Summary: S.2382 — 106th Congress (1999-2000)All Information (Except Text)

There is one summary for S.2382. Bill summaries are authored by CRS.

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Introduced in Senate (04/07/2000)

Technical Assistance, Trade Promotion, and Anti-Corruption Act of 2000 - Title I: Promoting Trade and Protecting United States Jobs - Subtitle A: Private Sector Development - Amends the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 to authorize the President to designate a private, nonprofit organization as eligible to receive Enterprise Funds with respect to any country for promoting: (1) development of the private sectors of eligible countries, including small businesses, the agricultural sector, and joint ventures with United States and host country participants; and (2) policies and practices conducive to private sector development in such countries on the same basis as Enterprise Funds are provided for Poland and Hungary under the Support for East European Democracy (SEED) Act of 1989.

Subtitle B: Protection of United States Jobs and Exports - Prohibits: (1) U.S. bilateral assistance (including direct and guaranteed loans and credit and insurance programs by the Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC)) to finance any loan to establish or expand production of any commodity for export by any country other than the United States, if such commodity is likely to be in surplus on world markets and such assistance will cause substantial injury to U.S. producers of the same, similar, or competing commodity; and (2) U.S. development assistance for any testing or breeding feasibility study, variety improvement or introduction, consultancy, publication, conference, or training in connection with the growth or production in a foreign country of an agricultural commodity grown or produced in the United States, with specified exceptions.

(Sec. 112) Amends the International Financial Institutions Act to direct the Secretary of the Treasury to instruct the U.S. Executive Directors of specified international financial institutions to use the U.S. vote to oppose any assistance by them for the production or extraction of any commodity or mineral for export, if it is in surplus on world markets and such assistance will cause substantial injury to U.S. producers of the same, similar, or competing commodity.

(Sec. 113) Amends the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 to prohibit U.S. assistance (other than direct and guaranteed loans and credit and insurance programs by OPIC) to provide: (1) financial incentive to a business enterprise located in the United States to relocate outside the United States if such incentive is likely to reduce the number of employees of such enterprise because U.S. production is being replaced by it outside the United States; (2) assistance to establish or develop in a foreign country any export processing zone in which the tax, tariff, labor, environment, and safety laws of such country do not apply to activities within the zone, unless the President determines and certifies that such assistance is not likely to cause a loss of jobs within the United States; or (3) assistance for any project that contributes to the violation of internationally recognized workers rights within a recipient country or zone, except that such assistance shall not be precluded for the informal sector of such country, micro and small-scale enterprise, and smallholder agriculture.

(Sec. 114) Declares that assistance under this Act should make full use of American resources, including commodities, products, and services, to the maximum extent possible.

Expresses the sense of Congress that, to the greatest extent practicable, all agricultural commodities, equipment, and products purchased with funds made available in this Act should be American-made. Requires Federal agency heads, in providing financial assistance to or entering into any contract with any entity using funds made available in this Act, to notify such entity of this intention.

Subtitle C: Trade Sanctions Reform and Export Enhancement - Trade Sanctions Reform and Export Enhancement Act of 2000 - Sets forth provisions respecting presidential and congressional authorities and procedures for the imposition of new, and termination of existing, unilateral agricultural and medical sanctions.

(Sec. 125) Requires prohibitions on certain U.S. assistance to a country supporting international terrorism to remain in effect until the Secretary of State determines that such country has repeatedly provided support for such terrorism.

Title II: Economic Assistance - Subtitle A: Assistance Authorities - Amends the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 to revise certain principles in the provision of U.S. bilateral development assistance to a foreign country to state that the successful transition of a developing country is dependent upon the economic reform and development of its institutions of democratic governance and its adherence to the rule of law.

(Sec. 202) Increases from 25 million to $50 million the amount of foreign assistance funds that the President is authorized to use for emergency contingencies during any fiscal year.

(Sec. 203) Provides for a waiver of restrictions on foreign assistance for narcotics-related assistance to foreign countries.

