Text: H.R.2601 — 109th Congress (2005-2006)All Information (Except Text)

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Placed on Calendar Senate (07/22/2005)

 
[Congressional Bills 109th Congress]
[From the U.S. Government Publishing Office]
[H.R. 2601 Placed on Calendar Senate (PCS)]


                                                       Calendar No. 172
109th CONGRESS
  1st Session
                                H. R. 2601


_______________________________________________________________________


                   IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES

                             July 22, 2005

            Received; read twice and placed on the calendar

_______________________________________________________________________

                                 AN ACT


 
  To authorize appropriations for the Department of State for fiscal 
              years 2006 and 2007, and for other purposes.

    Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the 
United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

    This Act may be cited as the ``Foreign Relations Authorization Act, 
Fiscal Years 2006 and 2007''.

SEC. 2. TABLE OF CONTENTS.

    The table of contents for this Act is as follows:

Sec. 1. Short title.
Sec. 2. Table of contents.
Sec. 3. Definitions.
               TITLE I--AUTHORIZATIONS OF APPROPRIATIONS

Sec. 101. Administration of foreign affairs.
Sec. 102. Contributions to international organizations.
Sec. 103. International commissions.
Sec. 104. Migration and Refugee Assistance.
Sec. 105. Centers and foundations.
Sec. 106. United States International Broadcasting activities.
Sec. 107. Enhancing protection of intellectual property rights.
        TITLE II--DEPARTMENT OF STATE AUTHORITIES AND ACTIVITIES

Sec. 201. Consolidation of law enforcement powers; new criminal 
                            offense.
Sec. 202. International litigation fund.
Sec. 203. Retention of medical reimbursements.
Sec. 204. Authority to administratively amend surcharges.
Sec. 205. Accountability review boards.
Sec. 206. Designation of Colin L. Powell Residential Plaza.
Sec. 207. Removal of contracting prohibition.
Sec. 208. Translation of reports of the Department of State.
Sec. 209. Entries within passports.
Sec. 210. United States actions with respect to Jerusalem as the 
                            capital of Israel.
Sec. 211. Availability of unclassified telecommunications facilities.
Sec. 212. Reporting formats.
Sec. 213. Extension of requirement for scholarships for Tibetans and 
                            Burmese.
Sec. 214. American Institute in Taiwan facilities enhancement.
Sec. 215. Activities related to Cuba.
Sec. 216. Establishment of the Active Response Corps.
Sec. 217. Passport security enhancement.
    TITLE III--ORGANIZATION AND PERSONNEL OF THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE

Sec. 301. Education allowances.
Sec. 302. Official residence expenses.
Sec. 303. Increased limits applicable to post differentials and danger 
                            pay allowances.
Sec. 304. Home leave.
Sec. 305. Overseas equalization and comparability pay adjustment.
Sec. 306. Fellowship of Hope Program.
Sec. 307. Regulations regarding retirement credit for government 
                            service performed abroad.
Sec. 308. Promoting assignments to international organizations.
Sec. 309. Suspension of Foreign Service members without pay.
Sec. 310. Death gratuity.
Sec. 311. Clarification of Foreign Service Grievance Board procedures.
Sec. 312. Repeal of recertification requirement for members of the 
                            Senior Foreign Service.
Sec. 313. Technical amendments to title 5, United States Code, 
                            provisions on recruitment, relocation, and 
                            retention bonuses.
Sec. 314. Limited appointments in the Foreign Service.
Sec. 315. Statement of Congress regarding career development program 
                            for Senior Foreign Service.
Sec. 316. Sense of Congress regarding additional United States consular 
                            posts.
Sec. 317. Office of the Culture of Lawfulness.
Sec. 318. Review of human resources policies of the Department of 
                            State.
Sec. 319. Worldwide availability.
Sec. 320. Treatment of territories and possessions as part of the 
                            geographic United States for purposes of 
                            transfer allowances.
                 TITLE IV--INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

Sec. 401. REDI Center.
Sec. 402. Extension of authorization of appropriation for the United 
                            States Commission on International 
                            Religious Freedom.
Sec. 403. Reform of the International Atomic Energy Agency.
Sec. 404. Property disposition.
                  TITLE V--INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING

Sec. 501. Short title.
Sec. 502. Middle East Broadcasting Networks.
Sec. 503. Improving signal delivery to Cuba.
Sec. 504. Establishing permanent authority for Radio Free Asia.
Sec. 505. Personal services contracting program.
Sec. 506. Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands education 
                            benefits.
                TITLE VI--ADVANCE DEMOCRACY ACT OF 2005

Sec. 601. Short title.
Sec. 602. Findings.
Sec. 603. Statement of policy.
Sec. 604. Definitions.
               Subtitle A--Department of State Activities

Sec. 611. Promotion of democracy in foreign countries.
Sec. 612. Reports.
Sec. 613. Strategies to enhance the promotion of democracy in foreign 
                            countries.
Sec. 614. Activities by the United States to promote democracy and 
                            human rights in foreign countries.
Sec. 615. Democracy Promotion and Human Rights Advisory Board.
Sec. 616. Establishment and maintenance of Internet site for global 
                            democracy and human rights.
Sec. 617. Programs by United States missions in foreign countries and 
                            activities of chiefs of mission.
Sec. 618. Training for Foreign Service officers.
Sec. 619. Performance pay; promotions; Foreign Service awards.
Sec. 620. Appointments.
         Subtitle B--Alliances With Other Democratic Countries

Sec. 631. Alliances with other democratic countries.
Sec. 632. Sense of Congress regarding the establishment of a Democracy 
                            Caucus.
Sec. 633. Annual diplomatic missions on multilateral issues.
Sec. 634. Strengthening the Community of Democracies.
             Subtitle C--Funding for Promotion of Democracy

Sec. 641. Policy.
Sec. 642. Human Rights and Democracy Fund.
                    Subtitle D--Presidential Actions

Sec. 651. Investigation of violations of international humanitarian 
                            law.
Sec. 652. Presidential communications.
TITLE VII--STRATEGIC EXPORT CONTROL AND SECURITY ASSISTANCE ACT OF 2005

                     Subtitle A--General Provisions

Sec. 701. Short title.
Sec. 702. Definitions.
Sec. 703. Declaration of policy.
    Subtitle B--Revising and Strengthening Strategic Export Control 
                                Policies

Sec. 711. Amendments to the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 
                            1956.
Sec. 712. Strategic Export Control Board.
Sec. 713. Authorization for additional license and compliance officers.
           Subtitle C--Procedures Relating to Export Licenses

Sec. 721. Transparency of jurisdictional determinations.
Sec. 722. Certifications relating to export of certain defense articles 
                            and defense services.
Sec. 723. Priority for United States military operations.
Sec. 724. License officer staffing and workload.
Sec. 725. Database of United States military assistance.
Sec. 726. Training and liaison for small businesses.
Sec. 727. Commercial communications satellite technical data.
Sec. 728. Reporting requirement for unlicensed exports.
    Subtitle D--Terrorist-Related Provisions and Enforcement Matters

Sec. 731. Sensitive technology transfers to foreign persons located 
                            within the United States.
Sec. 732. Certification concerning exempt weapons transfers along the 
                            northern border of the United States.
Sec. 733. Comprehensive nature of United States arms embargoes.
Sec. 734. Control of items on Missile Technology Control Regime Annex.
Sec. 735. Unlawful use of United States defense articles.
Sec. 736. Purposes of arms sales.
  Subtitle E--Strengthening United States Missile Nonproliferation Law

Sec. 741. Probationary period for foreign persons.
Sec. 742. Strengthening United States missile proliferation sanctions 
                            on foreign persons.
Sec. 743. Comprehensive United States missile proliferation sanctions 
                            on all responsible foreign persons.
         Subtitle F--Security Assistance and Related Provisions

Sec. 751. Authority to transfer naval vessels to certain foreign 
                            countries.
Sec. 752. Transfer of obsolete and surplus items from Korean War 
                            Reserves Stockpile and removal or disposal 
                            of remaining items.
Sec. 753. Extension of Pakistan waivers.
Sec. 754. Reporting requirement for foreign military training.
Sec. 755. Certain services provided by the United States in connection 
                            with foreign military sales.
Sec. 756. Maritime interdiction patrol boats for Mozambique.
Sec. 757. Reimbursement for international military education and 
                            training.
            TITLE VIII--NUCLEAR BLACK MARKET ELIMINATION ACT

Sec. 801. Short title.
      Subtitle A--Sanctions for Transfers of Nuclear Enrichment, 
Reprocessing, and Weapons Technology, Equipment and Materials Involving 
                     Foreign Persons and Terrorists

Sec. 811. Authority to impose sanctions on foreign persons.
Sec. 812. Presidential notification on activities of foreign persons.
   Subtitle B--Further Actions Against Corporations Associated With 
                       Sanctioned Foreign Persons

Sec. 821. Findings.
Sec. 822. Campaign by United States Government officials.
Sec. 823. Coordination.
Sec. 824. Report.
   Subtitle C--Incentives for Proliferation Interdiction Cooperation

Sec. 831. Authority to provide assistance to cooperative countries.
Sec. 832. Types of assistance.
Sec. 833. Congressional notification.
Sec. 834. Limitation.
Sec. 835. Use of assistance.
Sec. 836. Limitation on ship or aircraft transfers to uncooperative 
                            countries.
         Subtitle D--Rollback of Nuclear Proliferation Networks

