Text: S.788 — 108th Congress (2003-2004)All Information (Except Text)

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Introduced in Senate (04/03/2003)

 
[Congressional Bills 108th Congress]
[From the U.S. Government Printing Office]
[S. 788 Introduced in Senate (IS)]







108th CONGRESS
  1st Session
                                 S. 788

 To enable the United States to maintain its leadership in aeronautics 
                             and aviation.


_______________________________________________________________________


                   IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES

                             April 3, 2003

Mr. Hollings (for himself, Mr. Brownback, Mr. Rockefeller, Mr. Inouye, 
 Ms. Cantwell and Mr. Kerry) introduced the following bill; which was 
   read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science and 
                             Transportation

_______________________________________________________________________

                                 A BILL


 
 To enable the United States to maintain its leadership in aeronautics 
                             and aviation.

    Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the 
United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE; TABLE OF SECTIONS.

    (a) Short Title.--This Act may be cited as the ``Second Century of 
Flight Act''.
    (b) Table of Sections.--The table of sections for this Act is as 
follows:

        Sec. 1. Short title; table of sections.
        Sec. 2. Findings.
         TITLE I--THE OFFICE OF AEROSPACE AND AVIATION LIAISON

        Sec. 101. Office of Aerospace and Aviation Liaison.
        Sec. 102. National Air Traffic Management System Development 
                            Office.
        Sec. 103. Report on certain market developments and government 
                            policies.
                      TITLE II--TECHNICAL PROGRAMS

        Sec. 201. Aerospace workforce initiative.
        Sec. 202. Scholarships for service.
         TITLE III--FAA RESEARCH, ENGINEERING, AND DEVELOPMENT

        Sec. 301. Authorization of appropriations.
        Sec. 302. Research program to improve airfield pavements.
        Sec. 303. Ensuring appropriate standards for airfield 
                            pavements.
        Sec. 304. Assessment of wake turbulence research and 
                            development program.
        Sec. 305. Cabin air quality research program.
        Sec. 306. International role of the FAA.
        Sec. 307. FAA report on other nations' safety and technological 
                            advancements.
        Sec. 308. Development of analytical tools and certification 
                            methods.
        Sec. 309. Pilot program to provide incentives for development 
                            of new technologies.
        Sec. 310. FAA center for excellence for applied research and 
                            training in the use of advanced materials 
                            in transport aircraft.
        Sec. 311. FAA certification of design organizations.
        Sec. 312. Report on long term environmental improvements.
          TITLE IV--NASA RESEARCH, EDUCATION, AND DEVELOPMENT

        Sec. 401. NASA aeronautics research plan.
        Sec. 402. Assessment of NASA research plan.
        Sec. 403. Study of markets enabled by environmental 
                            technologies for future aircraft.
        Sec. 404. Vehicle-enabling technology program.
        Sec. 405. Aviation software initiatives.
        Sec. 406. Weather sensors and prediction.
        Sec. 407. Advisory committees.
        Sec. 408. National Center for Advanced Materials Performance.
        Sec. 409. Unified budget report.
        Sec. 410. Cost-sharing.

SEC. 2. FINDINGS.

    The Congress finds the following:
            (1) Since 1990, the United States has lost more than 
        600,000 aerospace jobs.
            (2) Over the last year, approximately 100,000 airline 
        workers and aerospace workers have lost their jobs as a result 
        of the terrorist attacks in the United States on September 11, 
        2001, and the slowdown in the world economy.
            (3) The United States has revolutionized the way people 
        travel, developing new technologies and aircraft to move people 
        more efficiently and more safely.
            (4) Past Federal investment in aeronautics research and 
        development have benefited the economy and national security of 
        the United States and the quality of life of its citizens.
            (5) The total impact of civil aviation on the United States 
        economy exceeds $900 billion annually--9 percent of the gross 
        national product--and 11 million jobs in the national 
        workforce. Civil aviation products and services generate a 
        significant surplus for United States trade accounts, and 
        amount to significant numbers of America's highly skilled, 
        technologically qualified work force.
            (6) Aerospace technologies, products and services underpin 
        the advanced capabilities of our men and women in uniform and 
        those charged with homeland security.
            (7) Future growth in civil aviation increasingly will be 
        constrained by concerns related to aviation system safety and 
        security, aviation system capabilities, aircraft noise, 
        emissions, and fuel consumption.
            (8) The United States is in danger of losing its aerospace 
        leadership to international competitors aided by persistent 
        government intervention. Many governments take their funding 
        beyond basic technology development, choosing to fund product 
        development and often bring the product to market, even if the 
        products are not fully commercially viable. Moreover, 
        international competitors have recognized the importance of 
        noise, emission, fuel consumption, and constraints of the 
        aviation system and have established aggressive agendas for 
        addressing each of these concerns.
            (9) Efforts by the European Union, through a variety of 
        means, will challenge the United States' leadership position in 
        aerospace. A recent report outlined the European Union's goal 
        of becoming the world's leader in aviation and aeronautics by 
        the end of 2020, utilizing better coordination among research 
        programs, planning, and funding to accomplish this goal.
            (10) Revitalization and coordination of the United States' 
        efforts to maintain its leadership in aviation and aeronautics 
        are critical and must begin now.
            (11) A recent report by the Commission on the Future of the 
        United States Aerospace Industry outlined the scope of the 
        problems confronting the aerospace and aviation industries in 
        the United States and found that--
                    (A) Aerospace will be at the core of America's 
                leadership and strength throughout the 21st century;
                    (B) Aerospace will play an integral role in our 
                economy, our security, and our mobility; and
                    (C) global leadership in aerospace is a national 
                imperative.
            (12) Despite the downturn in the global economy, Federal 
        Aviation Administration projections indicate that upwards of 1 
        billion people will fly annually by 2013. Efforts must begin 
        now to prepare for future growth in the number of airline 
        passengers.
            (13) The United States must increase its investment in 
        research and development to revitalize the aviation and 
        aerospace industries, to create jobs, and to provide 
        educational assistance and training to prepare workers in those 
        industries for the future.
            (14) Current and projected levels of Federal investment in 
        aeronautics research and development are not sufficient to 
        address concerns related to the growth of aviation.

