Text: H.Res.560 — 107th Congress (2001-2002)All Bill Information (Except Text)

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Introduced in House (09/26/2002)


107th CONGRESS
2d Session
H. RES. 560

Expressing the sense of the House of Representatives regarding the restoration and protection of the Great Lakes


IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
September 26, 2002

Mr. Camp submitted the following resolution; which was referred to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, and in addition to the Committees on Resources, Science, and International Relations, for a period to be subsequently determined by the Speaker, in each case for consideration of such provisions as fall within the jurisdiction of the committee concerned


RESOLUTION

Expressing the sense of the House of Representatives regarding the restoration and protection of the Great Lakes

Whereas the Great Lakes is the largest freshwater system on Earth;

Whereas over 90 percent of the 29,000,000 United States residents of the Great Lakes basin rely on the Great Lakes for drinking water;

Whereas scientists have detected more than 360 contaminants in the Great Lakes ecosystem, many of which may have a negative impact on plant, animal, and human life;

Whereas section 1109(b)(2) of the Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (42 U.S.C. 1962d–20(b)(2)) encourages the Great Lakes States, in consultation with the Canadian Provinces of Ontario and Quebec, to develop and implement a mechanism that provides a common conservation standard embodying the principles of water conservation and resource improvement for making decisions concerning the withdrawal and use of water from the Great Lakes Basin;

Whereas annual combined sewer overflow discharges are estimated at 1,260,000,000 gallons per year and a heavy concentration of combined sewer overflows are found in the Great Lakes region;

Whereas $450,000,000 for combined sewer overflow control programs has been requested by the United States Environmental Protection Agency in its previous year’s budget, but to date funds for such purposes have not been appropriated; and

Whereas more than 130 invasive species have been introduced in the Great Lakes and costs of controlling these invasive species are estimated to be as high as $5,000,000,000 over a 10-year period: Now, therefore, be it

Resolved,

SECTION 1. Ballast water treatment regulations required.

It is the sense of the House of Representatives that the Secretary of Transportation should issue under the Nonindigenous Aquatic Nuisance Prevention and Control Act of 1990 (16 U.S.C. 4701 et seq.) regulations to prevent the introduction and spread of aquatic nuisance species within the Great Lakes.

SEC. 2. Export of water from great lakes.

It is the sense of the House of Representatives that—

(1) the Great Lakes States, in consultation with the Canadian Provinces of Ontario and Quebec, should develop and implement a mechanism that provides a common conservation standard embodying the principles of water conservation and resource improvement for making decisions concerning the withdrawal and use of water from the Great Lakes Basin; and

(2) the Secretary of State should work with the Canadian Government to encourage and support the Provinces in the development and implementation of a mechanism and standard concerning the withdrawal and use of water from the Great Lakes Basin consistent with those mechanisms and standards developed by the Great Lakes States.

SEC. 3. Grants for the remediation of sediment contamination in areas of concern.

It is the sense of the House of Representatives that the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency should make grants to States, Indian tribes, regional agencies, and local governments to carry out projects in areas of concern located wholly or in part in the United States—

(1) to monitor or evaluate contaminated sediment;

(2) to remediate contaminated sediment; and

(3) to prevent further or renewed contamination of sediment.

SEC. 4. Research and development program.

It is the sense of the House of Representatives that the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency should conduct research on the development and use of innovative approaches, technologies, and techniques for the remediation of sediment contamination in areas of concern in the Great Lakes.

SEC. 5. Sewer overflow control grants.

It is the sense of the House of Representatives that funding for section 221 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C. 1301), relating to sewer overflow control grants, should be extended through fiscal year 2004 in accordance with H.R. 5183 of the 107th Congress.

SEC. 6. National sea grant college program.

It is the sense of the House of Representatives that appropriations for the national sea grant college program in fiscal year 2003 be funded at the level authorized in the National Sea Grant College Program Reauthorization Act of 1998 (Public Law 105–160).