Sec. 841. Nonproliferation as a condition of United States assistance.
Sec. 842. Report on identification of nuclear proliferation network 
                            host countries.
Sec. 843. Suspension of arms sales licenses and deliveries to nuclear 
                            proliferation network host countries.
                     Subtitle E--General Provisions

Sec. 851. Definitions.
                TITLE IX--EAST ASIA SECURITY ACT OF 2005

Sec. 901. Short title.
Sec. 902. Statements of policy.
Sec. 903. Report on foreign military exports to China.
Sec. 904. Report on China arms transfer policies of countries 
                            participating in United States defense 
                            cooperative projects; certain license 
                            requirements.
Sec. 905. Certain foreign ownership and control of defense articles in 
                            the United States.
Sec. 906. Chinese military end use of dual use exports.
Sec. 907. Application of measures to certain foreign persons.
Sec. 908. Procedures if discretionary measures are not applied.
Sec. 909. Determinations exempting foreign persons from mandatory 
                            measures.
Sec. 910. Definitions.
                 TITLE X--FOREIGN ASSISTANCE PROVISIONS

   Subtitle A--Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 and Related Provisions

        Chapter 1--Part I of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961

Sec. 1001. Assistance to establish centers for the treatment of 
                            obstetric fistula in developing countries.
Sec. 1002. Support for small and medium enterprises in sub-Saharan 
                            Africa.
Sec. 1003. Assistance to support democracy in Zimbabwe.
Sec. 1004. Restrictions on United States voluntary contributions to the 
                            United Nations Development Program.
Sec. 1005. Assistance for the Office of the Police Ombudsman for 
                            Northern Ireland.
Sec. 1006. Report on foreign law enforcement training and assistance.
Sec. 1007. Requirements relating to the largest exporting and importing 
                            countries of certain precursor chemicals.
Sec. 1008. Assistance for disaster mitigation efforts.
Sec. 1009. Assistance to promote democracy in Belarus.
Sec. 1010. Assistance for maternal and prenatal care for certain 
                            individuals of Belarus and Ukraine involved 
                            in the cleanup of the Chornobyl disaster.
Sec. 1011. Assistance to address non-infectious diseases in foreign 
                            countries.
        Chapter 2--Part II of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961

Sec. 1021. Economic support fund assistance for Egypt.
Sec. 1022. Inter-Arab Democratic Charter.
Sec. 1023. Middle East Partnership Initiative.
Sec. 1024. West Bank and Gaza Program.
Sec. 1025. Economic Support Fund assistance for Venezuela.
       Chapter 3--Part III of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961

Sec. 1031. Support for pro-democracy and human rights organizations in 
                            certain countries.
Sec. 1032. Limitation on assistance to the Palestinian Authority.
Sec. 1033. Assistance for law enforcement forces.
                  Subtitle B--Other Provisions of Law

Sec. 1041. Amendments to the Afghanistan Freedom Support Act of 2002.
Sec. 1042. Amendments to the Tibetan Policy Act of 2002.
Sec. 1043. Amendments to the Anglo-Irish Agreement Support Act of 1986.
Sec. 1044. Assistance for demobilization and disarmament of former 
                            irregular combatants in Colombia.
Sec. 1045. Support for famine relief in Ethiopia.
Sec. 1046. Assistance to promote democracy and human rights in Vietnam.
Sec. 1047. Transfer of marine patrol aircraft to the Government of 
                            Columbia.
Sec. 1048. Training and assistance to identify unknown victims who were 
                            abducted and murdered in Ciudad Juarez, 
                            Mexico.
                  Subtitle C--Miscellaneous Provisions

Sec. 1051. Report on United States weapons transfers, sales, and 
                            licensing to Haiti.
Sec. 1052. Sense of Congress regarding assistance for regional health 
                            education and training programs.
Sec. 1053. Sense of Congress regarding assistance for regional health 
                            care delivery.
Sec. 1054. Sense of Congress regarding elimination of extreme poverty 
                            in developing countries.
Sec. 1055. Sense of Congress regarding United States foreign 
                            assistance.
Sec. 1056. Sense of Congress regarding assistance for Chaldoassyrians 
                            and other indigenous christians in Iraq.
                    TITLE XI--REPORTING REQUIREMENTS

Sec. 1101. Trans-Sahara Counter-Terrorism Initiative.
Sec. 1102. Annual Patterns of Global Terrorism Report.
Sec. 1103. Dual gateway policy of the Government of Ireland.
Sec. 1104. Stabilization in Haiti.
Sec. 1105. Verification reports to Congress.
Sec. 1106. Protection of refugees from North Korea.
Sec. 1107. Acquisition and major security upgrades.
Sec. 1108. Services for children with autism at overseas missions.
Sec. 1109. Incidence and prevalence of autism worldwide.
Sec. 1110. Internet jamming.
Sec. 1111. Department of State employment composition.
Sec. 1112. Incitement to acts of discrimination.
Sec. 1113. Child marriage.
Sec. 1114. Magen David Adom Society.
Sec. 1115. Developments in and policy toward Indonesia.
Sec. 1116. Murders of United States citizens John Branchizio, Mark 
                            Parson, and John Marin Linde.
Sec. 1117. Diplomatic relations with Israel.
Sec. 1118. Tax enforcement in Colombia.
Sec. 1119. Provision of consular and visa services in Pristina, Kosova.
Sec. 1120. Democracy in Pakistan.
Sec. 1121. Status of the sovereignty of Lebanon.
Sec. 1122. Activities of international terrorist organizations in Latin 
                            America and the Caribbean.
Sec. 1123. Analysis of employing weapons scientists from the former 
                            Soviet Union in Project Bioshield.
Sec. 1124. Extradition of violent criminals from Mexico to the United 
                            States.
Sec. 1125. Actions of the 661 Committee.
Sec. 1126. Elimination of report on real estate transactions.
Sec. 1127. Alien smuggling and trafficking in persons from Ecuador.
Sec. 1128. Extraditions of Afghan drug traffickers and drug kingpins.
Sec. 1129. Funding for nongovernmental organizations under the 
                            President's emergency plan for AIDs relief.
       TITLE XII--HENRY J. HYDE UNITED NATIONS REFORM ACT OF 2005

Sec. 1201. Short title.
Sec. 1202. Definitions.
Sec. 1203. Statement of Congress.
          Subtitle A--Mission and Budget of the United Nations

Sec. 1211. United States financial contributions to the United Nations.
Sec. 1212. Weighted voting.
Sec. 1213. Budget certification requirements.
Sec. 1214. Accountability.
Sec. 1215. Terrorism and the United Nations.
Sec. 1216. United Nations treaty bodies.
Sec. 1217. Equality at the United Nations.
Sec. 1218. Report on United Nations reform.
Sec. 1219. Report on United Nations personnel.
Sec. 1220. Report on United States contributions to the United Nations.
Sec. 1221. United Nations Security Council and Lebanon.
Sec. 1222. Policy with respect to expansion of the Security Council.
Sec. 1223. Genocide and the United Nations.
Sec. 1224. Anti-semitism and the United Nations.
 Subtitle B--Human Rights and the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC)

Sec. 1231. Human rights.
Sec. 1232. Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC).
Sec. 1233. United Nations Democracy Fund.
             Subtitle C--International Atomic Energy Agency

Sec. 1241. International Atomic Energy Agency.
Sec. 1242. Sense of Congress regarding the nuclear security action plan 
                            of the IAEA.
                        Subtitle D--Peacekeeping

Sec. 1251. Sense of Congress regarding reform of United Nations 
                            peacekeeping operations.
Sec. 1252. Statement of policy relating to reform of United Nations 
                            peacekeeping operations.
Sec. 1253. Certification.
Sec. 1254. Rule of construction relating to protection of United States 
                            officials and members of the Armed Forces.
  Subtitle E--Department of State and Government Accountability Office

Sec. 1261. Positions for United States citizens at international 
                            organizations.
Sec. 1262. Budget justification for regular assessed budget of the 
                            United Nations.
Sec. 1263. Review and report.
Sec. 1264. Government Accountability Office.
      Subtitle F--Certifications and Withholding of Contributions

Sec. 1271. Certifications and withholding of contributions.
             TITLE XIII--OPENING DOORS FOR FOREIGN STUDENTS

Sec. 1301. Short title.
Sec. 1302. Findings.
Sec. 1303. Development of a comprehensive strategy to attract foreign 
                            students to study in the United States.
Sec. 1304. Identification of priority missions and missions employing 
                            best practices for attracting student visa 
                            applicants.
Sec. 1305. Enhanced training in processing and facilitating student 
                            visas.
Sec. 1306. Enhanced diplomatic efforts to negotiate favorable 
                            reciprocal agreements with foreign 
                            governments concerning student visa term 
                            limits.
                  TITLE XIV--MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS

                     Subtitle A--General Provisions

Sec. 1401. Statement of policy relating to democracy in Iran.
Sec. 1402. Iranian nuclear activities.
Sec. 1403. Location of international institutions in Africa.
Sec. 1404. Benjamin Gilman International Scholarship program.
Sec. 1405. Prohibition on commemorations relating to leaders of 
                            Imperial Japan.
Sec. 1406. United States policy regarding World Bank Group loans to 
                            Iran.
Sec. 1407. Statement of policy regarding support for SECI Regional 
                            Center for Combating Trans-Border Crime.
Sec. 1408. Statement of policy urging Turkey to respect the rights and 
                            religious freedoms of the Ecumenical 
                            Patriarch.
Sec. 1409. Statement of policy regarding the murder of United States 
                            citizen John M. Alvis.
Sec. 1410. Statement of Congress and policy with respect to the 
                            disenfranchisement of women.
Sec. 1411. Acquisition of maritime refueling support vessel for United 
                            States drug interdiction efforts in the 
                            Eastern Pacific maritime transit zone.
Sec. 1412. Statement of policy relating to international taxation.
Sec. 1413. Declaration of Heads of State of the Shanghai Cooperation 
                            Organization.
Sec. 1414. Prevention of smuggling of methamphetamine into the United 
                            States from Mexico.
Sec. 1415. Statement of policy regarding the attacks on United States 
                            citizens by Palestinian terrorists.
Sec. 1416. Statement of policy regarding transfer of Charles Taylor for 
                            trial for war crimes.
Sec. 1417. United States commitment to Iraq.
                Subtitle B--Sense of Congress Provisions

Sec. 1421. Korean Fulbright programs.
Sec. 1422. United States relations with Taiwan.
Sec. 1423. Nuclear proliferation and A. Q. Khan.
Sec. 1424. Palestinian textbooks.
Sec. 1425. International convention affirming the human rights and 
                            dignity of persons with disabilities.
Sec. 1426. Fulbright Scholarships for East Asia and the Pacific.
Sec. 1427. Baku-Tbilisi-Ceyhan energy pipeline.
Sec. 1428. Legislation requiring the fair, comprehensive, and 
                            nondiscriminatory restitution of private 
                            property confiscated in Poland.
Sec. 1429. Child labor practices in the cocoa sectors of Cote d'Ivoire 
                            and Ghana.
Sec. 1430. Contributions of Iraqi Kurds.
Sec. 1431. Proliferation Security Initiative.
Sec. 1432. Security of nuclear weapons and materials.
Sec. 1433. International Criminal Court and genocide in Darfur, Sudan.
Sec. 1434. Action against al-Manar television.
Sec. 1435. Stability and security in Iraq.
Sec. 1436. Property expropriated by the Government of Ethiopia.
Sec. 1437. United States-China Relations.
Sec. 1438. Capture, detention, and interrogation of terrorists at 
                            Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

SEC. 3. DEFINITIONS.

    In this Act:
            (1) Appropriate congressional committees.--Except as 
        otherwise provided, the term ``appropriate congressional 
        committees'' means the Committee on International Relations of 
        the House of Representatives and the Committee on Foreign 
        Relations of the Senate.
            (2) Department.--The term ``Department'' means the 
        Department of State.
            (3) Secretary.--The term ``Secretary'' means the Secretary 
        of State.

               TITLE I--AUTHORIZATIONS OF APPROPRIATIONS

SEC. 101. ADMINISTRATION OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS.

    The following amounts are authorized to be appropriated for the 
Department of State under ``Administration of Foreign Affairs'' to 
carry out the authorities, functions, duties, and responsibilities in 
the conduct of foreign affairs of the United States and for other 
purposes authorized by law:
            (1) Diplomatic and consular programs.--
                    (A) Authorization of appropriations.--For 
                ``Diplomatic and Consular Programs'', $3,769,118,000 
                for fiscal year 2006 and $3,896,611,500 for fiscal year 
                2007.
                    (B) Worldwide security upgrades.--In addition to 
                amounts authorized to be appropriated under 
                subparagraph (A), $689,523,000 for fiscal year 2006 and 
                $710,208,690 for fiscal year 2007 are authorized to be 
                appropriated for worldwide security upgrades.
                    (C) Public diplomacy.--Of the amounts authorized to 
                be appropriated under subparagraph (A), $333,863,000 
                for fiscal year 2006 and $343,699,000 for fiscal year 
                2007 are authorized to be appropriated for public 
                diplomacy.
                    (D) Bureau of democracy, human rights, and labor.--
                Of the amounts authorized to be appropriated under 
                subparagraph (A), $20,000,000 for fiscal year 2006 and 
                $20,000,000 for fiscal year 2007 are authorized to be 
                appropriated for salaries and expenses of the Bureau of 
                Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor.
                    (E) Organization for security and cooperation and 
                europe.--Of the amounts authorized to be appropriated 
                under subparagraph (A), the following amounts are 
                authorized to be appropriated for the following 
                activities of the Organization for Security and 
                Cooperation in Europe (OSCE):
                            (i) Anti-semitism.--For necessary expenses 
                        to fund secondments, hiring of staff, and 
                        support targeted projects of the Office of 
                        Democratic Institutions and Human Rights 
                        (ODIHR) regarding anti-Semitism and intolerance 
                        and for the OSCE/ODIHR Law Enforcement Officers 
                        Hate Crimes Training Program, $225,000 for 
                        fiscal year 2006 and $225,000 for fiscal year 
                        2007.
                            (ii) OSCE projects and activities regarding 
                        religious freedom.--For necessary expenses to 
                        fund secondments, hiring of staff, and support 
                        targeted projects of ODIHR regarding religious 
                        freedom and for the OSCE/ODIHR Panel of Experts 
                        on Freedom of Religion or Belief, $125,000 for 
                        fiscal year 2006 and $125,000 for fiscal year 
                        2007.
                            (iii) OSCE missions related to religious 
                        freedom.--For OSCE Missions in Armenia, 
                        Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, 
                        Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan for 
                        activities to address issues relating to 
                        religious freedom and belief and to fund the 
                        hiring of new staff who are dedicated to 
                        religious freedom and belief, $80,000 for 
                        fiscal year 2006 and $80,000 for fiscal year 
                        2007.
                    (F) Charles b. rangel international affairs 
                program.--Of the amounts authorized to be appropriated 
                under subparagraph (A), $1,500,000 for fiscal year 2006 
                and $1,500,000 for fiscal year 2007 are authorized to 
                be appropriated for the Charles B. Rangel International 
                Affairs Program at Howard University.
                    (G) Minority recruitment.--Of the amounts 
                authorized to be appropriated under subparagraph (A), 
                $3,000,000 for fiscal year 2006 and $3,000,000 for 
                fiscal year 2007 are authorized to be appropriated for 
                the recruitment of members of minority groups for 
                careers in the Foreign Service and international 
                affairs.
                    (H) Dissemination of names of fugitives residing in 
                cuba.--Of the amounts authorized to be appropriated 
                under subparagraph (A), an appropriate amount of such 
                funds for each of the fiscal years 2006 and 2007 are 
                authorized to be appropriated for the U.S. Interests 
                Section, Havana, to disseminate the names of fugitives, 
                such as Joanne Chesimard and William Morales, who are 
                residing in Cuba, and any rewards for their capture.
            (2) Capital investment fund.--For ``Capital Investment 
        Fund'', $131,000,000 for fiscal year 2006 and $131,000,000 for 
        fiscal year 2007.
            (3) Embassy security, construction and maintenance.--For 
        ``Embassy Security, Construction and Maintenance'', 
        $1,526,000,000 for fiscal year 2006 and $1,550,000,000 for 
        fiscal year 2007.
            (4) Educational and cultural exchange programs.--
                    (A) Authorization of appropriations.--For 
                ``Educational and Cultural Exchange Programs'', 
                $428,900,000 for fiscal year 2006 and $438,500,000 for 
                fiscal year 2007.
                    (B) Summer institutes for korean student leaders.--
                Of the amounts authorized to be appropriated under 
                subparagraph (A), $750,000 for fiscal year 2006 and 
                $750,000 for fiscal year 2007 are authorized to be 
                appropriated for summer academic study programs in the 
                United States (focusing on United States political 
                systems, government institutions, society, and 
                democratic culture) for college and university students 
                from the Republic of Korea, to be known as the ``United 
                States Summer Institutes for Korean Student Leaders''.
                    (C) Sudanese scholarships.--Of the amounts 
                authorized to be appropriated under subparagraph (A), 
                $500,000 for fiscal year 2006 and $500,000 for fiscal 
                year 2007 are authorized to be appropriated for 
                scholarships for students from southern Sudan for 
                secondary or postsecondary education in the United 
                States, to be known as ``Sudanese Scholarships''.
                    (D) Scholarships for indigenous peoples of mexico 
                and central and south america.--Of the amounts 
                authorized to be appropriated under subparagraph (A), 
                $250,000 for fiscal year 2006 and $250,000 for fiscal 
                year 2007 are authorized to be appropriated for 
                scholarships for secondary and postsecondary education 
                in the United States for students from Mexico and the 
                countries of Central and South America who are 
                descended from the indigenous peoples of Mexico or such 
                countries.
                    (E) South pacific exchanges.--Of the amounts 
                authorized to be appropriated under subparagraph (A), 
                $650,000 for fiscal year 2006 and $650,000 for fiscal 
                year 2007 are authorized to be appropriated for South 
                Pacific Exchanges.
                    (F) Tibetan scholarship program.--Of the amounts 
                authorized to be appropriated under subparagraph (A), 
                $750,000 for fiscal year 2006 and $800,000 for fiscal 
                year 2007 are authorized to be appropriated to carry 
                out the Tibetan scholarship program established under 
                section 103(b)(1) of the Human Rights, Refugee, and 
                Other Foreign Relations Provisions Act of 1996 (Public 
                Law 104-319; 22 U.S.C. 2151 note).
                    (G) Ngawang choepel exchange programs.--Of the 
                amounts authorized to be appropriated under 
                subparagraph (A), $500,000 for fiscal year 2006 and 
                $500,000 for fiscal year 2007 are authorized to be 
                appropriated for the ``Ngawang Choepel Exchange 
                Programs'' (formerly known as ``programs of educational 
                and cultural exchange between the United States and the 
                people of Tibet'') under section 103(a) of the Human 
                Rights, Refugee, and Other Foreign Relations Provisions 
                Act of 1996 (Public Law 104-319; 22 U.S.C. 2151 note).
                    (H) HIV/AIDS initiative.--Of the amounts authorized 
                to be appropriated under subparagraph (A), $1,000,000 
                for fiscal year 2006 and $1,000,000 for fiscal year 
                2007 are authorized to be appropriated for HIV/AIDS 
                research and mitigation strategies.
                    (I) Project children and cooperation with 
                ireland.--Of the amounts authorized to be appropriated 
                under subparagraph (A), $500,000 for fiscal year 2006 
                and $500,000 for fiscal year 2007 are authorized to be 
                appropriated for people-to-people activities (with a 
                focus on young people) to support the Northern Ireland 
                peace process involving Catholic and Protestant 
                participants from the Republic of Ireland, the United 
                Kingdom, and the United States, to be known as 
                ``Project Children''.
            (5) Representation allowances.--For ``Representation 
        Allowances'', $8,281,000 for fiscal year 2006 and $8,281,000 
        for fiscal year 2007.
            (6) Protection of foreign missions and officials.--
                    (A) For ``Protection of Foreign Missions and 
                Officials'', $15,000,000 for fiscal year 2006 and 
                $15,000,000 for fiscal year 2007.
                    (B) In addition to amounts authorized to be 
                appropriated under subparagraph (A), there are 
                authorized to be appropriated $19,580,000 for 
                ``Protection of Foreign Missions and Officials'' only 
                to reimburse the City of New York for necessary 
                expenses incurred since 2002 for the protection of 
                foreign missions and officials.
            (7) Emergencies in the diplomatic and consular service.--
        For ``Emergencies in the Diplomatic and Consular Service'', 
        $12,143,000 for fiscal year 2006 and $12,143,000 for fiscal 
        year 2007.
            (8) Repatriation loans.--For ``Repatriation Loans'', 
        $1,319,000 for fiscal year 2006 and $1,319,000 for fiscal year 
        2007.
            (9) Payment to the american institute in taiwan.--For 
        ``Payment to the American Institute in Taiwan'', $19,751,000 
        for fiscal year 2006 and $20,146,020 for fiscal year 2007.
            (10) Office of the inspector general.--For ``Office of the 
        Inspector General'', $29,983,000 for fiscal year 2006, and 
        $29,983,000 for fiscal year 2007.