         TITLE I--THE OFFICE OF AEROSPACE AND AVIATION LIAISON

SEC. 101. OFFICE OF AEROSPACE AND AVIATION LIAISON.

    (a) Establishment.--There is established within the Department of 
Transportation an Office of Aerospace and Aviation Liaison.
    (b) Function.--The Office shall--
            (1) coordinate aviation and aeronautics research programs 
        to achieve the goal of more effective and directed programs 
        that will result in applicable research;
            (2) coordinate goals and priorities and coordinate research 
        activities within the Federal Government with United States 
        aviation and aeronautical firms;
            (3) coordinate the development and utilization of new 
        technologies to ensure that when available, they may be used to 
        their fullest potential in aircraft and in the air traffic 
        control system;
            (4) facilitate the transfer of technology from research 
        programs such as the National Aeronautics and Space 
        Administration program established under section 401 and the 
        Department of Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency program 
        to Federal agencies with operational responsibilities and to 
        the private sector;
            (5) review activities relating to noise, emissions, fuel 
        consumption, and safety conducted by Federal agencies, 
        including the Federal Aviation Administration, the National 
        Aeronautics and Space Administration, the Department of 
        Commerce, and the Department of Defense;
            (6) review aircraft operating procedures intended to reduce 
        noise and emissions, identify and coordinate research efforts 
        on aircraft noise and emissions reduction, and ensure that 
        aircraft noise and emissions reduction regulatory measures are 
        coordinated; and
            (7) work with the National Air Traffic Management System 
        Development Office to coordinate research needs and 
        applications for the next generation air traffic management 
        system.
    (c) Public-Private Participation.--In carrying out its functions 
under this section, the Office shall consult with, and ensure 
participation by, the private sector (including representatives of 
general aviation, commercial aviation, and the space industry), members 
of the public, and other interested parties.
    (d) Reporting Requirements.--
            (1) Initial status report.--Not later than 90 days after 
        the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary of 
        Transportation shall submit a report to the Senate Committee on 
        Commerce, Science, and Transportation and the House of 
        Representatives Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure 
        on the status of the establishment of the Office of Aerospace 
        and Aviation Liaison, including the name of the program 
        manager, the list of staff from each participating department 
        or agency, names of the national team participants, and the 
        schedule for future actions.
            (2) Plan.--The Office shall submit to the Senate Committee 
        on Commerce, Science, and Transportation and the House of 
        Representatives Committee on Science a plan for implementing 
        paragraphs (1) and (2) of subsection (b) and a proposed budget 
        for implementing the plan.
            (3) Annual Report.--The Office shall submit to the Senate 
        Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, the House 
        of Representatives Committee on Transportation and 
        Infrastructure, and the House of Representatives Committee on 
        Science an annual report that--
                    (A) contains a unified budget that combines the 
                budgets of each program coordinated by the Office; and
                    (B) describes the coordination activities of the 
                Office during the preceding year.
    (e) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated to the Secretary of Transportation $2,000,000 for fiscal 
years 2004 and 2005 to carry out this section, such sums to remain 
available until expended.

SEC. 102. NATIONAL AIR TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT OFFICE.