(Sec. 204) Establishes a working capital fund for the U.S. Agency for International Development (AID) which shall be available without fiscal year limitation for expenses of personal and nonpersonal services, equipment, and supplies for international cooperative administrative support services, and rebates from the use of U.S. Government credit cards.

(Sec. 205) Provides that an organization shall be eligible for population planning assistance in a fiscal year if the AID Administrator determines and certifies to the appropriate congressional committees that it has not used such assistance for abortions or involuntary sterilizations.

(Sec. 206) Authorizes appropriations for development assistance to foreign countries. Earmarks specified amounts from such appropriations for: (1) certain activities of the Global Environment Center of the AID; (2) certain water and coastal resources activities; and (3) assistance to East Timor.

(Sec. 208) Amends the Horn of Africa Recovery and Food Security Act to make Economic Support Fund (ESF) assistance available for certain activities to aid the poor majority in the Horn of Africa.

(Sec. 209) Declares that the total amount of development assistance made available for FY 2001 for sub-Saharan Africa shall bear the same proportion to the total amount of development assistance made available for that fiscal year as the total amount of development assistance for such region made available for FY 2000 bears to the total amount of development assistance made available for FY 2000.

(Sec. 210) Amends the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 to make U.S. foreign assistance funds available for nonmilitary education programs and for anticorruption programs.

Subtitle B: International Disaster Assistance - Authorizes the President to provide, through international disaster assistance, for the reconstruction of foreign countries affected by natural disasters.

(Sec. 212) Requires the Administrator of AID, in processing applications for the transportation of humanitarian assistance abroad, to afford priority to applications for the transportation of disaster relief assistance.

Subtitle C: Sudan Peace Act - Sudan Peace Act - Declares that Congress: (1) condemns violations of human rights on all sides of the conflict in Sudan (including the Government of Sudan), the ongoing slave trade there, and the Government's increasing use and organization of "murahalliin" or "mujahadeen", Popular Defense Forces (PDF), and regular Sudanese Army units into raiding and slaving parties in Bahr al Ghazal, the Nuba Mountains, Upper Nile, and Blue Nile regions; and (2) recognizes that the use of raiding and slaving parties is a tool for creating food shortages as a systematic means to destroy the societies, culture, and economies of the Dinka and Nuba peoples in a policy of low-intensity ethnic cleansing.

(Sec. 225) Expresses the sense of Congress that it: (1) declares its support for the efforts by U.S. executive branch officials and the President's Special Envoy for Sudan to lead in a reinvigoration of the Inter-Governmental Authority on Development (IGAD)-sponsored peace process; (2) calls on IGAD member states, the European Union, the Organization of African Unity, Egypt, and other key states to support such process; (3) urges Kenya's leadership in the implementation of the process; and (4) declares that any such diplomatic efforts toward resolution of the conflict in Sudan are best made through a peace process based on the Declaration of Principles reached in Nairobi, Kenya, on July 20, 1994, and that the President should not create any process which could be viewed as a parallel or competing diplomatic track.

(Sec. 226) Expresses the sense of Congress that the President, acting through the U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations, should take specified actions to increase pressure on the combatants involved in the war in Sudan.

(Sec. 227) Directs the President to report to Congress on: (1) the specified sources (including any U.S. sources) and current status of Sudan's financing and construction of oil exploitation infrastructure and pipelines; (2) such financing's relation to sanctions contained in the Executive Order of November 4, 1997; (3) the extent of aerial bombardment by the Government of Sudan forces in areas outside its control; (4) the number, duration, and locations of air strips or other humanitarian relief facilities to which access is denied by any party to the conflict; and (5) the status of the IGAD-sponsored peace process or any other ongoing effort to end the conflict, including specific and verifiable steps taken by the parties to the conflict, the members of the IGAD Partners Forum, and the members of IGAD toward a comprehensive solution to the war.

(Sec. 228) Expresses the sense of Congress that the President should organize and maintain a formal consultative process with the European Union, the United Nations Security Council, and other relevant parties on coordinating an effort within the UN to revise the terms of Operation Lifeline Sudan (OLS) to end the Government of Sudan's veto power over OLS plans for air transport relief flights.