SEC. 102. CONTRIBUTIONS TO INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS.

    (a) Assessed Contributions to International Organizations.--There 
are authorized to be appropriated for ``Contributions to International 
Organizations'', $1,296,500,000 for fiscal year 2006 and $1,322,430,000 
for fiscal year 2007, for the Department of State to carry out the 
authorities, functions, duties, and responsibilities in the conduct of 
the foreign affairs of the United States with respect to international 
organizations and to carry out other authorities in law consistent with 
such purposes.
    (b) Contributions for International Peacekeeping Activities.--There 
are authorized to be appropriated for ``Contributions for International 
Peacekeeping Activities'', $1,035,500,000 for fiscal year 2006 and such 
sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007, for the Department of 
State to carry out the authorities, functions, duties, and 
responsibilities of the United States with respect to international 
peacekeeping activities and to carry out other authorities in law 
consistent with such purposes. Amounts appropriated pursuant to this 
subsection are authorized to remain available until expended.
    (c) Foreign Currency Exchange Rates.--
            (1) Authorization of appropriations.--In addition to 
        amounts authorized to be appropriated under subsection (a), 
        there are authorized to be appropriated such sums as may be 
        necessary for each of fiscal years 2006 and 2007 to offset 
        adverse fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates.
            (2) Availability of funds.--Amounts appropriated under this 
        subsection shall remain available for obligation and 
        expenditure only to the extent that the Director of the Office 
        of Management and Budget determines and certifies to Congress 
        that such amounts are necessary due to such fluctuations.
    (d) Withholding of Contributions for Certain United Nations 
Commissions, Organizations, or Any Affiliated Agencies.--
Notwithstanding any other provision of law, funds available to the 
Department of State or any other Federal department or agency may not 
be used for United States contributions to any United Nations 
commission, organization, or affiliated agency that is chaired or 
presided over by a country, the government of which the Secretary of 
State has determined, for purposes of section 6(j)(1) of the Export 
Administration Act of 1979 (50 U.S.C. App. 2405(j)(1)) has repeatedly 
provided support for acts of international terrorism, until such time 
as the President determines that such commission, organization, or 
agency is no longer chaired or presided over by such country and the 
commission, organization, or agency has established appropriate 
electoral reforms, including minimum standards for leadership positions 
and the elimination of automatic rotation of such leadership positions.

SEC. 103. INTERNATIONAL COMMISSIONS.

    The following amounts are authorized to be appropriated under 
``International Commissions'' for the Department of State to carry out 
the authorities, functions, duties, and responsibilities in the conduct 
of the foreign affairs of the United States and for other purposes 
authorized by law:
            (1) International boundary and water commission, united 
        states and mexico.--For ``International Boundary and Water 
        Commission, United States and Mexico''--
                    (A) for ``Salaries and Expenses'', $28,200,000 for 
                fiscal year 2006 and $28,200,000 for fiscal year 2007; 
                and
                    (B) for ``Construction'', $6,100,000 for fiscal 
                year 2006 and $6,100,000 for fiscal year 2007.
            (2) International boundary commission, united states and 
        canada.--For ``International Boundary Commission, United States 
        and Canada'', $1,429,000 for fiscal year 2006 and $1,429,000 
        for fiscal year 2007.
            (3) International joint commission.--For ``International 
        Joint Commission'', $6,320,000 for fiscal year 2006 and 
        $6,320,000 for fiscal year 2007.
            (4) International fisheries commissions.--For 
        ``International Fisheries Commissions'', $25,123,000 for fiscal 
        year 2006 and $25,123,000 for fiscal year 2007.

SEC. 104. MIGRATION AND REFUGEE ASSISTANCE.

    (a) In General.--There are authorized to be appropriated for the 
Department of State for ``Migration and Refugee Assistance'' for 
authorized activities, $955,000,000 for fiscal year 2006 and 
$983,650,000 for fiscal year 2007.
    (b) Refugees Resettling in Israel.--Of the amounts authorized to be 
appropriated under subsection (a), there are authorized to be 
appropriated $40,000,000 for fiscal year 2006 and $40,000,000 for 
fiscal year 2007 for resettlement of refugees in Israel.
    (c) Pilot Program for Long-Term Refugee Populations.--
            (1) Pilot program.--Of the amounts authorized to be 
        appropriated under subsection (a), there are authorized to be 
        appropriated $2,500,000 for fiscal year 2006 and $2,500,000 for 
        fiscal year 2007 for the establishment and implementation of a 
        two-year pilot program to improve conditions for long-term 
        refugee populations that are currently assisted in camps or 
        other segregated settlements.
            (2) Requirements.--In carrying out the pilot program under 
        paragraph (1), the Secretary of State shall--
                    (A) seek to protect and ensure basic rights granted 
                to refugees under the 1951 Convention Relating to the 
                Status of Refugees and the 1967 Protocol Relating to 
                the Status of Refugees;
                    (B) seek innovative modules or methods to assist 
                long-term refugee populations both within and outside 
                traditional camp settings, as appropriate, that support 
                refugees living or working in local communities, such 
                as integration of refugees into local schools and 
                services, resource conservation and livelihood projects 
                designed to diminish conflict between refugee hosting 
                communities and refugees, and engagement of civil 
                society components of refugee hosting communities in a 
                policy dialogue with the United Nations High 
                Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and international and 
                nongovernmental refugee assistance organizations to 
                enhance options to assist refugees and promote the 
                rights to which refugees may be entitled under the 1951 
                Convention and 1967 Protocol;
                    (C) provide a United States voluntary contribution 
                to UNHCR to conduct the pilot program in cooperation 
                with nongovernmental organizations with expertise in 
                the protection of refugee rights, one or more major 
                operational humanitarian assistance agencies, and in 
                consultation with host countries, the United States, 
                and other donor countries; and
                    (D) urge UNHCR to select not less than three host 
                countries in which to conduct the pilot program.
            (3) Report.--Not later than one year after the date on 
        which the first pilot program is established pursuant to 
        paragraph (2), the Secretary shall submit to the appropriate 
        congressional committees a report on the implementation of this 
        subsection, the development of innovative models to protect and 
        assist refugees, and recommendations for ensuring refugee 
        rights are respected in countries of temporary asylum.
    (d) Internally Displaced Persons in Eastern Burma.--Of the amounts 
authorized to be appropriated under subsection (a), there are 
authorized to be appropriated $3,000,000 for fiscal year 2006 and 
$3,000,000 for fiscal year 2007 for assistance to Thailand-based 
nongovernmental organizations operating along the border between 
Thailand and Burma to provide food, medical, and other humanitarian 
assistance to internally displaced persons in eastern Burma.

