Text: S.1758 — 106th Congress (1999-2000)All Information (Except Text)

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Introduced in Senate (10/20/1999)

 
[Congressional Bills 106th Congress]
[From the U.S. Government Printing Office]
[S. 1758 Introduced in Senate (IS)]







106th CONGRESS
  1st Session
                                S. 1758

   To authorize urgent support for Colombia and front line states to 
secure peace and the rule of law, to enhance the effectiveness of anti-
drug efforts that are essential to impeding the flow of deadly cocaine 
 and heroin from Colombia to the United States, and for other purposes.


_______________________________________________________________________


                   IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES

                            October 20, 1999

 Mr. Coverdell (for himself, Mr. DeWine, and Mr. Grassley) introduced 
the following bill; which was read twice and referred to the Committee 
                          on Foreign Relations

_______________________________________________________________________

                                 A BILL


 
   To authorize urgent support for Colombia and front line states to 
secure peace and the rule of law, to enhance the effectiveness of anti-
drug efforts that are essential to impeding the flow of deadly cocaine 
 and heroin from Colombia to the United States, and for other purposes.

    Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the 
United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE; TABLE OF CONTENTS.

    (a) Short Title.--This Act may be cited as the ``Alliance with 
Colombia and the Andean Region (ALIANZA) Act of 1999''.
    (b) Table of Contents.--The table of contents of this Act is as 
follows:

Sec. 1. Short title; table of contents.
Sec. 2. Purposes.
Sec. 3. Findings.
Sec. 4. Definitions.
              TITLE I--UNITED STATES POLICY AND PERSONNEL

Sec. 101. Statement of policy regarding support for democracy, peace, 
                            the rule of law, and human rights in 
                            Colombia.
Sec. 102. Requirement for a comprehensive regional strategy to support 
                            Colombia and the front line states.
Sec. 103. Availability of funds conditioned on submission of strategic 
                            plan and application of congressional 
                            notification procedures.
Sec. 104. Limitation on availability of funds.
Sec. 105. Sense of Congress on unimpeded access by Colombian law 
                            enforcement officials to all areas of the 
                            national territory of Colombia.
Sec. 106. Extradition of narcotics traffickers.
Sec. 107. Additional personnel requirements for the United States 
                            mission in Colombia.
Sec. 108. Sense of Congress on a special coordinator on Colombia.
Sec. 109. Sense of Congress on the death of three United States 
                            citizens in Colombia in March 1999.
Sec. 110. Sense of Congress on members of Colombian security forces and 
                            members of Colombian irregular forces.
                     TITLE II--ACTIVITIES SUPPORTED

  Subtitle A--Democracy, Peace, the Rule of Law, and Human Rights in 
                                Colombia

Sec. 201. Support for democracy, peace, the rule of law, and human 
                            rights in Colombia.
Sec. 202. United States emergency humanitarian assistance fund for 
                            internally forced displaced population in 
                            Colombia.
Sec. 203. Investigation by Colombian Attorney General of drug 
                            trafficking and human rights abuses by 
                            irregular forces and security forces.
Sec. 204. Report on Colombian military justice.
Sec. 205. Denial of visas to and inadmissibility of aliens who have 
                            been involved in drug trafficking and human 
                            rights violations in Colombia.
  Subtitle B--Eradication of Drug Production and Interdiction of Drug 
                              Trafficking

Sec. 211. Targeting new illicit cultivation and mobilizing the 
                            Colombian security forces against the 
                            narcotrafficking threat.
Sec. 212. Reinvigoration of efforts to interdict illicit narcotics in 
                            Colombia.
Sec. 213. Enhancement of Colombian police and navy law enforcement 
                            activities nationwide.
Sec. 214. Targeting illicit assets of irregular forces.
Sec. 215. Enhancement of regional interdiction of illicit drugs.
Sec. 216. Revised authorities for provision of additional support for 
                            counter-drug activities of Colombia and 
                            Peru.
Sec. 217. Sense of Congress on assistance to Brazil.
Sec. 218. Monitoring of assistance for Colombian security forces.
Sec. 219. Development of economic alternatives to the illicit drug 
                            trade.

SEC. 2. PURPOSES.

    The purposes of this Act are--
            (1) to prescribe proactive measures to confront the threat 
        to United States interests of continued instability in 
        Colombia;
            (2) to defend constitutional order, the rule of law, and 
        human rights, which will benefit all persons;
            (3) to support the democratically elected Government of the 
        Republic of Colombia to secure a firm and lasting end to the 
        armed conflict and lawlessness within its territory, which now 
        costs countless lives, threatens regional security, and 
        undermines effective anti-drug efforts;
            (4) to require the President to design and implement an 
        urgent, comprehensive, and adequately funded plan of support 
        for Colombia and its neighbors;
            (5) to authorize adequate funds to implement an urgent and 
        comprehensive plan of economic development and anti-drug 
        support for Colombia and the front line states;
            (6) to authorize indispensable material, technical, and 
        logistical support to enhance the effectiveness of anti-drug 
        efforts that are essential to impeding the flow of deadly 
        cocaine and heroin from Colombia to the United States; and
            (7) to bolster the capacity of the front line states to 
        confront the current destabilizing effects of the Colombia 
        conflict and to resist illicit narcotics trafficking activities 
        that may seek to elude enhanced law enforcement efforts in 
        Colombia.

