There is one summary for this bill. Bill summaries are authored by CRS.

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Introduced in Senate (03/23/1995)

Superfund Recycling Equity Act of 1995 - Amends the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 to absolve persons (other than owners or operators) who arranged for the recycling of recyclable material from liability for environmental response actions.

Excludes from the definition of "recyclable material" any material that contains polychlorinated biphenyls in excess of 50 parts per million or any Federal standard promulgated after this Act's enactment.

Considers transactions involving scrap paper, plastic, glass, textiles, rubber (other than whole tires), or metal or spent batteries to be arranging for recycling if the person arranging the transaction can demonstrate that: (1) the recyclable material met a commercial specification grade and a market existed for the material; (2) a substantial portion of the material was made available for use as a feedstock for the manufacture of a new saleable product; (3) the material (or product to be made from the material) could have been a replacement for a virgin raw material; (4) in the case of transactions occurring no later than 90 days after this Act's enactment, the person exercised reasonable care to determine that the consuming facility was in compliance with Federal, State, or local environmental laws or regulations; (5) in the case of transactions involving scrap metal that occurred after the effective date of a regulation or standard associated with scrap metal recycling promulgated under the Solid Waste Disposal Act, the person was in compliance with such regulation or standard and did not melt the metal prior to the transaction; and (6) in the case of transactions involving batteries, the person did not recover the valuable components of the battery and the person was in compliance with Federal environmental regulations or standards regarding battery recycling.

Makes the exemptions from liability under this Act inapplicable if the person: (1) had an objectively reasonable basis to believe at the time of the recycling transaction that the recyclable material would not be recycled or would be burned as fuel or for energy recovery or incineration or that, in the case of transactions occurring no later than 90 days after this Act's enactment, the consuming facility was not in compliance with Federal, State, or local environmental laws or regulations; (2) added hazardous substances to the material for purposes other than processing for recycling; or (3) failed to exercise reasonable care with respect to the management of the material.