States of New Mexico, Arizona, 
    Nevada, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Illinois, Indiana, Maine, 
    Connecticut, Rhode Island, and North Carolina.
        (6) These staff cutbacks will adversely affect States with very 
    low per-capita personal income, including New Mexico which ranks 
    47th in the Nation in per-capita personal income, Oklahoma ranking 
    46th, North Dakota ranking 42nd, Arizona ranking 35th, Maine 
    ranking 34th, and North Carolina ranking 33rd.
    (b) Sense of the Senate.--It is the sense of the Senate that the 
functional totals and aggregates underlying this budget resolution 
assume that--
        (1) it is regrettable that the Economic Development 
    Administration has elected to reduce field-based economic 
    development representatives who are fulfilling the Economic 
    Development Administration's mission of interacting with and 
    counseling nonurban communities in economically disadvantaged 
    regions of the United States;
        (2) the Economic Development Administration should take all 
    necessary and appropriate actions to ensure that field-based 
    economic development representation receives high priority; and
        (3) the Economic Development Administration should reconsider 
    the planned termination of field-based economic development 
    representatives responsible for States that are economically 
    disadvantaged, and that this reconsideration take place without 
    delay.

SEC. 434. SENSE OF THE SENATE ON LIHEAP.

    (a) Findings.--The Senate finds that:
        (1) home energy assistance for working and low-income families 
    with children, the elderly on fixed incomes, the disabled, and 
    others who need such aid is a critical part of the social safety 
    net in cold-weather areas during the winter, and a source of 
    necessary cooling aid during the summer;
        (2) LIHEAP is a highly targeted, cost-effective way to help 
    millions of low-income Americans pay their home energy bills. More 
    than two-thirds of LIHEAP-eligible households have annual incomes 
    of less than $8,000, more than one half have annual incomes below 
    $6,000; and
        (3) LIHEAP funding has been substantially reduced in recent 
    years, and cannot sustain further spending cuts if the program is 
    to remain a viable means of meeting the home heating and other 
    energy-related needs of low-income families, especially those in 
    cold-weather States.
    (b) Sense of the Senate.--The assumptions underlying this budget 
resolution assume that it is the sense of the Senate that the funds 
made available for LIHEAP for fiscal year 1997 will be not less than 
the actual expenditures made for LIHEAP in fiscal year 1996.

SEC. 435. SENSE OF THE SENATE ON DAVIS-BACON.

    Notwithstanding any provision of this resolution, it is the sense 
of the Senate that the provisions in this resolution do not assume the 
repeal but rather reform of the Davis-Bacon Act.

SEC. 436. SENSE OF THE SENATE ON REIMBURSEMENT OF THE UNITED STATES FOR 
              OPERATIONS SOUTHERN WATCH AND PROVIDE COMFORT.

    (a) Findings.--The Senate finds that--
        (1) as of May 1996, the United States has spent $2,937,000,000 
    of United States taxpayer funds since the conclusion of the Gulf 
    War in 1991 for the singular purpose of protecting the Kurdish and 
    Shiite population from Iraqi aggression;
        (2) the President's defense budget request for 1997 includes an 
    additional $590,100,000 for Operations Southern Watch and Provide 
    Comfort, both of which are designed to restrict Iraqi military 
    aggression against the Kurdish and Shiite people of Iraq;
        (3) costs for these military operations constitute part of the 
    continued budget deficit of the United States; and
        (4) United Nations Security Council Resolution 986 (1995) 
    (referred to as ``SCR 986'') would allow Iraq to sell up to 
    $1,000,000,000 in petroleum and petroleum products every 90 days, 
    for an initial period of 180 days.
    (b) Sense of the Senate.--It is the sense of the Senate that the 
assumptions underlying the function totals and aggregates in this 
resolution assume that--
        (1) the President should instruct the United States Permanent 
    Representative to the United Nations to ensure any subsequent 
    extension of authority beyond the 180 days originally provided by 
    SCR 986 specifically mandates and authorizes the reimbursement of 
    the United States for costs associated with Operations Southern 
    Watch and Provide Comfort out of revenues generated by any sale of 
    petroleum or petroleum-related products originating from Iraq;
        (2) in the event that the United States Permanent 
    Representative to the United Nations fails to modify the terms of 
    any subsequent resolution extending the authority granted by SCR 
    986 as called for in paragraph (1), the President should reject any 
    United Nations' action or resolution seeking to extend the terms of 
    the oil sale beyond the 180 days authorized by SCR 986;
        (3) the President should take the necessary steps to ensure 
    that--
            (A) any effort by the United Nations to temporarily lift 
        the trade embargo for humanitarian purposes, specifically the 
        sale of petroleum or petroleum products, restricts all revenues 
        from such sale from being diverted to benefit the Iraqi 
        military; and
            (B) the temporary lifting of the trade embargo does not 
        encourage other countries to take steps to begin promoting 
        commercial relations with the Iraqi military in expectation 
        that sanctions will be permanently lifted; and
        (4) revenues reimbursed to the United States from the oil sale 
    authorized by SCR 986, or any subsequent action or resolution, 
    should be used to reduce the Federal budget deficit.

SEC. 437. SENSE OF THE SENATE ON SOLVENCY OF THE MEDICARE TRUST FUND.

    (a) Findings.--The Senate finds that repeal of certain provisions 
from the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1993 would move the 
insolvency date of the HI (Medicare) Trust Fund forward by a full year.
    (b) Sense of the Senate.--It is the sense of the Senate that no 
provisions in this budget resolution should worsen the solvency of the 
Medicare Trust Fund.

SEC. 438. SENSE OF THE SENATE ON THE PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION CAMPAIGN 
              FUND.

    It is the sense of the Senate that the assumptions underlying the 
functional totals in this resolution assume that when the Finance 
Committee meets its outlay and revenue obligations under this 
resolution the committee should not make any changes in the 
Presidential Election Campaign Fund or its funding mechanism and should 
meet its revenue and outlay targets through other programs within its 
jurisdiction.

SEC. 439. SENSE OF THE SENATE REGARDING THE FUNDING OF AMTRAK.

    (a) Findings.--The Senate finds that--
        (1) a capital funding stream is essential to the ability of the 
    National Rail Passenger Corporation (``Amtrak'') to reduce its 
    dependence on Federal operating support; and
        (2) Amtrak needs a secure source of financing, no less 
    favorable than provided to other modes of transportation, for 
    capital improvements.
    (b) Sense of the Senate.--It is the sense of the Senate that--
        (1) revenues attributable to one-half cent per gallon of the 
    excise taxes imposed on gasoline, special motor fuel, and diesel 
    fuel from the Mass Transit Account should be dedicated to a new 
    Intercity Passenger Rail Trust Fund during the period January 1, 
    1997, through September 30, 2001;
        (2) revenues would not be deposited in the Intercity Passenger 
    Rail Trust Fund during any fiscal year to the extent that the 
    deposit is estimated to result in available revenues in the Mass 
    Transit Account being insufficient to satisfy that year's estimated 
    appropriation levels;
        (3) monies in the Intercity Passenger Rail Trust Fund should be 
    generally available to fund, on a reimbursement basis, capital 
    expenditures incurred by Amtrak;
        (4) amounts to fund capital expenditures related to rail 
    operations should be set aside for each State that has not had 
    Amtrak service in such State for the preceding year; and
        (5) funding provided by the Intercity Passenger Rail Trust Fund 
    shall be made available subject to appropriations and shall not 
    increase mandatory spending.
Attest:

                                 Clerk of the House of Representatives.

Attest:

                                               Secretary of the Senate.