(Sec. 229) Expresses the sense of Congress that the President should continue to increase the use of non-OLS agencies in the distribution of relief supplies in southern Sudan.

(Sec. 230) Directs the President to develop and report to Congress on a contingency plan to provide, outside UN auspices, the greatest amount of U.S. Government and privately donated relief to all affected areas in Sudan, including the Nuba Mountains, Upper Nile, and Blue Nile, in the event the Government of Sudan imposes a ban on OLS air transport relief flights.

(Sec. 231) Supports the President's ongoing efforts to diversify and increase the effectiveness of U.S. assistance to populations in areas of Sudan outside the control of the Government of Sudan, especially the long-term focus shown in the Sudan Transition Assistance for Rehabilitation (STAR) program with its emphasis on promoting democracy, self-reliance, and actively supporting people-to-people reconciliation efforts. Authorizes appropriations.

Grants the President authority to undertake any appropriate programs using Federal agencies, contractual arrangements, or direct support of indigenous groups, agencies, or organizations in areas outside the control of the Government of Sudan (including northern, southern, and eastern regions) in an effort to provide emergency relief, economic self-sufficiency, build civil authority, provide education, enhance rule of law and the development of the judiciary, support people-to-people reconciliation efforts, or implementation of any programs in support of any viable peace agreement.

Expresses the sense of Congress that: (1) the President should immediately and to the fullest extent possible utilize the Office of Transition Initiatives at the Agency for International Development to pursue such programs in the Sudan; and (2) priority should be given in current and future development or transition programs undertaken by the U.S. Government to rebuilding and supporting the Rumbek Secondary School in the Sudan.

(Sec. 232) Expresses the sense of Congress that the President should assess the humanitarian needs in the Nuba Mountains, Red Sea Hills, and Blue Nile regions of Sudan, and respond appropriately to those needs.

(Sec. 233) Directs the President to report to the appropriate congressional committees detailing possible options or plans of the U.S. Government for the provision of nonlethal assistance to participants of the National Democratic Alliance.

Subtitle D: Assistance to Countries With Large Populations Having HIV/AIDS - Amends the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 to revise requirements for assistance for health programs in developing countries to declare that Congress recognizes: (1) the growing international dilemma of children with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV); and (2) that mother-to-child transmission prevention strategies can serve as a major force for change in developing regions, and that it is therefore a major objective of the foreign assistance program to control the acquired immune deficiency syndrom (AIDS) epidemic. Provides that Congress expects the agency primarily responsible for administering this Act to make the prevention and control of HIV/AIDS a priority in the foreign assistance program for developing countries. Authorizes appropriations (earmarking amounts for training and training facilities in sub-Saharan Africa and U.S. contributions to the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunizations and the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative).

(Sec. 245) Directs the President to enter into negotiations with foreign government officials and other interested parties to establish an international vaccine purchase fund that would: (1) accept contributions from governments to purchase and distribute in developing countries vaccines for malaria, tuberculosis, HIV, and any infectious disease which causes the deaths of over one million people worldwide each year; and (2) be a significant market incentive for private sector vaccine research.

(Sec. 246) Directs the Secretary of the Treasury to enter into negotiations with the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (World Bank) or the International Development Association (IDA), and with their member nations and other interested parties, for the creation of two trust funds which would accept contributions from governments, the private sector, and nongovernmental entities to: (1) address the AIDS epidemic in countries eligible to borrow from the IDA; and (2) provide support for or the establishment of programs which provide primary and secondary education for orphans in sub-Saharan Africa. Authorizes appropriations.

(Sec. 248) Directs the President to coordinate the development of multidonor strategy to provide for the support and education of AIDS orphans and the families, communities, and institutions most affected by the HIV/AIDS epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa. Requires the United States to ensure that classroom training under the African Crisis Response Initiative includes military-based education on the prevention of the spread of AIDS.