SEC. 3. FINDINGS.

    Congress makes the following findings:
            (1) The armed conflict and resulting lawlessness in 
        Colombia present a clear and present danger to the security of 
        the front line states, to law enforcement efforts intended to 
        impede the flow of cocaine and heroin, and, therefore, to the 
        well-being of the people of the United States.
            (2) Colombia is a democratic country fighting multiple 
        wars, against the Colombian Revolutionary Armed Forces (FARC), 
        the National Liberation Army (ELN), paramilitary organizations, 
        and international narcotics trafficking kingpins.
            (3) With 34 percent of world terrorist acts committed 
        there, Colombia is the world's third most dangerous country in 
        terms of political violence.
            (4) Colombia is the world's kidnapping capital of the world 
        with 2,609 kidnappings reported in 1998 and 513 reported in the 
first three months of 1999.
            (5) In 1998 alone, 308,000 Colombians were internally 
        displaced in Colombia. During the last decade, 35,000 
        Colombians have been killed.
            (6) The FARC and the ELN are the two main guerrilla groups 
        that have waged the longest-running anti-government insurgency 
        in Latin America.
            (7) The FARC and the ELN engage in systematic extortion 
        through the abduction of United States citizens, have murdered 
        United States citizens, profit from the illegal drug trade, and 
        engage in systematic and indiscriminate crimes, including 
        kidnapping, torture, and murder, against Colombian civilian and 
        security forces.
            (8) The FARC and the ELN have targeted United States 
        Government personnel, private United States citizens, and 
        United States business interests.
            (9) In March 1999, the FARC murdered three kidnapped United 
        States human rights workers near the international border 
        between Colombia and Venezuela.
            (10) The Colombian rebels are estimated to have a combined 
        strength of 10,000 to 20,000 full-time guerrillas, and they 
        have initiated armed action in nearly 700 of the country's 
        1,073 municipalities and control or influence roughly 60 
        percent of rural Colombia.
            (11) The Government of Colombia has recovered 5,000 new AK-
        47s from guerrilla caches in 1 month, and the FARC has plotted 
        to use $3,000,000 in funds earned from drug trafficking to buy 
        30,000 AK-47s.
            (12) Although the Colombian Army has 122,000 soldiers, 
        there are no more than 40,000 soldiers available for offensive 
        combat operations.
            (13) Colombia faces the threat of an estimated 5,000 armed 
        persons who comprise paramilitary organizations, who engage in 
        lawless acts and undermine the peace process.
            (14) Paramilitary organizations profit from the illegal 
        drug trade and engage in systematic and indiscriminate crimes, 
        including extortion, kidnapping, torture, and murder, against 
        Colombian civilians.
            (15) The conflict in Colombia is creating instability along 
        its borders with neighboring countries, Ecuador, Panama, Peru, 
        and Venezuela, several of which have deployed forces to their 
        border with Colombia.
            (16) Coca production has increased 28 percent in Colombia 
        since 1998, and already 75 percent of the world's cocaine and 
        75 percent of the heroin seized in the northeast United States 
        is of Colombian origin.
            (17) The first 900-soldier Counternarcotics Battalion has 
        been established within the Colombian Army with training and 
        logistical support of the United States military and the 
        Department of State international narcotics and law enforcement 
        program, and it will be ready for deployment in areas of new 
        illicit coca cultivation in southern Colombia by November 1999.
            (18) In response to serious human rights abuse allegations 
        by the Colombian military, the Government of Colombia has 
        dismissed alleged abusers and undertaken military reforms, and, 
        while the Colombian military was implicated in 50 percent of 
        human rights violations in 1995, by 1998, the number of 
        incidents attributed to the military plummeted to 4-6 percent.
            (19) The Government of Colombia has convicted 240 members 
        of the military and police accused of human rights violations.
            (20) In 1998, two-way trade between the United States and 
        Colombia was more than $11,000,000,000, making the United 
        States Colombia's number one trading partner and Colombia the 
        fifth largest market for United States exports in the region.
            (21) Colombia is experiencing a historic economic 
        recession, with unemployment rising to approximately 20 percent 
        in 1999 after 40 years of annual economic growth averaging 5 
        percent per year.
            (22) The Colombian judicial system is inefficient and 
        ineffective in bringing to justice those who violate the rule 
        of law.
            (23) The FARC continue to press for an exchange of detained 
        rebels, which, if granted, will enable the FARC to increase its 
        manpower in the short term by as many as 4,000 combatants.
            (24) The Drug Enforcement Administration has reported that 
        the Colombian irregular forces are involved in drug trafficking 
        and that certain irregular forces leaders have become major 
        drug traffickers.

SEC. 4. DEFINITIONS.