    (a) Establishment.--There is established within the Federal 
Aviation Administration a National Air Traffic Management System 
Development Office, the head of which shall report directly to the 
Administrator.
    (b) Development of Next Generation Air Traffic Management System.--
            (1) In General.--The Office shall develop a next generation 
        air traffic management system plan for the United States that 
        will--
                    (A) transform the national airspace system to meet 
                air transportation mobility, efficiency, and capacity 
                needs beyond those currently included in the Federal 
                Aviation Administration's operational evolution plan;
                    (B) result in a national airspace system that can 
                safely and efficiently accommodate the needs of all 
                users;
                    (C) build upon current air traffic management and 
                infrastructure initiatives;
                    (D) improve the security, safety, quality, and 
                affordability of aviation services;
                    (E) utilize a system-of-systems, multi-agency 
                approach to leverage investments in civil aviation, 
                homeland security, and national security;
                    (F) develop a highly integrated, secure 
                architecture to enable common situational awareness for 
                all appropriate system users; and
                    (G) ensure seamless global operations for system 
                users, to the maximum extent possible.
            (2) Multi-agency and stakeholder involvement.--In 
        developing the system, the Office shall--
                    (A) include staff from the Federal Aviation 
                Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space 
                Administration, the Department of Homeland Security, 
                the Department of Defense, the Department of Commerce, 
                and other Federal agencies and departments determined 
                by the Secretary of Transportation to have an important 
                interest in, or responsibility for, other aspects of 
                the system; and
                    (B) consult with, and ensure participation by, the 
                private sector (including representatives of general 
                aviation, commercial aviation, and the space industry), 
                members of the public, and other interested parties.
            (3) Development criteria and requirements.--In developing 
        the next generation air traffic management system plan under 
        paragraph (1), the Office shall--
                    (A) develop system performance requirements;
                    (B) select an operational concept to meet system 
                performance requirements for all system users;
                    (C) ensure integration of civil and military system 
                requirements, balancing safety, security, and 
                efficiency, in order to leverage Federal funding;
                    (D) utilize modeling, simulation, and analytical 
                tools to quantify and validate system performance and 
                benefits;
                    (E) develop a transition plan, including necessary 
                regulatory aspects, that ensures operational 
                achievability for system operators;
                    (F) develop transition requirements for ongoing 
                modernization programs, if necessary;
                    (G) develop a schedule for aircraft equipment 
                implementation and appropriate benefits and incentives 
                to make that schedule achievable; and
                    (H) assess, as part of its function within the 
                Office of Aeronautical and Aviation Liaison, the 
                technical readiness of appropriate research 
                technological advances for integration of such research 
                and advances into the plan.
    (c) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated to the Administrator of the Federal Aviation 
Administration $300,000,000 for the period beginning with fiscal year 
2004 and ending with fiscal year 2010 to carry out this section.

SEC. 103. REPORT ON CERTAIN MARKET DEVELOPMENTS AND GOVERNMENT 
              POLICIES.

    Within 6 months after the date of enactment of this Act, the 
Department of Transportation's Office of Aerospace and Aviation 
liaison, in cooperation with appropriate Federal agencies, shall submit 
to the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, the 
House of Representatives Committee on Science, and the House of 
Representatives Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure a report 
about market developments and government policies influencing the 
competitiveness of the United States jet transport aircraft industry 
that--
            (1) describes the structural characteristics of the United 
        States and the European Union jet transport industries, and the 
        markets for these industries;
            (2) examines the global market factors affecting the jet 
        transport industries in the United States and the European 
        Union, such as passenger and freight airline purchasing 
        patterns, the rise of low-cost carriers and point-to-point 
        service, the evolution of new market niches, and direct and 
        indirect operating cost trends;
            (3) reviews government regulations in the United States and 
        the European Union that have altered the competitive landscape 
        for jet transport aircraft, such as airline deregulation, 
        certification and safety regulations, noise and emissions 
        regulations, government research and development programs, 
        advances in air traffic control and other infrastructure 
        issues, corporate and air travel tax issues, and industry 
        consolidation strategies;
            (4) analyzes how changes in the global market and 
        government regulations have affected the competitive position 
        of the United States aerospace and aviation industry vis-a-vis 
        the European Union aerospace and aviation industry; and
            (5) describes any other significant developments that 
        affect the market for jet transport aircraft.

                      TITLE II--TECHNICAL PROGRAMS

SEC. 201. AEROSPACE WORKFORCE INITIATIVE.