Subtitle E: International Tuberculosis Control - International Tuberculosis Control Act of 2000 - Amends the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 to revise requirements for assistance for health programs in developing countries to declare that Congress recognizes: (1) the growing international problem of tuberculosis; and (2) that the means exist to control and treat it, and that it is therefore a major objective of the foreign assistance program to control the disease.

(Sec. 253) Declares that Congress expects the agency primarily responsible for administering this Act to: (1) coordinate with the World Health Organization, the Centers for Disease Control, the National Institutes of Health, and other organizations toward the development and implementation of a comprehensive tuberculosis control program; and (2) set as a goal the detection of at least 70 percent of the cases of infectious tuberculosis, and the cure of at least 85 percent of the cases detected, in those countries in which the agency has established development programs, by December 31, 2010. Authorizes appropriations.

Subtitle F: Global Opportunities for Biotechnology in Agriculture - Advancing the Global Opportunities for Biotechnology in Agriculture Act of 2000 - Authorizes the appropriation of certain foreign assistance funds to the President for programs and projects designed, through the establishment of technical exchange programs for foreign officials and U.S. biotechnology experts, to educate government officials in developing countries regarding the use of biotechnology in the agricultural sector and the regulatory procedures used by the United States with respect to agricultural products using biotechnology. Declares that such programs shall encourage acceptance by such countries of products approved under the U.S. regulatory system or, in the case of countries which choose to establish a national regulatory system based on science, to encourage adoption of domestic approval processes based on objective scientific principles.

(Sec. 265) Directs the President to establish an interagency process for all relevant executive branch agencies, including the Department of Agriculture, the Office of the U.S. Trade of Representative, the Department of State, the U.S. Agency for International Development (AID), the Department of Commerce, the Food and Drug Administration, and the Environmental Protection Agency, to coordinate efforts and to generate support for the acceptance of agricultural biotechnology. Urges U.S. policies to stress the prominence of science as the foundation for regulatory decision-making and work aggressively in international fora such as the World Trade Organization, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, including its CODEX Alimentarius, and the United Nations, to advocate for science-based decision-making.

Urges AID and the Department of Agriculture to ensure that all food and grain products that meet U.S. health and safety requirements are acceptable to foreign countries under relevant food aid programs.

(Sec. 266) Expresses the sense of Congress that the Secretary of State should work with U.S. embassies abroad to develop bilateral support from foreign governments for the approval of science-based trading regimes in multilateral forums and organizations.

Title III: Peace Corps of the United States - Amends the Peace Corps Act to redesignate the Peace Corps as the Peace Corps of the United States.

Title IV: Strengthening Anticorruption Measures and Accountability - Amends the Bretton Woods Agreement Act to authorize appropriations through FY 2003 for U.S. contributions to the Heavily Indebted Poor Country Trust Fund of the World Bank.

(Sec. 402) Directs the Secretary of the Treasury to instruct the U.S. Executive Director of each multilateral development bank to exert U.S. influence to strengthen each bank's procedures and management controls to ensure that funds disbursed by it to borrowing countries are used as intended and in a manner that complies with the conditions of the bank's loan to such country.

(Sec. 403) Directs the Comptroller General to report annually to the appropriate congressional committees on the sufficiency of audits of the financial operations of each multilateral development bank conducted by persons or entities outside of such bank.

(Sec. 404) Amends the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 to repeal the President's discretionary authority to transfer certain funds to certain international financial institutions for the purpose of bilateral funding.

Title V: Serbia Democratization Act - Serbia Democratization Act of 2000 - Subtitle A: Support for the Democratic Forces - Authorizes the President to furnish assistance and other support to promote and strengthen institutions of democratic government and the growth of an independent civil society in Serbia, including ethnic tolerance and respect for internationally recognized human rights. Authorizes appropriations. Urges the President to take all necessary steps to ensure that such assistance shall not be provided to the Government of Yugoslavia or the Government of Serbia.

(Sec. 512) Authorizes the President to provide assistance to the Government of Montenegro, unless the President determines, and reports to the appropriate congressional committees, that the leadership of such government is not committed to, or is not taking steps to promote, democratic principles, the rule of law, or respect for internationally recognized human rights.