    In this Act:
            (1) Appropriate congressional committees.--Except as 
        provided in section 218, the term ``appropriate congressional 
        committees'' means--
                    (A) the Committee on Appropriations and the 
                Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate; and
                    (B) the Committee on Appropriations and the 
                Committee on International Relations of the House of 
                Representatives.
            (2) Front line states.--The term ``front line states'' 
        means Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador, Panama, Peru, and Venezuela.
            (3) Illicit drug trafficking.--The term ``illicit drug 
        trafficking'' means illicit trafficking in narcotic drugs, 
        psychotropic substances, and other controlled substances (as 
        defined in section 102(6) of the Controlled Substances Act (21 
        U.S.C. 802(6)), as such activities are described by any 
        international narcotics control agreement to which the United 
        States is a signatory, or by the domestic law of the country in 
        whose territory or airspace the interdiction is occurring.
            (4) Irregular forces.--The term ``irregular forces'' means 
        irregular armed groups engaged in illegal activities, including 
        the Colombia Revolutionary Armed Forces (FARC), the National 
Liberation Army (ELN), and paramilitary organizations.

              TITLE I--UNITED STATES POLICY AND PERSONNEL

SEC. 101. STATEMENT OF POLICY REGARDING SUPPORT FOR DEMOCRACY, PEACE, 
              THE RULE OF LAW, AND HUMAN RIGHTS IN COLOMBIA.

    It shall be the policy of the United States--
            (1) to support the democratically elected Government of the 
        Republic of Colombia in its efforts to secure a firm and 
        lasting end to the armed conflict and lawlessness within its 
        territory, which now costs countless lives, threatens regional 
        security, and undermines effective anti-drug efforts;
            (2) to insist that the Government of Colombia complete 
        urgent reform measures intended to open its economy fully to 
        foreign investment and commerce, particularly in the petroleum 
        industry, as a path toward economic recovery and self-
        sufficiency;
            (3) to promote the protection of human rights in Colombia 
        by conditioning assistance to security forces on respect for 
        all internationally recognized human rights;
            (4) to support Colombian authorities in strengthening 
        judicial systems and investigative capabilities to bring to 
        justice any person against whom there exists credible evidence 
        of gross violations of human rights;
            (5) to expose the lawlessness and gross human rights 
        violations committed by irregular forces in Colombia; and
            (6) to mobilize international support for the 
        democratically elected Government of the Republic of Colombia 
        so that that government can resist making unilateral 
        concessions that undermine the credibility of the peace 
        process.

SEC. 102. REQUIREMENT FOR A COMPREHENSIVE REGIONAL STRATEGY TO SUPPORT 
              COLOMBIA AND THE FRONT LINE STATES.

    (a) Report Required.--Not later than 60 days after the date of 
enactment of this Act, the President shall submit to the appropriate 
congressional committees and the Caucus on International Narcotics 
Control of the Senate a report on the current United States policy and 
strategy regarding United States counternarcotics assistance for 
Colombia and the front line states.
    (b) Report Elements.--The report required by subsection (a) shall 
address the following:
            (1) The primary and second priorities of the United States 
        in its relations with Colombia and the front line states that 
        are the source of most of the illicit narcotics entering the 
        United States.
            (2) The actions required of the United States to support 
        and promote such priorities.
            (3) A schedule for implementing actions in order to meet 
        such priorities.
            (4) The role of the United States in the efforts of the 
        Government of Colombia to deal with illegal drug production in 
        Colombia.
            (5) The role of the United States in the efforts of the 
        Government of Colombia to deal with the insurgency in Colombia.
            (6) The role of the United States in the efforts of the 
        Government of Colombia to deal with irregular forces in 
        Colombia.
            (7) How the strategy with respect to Colombia relates to 
        the United States strategy for the front line states.
            (8) How the strategy with respect to Colombia relates to 
        the United States strategy for fulfilling global 
        counternarcotics goals.
            (9) A strategy and schedule for providing urgent material, 
        technical, and logistical support to Colombia and the front 
        line states in order to defend the rule of law and to more 
        effectively impede the cultivation, production, transit, and 
        sale of illicit narcotics.

SEC. 103. AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS CONDITIONED ON SUBMISSION OF STRATEGIC 
              PLAN AND APPLICATION OF CONGRESSIONAL NOTIFICATION 
              PROCEDURES.

    Funds made available to carry out this Act shall only be made 
available--
            (1) upon submission to Congress by the President of the 
        plan required by section 102; and
            (2) in accordance with the procedures applicable to 
        reprogramming notifications under section 634A of the Foreign 
        Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2394-1).

SEC. 104. LIMITATION ON AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS.

    (a) Ineligibility of Units of Security Forces for Assistance.--The 
same restrictions contained in section 568 of the Foreign Operations, 
Export Financing, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 1999 (as 
contained in section 101(d) of division A of Public Law 105-277) and 
section 8130 of Public Law 105-262 that apply to the availability of 
funds under those Acts shall apply to the availability of funds under 
this Act.
    (b) Additional Restrictions.--In addition to the application of the 
restrictions described in subsection (a), those restrictions shall 
apply with respect to the availability of funds for a unit of the 
security forces of Colombia if the Secretary of State reports to 
Congress that credible evidence exists that a member of that unit has 
provided material support to irregular forces in Colombia or to any 
criminal narcotics trafficking syndicate that operates in Colombia. The 
Secretary of State may detail such evidence in a classified annex to 
any such report, if necessary.