    (a) In General.--The Administrator of the National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration and the Administrator of the Federal Aviation 
Administration shall establish a joint program of competitive, merit-
based, multi-year grants for eligible applicants to increase the number 
of students studying toward and completing technical training programs, 
certificate programs, and associate's, bachelor's, master's, or 
doctorate degrees in fields related to aerospace.
    (b) Increased Participation Goal.--In selecting projects under this 
paragraph, the Director shall strive to increase the number of students 
studying toward and completing technical training and apprenticeship 
programs, certificate programs, and associate's or bachelor's degrees 
in fields related to aerospace who are individuals identified in 
section 33 or 34 of the Science and Engineering Equal Opportunities Act 
(42 U.S.C. 1885a or 1885b).
    (c) Supportable Projects.--The types of projects the Administrators 
may support under this paragraph include those that promote high 
quality--
            (1) interdisciplinary teaching;
            (2) undergraduate-conducted research;
            (3) mentor relationships for students;
            (4) graduate programs;
            (5) bridge programs that enable students at community 
        colleges to matriculate directly into baccalaureate aerospace 
        related programs;
            (6) internships, including mentoring programs, carried out 
        in partnership with the aerospace and aviation industry;
            (7) technical training and apprenticeship that prepares 
        students for careers in aerospace manufacturing or operations; 
        and
            (8) innovative uses of digital technologies, particularly 
        at institutions of higher education that serve high numbers or 
        percentages of economically disadvantaged students.
    (d) 50 Percent Federal Share.--Not less than 50 percent of the 
publicly financed costs associated with eligible activities shall come 
from non-Federal sources. Matching contributions may not be derived, 
directly or indirectly, from Federal funds. The Administrators shall 
endeavor to minimize the Federal share, taking into account the 
differences in fiscal capacity of eligible applicants.
    (e) Grantee Requirements.--
            (1) Targets.--In order to receive a grant under this 
        section, an eligible applicant shall establish targets to 
        increase the number of students studying toward and completing 
        technical training and apprenticeship programs, certificate 
        programs, and associate's or bachelor's degrees in fields 
        related to aerospace.
            (2) Grant period.--A grant under this section shall be 
        awarded for a period of 5 years, with the final 2 years of 
        funding contingent on the Director's determination that 
        satisfactory progress has been made by the grantee toward 
        meeting the targets established under paragraph (1).
            (3) Community college rule.--In the case of community 
        colleges, a student who transfers to a baccalaureate program, 
        or receives a certificate under an established certificate 
        program, in science, mathematics, engineering, or technology 
        shall be counted toward meeting a target established under 
        paragraph (1).
    (f) Definitions.--In this section:
            (1) Eligible applicant defined.--The term ``eligible 
        applicant'' means--
                    (A) an institution of higher education;
                    (B) a consortium of institutions of higher 
                education; or
                    (C) a partnership between--
                            (i) an institution of higher education or a 
                        consortium of such institutions; and
                            (ii) a nonprofit organization, a State or 
                        local government, or a private company, with 
                        demonstrated experience and effectiveness in 
                        aerospace education.
            (2) Institution of higher education.--The term 
        ``institution of higher education'' has the meaning given that 
        term by subsection (a) of section 101 of the Higher Education 
        Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1001(a)), and includes an institution 
        described in subsection (b) of that section.
    (g) Authorization of Appropriations.--
            (1) NASA.--There are authorized to be appropriated to the 
        Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space 
        Administration $5,000,000 for fiscal year 2004 and $7,000,000 
        for fiscal year 2005 to carry out this section, such sums to 
        remain available until expended.
            (2) FAA.--There are authorized to be appropriated to the 
        Administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration $5,000,000 
        for fiscal year 2004 and $7,000,000 for fiscal year 2005 to 
        carry out this section, such sums to remain available until 
        expended.

SEC. 202. SCHOLARSHIPS FOR SERVICE.

    (a) In General.--The Administrator of the National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration and the Administrator of the Federal Aviation 
Administration may provide loans of up to $5,000 per year to fulltime 
students enrolled in an undergraduate or post-graduate program leading 
to an advanced degree in an aerospace related field of endeavor.
    (b) Limitation.--An individual may not receive a loan under 
subsection (a) for more than 5 different years of study.
    (c) Forgiveness for Service.--The Administrators may forgive the 
repayment of principal and interest on any loan made under subsection 
(a) to an individual at the rate of 1 year's loan forgiveness for each 
12-month period of service by that individual as a United States 
government employee in an aerospace related field of employment 
commencing after that individual completes the graduate program for 
which the loan was made.
    (d) Internships.--The Administrators may provide temporary 
internships to recipients of loans under subsection (a), but any period 
of service as such an intern shall not be taken into account for 
purposes of subsection (c).
    (e) Authorization of Appropriations.--
            (1) NASA.--There are authorized to be appropriated to the 
        Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space 
        Administration $7,000,000 for fiscal year 2004 and $10,000,000 
        for fiscal year 2005 to carry out this section, such sums to 
        remain available until expended.
            (2) FAA.--There are authorized to be appropriated to the 
        Administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration $7,000,000 
        for fiscal year 2004 and $10,000,000 for fiscal year 2005 to 
        carry out this section, such sums to remain available until 
        expended.

         TITLE III--FAA RESEARCH, ENGINEERING, AND DEVELOPMENT

SEC. 301. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

    (a) Amounts Authorized.--Section 48102(a) of title 49, United 
States Code, is amended--
            (1) by striking ``and'' at the end of paragraph (7);
            (2) by striking the period at the end of paragraph (8) and 
        inserting a semicolon; and
            (3) by adding at the end the following:
            ``(9) for fiscal year 2004, $289,000,000, including--
                    ``(A) $200,000,000 to improve aviation safety, 
                including icing, crashworthiness, and aging aircraft;
                    ``(B) $18,000,000 to improve the efficiency of the 
                air traffic control system;
                    ``(C) $27,000,000 to reduce the environmental 
                impact of aviation;
                    ``(D) $16,000,000 to improve the efficiency of 
                mission support; and
                    ``(E) $28,000,000 to improve the durability and 
                maintainability of advanced material structures in 
                transport airframe structures;
            ``(10) for fiscal year 2005, $304,000,000, including--
                    ``(A) $211,000,000 to improve aviation safety;
                    ``(B) $19,000,000 to improve the efficiency of the 
                air traffic control system;
                    ``(C) $28,000,000 to reduce the environmental 
                impact of aviation;
                    ``(D) $17,000,000 to improve the efficiency of 
                mission support; and
                    ``(E) $29,000,000 to improve the durability and 
                maintainability of advanced material structures in 
                transport airframe structures; and
            ``(11) for fiscal year 2006, $317,000,000, including--
                    ``(A) $220,000,000 to improve aviation safety;
                    ``(B) $20,000,000 to improve the efficiency of the 
                air traffic control system;
                    ``(C) $29,000,000 to reduce the environmental 
                impact of aviation;
                    ``(D) $18,000,000 to improve the efficiency of 
                mission support; and
                    ``(E) $30,000,000 to improve the durability and 
                maintainability of advanced material structures in 
                transport airframe structures.''.