(Sec. 513) Directs the Broadcasting Board of Governors to further the open communication of information and ideas through the increased use of radio and television broadcasting (Voice of America and Radio Free Europe-Radio Liberty, Incorporated) to Yugoslavia in both the Serbo-Croatian and Albanian languages.

Subtitle B: Assistance to the Victims of Oppression - Expresses the sense of Congress that: (1) the Government of Yugoslavia and the Government of Serbia bear responsibility to the victims of the conflict in Kosovo, including refugees and internally displaced persons, and for property damage in Kosovo; (2) under President Milosevic's direction neither government has provided the resources to assist innocent, civilian victims of oppression in Kosovo; and (3) because neither government has fulfilled the responsibilities of a sovereign government toward the Kosovar people, the international community offers the only course for humanitarian assistance to victims of oppression in Kosovo.

(Sec. 523) Authorizes the President to furnish assistance (including economic support funds) under the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 and the Migration and Refugee Assistance Act of 1962 for: (1) relief, rehabilitation, and reconstruction in Kosovo; and (2) refugees and persons displaced by the conflict there. Prohibits assistance to any organization that has been designated as a terrorist organization.

Subtitle C: "Outer Wall" Sanctions - Imposes certain economic and non-economic ("Outer Wall") sanctions against Yugoslavia until the President determines, and certifies to the appropriate congressional committees, that the Government of Yugoslavia has made significant progress in meeting certain conditions, including: (1) agreement on a lasting settlement in Kosovo; (2) compliance with the General Framework Agreement for Peace in Bosnia and Herzegovina; (3) implementation of internal democratic reform; (4) settlement of all succession issues with the other republics that emerged from the break-up of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia; and (5) cooperation with the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, including the transfer to the Hague of all individuals in Yugoslavia indicted by the Tribunal.

(Sec. 531) Sets forth such sanctions, including instructing: (1) the U.S. executive directors of the international financial institutions to oppose, and vote against, any extension of any financial assistance of any kind to the Government of Yugoslavia; (2) the U.S. Ambassador to the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) to oppose and block any consensus to allow the participation of Yugoslavia in the OSCE; (3) the U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations (UN) to oppose any resolution in the UN Security Council to admit Yugoslavia to the UN, including any proposal to allow it to assume the membership of the former Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia in the UN General Assembly; (4) the U.S. Permanent Representative to the North Atlantic Council to oppose the extension to Yugoslavia of membership in the Partnership for Peace program or any other affiliated NATO organization; and (5) the U.S. Representatives to the Southeast European Cooperation Initiative (SECI) to actively oppose the extension of SECI membership to Yugoslavia.

Expresses the sense of Congress that the President: (1) should not restore full diplomatic relations with Yugoslavia until the President has determined, and reported to the appropriate congressional committees, that Yugoslavia has met the aforementioned conditions; and (2) should encourage all other European countries to diminish their level of diplomatic relations with Yugoslavia.

(Sec. 532) Expresses the sense of Congress that if any international financial institution approves a loan or other financial assistance to the Government of Yugoslavia over the opposition of the United States, then the Secretary of the Treasury should withhold from payment the U.S. share of any increase in the paid-in capital of such institution in an amount equal to the amount of such loan or other assistance.

Subtitle D: Other Measures Against Yugoslavia - Blocks all property of the Government of Serbia or the Government of Yugoslavia (including commercial, industrial, or public utility or entities) that is in the United States.

(Sec. 542) Directs the President to use the authorities under the Immigration and Nationality Act to suspend the entry into the United States of any alien who: (1) holds a position in the senior leadership of the Government of Yugoslavia or the Government of Serbia; or (2) is a spouse, minor child, or agent of such person.

(Sec. 543) Prohibits the export of computers, computer software, or goods or technology intended to manufacture or service computers to or for use by the Government of Yugoslavia or by the Government of Serbia (including the military, the police, the prison system, and the national security agencies of such republics). Declares that nothing in this section shall prevent the issuance of licenses to ensure the safety of civil aviation and safe operation of U.S.-origin commercial passenger aircraft and to ensure the safety of ocean-going maritime traffic in international waters.