SEC. 105. SENSE OF CONGRESS ON UNIMPEDED ACCESS BY COLOMBIAN LAW 
              ENFORCEMENT OFFICIALS TO ALL AREAS OF THE NATIONAL 
              TERRITORY OF COLOMBIA.

    It is the sense of Congress that the effectiveness of United States 
anti-drug assistance to Colombia depends on the ability of law 
enforcement officials of that country having unimpeded access to all 
areas of the national territory of Colombia for the purposes of 
carrying out the interdiction of illegal narcotics and the eradication 
of illicit crops.

SEC. 106. EXTRADITION OF NARCOTICS TRAFFICKERS.

    (a) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that the 
Government of Colombia and the governments of the front line states 
should take effective steps to prevent the creation of a safe haven for 
narcotics traffickers by ensuring that narcotics traffickers indicted 
in the United States are promptly arrested, prosecuted, and sentenced 
to the maximum extent of the law and, upon the request of the United 
States Government, extradited to the United States for trial for their 
egregious offenses against the security and well-being of the people of 
the United States.
    (b) Reports.--Not later than six months after the date of the 
enactment of this Act, and every six months thereafter, the Secretary 
of State shall submit to the Committee on Foreign Relations and the 
Committee on the Judiciary of the Senate and the Committee on 
International Relations and the Committee on the Judiciary of the House 
of Representatives a report setting forth--
            (1) a list of the persons whose extradition has been 
        requested from Colombia or the front line states, indicating 
        those persons who--
                    (A) have been surrendered to the custody of United 
                States authorities;
                    (B) have been detained by authorities of Colombia 
                or a front line state and who are being processed for 
                extradition;
                    (C) have been detained by the authorities of 
                Colombia or a front line state and who are not yet 
                being processed for extradition; or
                    (D) are at large;
            (2) a determination whether or not authorities of Colombia 
        and the front line states are making good faith efforts to 
        ensure the prompt extradition of each of the persons sought by 
        United States authorities; and
            (3) an analysis of--
                    (A) any legal obstacles in the laws of Colombia and 
                of the front line states to the prompt extradition of 
                persons sought by United States authorities; and
                    (B) the steps taken by authorities of the United 
                States and the authorities of each such state to remove 
                such obstacles.

SEC. 107. ADDITIONAL PERSONNEL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE UNITED STATES 
              MISSION IN COLOMBIA.

    (a) Report to Congress.--Not later than 60 days after the date of 
enactment of this Act, the President shall submit to the appropriate 
congressional committees a report detailing the additional personnel 
requirements of the United States Mission in Colombia that are 
necessary to implement this Act.
    (b) Funding of Report Recommendations.--
            (1) Authorization of appropriations.--
                    (A) In general.--In addition to amounts otherwise 
                available for such purpose, there are authorized to be 
                appropriated to the relevant departments and agencies 
                of the United States for the period beginning October 
                1, 1999, and ending September 30, 2002, such sums as 
                may be necessary to pay the salaries of such number of 
                additional personnel as are recommended in the report 
                required by subsection (a).
                    (B) Availability of funds.--Amounts appropriated 
                pursuant to subparagraph (A) are authorized to remain 
                available until expended.
            (2) Additional personnel defined.--In paragraph (1), the 
        term ``additional personnel'' means the number of personnel 
        above the number of personnel employed in the United States 
        Mission in Colombia as of the date of enactment of this Act.

SEC. 108. SENSE OF CONGRESS ON A SPECIAL COORDINATOR ON COLOMBIA.

    It is the sense of Congress that the President should designate a 
special coordinator on Colombia with sufficient authority--
            (1) to coordinate interagency efforts to prepare and 
        implement a comprehensive regional strategy to support Colombia 
        and the front line states;
            (2) to advocate within the executive branch adequate 
        funding for and urgent delivery of assistance authorized by 
        this Act; and
            (3) to coordinate diplomatic efforts to maximize 
        international political and financial support for Colombia and 
        the front line states.

SEC. 109. SENSE OF CONGRESS ON THE DEATH OF THREE UNITED STATES 
              CITIZENS IN COLOMBIA IN MARCH 1999.

    It is the sense of Congress that the Government of Colombia should 
resolve the case of the three United States citizens killed in Colombia 
in March 1999 and bring to justice those involved in this atrocity.

SEC. 110. SENSE OF CONGRESS ON MEMBERS OF COLOMBIAN SECURITY FORCES AND 
              MEMBERS OF COLOMBIAN IRREGULAR FORCES.