SEC. 105. CENTERS AND FOUNDATIONS.

    (a) Asia Foundation.--There are authorized to be appropriated for 
``The Asia Foundation'' for authorized activities, $18,000,000 for 
fiscal year 2006 and $18,000,000 for fiscal year 2007.
    (b) National Endowment for Democracy.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated for the ``National Endowment for Democracy'' for 
authorized activities, $80,000,000 for fiscal year 2006 and $80,000,000 
for fiscal year 2007.
    (c) Center for Cultural and Technical Interchange Between East and 
West.--There are authorized to be appropriated for the ``Center for 
Cultural and Technical Interchange Between East and West'' for 
authorized activities, $13,024,000 for fiscal year 2006 and $13,024,000 
for fiscal year 2007.

SEC. 106. UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING ACTIVITIES.

    The following amounts are authorized to be appropriated to carry 
out United States Government international broadcasting activities 
under the United States Information and Educational Exchange Act of 
1948, the Radio Broadcasting to Cuba Act, the Television Broadcasting 
to Cuba Act, the United States International Broadcasting Act of 1994, 
and the Foreign Affairs Reform and Restructuring Act of 1998, and to 
carry out other authorities in law consistent with such purposes:
            (1) International broadcasting operations.--For 
        ``International Broadcasting Operations'', $603,394,000 for 
        fiscal year 2006 and $621,495,820 for fiscal year 2007. Of the 
        amounts authorized to be appropriated under this paragraph, 
        $5,000,000 is authorized to be appropriated for fiscal year 
        2006 and $5,000,000 is authorized to be appropriated for fiscal 
        year 2007 for increased broadcasting to Belarus.
            (2) Broadcasting capital improvements.--For ``Broadcasting 
        Capital Improvements'', $10,893,000 for fiscal year 2006 and 
        $10,893,000 for fiscal year 2007.
            (3) Broadcasting to cuba.--For ``Broadcasting to Cuba'', 
        $37,656,000 for fiscal year 2006 and $29,931,000 for fiscal 
        year 2007, to remain available until expended, for necessary 
        expenses to enable the Broadcasting Board of Governors to carry 
        out broadcasting to Cuba, including the purchase, rent, 
        construction, and improvement of facilities for radio and 
        television transmission and reception, and the purchase, lease, 
        and installation of necessary equipment, including aircraft, 
        for radio and television transmission and reception.
            (4) Radio free asia.--In addition to such amounts as are 
        otherwise authorized to be appropriated for the Broadcasting 
        Board of Governors, there are authorized to be appropriated 
        $9,100,000 for fiscal years 2006 and 2007 to overcome the 
        jamming of Radio Free Asia by Vietnam.
            (5) Broadcasting to venezuela.--For broadcasting to 
        Venezuela, such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2006 
        and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007, to 
        remain available until expended, to allow the Broadcasting 
        Board of Governors to carry out broadcasting to Venezuela for 
        at least 30 minutes per day of balanced, objective, and 
        comprehensive television news programming, radio news 
        programming, or both.

SEC. 107. ENHANCING PROTECTION OF INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS.

    In addition to such amounts as may otherwise be authorized to be 
appropriated for such purpose, there are authorized to be appropriated 
for the Department of State, $5,000,000 to carry out the following 
activities to enhance intellectual property laws and enforcement in 
countries that are not members of the Organization for Economic 
Cooperation and Development (OECD):
            (1) Provision of equipment and training for foreign law 
        enforcement, including in the interpretation of intellectual 
        property laws.
            (2) Training for judges and prosecutors, including in the 
        interpretation of intellectual property laws.
            (3) Assistance in complying with obligations under 
        appropriate international copyright and intellectual property 
        treaties and agreements.

        TITLE II--DEPARTMENT OF STATE AUTHORITIES AND ACTIVITIES

SEC. 201. CONSOLIDATION OF LAW ENFORCEMENT POWERS; NEW CRIMINAL 
              OFFENSE.

    (a) In General.--Chapter 203 of title 18, United States Code, is 
amended by adding at the end the following new section:
``Sec. 3064. Powers of special agents in the Department of State and 
              the Foreign Service
    ``Whoever knowingly and willfully obstructs, resists, or interferes 
with a Federal law enforcement agent engaged in the performance of the 
protective functions authorized by section 37 of the State Department 
Basic Authorities Act of 1956 or by section 103 of the Omnibus 
Diplomatic Security and Antiterrorism Act of 1986 shall be fined under 
this title or imprisoned not more than one year, or both.''.
    (b) Table of Sections Amendment.--The table of sections at the 
beginning of chapter 203 of title 18, United States Code, is amended by 
adding at the end the following new item:

``3064. Powers of special agents in the Department of State and the 
                            Foreign Service.''.

SEC. 202. INTERNATIONAL LITIGATION FUND.

    Section 38(d)(3) of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 
1956 (22 U.S.C. 2710(d)(3)) is amended--
            (1) by inserting ``as a result of a decision of an 
        international tribunal,'' after ``received by the Department of 
        State''; and
            (2) by inserting a comma after ``United States 
        Government''.

SEC. 203. RETENTION OF MEDICAL REIMBURSEMENTS.

    Section 904 of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 4084) is 
amended by adding at the end the following new subsection:
    ``(g) Reimbursements paid to the Department of State for funding 
the costs of medical care abroad for employees and eligible family 
members shall be credited to the currently available applicable 
appropriation account. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, such 
reimbursements shall be available for obligation and expenditure during 
the fiscal year in which they are received or for such longer period of 
time as may be provided in law.''.

SEC. 204. AUTHORITY TO ADMINISTRATIVELY AMEND SURCHARGES.

    (a) In General.--Beginning in fiscal year 2006 and thereafter, the 
Secretary of State is authorized to amend administratively the amounts 
of the surcharges related to consular services in support of enhanced 
border security (provided for in the last paragraph under the heading 
``diplomatic and consular programs'' under title IV of division B of 
the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2005 (Public Law 108-447)) that 
are in addition to the passport and immigrant visa fees in effect on 
January 1, 2004.
    (b) Requirements.--In carrying out subsection (a) and the provision 
of law described in such subsection, the Secretary shall meet the 
following requirements:
            (1) The amounts of the surcharges shall be reasonably 
        related to the costs of providing services in connection with 
        the activity or item for which the surcharges are charged.
            (2) The aggregate amount of surcharges collected may not 
        exceed the aggregate amount obligated and expended for the 
        costs related to consular services in support of enhanced 
        border security incurred in connection with the activity or 
        item for which the surcharges are charged.
            (3) A surcharge may not be collected except to the extent 
        the surcharge will be obligated and expended to pay the costs 
        related to consular services in support of enhanced border 
        security incurred in connection with the activity or item for 
        which the surcharge is charged.
            (4) A surcharge shall be available for obligation and 
        expenditure only to pay the costs related to consular services 
        in support of enhanced border security incurred in providing 
        services in connection with the activity or item for which the 
        surcharge is charged.

SEC. 205. ACCOUNTABILITY REVIEW BOARDS.

    Section 301(a) of the Diplomatic Security Act (22 U.S.C. 4831(a)) 
is amended--
            (1) in paragraph (1), by striking ``paragraph (2)'' and 
        inserting ``paragraphs (2) and (3)''; and
            (2) by adding at the end the following new paragraph:
            ``(3) Facilities in afghanistan and iraq.--
                    ``(A) Limited exemptions from requirement to 
                convene board.--The Secretary of State is not required 
                to convene a Board in the case of an incident that--
                            ``(i) involves serious injury, loss of 
                        life, or significant destruction of property 
                        at, or related to, a United States Government 
                        mission in Afghanistan or Iraq; and
                            ``(ii) occurs during the period beginning 
                        on July 1, 2004, and ending on September 30, 
                        2009.
                    ``(B) Reporting requirements.--In the case of an 
                incident described in subparagraph (A), the Secretary 
                shall--
                            ``(i) promptly notify the Committee on 
                        International Relations of the House of 
                        Representatives and the Committee on Foreign 
                        Relations of the Senate of the incident;
                            ``(ii) conduct an inquiry of the incident; 
                        and
                            ``(iii) upon completion of the inquiry 
                        required by clause (ii), submit to each such 
                        Committee a report on the findings and 
                        recommendations related to such inquiry and the 
                        actions taken with respect to such 
                        recommendations.''.

SEC. 206. DESIGNATION OF COLIN L. POWELL RESIDENTIAL PLAZA.

    (a) Designation.--The Federal building in Kingston, Jamaica, 
formerly known as the Crowne Plaza and currently a staff housing 
facility for the Embassy of the United States in Jamaica, shall be 
known and designated as the ``Colin L. Powell Residential Plaza''.
    (b) References.--Any reference in a law, map, regulation, document, 
paper, or other record of the United States to the Federal building 
referred to in subsection (a) shall be deemed to be a reference to the 
``Colin L. Powell Residential Plaza''.

SEC. 207. REMOVAL OF CONTRACTING PROHIBITION.

    Section 406(c) of the Omnibus Diplomatic Security and Antiterrorism 
Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-399) (relating to the ineligibility of 
persons doing business with Libya to be awarded a contract) is 
repealed.