(Sec. 544) Prohibits: (1) any Government agency (including the Export-Import Bank and the Overseas Private Investment Corporation) from extending any loan, credit guarantee, insurance, financing, or other similar financial assistance to the Government of Yugoslavia or the Government of Serbia; and (2) any funds being made available for activities of the Trade and Development Agency in or for Serbia.

Urges all other countries, particularly European countries, to suspend any of their programs that provide similar financial assistance to the Government of Yugoslavia or the Government of Serbia, including rescheduling either government's debt under more favorable conditions.

Prohibits any U.S. national from making or approving any loan or other extension of credit (unless it is for housing, education, or humanitarian benefit to assist the victims of repression in Kosovo), directly or indirectly, to the Government of Yugoslavia or to the Government of Serbia.

(Sec. 545) Prohibits the U.S. Government (including any Federal agency or entity) from providing assistance under the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 or the Arms Export Control Act (including the provision of Foreign Military Financing or international military education and training (IMET)) or providing any defense articles or defense services under such Acts, to the armed forces of the Government of Yugoslavia or of the Government of Serbia.

(Sec. 546) Expresses the sense of Congress that the President should continue to seek to coordinate with other countries, particularly European countries, a comprehensive, multilateral strategy to further the purposes of this Act, including, as appropriate, encouraging other countries to take similar measures contained in this title.

(Sec. 547) Exempts from the sanctions imposed in this Act both Kosovo and Montenegro (unless the President determines and certifies to the appropriate congressional committees that the leadership of the Government of Montenegro is not committed to, or is not taking steps to promote, democratic principles, the rule of law, or respect for internationally recognized human rights). Provides for a waiver and termination of sanctions imposed against Yugoslavia.

Subtitle E: Miscellaneous Provisions - Declares it is U.S. policy to support the investigation of President Slobodan Milosevic by the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia for genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, and grave breaches of the Geneva Convention.

(Sec. 552) Expresses the sense of Congress that the President should call on NATO allies in negotiating the future of Kosovo to establish guarantees for the rights of the ethnic Hungarian community of Vojvodina.

(Sec. 553) Declares it is U.S. policy to insist that the Government of Yugoslavia has the responsibility to engage in good faith negotiations with the Governments of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, and Slovenia for resolution of outstanding property issues and disposition of specified properties located in the United States. Expresses the sense of Congress that if the Government of Yugoslavia refuses to negotiate in good faith, the President should take steps to return such properties to such governments.

(Sec. 554) Authorizes the President to furnish assistance to Yugoslavia if he determines, and certifies to the appropriate congressional committees, that the Government of Yugoslavia is committed to democratic principles and the rule of law and respects internationally recognized human rights.

Title VI: Microenterprise Assistance - Microenterprise for Self-Reliance Act of 2000 - Amends the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 to set forth congressional findings and policy, including that: (1) the development of microenterprise (including micro- and small enterprises) is a vital factor in the growth of developing countries and in the development of free, open, and equitable international economic systems; (2) it is in the best interest of the United States to assist the development of microenterprises and of enterprises of the poor in developing countries; and (3) the support of microenterprise can be served by programs that provide credit, savings, training, technical assistance, and business development services.

(Sec. 604) Authorizes the President to provide grants and other assistance for programs to increase the availability of credit and other services to microenterprises (including micro- and small enterprises) lacking full access to capital training, technical assistance, and business development services through: (1) grants to microfinance institutions; (2) loans and guarantees to credit institutions (with a limit of $30 million per borrower); (3) grants to microenterprise institutions for training, technical assistance, and business development services; and (4) policy and regulatory programs at the country level.