    It is the sense of Congress that--
            (1) any links between members of Colombian irregular forces 
        and members of Colombian security forces are deeply troubling 
        and clearly counterproductive to the effort to combat drug 
        trafficking and the prevention of human rights violations; and
            (2) the involvement of Colombian irregular forces in drug 
        trafficking and in systematic terror campaigns targeting the 
        noncombatant civilian population is deplorable and contrary to 
        United States interests and policy.

                     TITLE II--ACTIVITIES SUPPORTED

  Subtitle A--Democracy, Peace, the Rule of Law, and Human Rights in 
                                Colombia

SEC. 201. SUPPORT FOR DEMOCRACY, PEACE, THE RULE OF LAW, AND HUMAN 
              RIGHTS IN COLOMBIA.

    (a) In General.--The President is authorized to support programs 
and activities to advance democracy, peace, the rule of law, and human 
rights in Colombia, including--
            (1) the deployment of international observers, upon the 
        request of the Government of Colombia, to monitor compliance 
        with any peace initiative of the Government of Colombia;
            (2) support for credible, internationally recognized 
        independent nongovernmental human rights organizations working 
        in Colombia;
            (3) support for the Human Rights Unit of the Attorney 
        General of Colombia;
            (4) to enhance the rule of law through training of judges, 
        prosecutors, and other judicial officials and through a witness 
        protection program;
            (5) to improve police investigative training and facilities 
        and related civilian police activities; and
            (6) to strengthen a credible military justice system, 
        including technical support by the United States Judge Advocate 
        General, and strengthen existing human rights monitors within 
        the ranks of the military.
    (b) Authorization of Appropriations.--
            (1) In general.--In addition to amounts otherwise available 
        for such purpose, there is authorized to be appropriated to the 
        President $100,000,000 for the period beginning October 1, 
        1999, and ending September 30, 2002, to carry out subsection 
        (a).
            (2) Availability of funds.--Amounts appropriated pursuant 
        to paragraph (1) are authorized to remain available until 
        expended.

SEC. 202. UNITED STATES EMERGENCY HUMANITARIAN ASSISTANCE FUND FOR 
              INTERNALLY FORCED DISPLACED POPULATION IN COLOMBIA.

    (a) Sense of Congress.-- It is the sense of Congress that--
            (1) the United States Government should provide assistance 
        to forcibly displaced persons in Colombia; and
            (2) the Government of Colombia should support the return of 
        the forcibly displaced to their homes only when the safety of 
        civilians is fully assured and they return voluntarily.
    (b) Report.--Not later than 60 days after the date of enactment of 
the Act, the Secretary of State shall submit to the appropriate 
congressional committees a report containing an examination of the 
options available to address the needs of the internally displaced 
population of Colombia.
    (c) Authorization To Provide Assistance.--The President is 
authorized--
            (1) to provide assistance to the internally displaced 
        population of Colombia; and
            (2) to assist in the temporary resettlement of the 
        internally displaced Colombians.
    (d) Funding.--Amounts authorized to be appropriated by section 
201(b) shall be available to the President for purposes of activities 
under subsection (c).

SEC. 203. INVESTIGATION BY COLOMBIAN ATTORNEY GENERAL OF DRUG 
              TRAFFICKING AND HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES BY IRREGULAR FORCES 
              AND SECURITY FORCES.

    (a) Authority.--The President is authorized to support efforts by 
the Attorney General of Colombia--
            (1) to investigate and prosecute members of Colombian 
        irregular forces involved in the production or trafficking in 
        illicit drugs;
            (2) to investigate and prosecute members of Colombian 
        security forces involved in the production or trafficking in 
        illicit drugs;
            (3) to investigate and prosecute members of Colombian 
        irregular forces involved in gross violations of 
        internationally recognized human rights; and
            (4) to investigate and prosecute members of Colombian 
        security forces involved in gross violations of internationally 
        recognized human rights.
    (b) Funding.--Amounts authorized to be appropriated by section 
201(b) shall be available to the President for purposes of activities 
under subsection (a).

SEC. 204. REPORT ON COLOMBIAN MILITARY JUSTICE.

    (a) Report Required.--Not later than 90 days after the date of 
enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State shall submit to the 
appropriate congressional committees a report examining the efforts to 
strengthen and reform the military justice system of Colombia and 
making recommendations for directing assistance authorized by this Act 
for that purpose.
    (b) Report Elements.--The report required by subsection (a) shall 
contain the following:
            (1) A review of the laws, regulations, directives, 
        policies, and practices of the military justice system of 
        Colombia, including specific military reform measures being 
        considered and implemented.
            (2) An assessment of the extent to which the laws, 
        regulations, directives, policies, practices, and reforms 
        relating to the military justice system have been effective in 
        preventing and punishing human rights violations, irregular 
        forces, and narcotrafficking ties.
            (3) Recommendations for the measures necessary to 
        strengthen and improve the effectiveness and enhance the 
        credibility of the military justice system of Colombia.

SEC. 205. DENIAL OF VISAS TO AND INADMISSIBILITY OF ALIENS WHO HAVE 
              BEEN INVOLVED IN DRUG TRAFFICKING AND HUMAN RIGHTS 
              VIOLATIONS IN COLOMBIA.