SEC. 208. TRANSLATION OF REPORTS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE.

    (a) Translation.--Not later than 30 days after the date of issuance 
of each of the reports listed in subsection (c), the appropriate United 
States mission in a foreign country shall translate into the official 
languages of such country the respective country report from each of 
such reports.
    (b) Posting on Website.--Not later than five days after each of the 
translations required under subsection (a) are completed, the 
appropriate United States mission shall post each of such translations 
on the website of the United States Embassy (or other appropriate 
United States mission) for such country.
    (c) Reports.--The reports referred to in subsection (a) are the 
following:
            (1) The Country Reports on Human Rights Practices, 
        including the Trafficking in Persons Report, required under 
        sections 116 and 502B of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 
        U.S.C. 2151n and 2304).
            (2) The Annual Report on International Religious Freedom, 
        required under section 102b of the International Religious 
        Freedom Act of 1998 (22 U.S.C. 6412).
            (3) The Annual Report on Democracy required under section 
        612 of this Act.
            (4) The annual Trafficking in Persons Report prepared by 
        the Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons of the 
        Department of State, required under section 110(b) of the 
        Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 7107(b)).

SEC. 209. ENTRIES WITHIN PASSPORTS.

    (a) Findings.--Congress finds the following:
            (1) The power of the executive branch to issue passports or 
        other travel documents to United States citizens is derived 
        solely from law.
            (2) The Secretary of State has caused entries to be made in 
        passports of United States citizens who were born in Jerusalem, 
        Israel, that are inconsistent with the usual practice of 
        entering the name of a country and not a city as a place of 
        birth.
    (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that United 
States citizens who have passports should not be required to carry 
passports which inaccurately or inconsistently represent their personal 
details.
    (c) Authority.--This section is passed in exercise of the power of 
Congress, pursuant to Article 1, Section 8 of the Constitution of the 
United States ``To make all Laws which shall be necessary and proper 
for carrying into Execution the foregoing Powers, and all other Powers 
vested by the Constitution in the Government of the United States, or 
in any Department or Officer thereof.''.
    (d) Requirement That Accurate Entries Be Made on Request of 
Citizen.--The first section of ``An Act to regulate the issue and 
validity of passports, and for other purposes'', approved July 3, 1926, 
(22 U.S.C. 211a; 44 Stat. 887), is amended by inserting after the first 
sentence the following new sentence: ``For purposes of the issuance of 
a passport to a United States citizen born in the city of Jerusalem, 
the Secretary shall, upon the request of the citizen or the citizen's 
legal guardian, record the place of birth as Israel.''.

SEC. 210. UNITED STATES ACTIONS WITH RESPECT TO JERUSALEM AS THE 
              CAPITAL OF ISRAEL.

    (a) Limitation on Use of Funds for Consulate in Jerusalem.--None of 
the funds authorized to be appropriated by this Act may be expended for 
the operation of a United States consulate or diplomatic facility in 
Jerusalem unless such consulate or diplomatic facility is under the 
supervision of the United States Ambassador to Israel.
    (b) Limitation on Use of Funds for Publications.--None of the funds 
authorized to be appropriated by this Act may be available for the 
publication of any official United States Government document that 
lists countries and their capital cities unless such publication 
identifies Jerusalem as the capital of the State of Israel.

SEC. 211. AVAILABILITY OF UNCLASSIFIED TELECOMMUNICATIONS FACILITIES.

    The Secretary of State shall make available to the appropriate 
congressional committees the use of unclassified telecommunications 
facilities of the Department of State that are located in an embassy, 
consulate, or other facility of the United States in a foreign country 
to allow such committees to receive testimony or other communication 
from an individual in any such country.

SEC. 212. REPORTING FORMATS.

    (a) In General.--The Secretary of State shall, with respect to a 
report that the Secretary is required to submit to the appropriate 
congressional committees, submit each such report on suitable media in 
machine-readable format, including in plain text and in hypertext mark-
up language (commonly referred to as ``HTML''), in addition to 
submission in written format.
    (b) Effective Date.--The requirement specified under subsection (a) 
shall apply beginning with the first report that the Secretary is 
required to submit to the appropriate congressional committees after 
the date that is not later than 90 days after the date of the enactment 
of this Act.

SEC. 213. EXTENSION OF REQUIREMENT FOR SCHOLARSHIPS FOR TIBETANS AND 
              BURMESE.

    Section 103(b)(1) of the Human Rights, Refugee, and Other Foreign 
Relations Provisions Act of 1996 (Public Law 104-319; 22 U.S.C. 2151 
note) is amended by striking ``for the fiscal year 2003'' and inserting 
``for each of fiscal years 2006 and 2007''.

SEC. 214. AMERICAN INSTITUTE IN TAIWAN FACILITIES ENHANCEMENT.

    Section 3(a) of the American Institute in Taiwan Facilities 
Enhancement Act (Public Law 106-212) is amended by striking ``the sum 
of $75,000,000'' and inserting ``such sums as may be necessary''.

SEC. 215. ACTIVITIES RELATED TO CUBA.

    (a) Activities.--Of the funds made available for fiscal year 2006 
for the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs of the Department of 
State, $5,000,000 shall be used for activities related to Cuba under--
            (1) the J. William Fulbright Educational Exchange Program;
            (2) the Hubert Humphrey Fellowship Program;
            (3) the International Visitors Program;
            (4) the Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship 
        Program;
            (5) the EducationUSA Program; and
            (6) professional, cultural, and youth programs operated by 
        the Office of Citizen Exchanges of the Bureau.
    (b) Priority.--The Secretary of State shall give priority to human 
rights dissidents, pro-democracy activists, and independent civil 
society members for participation in the activities described in 
subsection (a).
    (c) Congressional Notification.--Not later than 90 days after the 
date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall notify the 
appropriate congressional committees on efforts to identify eligible 
participants for activities described in subsection (a). Not later than 
15 days prior to a final determination of eligible participants for 
activities described in subsection (a), the Secretary shall notify the 
appropriate congressional committees of such determination and provide 
a list that contains the names of such eligible participants.

SEC. 216. ESTABLISHMENT OF THE ACTIVE RESPONSE CORPS.

    (a) Establishment.--The Secretary of State, in consultation with 
the Administrator of the United States Agency for International 
Development, is authorized to establish an Active Response Corps 
(referred to in this section as the ``Corps'') to provide assistance in 
support of stabilization and reconstruction activities in foreign 
countries or regions that are in, are in transition from, or are likely 
to enter into, conflict or civil strife.
    (b) Composition.--If the Corps is established in accordance with 
subsection (a), the Secretary and Administrator shall coordinate in the 
identification and training, and if necessary, in the recruitment and 
hiring, of necessary personnel. Such personnel shall be composed of 
employees of United States civilian agencies or non-Federal employees.
    (c) Use of Active Response Corps.--The members of the Active 
Response Corps shall be available--
            (1) if the President determines that it is in the national 
        security interests of the United States to engage in 
        stabilization and reconstruction activities in a country or 
        region that is in, is in transition from, or is likely to enter 
        into, conflict or civil strife; and
            (2) if not engaged in such stabilization and reconstruction 
        activities, for assignment in the United States, at diplomatic 
        missions of the United States, and at missions of the United 
        States Agency for International Development.
    (d) Training and Education Programs.--
            (1) In general.--The Coordinator for Stabilization and 
        Reconstruction is authorized to conduct and arrange for 
        training and education of the Active Response Corps.
            (2) Emphasis.--Training and education shall emphasize 
        acquisition of general skills needed to operate in a post-
        conflict environment and training specific to the job skill set 
        for which the member has been identified to participate in the 
        Active Response Corps.
            (3) Contents.--Training and education may consist of--
                    (A) conducting inter-agency training, including 
                training related to inter-agency decisionmaking, 
                operational planning, and execution simulations, for 
                mid-level government officials and managers to prepare 
                such officials and managers to address stabilization 
                and reconstruction operations;
                    (B) conducting advanced training related to 
                stabilization and reconstruction operations for members 
                of the Active Response Corps;
                    (C) conducting pre-deployment training related to 
                stabilization and reconstruction operations for 
                civilians and military-civil affairs personnel;
                    (D) conducting exercises related to stabilization 
                and reconstruction operations for United States and 
                international experts;
                    (E) developing a uniform set of operating 
                procedures for stabilization and reconstruction 
                operations; and
                    (F) conducting ongoing evaluations and after-action 
                reviews of stabilization and reconstruction operations.
    (e) Facilities.--Training and education programs should be 
coordinated with and utilize to the extent possible existing programs 
and facilities such as the George P. Shultz National Foreign Affairs 
Training Center (commonly referred to as the ``Foreign Service 
Institute''), the National Defense University, the Center for 
Stabilization and Reconstruction Studies at the Naval Postgraduate 
School, and the United States Institute for Peace.
    (f) Additional Authorities.--
            (1) Establishment and purpose of reserve component of 
        active response corps.--The Secretary, in consultation with the 
        heads of other relevant Executive agencies, is authorized to 
        establish and maintain a roster of personnel who are trained 
        and available as needed to perform services necessary to carry 
        out the purpose of the Corps under subsection (c). The 
        personnel listed on the roster shall constitute a reserve 
        component of the Active Response Corps.
            (2) Federal employees.--The reserve component may include 
        employees of the Department of State, including Foreign Service 
        Nationals, employees of the United States Agency for 
        International Development, employees of any other Executive 
        agency (as such term is defined in section 105 of title 5, 
        United States Code), and employees from the legislative and 
        judicial branches who--
                    (A) have the training and skills necessary to 
                enable them to contribute to stabilization and 
                reconstruction activities under this section; and
                    (B) have volunteered for deployment to carry out 
                such stabilization and reconstruction activities.
    (g) Use of Reserve Component.--The Secretary may deploy members of 
the reserve component in support of stabilization and reconstruction 
activities in a foreign country or region if the President makes a 
determination regarding a stabilization and reconstruction crisis. The 
Secretary is authorized to employ contractor personnel, nongovernmental 
organization personnel, and State and local government employees, who--
            (1) have the training and skills necessary to enable them 
        to contribute to stabilization and reconstruction activities 
        under this section; and
            (2) have volunteered to carry out such stabilization and 
        reconstruction activities.
    (h) Report.--Not later than 180 days after the date of the 
enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall submit to the appropriate 
congressional committees a report on the status of efforts to establish 
the Active Response Corps. The report shall include recommendations--
            (1) for any legislation necessary to implement subsection 
        (a); and
            (2) concerning the regulation and structure of the Active 
        Response Corps, including recommendations related to pay and 
        employment security for, and benefit and retirement matters 
        related to, members of the Corps.