(Sec. 606) Directs the Administrator of the U.S. Agency for International Development (AID) to establish: (1) a monitoring system that provides, among other things, for performance goals for microenterprise development grant assistance; (2) eligibility criteria for determining which entities shall carry out activities receiving credit assistance; and (3) a U.S. Microfinance Loan Facility to prevent the bankruptcy of microfinance institutions caused by natural disasters, war or civil conflict, national financial crisis, or other short-term financial movements that threaten the long-term development of such institutions. Authorizes appropriations.

(Sec. 607) Directs the President to report to the appropriate congressional committees on the most cost-effective methods and measurements for increasing the access of poor people overseas to credit, other financial services, and related training.

(Sec. 608) Expresses the sense of the Congress that: (1) the administrator of AID and the Secretary of State should seek to support and strengthen the effectiveness of microfinance activities in United Nations (UN) agencies, such as the International Fund for Agricultural Development and the UN Development Program, which have provided key leadership in developing the microenterprise sector; and (2) the Secretary of the Treasury should instruct each U.S. Executive Director of the multilateral development banks to advocate the development of a coherent and coordinated strategy to support the microenterprise sector, including an increase of multilateral resource flows for building microenterprise retail and wholesale intermediaries.

Title VII: Defense and Security Assistance - Subtitle A: Military and Related Assistance - Authorizes appropriations for FY 2001 for foreign military financing grants and direct loans.

(Sec. 711) Amends the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 to increase the aggregate value of the emergency drawdown of defense articles from the stocks of the Department of Defense (DOD), defense services of DOD, and international military education and training (IMET) to foreign countries in any fiscal year. Authorizes the drawdown of such articles, services, and training for counterterrorism and nonproliferation purposes.

(Sec. 712) Authorizes the President to provide for the transportation of excess defense articles without charge to a country for the costs of such transportation if, among other things, the total weight of such transfer does not exceed 50,000 pounds (currently, 25,000 pounds).

Subtitle B: International Military Education and Training - Authorizes appropriations for FY 2001 for IMET assistance to foreign countries. Sets forth certain additional requirements with respect to the provision of such assistance.

Subtitle C: Nonproliferation and Export Control Assistance - Authorizes the President to furnish assistance to foreign countries in order to enhance their ability to halt the proliferation of nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons, and advanced conventional weaponry.

(Sec. 731) Authorizes appropriations for FY 2001 (earmarking amounts for training and education of personnel from friendly countries in the United States, science and technology centers in the independent states of the former Soviet Union, and static cargo x-ray facility in Malta).

Subtitle D: Antiterrorism Assistance - Authorizes appropriations for FY 2001 for antiterrorism assistance to foreign countries.

Subtitle E: Integrated Security Assistance Planning - Requires the Secretary of State to report annually to the appropriate congressional committees on a National Security Assistance Strategy for the United States.

(Sec. 752) Authorizes appropriations for FY 2001 for security assistance surveys used in preparing the Strategy.

(Sec. 761) Authorizes appropriations for FY 2001 for foreign military financing grants for the Czech Republic, Hungary, and Poland. Earmarks specified amounts of IMET assistance funds for such countries, including Greece and turkey.

(Sec. 763) Earmarks specified amounts for FY 2001 for foreign military financing grants for Israel and Egypt. Earmarks specified amounts for such grants (including IMET assistance) for: (1) Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania; (2) Philippines; (3) Georgia; (4) Malta; (5) Slovenia; (6) Slovakia; (7) Romania; and (8) Bulgaria.

(Sec. 765) Earmarks certain funds for FY 2001 to assist GUUAM countries (group of countries that signed a protocol on quadrilateral cooperation on November 25, 1997) and Armenia to: (1) strengthen national control of their borders (including to prevent the trafficking of illegal narcotics and the proliferation of technology and materials related to weapons of mass destruction, and to contain and inhibit transnational organized criminal activities); and (2) promote the independence and territorial sovereignty of such countries.

Subtitle F: Other Provisions - Amends the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 to authorize the use of defense articles and defense services made available through the provision of U.S. military assistance to foreign countries for antiterrorism and nonproliferation purposes.

(Sec. 772) Amends the Arms Export Control Act to authorize the President to reduce the price for the sale of DOD and Coast Guard defense articles to eligible foreign countries if certain conditions are met.