    (a) Grounds for Denial of Visas and Inadmissibility.--Except as 
provided in subsection (b), the Secretary of State shall deny a visa 
to, and the Attorney General shall not admit to the United States, any 
alien who the Secretary of State has credible evidence is a person 
who--
            (1) is or was an illicit trafficker in any controlled 
        substance or has knowingly aided, abetted, conspired, or 
        colluded with others in the illicit trafficking in any 
        controlled substance in Colombia; or
            (2) ordered, carried out, or materially assisted in gross 
        violations of internationally recognized human rights in 
        Colombia.
    (b) Exceptions.--
            (1) Grounds for exception.--Subsection (a) does not apply 
        in any case in which--
                    (A) the Secretary of State finds, on a case by case 
                basis, that--
                            (i) the entry into the United States of the 
                        person who would otherwise be denied a visa or 
                        not admitted under this section is necessary 
                        for medical reasons; or
                            (ii) the alien has cooperated fully with 
                        the investigation of human rights violations; 
                        or
                    (B) the Attorney General of the United States 
                determines, on a case-by-case basis, that admission of 
                the alien to the United States is necessary for law 
                enforcement purposes.
            (2) Congressional notification.--Whenever an alien 
        described in subsection (a) is issued a visa pursuant to 
paragraph (1) or admitted to the United States pursuant to paragraph 
(2), the Secretary of State or the Attorney General, as appropriate, 
shall notify in writing the Committee on Foreign Relations of the 
Senate and the Committee on International Relations of the House of 
Representatives of such action.
    (c) Reporting Requirement.--
            (1) List of the united states chief of mission.--The United 
        States chief of mission to Colombia shall transmit to the 
        Secretary of State a list of those individuals who have been 
        credibly alleged to have carried out drug trafficking and human 
        rights violations described in paragraphs (1) and (2) of 
        subsection (a).
            (2) Transmittal by secretary of state.--Not later than 
        three months after the date of the enactment of this Act, the 
        Secretary of State shall submit the list prepared under 
        paragraph (1) to the Committee on Foreign Relations of the 
        Senate and the Committee on International Relations of the 
        House of Representatives.
    (d) Definitions.--In this section:
            (1) Controlled substance.--The term ``controlled 
        substance'' has the meaning given the term in section 102(6) of 
        the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 802(6)).
            (2) Human rights.--The term ``human rights violations'' 
        means gross violations of internationally recognized human 
        rights within the meaning of sections 116 and 502B of the 
        Foreign Assistance Act of 1961.

  Subtitle B--Eradication of Drug Production and Interdiction of Drug 
                              Trafficking

SEC. 211. TARGETING NEW ILLICIT CULTIVATION AND MOBILIZING THE 
              COLOMBIAN SECURITY FORCES AGAINST THE NARCOTRAFFICKING 
              THREAT.

    (a) Authority.--The President is authorized to support programs and 
activities by the Government of Colombia, including its security 
forces, to target eradication and law enforcement activities in areas 
of new cultivation of coca and opium poppy, including--
            (1) material support and technical assistance to aid the 
        training, outfitting, deployment, and operations of not less 
        than three counterdrug battalions of the Army of Colombia;
            (2) to support the acquisition of up to 15 UH-60 
        helicopters or comparable transport helicopters, including 
        spare parts, maintenance services and training, or aircraft 
        upgrade kits for the Army of Colombia;
            (3) communications and intelligence training and equipment 
        for the Army and Navy of Colombia;
            (4) additional aircraft for the National Police of Colombia 
        to enhance its eradication efforts and to support its joint 
        operations with the military of Colombia; and
            (5) not less than $10,000,000 to support the urgent 
        development of an application of naturally occurring and 
        ecologically sound methods of eradicating illicit crops.
    (b) Authorization of Appropriations.--
            (1) In general.--In addition to amounts otherwise available 
        for such purpose, there is authorized to be appropriated 
        $540,000,000 for the period beginning October 1, 1999, and 
ending September 30, 2002, to carry out subsection (a).
    (c) Sense of Congress Relating to Eradication.--It is the sense of 
Congress that the Government of Colombia should commit itself 
immediately to the urgent development and application of naturally 
occurring and ecologically sound methods for eradicating illicit crops.

SEC. 212. REINVIGORATION OF EFFORTS TO INTERDICT ILLICIT NARCOTICS IN 
              COLOMBIA.

    (a) Authority.--The President is authorized to support programs and 
activities by the Government of Colombia, including its security 
forces, to reinvigorate a nationwide program to interdict shipments of 
illicit drugs in Colombia, including--
            (1) the acquisition of additional airborne and ground-based 
        radar;
            (2) the acquisition of airborne intelligence and 
        surveillance aircraft for the Colombian Army;
            (3) the acquisition of additional aerial refueling aircraft 
        and fuel; and
            (4) the construction of remote airfields.
    (b) Authorization of Appropriations.--
            (1) In general.--In addition to amounts otherwise available 
        for such purpose, there is authorized to be appropriated to the 
        President $200,000,000 for the period beginning October 1, 
        1999, and ending September 30, 2002, to carry out subsection 
        (a).
            (2) Availability of funds.--Amounts appropriated pursuant 
        to paragraph (1) are authorized to remain available until 
        expended.