SEC. 302. RESEARCH PROGRAM TO IMPROVE AIRFIELD PAVEMENTS.

    The Administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration shall 
continue the program to consider awards to nonprofit concrete and 
asphalt pavement research foundations to improve the design, 
construction, rehabilitation, and repair of rigid concrete airfield 
pavements to aid in the development of safer, more cost-effective, and 
more durable airfield pavements. The Administrator may use grants or 
cooperative agreements in carrying out this section. Nothing in this 
section requires the Administrator to prioritize an airfield pavement 
research program above safety, security, Flight 21, environment, or 
energy research programs.

SEC. 303. ENSURING APPROPRIATE STANDARDS FOR AIRFIELD PAVEMENTS.

    (a) In General.--The Administrator of the Federal Aviation 
Administration shall review and determine whether the Federal Aviation 
Administration's standards used to determine the appropriate thickness 
for asphalt and concrete airfield pavements are in accordance with the 
Federal Aviation Administration's standard 20-year-life requirement 
using the most up-to-date available information on the life of airfield 
pavements. If the Administrator determines that such standards are not 
in accordance with that requirement, the Administrator shall make 
appropriate adjustments to the Federal Aviation Administration's 
standards for airfield pavements.
    (b) Report.--Within 1 year after the date of enactment of this Act, 
the Administrator shall report the results of the review conducted 
under subsection (a) and the adjustments, if any, made on the basis of 
that review to the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation and the House of Representatives Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure.

SEC. 304. ASSESSMENT OF WAKE TURBULENCE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT 
              PROGRAM.

    (a) Assessment.--The Administrator of the Federal Aviation 
Administration shall enter into an arrangement with the National 
Research Council for an assessment of the Federal Aviation 
Administration's proposed wake turbulence research and development 
program. The assessment shall include--
            (1) an evaluation of the research and development goals and 
        objectives of the program;
            (2) a listing of any additional research and development 
        objectives that should be included in the program;
            (3) any modifications that will be necessary for the 
        program to achieve the program's goals and objectives on 
        schedule and within the proposed level of resources; and
            (4) an evaluation of the roles, if any, that should be 
        played by other Federal agencies, such as the National 
        Aeronautics and Space Administration and the National Oceanic 
        and Atmospheric Administration, in wake turbulence research and 
        development, and how those efforts could be coordinated.
    (b) Report.--A report containing the results of the assessment 
shall be provided to the Committee on Science of the House of 
Representatives and to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation of the Senate not later than 1 year after the date of 
enactment of this Act.
    (c) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated to the Administrator of the Federal Aviation 
Administration $500,000 for fiscal year 2004 to carry out this section.

SEC. 305. CABIN AIR QUALITY RESEARCH PROGRAM.

    In accordance with the recommendation of the National Academy of 
Sciences in its report entitled ``The Airliner Cabin Environment and 
the Health of Passengers and Crew'', the Federal Aviation 
Administration shall establish a research program to address questions 
about improving cabin air quality of aircraft, including methods to 
limit airborne diseases.

SEC. 306. INTERNATIONAL ROLE OF THE FAA.

    Section 40101(d) of title 49, United States Code, is amended by 
adding at the end the following:
            ``(8) Exercising leadership with the Administrator's 
        foreign counterparts, in the International Civil Aviation 
        Organization and its subsidiary organizations, and other 
        international organizations and fora, and with the private 
        sector to promote and achieve global improvements in the 
        safety, efficiency, and environmental effect of air travel.''.

SEC. 307. FAA REPORT ON OTHER NATIONS' SAFETY AND TECHNOLOGICAL 
              ADVANCEMENTS.

    The Administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration shall 
review aviation and aeronautical safety, and research funding and 
technological actions in other countries. The Administrator shall 
submit a report to the Committee on Science of the House of 
Representatives and to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation of the Senate, together with any recommendations as to 
how such activities might be utilized in the United States.

SEC. 308. DEVELOPMENT OF ANALYTICAL TOOLS AND CERTIFICATION METHODS.

    The Federal Aviation Administration shall conduct research to 
promote the development of analytical tools to improve existing 
certification methods and to reduce the overall costs for the 
certification of new products.

SEC. 309. PILOT PROGRAM TO PROVIDE INCENTIVES FOR DEVELOPMENT OF NEW 
              TECHNOLOGIES.

    (a) In General.--The Administrator of the Federal Aviation 
Administration may conduct a limited pilot program to provide operating 
incentives to users of the airspace for the deployment of new 
technologies, including technologies to facilitate expedited flight 
routing and sequencing of take-offs and landings.
    (b) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated to the Administrator $500,000 for fiscal year 2004.

SEC. 310. FAA CENTER FOR EXCELLENCE FOR APPLIED RESEARCH AND TRAINING 
              IN THE USE OF ADVANCED MATERIALS IN TRANSPORT AIRCRAFT.