(Sec. 773) Repeals certain congressional reporting and certification requirements with respect to cooperative projects with North American Treaty Organization countries.

(Sec. 774) Exempts a prohibition on U.S. assistance to the Government of Azerbaijan from certain congressional oversight provisions under the National Security Act of 1947.

(Sec. 775) Sets forth the maximum value of additions to stockpiles in foreign countries for FY 2001. Makes amounts available for such stockpiles in the Republic of Korea.

(Sec. 776) Authorizes the President to transfer to Israel certain obsolete or surplus defense articles in return for concessions to be negotiated by the Secretary of Defense.

(Sec. 777) Prohibits US sale of Stinger missiles in the Persian Gulf, with certain exceptions.

(Sec. 778) Amends Federal law to increase: (1) the bond required to be filed with the Secretary of the Treasury in cases where certain required export information may be filed with the Secretary by a carrier in connection with the exportation or transportation of cargo after the departure of such carrier from the port or place of exportation or transportation; and (2) the penalty for a carrier's failure to file such information within the prescribed period.

Subjects a person who knowingly fails to file, or knowingly files false or misleading, export information through the Shipper's Export Declaration (SED) or the Automated Export System (AES) to a fine not to exceed $10,000, or imprisoned for not more than five years, or both. Increases the civil penalty with respect to the violation of the other reporting requirements under this Act.

(Sec. 779) Authorizes for FY 2001 the use of DOD funds for crating, packing, handling, and transporting excess defense articles to Mongolia.

(Sec. 780) Directs the President to certify annually to the appropriate congressional committees that any Russian person engaged in a commercial operation involving Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR) equipment or technology with a U.S. person pursuant to an arms export license issued within the 36 months preceding the certification is not suspected of contributing to the acquisition, design, development, or production of MTCR-class ballistic missiles in Iran at any time since January 1, 2000. Authorizes the President to terminate such license if it is determined that the foreign person has engaged in the transfer of any MTCR equipment or technology.

(Sec. 781) Makes specified amounts of economic support fund (ESF) and foreign military financing funds available only to Israel for FY 2001 through 2008.

Subtitle G: Transfers of Naval Vessels - Authorizes the President to transfer certain naval vessels to: (1) Australia; (2) Brazil; (3) Chile; (4) Egypt; (5) Greece; and (6) Turkey.

(Sec. 792) Sets forth requirements with respect to: (1) the inapplicability of aggregate annual limitation on the value of transferred excess defense articles; (2) who should be charged the costs related to such transfers; (3) conditions related to the transfer of naval vessels on a combined lease-sale basis; and (4) the funding of costs related to such transfers.

Subtitle H: Definition - Defines "appropriate committees of Congress".

Title VIII: Special Authorities and Other Provisions - Amends the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 to set forth additional authority under the Arms Export Control Act for the prohibition on assistance to any foreign government that provides lethal military equipment to a country that the Secretary of State has determined has a terrorist government, unless the President determines that furnishing such assistance is in the U.S. national interest.

(Sec. 802) Authorizes the Administrator of the agency primarily responsible for administering development assistance to foreign countries to provide program and management oversight for activities that are funded by such assistance in countries in which such agency does not have a field mission or office.

(Sec. 803) Sets forth revised requirements with respect to the availability of foreign assistance funds for the winding up of programs that have been terminated.

(Sec. 804) Authorizes the President to furnish foreign assistance to support or strengthen the administration of justice in countries in Latin American and the Caribbean. Repeals the prohibition against the participation of DOD personnel and members of the U.S. armed forces in the provision of training with respect to the administration of justice in such countries.

(Sec. 805) Amends the International Financial Institutions Act to require the annual reporting of environmental impact of multilateral development bank assistance proposals (currently made semi-annually).

(Sec. 806) Expresses the sense of the Senate on environmental contamination and health effects emanating from former U.S. military facilities in the Philippines.

(Sec. 807) Repeals obsolete provisions of specified Federal laws.