SEC. 213. ENHANCEMENT OF COLOMBIAN POLICE AND NAVY LAW ENFORCEMENT 
              ACTIVITIES NATIONWIDE.

    (a) Authority.--The President is authorized to support programs and 
activities by the Government of Colombia, including its security 
forces, to support anti-drug law enforcement activities by the National 
Police and Navy of Colombia nationwide, including--
            (1) acquisition of transport aircraft, spare engines, and 
        other parts, additional UH-1H upgrade kits, forward-looking 
        infrared systems, and other equipment for the National Police 
        of Colombia;
            (2) training and operation of specialized vetted units of 
        the National Police of Colombia;
            (3) construction of additional bases for the National 
        Police of Colombia near its national territorial borders; and
            (4) acquisition of 16 patrol aircraft, 4 helicopters, 
        forward-looking infrared systems, and patrol boats to support 
        for the nationwide riverine and coastal patrol capabilities of 
        the Navy of Colombia.
    (b) Authorization of Appropriations.--
            (1) In general.--In addition to amounts otherwise available 
        for such purpose, there is authorized to be appropriated to the 
        President $205,000,000 for the period beginning October 1, 
        1999, and ending September 30, 2002, to carry out subsection 
        (a).
            (2) Availability of funds.--Amounts appropriated pursuant 
        to paragraph (1) are authorized to remain available until 
        expended.

SEC. 214. TARGETING ILLICIT ASSETS OF IRREGULAR FORCES.

    (a) Establishment of Task Force.--Not later than three months after 
the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary of the Treasury, in 
coordination with the Director of the Office of National Drug Control 
Policy, Attorney General, Secretary of State, and Director of Central 
Intelligence, shall establish a task force to identify assets of 
irregular forces that operate in Colombia for the purpose of imposing 
restrictions on transactions by such forces using the President's 
authority under the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (50 
U.S.C. 1701).
    (b) Report on Assets of Irregular Forces.--Not later than 12 months 
after the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary of the Treasury 
shall submit to Congress a report on measures taken in compliance with 
this section and recommend measures to target the unlawfully obtained 
assets of irregular forces that operate in Colombia.

SEC. 215. ENHANCEMENT OF REGIONAL INTERDICTION OF ILLICIT DRUGS.

    (a) Authority.--The President is authorized to support programs and 
activities by the United States Government, the Government of Colombia, 
and the governments of the front line states to enhance interdiction of 
illicit drugs in that region.
    (b) Authorization of Appropriations.--In addition to amounts 
otherwise available for such purposes, there is authorized to be 
appropriated to the President $410,000,000 for the period beginning 
October 1, 1999, and ending September 30, 2002, to carry out subsection 
(a), of which amount--
            (1) up to $325,000,000 shall be available for material 
        support and other costs by United States Government agencies to 
        support regional interdiction efforts, of which--
                    (A) not less than $60,000,000 shall be available 
                for the Drug Enforcement Administration;
                    (B) not less than $40,000,000 shall be available 
                for regional intelligence activities; and
                    (C) not less than $30,000,000 for the acquisition 
                of surveillance and reconnaissance aircraft for use by 
                the United States Southern Command primarily for 
                detection and monitoring in support of the interdiction 
                of illicit drugs; and
            (2) up to $85,000,000 shall be available for the 
        governments of the front line states to increase the 
        effectiveness of regional interdiction efforts.
    (c) Availability of Funds.--Amounts appropriated pursuant to 
subsection (b) are authorized to remain available until expended.
    (d) Limitation on Availability of Funds.--Funds made available to 
carry out this section may be made available to a front line state only 
after the President determines and certifies to the appropriate 
congressional committees that such state is cooperating fully with 
regional and bilateral aerial and maritime narcotics efforts or is 
taking extraordinary and effective measures on its own to impede 
suspicious aircraft or maritime vessels through its territory. A 
determination and certification with respect to a front line state 
under this subsection shall be effective for not more than 12 months.

SEC. 216. REVISED AUTHORITIES FOR PROVISION OF ADDITIONAL SUPPORT FOR 
              COUNTER-DRUG ACTIVITIES OF COLOMBIA AND PERU.

    Section 1033 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 1998 (Public Law 105-85) is amended--
            (1) in the first sentence of subsection (a), by inserting 
        before the period at the end the following: ``, including but 
        not limited to riverine counter-drug activities'';
            (2) in subsection (c), by adding at the end the following:
            ``(4) The operating costs of equipment of the government 
        that is used for counter-drug activities.''; and
            (3) in subsection (e)(2), by striking ``any of the fiscal 
        years 1999 through 2002'' and inserting ``the fiscal year 1999 
        and may not exceed $75,000,000 during the fiscal years 2000 
        through 2002''.

