Text: S.J.Res.51 — 107th Congress (2001-2002)All Bill Information (Except Text)

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Introduced in Senate (10/17/2002)


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[Congressional Bills 107th Congress]
[From the U.S. Government Printing Office]
[S.J. Res. 51 Introduced in Senate (IS)]





107th CONGRESS
  2d Session
S. J. RES. 51

To recognize the rights of consumers to use copyright protected works, 
                        and for other purposes.


_______________________________________________________________________


                   IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES

                            October 17, 2002

  Mr. Wyden introduced the following joint resolution; which was read 
          twice and referred to the Committee on the Judiciary

_______________________________________________________________________

                            JOINT RESOLUTION


 
To recognize the rights of consumers to use copyright protected works, 
                        and for other purposes.

    Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United 
States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

    This Joint Resolution may be referred to as the ``Consumer 
Technology Bill of Rights''.

SEC. 2. RECOGNITION OF RIGHTS.

    It is the Sense of the Congress that United States copyright law 
should not prohibit a consumer of information or entertainment content 
distributed via electronic media from engaging in the reasonable, 
personal, and noncommercial exercise of the rights described in section 
3 with respect to works that the consumer has legally acquired.

SEC. 3. ENUMERATION OF RIGHTS.

    The following rights are the rights to which section 2 refers:
            (1) The right to record legally acquired video or audio for 
        later viewing or listening (popularly referred to as ``time-
        shifting'').
            (2) The right to use legally acquired content in different 
        places (popularly referred to as ``space-shifting'').
            (3) The right to archive or make backup copies of legally 
        acquired content for use in the event that the original copies 
        are destroyed.
            (4) The right to use legally acquired content on the 
        electronic platform or device of the consumer's choice.
            (5) The right to translate legally acquired content into 
        comparable formats.
            (6) The right to use technology in order to achieve the 
        rights enumerated in paragraphs (1) through (5).
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