    (a) In General.--The Administrator of the Federal Aviation 
Administration shall develop a Center for Excellence focused on applied 
research and training on the durability and maintainability of advanced 
materials in transport airframe structures, including the use of 
polymeric composites in large transport aircraft. The Center shall--
            (1) promote and facilitate collaboration among academia, 
        the Federal Aviation Administration's Transportation Division, 
        and the commercial aircraft industry, including manufacturers, 
        commercial air carriers, and suppliers; and
            (2) establish goals set to advance technology, improve 
        engineering practices, and facilitate continuing education in 
        relevant areas of study.
    (b) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated to the Administrator $500,000 for fiscal year 2004 to 
carry out this section.

SEC. 311. FAA CERTIFICATION OF DESIGN ORGANIZATIONS.

    (a) General Authority to Issue Certificates.--Section 44702(a) is 
amended by inserting ``design organization certificates,'' after 
``airman certificates,''.
    (b) Design Organization Certificates.--
            (1) In general.--Section 44704 is amended--
                    (A) by striking the section heading and inserting 
                the following:
``Sec.  44704. Design organization certificates, type certificates, 
              production certificate, and airworthiness 
certificates''; 
                    (B) by redesignating subsections (a) through (d) as 
                subsections (b) through (e);
                    (C) by inserting before subsection (b) the 
                following:
    ``(a) Design Organization Certificates.--
            ``(1) Plan.--Within 1 year after the date of enactment of 
        the Second Century of Flight Act, the Administrator of the 
        Federal Aviation Administration shall submit a plan to the 
        Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation and 
        the House of Representatives Committee on Transportation and 
        Infrastructure for the development and oversight of a system 
        for certification of design organizations under paragraph (2).
            ``(2) Implementation of plan.--Within 5 years after the 
        date of enactment of the Second Century of Flight Act, the 
        Administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration may 
        commence the issuance of design organization certificates under 
        paragraph (3) to authorize design organizations to certify 
        compliance with the requirements and minimum standards 
        prescribed under section 44701(a) for the type certification of 
        aircraft, aircraft engines, propellers, or appliances.
            ``(3) Issuance of certificates.--On receiving an 
        application for a design organization certificate, the 
        Administrator shall examine and rate the design organization in 
        accordance with the regulations prescribed by the Administrator 
        to determine that the design organization has adequate 
        engineering, design, and testing capabilities, standards, and 
        safeguards to ensure that the product being certificated is 
        properly designed and manufactured, performs properly, and 
        meets the regulations and minimum standards prescribed under 
        that section. The Administrator shall include in a design 
        organization certificate terms required in the interest of 
        safety.'';
                    (D) by striking subsection (b), as redesignated, 
                and inserting the following:
    ``(b) Type Certificates.--
            ``(1) In general.--The Administrator may issue a type 
        certificate for an aircraft, aircraft engine, or propeller, or 
        for an appliance specified under paragraph (2)(A) of this 
        subsection--
                    ``(A) when the Administrator finds that the 
                aircraft, aircraft engine, or propeller, or appliance 
                is properly designed and manufactured, performs 
                properly, and meets the regulations and minimum 
                standards prescribed under section 44701(a) of this 
                title; or
                    ``(B) based on a certification of compliance made 
                by a design organization certificated under subsection 
                (a).
            ``(2) Investigation and hearing.--On receiving an 
        application for a type certificate not accompanied by a 
        certification of compliance made by a design organization 
        certificated under subsection (a), the Administrator shall 
        investigate the application and may conduct a hearing. The 
        Administrator shall make, or require the applicant to make, 
        tests the Administrator considers necessary in the interest of 
        safety.''.
    (c) Reinspection and Reexamination.--Section 44709(a) is amended by 
inserting ``design organization, production certificate holder,'' after 
``appliance,''.
    (d) Prohibitions.--Section 44711(a)(7) is amended by striking 
``agency'' and inserting ``agency, design organization certificate, ''.
    (e) Conforming Amendments.--
            (1) Chapter analysis.--The chapter analysis for chapter 447 
        is amended by striking the item relating to section 44704 and 
        inserting the following:
        ``44704. Design organization certificates, type certificates, 
                            production certificate, and airworthiness 
                            certificates''.
            (2) Cross reference.--Section 44715(a)(3) is amended by 
        striking ``44704(a)'' and inserting ``44704(b)''.

SEC. 312. REPORT ON LONG TERM ENVIRONMENTAL IMPROVEMENTS.

    (a) In General.--The Administrator of the Federal Aviation 
Administration, in consultation with the Administrator of the National 
Aeronautics and Space Administration and the head of the Department of 
Transportation's Office of Aerospace and Aviation Liaison, shall 
conduct a study of ways to reduce aircraft noise and emissions and to 
increase aircraft fuel efficiency. The study shall--
            (1) explore new operational procedures for aircraft to 
        achieve those goals;
            (2) identify both near term and long term options to 
        achieve those goals;
            (3) identify infrastructure changes that would contribute 
        to attainment of those goals;
            (4) identify emerging technologies that might contribute to 
        attainment of those goals;
            (5) develop a research plan for application of such 
        emerging technologies, including new combuster and engine 
        design concepts and methodologies for designing high bypass 
        ratio turbofan engines so as to minimize the effects on climate 
        change per unit of production of thrust and flight speed; and
            (6) develop an implementation plan for exploiting such 
        emerging technologies to attain those goals.
    (b) Report.--The Administrator shall transmit a report on the study 
to the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation and 
the House of Representatives Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure within 1 year after the date of enactment of this Act.
    (c) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated to the Administrator of the Federal Aviation 
Administration $500,000 for fiscal year 2004 to carry out this section.