SEC. 217. SENSE OF CONGRESS ON ASSISTANCE TO BRAZIL.

    It is the sense of Congress that the President should--
            (1) review the nature of the cooperation between the United 
        States and Brazil in counternarcotics activities;
            (2) recognize the extraordinary threat that narcotics 
        trafficking poses to the national security of Brazil and to the 
        national security of the United States;
            (3) support the efforts of the Government of Brazil to 
        control drug trafficking in and through the Amazon River basin;
            (4) share information with Brazil on narcotics interdiction 
        in accordance with section 1012 of the National Defense 
        Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1995 (22 U.S.C. 2291-4) in 
        light of the enactment of legislation by the Congress of Brazil 
        that--
                    (A) authorizes appropriate personnel to damage, 
                render inoperative, or destroy aircraft within Brazil 
                territory that are reasonably suspected to be engaged 
                primarily in trafficking in illicit narcotics; and
                    (B) contains measures to protect against the loss 
                of innocent life during activities referred to in 
                subparagraph (A), including an effective measure to 
                identify and warn aircraft before the use of force; and
            (5) issue a determination outlining the matters referred to 
        in paragraphs (1) through (4) in order to prevent any 
        interruption in the provision by the United States of critical 
        operational, logistical, technical, administrative, and 
        intelligence assistance to Brazil.

SEC. 218. MONITORING OF ASSISTANCE FOR COLOMBIAN SECURITY FORCES.

    (a) Authorization of Appropriations.--
            (1) In general.--In addition to amounts otherwise available 
        for such purpose, there is authorized to be appropriated for 
        the Department of Defense and the Department of State for each 
        of fiscal years 2000, 2001, and 2002 an amount not to exceed 
        the amount equal to one percent of the total security 
        assistance for the Colombian armed forces for such fiscal year 
        for purposes of monitoring the use of United States assistance 
        by the Colombian armed forces, including monitoring to ensure 
        compliance with the provisions of this Act and the provisions 
        of section 568 of the Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and 
        Related Programs Appropriations Act, 1999 (as contained in 
        Public Law 105-277; 112 Stat. 2681-195) and section 8130 of the 
        Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 1999 (Public Law 105-
        262; 112 Stat. 2335).
            (2) Availability of funds.--Amounts appropriated pursuant 
        to paragraph (1) are authorized to remain available until 
        expended.
    (b) Reports.--Not later than six months after the date of the 
enactment of this Act, and every six months thereafter, the Secretary 
of Defense and the Secretary of State shall jointly submit to the 
appropriate congressional committees a report on the monitoring 
activities undertaken using funds authorized to be appropriated by 
subsection (a) during the six-month period ending on the date of such 
report.
    (c) Appropriate Congressional Committees Defined.--In this section, 
the term ``appropriate congressional committees'' means the following:
            (1) The Committees on Appropriations, Armed Services, and 
        Foreign Relations of the Senate.
            (2) The Committees on Appropriations, Armed Services, and 
        International Relations and the Permanent Select Committee on 
        Intelligence of the House of Representatives.

SEC. 219. DEVELOPMENT OF ECONOMIC ALTERNATIVES TO THE ILLICIT DRUG 
              TRADE.

    (a) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress--
            (1) to recognize the importance of well-constructed 
        programs for the development of economic alternatives to the 
        illicit drug trade in order to encourage growers to cease 
        illicit crop cultivation; and
            (2) to stress the need to link enforcement efforts with 
        verification efforts in order to ensure that assistance under 
        such programs does not become a form of income supplement to 
        the growers of illicit crops.
    (b) Support for Development of Economic Alternatives.--The 
President is authorized to support programs and activities by the 
United States Government and regional governments to enhance the 
development of economic alternatives to the illicit drug trade.
    (c) Prohibition on Certain Use of Alternative Development 
Assistance.--No funds available under this Act for the development of 
economic alternatives to the illicit drug trade may be used to 
reimburse persons for the eradication of illicit drug crops.
    (d) Limitation on Use of Funds.--Funds authorized to be 
appropriated by subsection (e) may only be made available to Colombia 
or a front line state after--
            (1) such state has provided to the United States agency 
        responsible for the administration of this section a 
        comprehensive development strategy that conditions the 
        development of economic alternatives to the illicit drug trade 
        on verifiable illicit crop eradication programs; and
            (2) the President certifies to the appropriate 
        congressional committees that such strategy is comprehensive 
        and applies sufficient resources toward achieving realistic 
        objectives to ensure the ultimate eradication of illicit crops.
    (e) Authorization of Appropriations.--
            (1) In general.--In addition to amounts otherwise available 
        for such purpose, there is authorized to be appropriated 
        $180,000,000 for the period beginning October 1, 1999, and 
        ending September 30, 2002, to carry out subsection (b), 
        including up to $50,000,000 for Colombia, up to $90,000,000 for 
        Bolivia, and up to $40,000,000 for Peru.
            (2) Availability of funds.--Amounts appropriated pursuant 
        to paragraph (1) are authorized to remain available until 
        expended.
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