Text: S.Con.Res.7 — 107th Congress (2001-2002)All Information (Except Text)

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Referred in House (04/24/2001)

 
[Congressional Bills 107th Congress]
[From the U.S. Government Printing Office]
[S. Con. Res. 7 Referred in House (RFH)]

  1st Session
S. CON. RES. 7


_______________________________________________________________________


                    IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

                             April 24, 2001

 Referred to the Committee on International Relations, and in addition 
  to the Committee on Education and the Workforce, for a period to be 
subsequently determined by the Speaker, in each case for consideration 
  of such provisions as fall within the jurisdiction of the committee 
                               concerned

_______________________________________________________________________

                         CONCURRENT RESOLUTION


 
    Expressing the sense of Congress that the United States should 
    establish an international education policy to further national 
security, foreign policy, and economic competitiveness, promote mutual 
  understanding and cooperation among nations, and for other purposes.

Whereas promoting international education for United States citizens and 
        ensuring access to high level international experts are important to 
        meet national security, foreign policy, economic, and other global 
        challenges facing the United States;
Whereas international education entails the imparting of effective global 
        competence to United States students and other citizens as an integral 
        part of their education at all levels;
Whereas research indicates that the United States is failing to graduate enough 
        students with expertise in foreign languages, cultures, and policies to 
        fill the demands of business, government, and universities;
Whereas, according to the Institute for International Education, less than 10 
        percent of United States students graduating from college have studied 
        abroad;
Whereas, according to the American Council on Education, foreign language 
        enrollments in United States higher education fell from 16 percent in 
        1960 to just 8 percent today, and the number of 4-year colleges with 
        foreign language entrance and graduation requirements also declined;
Whereas educating international students is an important way to impart cross-
        cultural understanding, to spread United States values and influence, 
        and to create goodwill for the United States throughout the world;
Whereas, based on studies by the College Board, the Institute for International 
        Education, and Indiana University, more than 500,000 international 
        students and their dependents contributed an estimated $12,300,000,000 
        to the United States economy in the academic year 1999-2000;
Whereas, according to the Departments of State and Education, the proportion of 
        international students choosing to study in the United States has 
        declined from 40 to 30 percent since 1982;
Whereas international exchange programs, which in the past have done much to 
        extend United States influence in the world by educating the world's 
        leaders, as well as educating United States citizens about other nations 
        and their cultures, are suffering from decline; and
Whereas American educational institutions chartered in the United States but 
        operating abroad are important resources both for deepening the 
        international knowledge of United States citizens and for nurturing 
        United States ideals in other countries: Now, therefore, be it
    Resolved by the Senate (the House of Representatives concurring),

SECTION 1. SENSE OF CONGRESS ON THE ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INTERNATIONAL 
              EDUCATION POLICY FOR THE UNITED STATES.

    It is the sense of Congress that the United States should establish 
an international education policy to enhance national security, 
significantly further United States foreign policy and economic 
competitiveness, and promote mutual understanding and cooperation among 
nations.

SEC. 2. OBJECTIVES OF AN INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION POLICY FOR THE UNITED 
              STATES.

    An international education policy for the United States should 
strive to achieve the following:
            (1) Enhance the educational infrastructure through which 
        the United States produces citizens with a high level of 
        international expertise, and builds a broad knowledge base that 
        serves the United States.
            (2) Promote greater diversity of locations, languages, and 
        subjects involved in teaching, research, and study abroad to 
        ensure that the United States maintains a broad international 
        knowledge base.
            (3) Significantly increase participation in study and 
        internships abroad by United States students.
            (4) Invigorate citizen and professional international 
        exchange programs and promote the international exchange of 
        scholars.
            (5) Support visas and employment policies that promote 
        increased numbers of international students.
            (6) Ensure that a United States college graduate has 
        knowledge of a second language and of a foreign area, as well 
        as a broader understanding of the world.
            (7) Encourage programs that begin foreign language learning 
        in the United States at an early age.
            (8) Promote educational exchanges and research 
        collaboration with American educational institutions abroad 
        that can strengthen the foreign language skills and a better 
        understanding of the world by United States citizens.
            (9) Promote partnerships among government, business, and 
        educational institutions and organizations to provide adequate 
        resources for implementing this policy.

            Passed the Senate April 6, 2001.

            Attest:

                                                    GARY SISCO,

                                                             Secretary.