SEC. 217. PASSPORT SECURITY ENHANCEMENT.

    (a) Report on Documents Related to Passport Issuance.--
            (1) In general.--Not later than one year after the date of 
        the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State shall submit 
        to the appropriate congressional committees a report that 
        describes existing security weaknesses of identification 
        documents, including birth certificates, required for the 
        issuance of a passport, and that includes, in accordance with 
        paragraph (3), recommended criteria for birth certificates that 
        will be acceptable to establish valid proof of identity and 
        national origin of individuals for the issuance of passports to 
        such individuals.
            (2) Consultation.--The Secretary shall consult with 
        appropriate officials of States and cities identified as vital 
        registration jurisdictions in the preparation of such criteria.
            (3) Acceptance criteria.--The criteria referred to in 
        paragraph (1) shall include the establishment of minimum 
        acceptance criteria for identification documents issued by such 
        jurisdictions, including criteria related to--
                    (A) vital records security and procedures;
                    (B) security paper and printing for birth 
                certificates;
                    (C) customer identification requirements;
                    (D) issuance of birth certificates, including 
                duplicates;
                    (E) controlling access to birth certificate records 
                to prevent identity fraud;
                    (F) data element definitions to facilitate 
                electronic exchange of birth and death registration 
                information with the Department of State for purposes 
                of issuing passports; and
                    (G) routine matching of all birth and death 
                records.
    (b) Background Investigation and Establishment of Training Program 
for Passport Acceptance Agents.--
            (1) Background Investigation.--Not later than 180 days 
        after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of 
        State shall establish a mandatory requirement for background 
        investigations of passport acceptance agents.
            (2) Establishment of Training Program.--Not later than one 
        year after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Under 
        Secretary for Management of the Department of State, acting 
        through the Bureau of Consular Affairs of the Department, 
        shall--
                    (A) establish a comprehensive training program for 
                passport acceptance agents that includes instruction 
                and training relating to identification document fraud 
                detection, customer identification authentication, and 
                the penalties for passport fraud by employees, agents, 
                and passport applicants;
                    (B) establish a database that records when passport 
                acceptance agents complete such training;
                    (C) require all newly appointed passport acceptance 
                agents to complete such training before initial 
                processing of passport applications; and
                    (D) establish a training schedule so that all 
                existing passport acceptance agents have completed such 
                training no later than three years after the date of 
                the establishment of the training program under this 
                paragraph.
    (c) Expanded Authority of Special Agents.--Section 203 of the 
Omnibus Diplomatic and Antiterrorism Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-399; 22 
U.S.C. 4823) is amended--
            (1) in the first sentence, by striking ``Special agent 
        positions'' and inserting ``(a) Special agent positions''; and
            (2) by adding at the end the following new subsection:
    ``(b) In connection with investigations of corruption, waste, 
fraud, and abuse by officers and employees of the United States 
Government, including the illegal sale of United States passports and 
visas and other United States criminal offenses, the Federal District 
Court for the District of Columbia shall have authority to issue 
warrants with respect to properties within the special maritime and 
territorial jurisdiction of the United States, as defined under section 
7(9) of title 18, United States Code. Special agents under the 
direction of the Director of the Diplomatic Security Service shall have 
authority to execute such warrants.''.
    (d) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated such sums as may be necessary, or to reprogram funds 
otherwise obtained through receipts from the issuance of passports and 
visas, to carry out this section.

    TITLE III--ORGANIZATION AND PERSONNEL OF THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE

SEC. 301. EDUCATION ALLOWANCES.

    Section 5924(4) of title 5, United States Code, is amended--
            (1) in the first sentence of subparagraph (A), by inserting 
        ``United States'' after ``nearest'';
            (2) by striking subparagraph (B) and inserting the 
        following new subparagraph:
                    ``(B) The travel expenses of dependents of an 
                employee to and from a secondary or post-secondary 
                educational institution, not to exceed one annual trip 
                each way for each dependent, except that an allowance 
                payment under subparagraph (A) may not be made for a 
                dependent during the 12 months following the arrival of 
                the dependent at the selected educational institution 
                under authority contained in this subparagraph.''; and
            (3) by adding at the end the following new subparagraph:
                    ``(D) Allowances provided pursuant to subparagraphs 
                (A) and (B) may include, at the election of the 
                employee, payment or reimbursement of the costs 
                incurred to store baggage for the employee's dependent 
                at or in the vicinity of the dependent's school during 
                the dependent's annual trip between the school and the 
                employee's duty station, except that such payment or 
                reimbursement may not exceed the cost that the 
                Government would incur to transport the baggage with 
                the dependent in connection with the annual trip, and 
                such payment or reimbursement shall be in lieu of 
                transportation of the baggage.''.

SEC. 302. OFFICIAL RESIDENCE EXPENSES.

    Section 5913 of title 5, United States Code, is amended by adding 
at the end the following new subsection:
    ``(c) Funds made available under subsection (b) may be provided in 
advance to persons eligible to receive reimbursements.''.

SEC. 303. INCREASED LIMITS APPLICABLE TO POST DIFFERENTIALS AND DANGER 
              PAY ALLOWANCES.

    (a) Repeal of Limited-Scope Effective Date for Previous Increase.--
Subsection (c) of section 591 of the Foreign Operations, Export 
Financing, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 2004 (division D of 
Public Law 108-199) is repealed.
    (b) Post Differentials.--Section 5925(a) of title 5, United States 
Code, is amended in the third sentence by striking ``25 percent of the 
rate of basic pay or, in the case of an employee of the United States 
Agency for International Development,''.
    (c) Danger Pay Allowances.--Section 5928 of title 5, United States 
Code, is amended by striking ``25 percent of the basic pay of the 
employee or 35 percent of the basic pay of the employee in the case of 
an employee of the United States Agency for International Development'' 
both places that it appears and inserting ``35 percent of the basic pay 
of the employee''.
    (d) Criteria.--The Secretary of State shall inform the appropriate 
congressional committees of the criteria to be used in determinations 
of appropriate adjustments in post differentials under section 5925(a) 
of title 5, United States Code, as amended by subsection (b), and 
danger pay allowances under section 5928 of title 5, United States 
Code, as amended by subsection (c).
    (e) Study and Report.--Not later than two years after the date of 
the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State shall conduct a study 
assessing the effect of the increases in post differentials and danger 
pay allowances made by the amendments in subsections (b) and (c), 
respectively, in filling ``hard-to-fill'' positions and shall submit a 
report of such study to the appropriate congressional committees.

SEC. 304. HOME LEAVE.

    Chapter 9 of title I of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (relating 
to travel, leave, and other benefits) is amended--
            (1) in section 901(6) (22 U.S.C. 4081(6)), by striking 
        ``unbroken by home leave'' both places that it appears; and
            (2) in section 903(a) (22 U.S.C. 4083), by striking ``18 
        months'' and inserting ``12 months''.

SEC. 305. OVERSEAS EQUALIZATION AND COMPARABILITY PAY ADJUSTMENT.

    (a) Overseas Comparability Pay Adjustment.--
            (1) In general.--Chapter 4 of the Foreign Service Act of 
        1980 (22 U.S.C. 3961 et seq.) (relating to compensation) is 
        amended by adding at the end the following new section:

``SEC. 415. OVERSEAS COMPARABILITY PAY ADJUSTMENT.