          TITLE IV--NASA RESEARCH, EDUCATION, AND DEVELOPMENT

SEC. 401. NASA AERONAUTICS RESEARCH PLAN.

    (a) In General.--Within 6 months after the date of enactment of 
this Act, the Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration shall transmit an aeronautics research and development 
plan to the Committee of Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the 
Senate and the Committee on Science of the House of Representatives 
setting forth the research goals and funding needs over the next 10 
years that will allow the United States to continue its lead in 
commercial aviation.
    (b) Specific Areas of Research Required.--The plan shall include 
research on--
            (1) enabling commercial aircraft to achieve noise levels on 
        takeoff and on airport approach and landing that do not exceed 
        ambient noise levels in the absence of flight operations in the 
        vicinity of airports from which such commercial aircraft would 
        normally operate;
            (2) enabling commercial aircraft to achieve significant 
        improvement in fuel efficiency, including specific fuel 
        consumption, lift-to-drag ratio, and structural weight 
        fraction, compared to aircraft in commercial service as of the 
        date of enactment of this Act;
            (3) enabling commercial aircraft to reduce emissions for 
        nitrogen oxides to less than 5 grams per kilogram of fuel 
        burned and to significantly reduce carbon dioxide emissions;
            (4) technologies that will result in rotorcraft that, when 
        compared to rotorcraft operating as of the date of enactment of 
        this Act, will exhibit--
                    (A) an 80 percent reduction in noise levels on 
                takeoff and on approach and landing as perceived by a 
                human observer;
                    (B) a 10 percent reduction in vibration;
                    (C) a 30 percent reduction in empty weight;
                    (D) a predicted accident rate equivalent to that of 
                fixed-wing aircraft in commercial service;
                    (E) the capability for zero-ceiling, zero-
                visibility operations; and
                    (F) operating noise levels that meet the conditions 
                and noise limitations imposed by the Administrator of 
                the Federal Aviation Administration under section 40128 
                of title 49, United States Code, for overflights of 
                national parks;
            (5) the development of a supersonic civil transport with--
                    (A) an operating speed of at least Mach 1.6;
                    (B) a range of at least 4,000 nautical miles;
                    (C) a payload of at least 150 passengers;
                    (D) a lift-to-drag ratio of at least 9.0;
                    (E) noise levels on takeoff and on airport approach 
                and landing that meet community noise standards in 
                place at airports from which such commercial supersonic 
                aircraft would normally operate at the time the 
                aircraft would enter commercial service;
                    (F) an N-shaped signature sonic boom peak 
                overpressure of less than 1.0 pounds per square foot;
                    (G) nitrogen oxide emissions of less than 15 grams 
                per kilogram of fuel burned; and
                    (H) water vapor emissions for stratospheric flight 
                of no greater than 1,400 grams per kilogram of fuel 
                burned; and
            (6) other technologies which would improve United States 
        aeronautics, including powered lift.
    (c) Public-Private Participation; Coordination.--In developing the 
plan, the Administrator shall consult with representatives of the 
United States aviation and aerospace industry and with the Office of 
Aerospace and Aviation Liaison of the Department of Transportation.
    (d) DOT To Coordinate Research.--Any research undertaken pursuant 
to the plan shall be coordinated with the Office of Aerospace and 
Aviation Liaison of the Department of Transportation.
    (e) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated to the Secretary of Transportation $500,000 for each of 
fiscal years 2004 and 2005 to carry out this section.

SEC 402. ASSESSMENT OF NASA RESEARCH PLAN.

    (a) Assessment.--In order to ensure that the United States retains 
needed capabilities in fundamental aerodynamics and other areas of 
fundamental aeronautics research, the Administrator of the National 
Aeronautics and Space Administration shall enter into an arrangement 
with the National Research Council for an assessment of the Aeronautics 
Research Plan developed under section 401 and the United States' future 
requirements for fundamental aeronautics research and needs for a 
skilled research workforce and research facilities commensurate with 
those requirements. The assessment shall include--
            (1) an identification of any projected gaps; and
            (2) recommendations for what steps should be taken by the 
        United States to eliminate those gaps.
    (b) Report.--The Administrator shall transmit the assessment 
described in subsection (a), along with the Administration's response 
to the assessment, to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation of the Senate and to the Committee on Science of the 
House of Representatives not later than 1 year after the date of 
enactment of this Act.
    (c) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated to the Administrator $500,000 for fiscal year 2004 to 
carry out this section.

SEC. 403. STUDY OF MARKETS ENABLED BY ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGIES FOR 
              FUTURE AIRCRAFT.

    (a) Objective.--The Administrator of the National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration shall conduct a study to identify and quantify new 
markets that would be created, as well as existing markets that would 
be expanded, by the incorporation of the technologies developed 
pursuant to section 401 into future commercial aircraft. As part of the 
study, the Administrator shall identify whether any of the performance 
characteristics specified in section 401(a) would need to be made more 
stringent in order to create new markets or expand existing markets. 
The Administrator shall seek input from at least the aircraft 
manufacturing industry, academia, and the airlines in carrying out the 
study.
    (b) Report.--A report containing the results of the study shall be 
provided to the Committee on Science of the House of Representatives 
and to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the 
Senate within 18 months after the date of enactment of this Act.
    (c) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated to the Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration $500,000 to carry out this section.

SEC. 404. VEHICLE-ENABLING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM.

    (a) In General.--The Administrator of the National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration shall--
            (1) redesignate the Administration's vehicle systems 
        program as the vehicle-enabling technologies program; and
            (2) broaden the scope of the program--
                    (A) to include cooperative efforts with aviation 
                airframe, engine, avionics, and aircraft systems 
                manufacturers to develop technologies that--
                            (i) will enable manufacturers to design, 
                        produce, and gain Federal Aviation 
                        Administration certification of innovative 
                        technologies that bring new capabilities to 
                        aircraft types currently being produced; and
                            (ii) will foster innovative capabilities 
                        and designs for future air vehicles and 
                        systems; and
                    (B) to include a thorough assessment of the full 
                range of technology needs, from general aviation 
                aircraft through supersonic vehicles, that might be 
                adopted by airlines or corporate aviation.
    (b) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated to the Administrator $5,000,000,000 for the period 
beginning with fiscal year 2004 and ending with fiscal year 2010 to 
carry out this section.

SEC. 405. AVIATION SOFTWARE INITIATIVES.

    (a) In General.--The Administrator of the National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration shall undertake the development of innovative 
software-validation technologies--
            (1) to assist avionics and airframe manufacturers in 
        demonstrating to the Federal Aviation Administration that their 
        software-related products meet the accuracy, integrity, and 
        reliability goals established by the Federal Aviation 
        Administration for certification; and
            (2) for software employed in the air traffic management 
        system.
    (b) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated to the Administrator $350,000,000 for the period beginning 
with fiscal year 2004 and ending with fiscal year 2010 to carry out 
this section.

SEC. 406. WEATHER SENSORS AND PREDICTION.

    (a) In General.--In order to enhance the accuracy of weather 
predictions for the surface and the atmosphere up to 18,000 feet, 
especially in rural areas, the Administrator of the National 
Aeronautics and Space Administration, in conjunction with the 
Administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 
shall increase research by the National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration into satellite sensors of wind speed, wind direction, 
temperature, dew point, and other low and middle-altitude weather 
phenomena.
    (b) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated to the Administrator $100,000,000 for the period beginning 
with fiscal year 2004 and ending with fiscal year 2010 to carry out 
this section.

SEC. 407. ADVISORY COMMITTEES.

    It is the sense of the Congress that, in continuing to assess the 
applicability of its programs to aerospace industry needs, the 
Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration 
should--
            (1) make full use of the Administration's advisory 
        committees, especially the Aerospace Technology Advisory 
        Committee; and
            (2) through that committee ensure that the Administration 
        has aligned advisory committee subcommittees to reflect the 
        focus of each of its programs and strategic goals.

SEC. 408. NATIONAL CENTER FOR ADVANCED MATERIALS PERFORMANCE.

    (a) In General.--The Administrator of the National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration shall develop a National Center for Advanced 
Materials Performance focused on shared-database methodologies 
addressing material, structural, manufacturing, and repair processes 
for use of advanced materials in commercial and military applications. 
The Center shall--
            (1) be established on the basis of previous experience in 
        advanced materials research and the provision of materials data 
        and information to the aviation industry;
            (2) promote and facilitate coordination between the Federal 
        Aviation Administration and the aerospace and aviation industry 
        which includes airframe manufacturers and material suppliers;
            (3) establish goals to promote data sharing among multiple 
        aerospace users and reduce testing via increased capability and 
        use of numerical and analytical simulation tools; and
            (4) enable the latest advanced material forms to be used 
        cost-effectively on past and future aircraft.
    (b) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated to the Administrator $35,000,000 for the period beginning 
with fiscal year 2004 and ending with fiscal year 2010 to carry out 
this section.

SEC. 409. UNIFIED BUDGET REPORT.

    The Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration shall submit to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation, the House of Representatives Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure, and the House of Representatives 
Committee on Science an annual report that contains a unified budget 
that combines the budgets of each program coordinated by the 
Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

SEC. 410. COST-SHARING.

    The Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration shall prescribe guidelines to provide for consideration 
of the fair market value of background technologies as in-kind 
contributions by non Federal government participants in cost-shared 
projects administered by the Administrator. The Administrator shall use 
the authority of the Administration to the fullest to implement the 
guidelines in a manner that reduces program costs and increases the 
flow of innovative technology between the private sector and the 
Administration's programs and projects.
                                 <all>