    ``(a) In General.--In accordance with subsection (c), a member of 
the Service who is designated class 1 or below and who does not have as 
an official duty station a location in the continental United States or 
in a non-foreign area shall receive locality-based comparability 
payments under section 5304 of title 5, United States Code, that would 
be paid to such member if such member's official duty station would 
have been Washington, D.C.
    ``(b) Treatment as Basic Pay.--The locality-based comparability 
payment described in subsection (a) shall--
            ``(1) be considered to be part of the basic pay of a member 
        in accordance with section 5304 of title 5, United States Code, 
        for the same purposes for which comparability payments are 
        considered to be part of basic pay under such section; and
            ``(2) be subject to any applicable pay limitations.
    ``(c) Phase-In.--The comparability pay adjustment described under 
this section shall be paid to a member described in subsection (a) in 
three phases, as follows:
            ``(1) In fiscal year 2006, 33.33 percent of the amount of 
        such adjustment to which such member is entitled.
            ``(2) In fiscal year 2007, 66.66 percent of the amount of 
        such adjustment to which such member is entitled.
            ``(3) In fiscal year 2008 and subsequent fiscal years, 
        100.00 percent of the amount of such adjustment to which such 
        member is entitled.''.
            (2) Conforming amendment.--The table of sections in section 
        2 of such Act is amended by inserting after the item relating 
        to section 414 the following new item:

``Sec. 415. Overseas comparability pay adjustment.''.
    (b) Conforming Amendments Relating to the Retirement and Disability 
System of the Foreign Service.--
            (1) Contributions to the fund.--Section 805(a) of the 
        Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 4045(a)) is amended--
                    (A) in paragraph (1)--
                            (i) in the first sentence, by striking 
                        ``7.25 percent'' and inserting ``7.00 
                        percent''; and
                            (ii) in the second sentence, by striking 
                        ``The contribution by the employing agency'' 
                        through ``and shall be made'' and inserting 
                        ``An equal amount shall be contributed by the 
                        employing agency'';
                    (B) in paragraph (2)--
                            (i) in subparagraph (A), by striking ``, 
                        plus an amount equal to .25 percent of basic 
                        pay''; and
                            (ii) in subparagraph (B), in the first 
                        sentence, by striking ``, plus an amount equal 
                        to .25 percent of basic pay''; and
                    (C) in paragraph (3), by striking ``, plus .25 
                percent''.
            (2) Computation of annuities.--Section 806(a)(9) of such 
        Act (22 U.S.C. 4046(a)(9)) is amended--
                    (A) by striking ``is outside'' and inserting ``was 
                outside''; and
                    (B) by inserting after ``continental United 
                States'' the following: ``for any period of time from 
                December 29, 2002, to the first day of the first full 
                pay period beginning after the date of applicability of 
                the overseas comparability pay adjustment under section 
                415'';
            (3) Entitlement to annuity.--Section 855(a)(3) of such Act 
        (22 U.S.C. 4071d(a)(3)) is amended--
                    (A) by striking ``is outside'' and inserting ``was 
                outside''; and
                    (B) by inserting after ``continental United 
                States'' the following: ``for any period of time from 
                December 29, 2002, to the first day of the first full 
                pay period beginning after the date of applicability of 
                the overseas comparability pay adjustment under section 
                415''.
            (4) Deductions and withholdings from pay.--Section 
        856(a)(2) of such Act (22 U.S.C. 4071e(a)(2)) is amended to 
        read as follows:
    ``(2) The applicable percentage under this subsection shall be as 
follows:

 
 
 
Percentage                          Time Period
  7.5.............................  Before January 1, 1999.
  7.75............................  January 1, 1999, to December 31,
                                     1999.
  7.9.............................  January 1, 2000, to December 31,
                                     2000.
  7.55............................  January 11, 2003, to September 30,
                                     2004.
  7.5.............................  After September 30, 2004.''.

    (c) Effective Date.--The amendments made by this section shall take 
effect on the date of the enactment of this Act and apply beginning on 
the first day of the first full pay period beginning after such date.

SEC. 306. FELLOWSHIP OF HOPE PROGRAM.

    (a) Fellowship Authorized.--Chapter 5 of title I of the Foreign 
Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 3981 et seq.) is amended by adding at 
the end the following new section:

``SEC. 506. FELLOWSHIP OF HOPE PROGRAM.

    ``(a) Establishment.--The Secretary is authorized to establish a 
program to be known as the `Fellowship of Hope Program'. Under the 
Program, the Secretary may assign a member of the Service, for not more 
than one year, to a position with any designated country or designated 
entity that permits an employee of such country or entity to be 
assigned to a position with the Department.
    ``(b) Salary and Benefits.--The salary and benefits of a member of 
the Service shall be paid as described in subsection (b) of section 503 
during a period in which such member is participating in the Fellowship 
of Hope Program. The salary and benefits of an employee of a designated 
country or designated entity participating in the Program shall be paid 
by such country or entity during the period in which such employee is 
participating in the Program.
    ``(c) Definitions.--In this section:
            ``(1) The term `designated country' means a member country 
        of--
                    ``(A) the North Atlantic Treaty Organization; or
                    ``(B) the European Union.
            ``(2) The term `designated entity' means--
                    ``(A) the North Atlantic Treaty Organization; or
                    ``(B) the European Union.
    ``(d) Rule of Construction.--Nothing in this section shall be 
construed to--
            ``(1) authorize the appointment as an officer or employee 
        of the United States of--
                    ``(A) an individual whose allegiance is to any 
                country, government, or foreign or international entity 
                other than to the United States; or
                    ``(B) an individual who has not met the 
                requirements of sections 3331, 3332, 3333, and 7311 of 
                title 5, United States Code, and any other provision of 
                law concerning eligibility for appointment as, and 
                continuation of employment as, an officer or employee 
                of the United States; or
            ``(2) authorize the Secretary to assign a member of the 
        Service to a position with any foreign country whose law, or to 
        any foreign or international entity whose rules, require such 
        member to give allegiance or loyalty to such country or entity 
        while assigned to such position.''.
    (b) Technical and Conforming Amendments.--Such Act is amended--
            (1) in section 503 (22 U.S.C. 3983)--
                    (A) in the section heading, by striking ``and'' and 
                inserting ``Foreign Governments, Or''; and
                    (B) in subsection (a)--
                            (i) in the matter preceding paragraph (1), 
                        by inserting ``foreign government,'' after 
                        ``organization,''; and
                            (ii) in paragraph (1), by inserting ``, or 
                        with a foreign government under section 506'' 
                        before the semicolon; and
            (2) in section 2, in the table of contents--
                    (A) by striking the item relating to section 503 
                and inserting the following new item:

``Sec. 503. Assignments to agencies, international organizations, 
                            foreign governments, or other bodies.'';
                and
                    (B) by inserting after the item relating to section 
                505 the following new item:

``Sec. 506. Fellowship of Hope Program.''.

SEC. 307. REGULATIONS REGARDING RETIREMENT CREDIT FOR GOVERNMENT 
              SERVICE PERFORMED ABROAD.

    Section 321(f) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal 
Year 2003 (5 U.S.C. 8411 note; Public Law 107-228) is amended by 
inserting ``, not later than 60 days after the date of the enactment of 
the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 2006 and 2007,'' 
after ``regulations''.

SEC. 308. PROMOTING ASSIGNMENTS TO INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS.

    (a) Promotions.--Section 603(b) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 
(22 U.S.C. 4003) is amended by striking the period at the end and 
inserting the following: ``, and shall consider whether the member of 
the Service has served in a position whose primary responsibility is to 
formulate policy toward or represent the United States at an 
international organization, a multilateral institution, or a broad-
based multilateral negotiation of an international instrument.''.
    (b) Effective Date.--The amendment made by subsection (a) shall 
take effect and apply beginning on January 1, 2010.

SEC. 309. SUSPENSION OF FOREIGN SERVICE MEMBERS WITHOUT PAY.

    (a) Suspension.--Section 610 of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 
U.S.C. 4010) is amended by adding at the end the following new 
subsection:
    ``(c)(1) The Secretary may suspend a member of the Service without 
pay when there is reasonable cause to believe that the member has 
committed a crime for which a sentence of imprisonment may be imposed 
and there is a connection between the conduct and the efficiency of the 
Foreign Service.
    ``(2) Any member of the Service for whom a suspension is proposed 
shall be entitled to--
            ``(A) written notice stating the specific reasons for the 
        proposed suspension;
            ``(B) a reasonable time to respond orally and in writing to 
        the proposed suspension;
            ``(C) representation by an attorney or other 
        representative; and
            ``(D) a final written decision, including the specific 
        reasons for such decision, as soon as practicable.
    ``(3) Any member suspended under this section may file a grievance 
in accordance with the procedures applicable to grievances under 
chapter 11 of this title.
    ``(4) In the case of a grievance filed under paragraph (3), the 
Foreign Service Grievance Board may not exercise the authority provided 
under section 1106(8).
    ``(5) In this subsection:
            ``(A) The term `reasonable time' means 30 days after 
        receiving notice of the proposed suspension.
            ``(B) The terms `suspend' and `suspension' mean the placing 
        of a member of the Service in a temporary status without duties 
        and pay.''.
    (b) Conforming and Clerical Amendments.--
            (1) Amendment of section heading.--Such section, as amended 
        by subsection (a), is further amended in the section heading by 
        inserting ``; Suspension'' before the period at the end.
            (2) Clerical amendment.--Section 2 of such Act is amended, 
        in the table of contents, by striking the item relating to 
        section 610 and inserting the following new item:

``Sec. 610. Separation for cause; suspension.''.

SEC. 310. DEATH GRATUITY.

    Section 413(a) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 
3973(a)) is amended in the first sentence by inserting before the 
period at the end the following: ``or $100,000, whichever is greater''.

SEC. 311. CLARIFICATION OF FOREIGN SERVICE GRIEVANCE BOARD PROCEDURES.

    Section 1106(8) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 
4136(8)) is amended in the first sentence--
            (1) by inserting ``the involuntary separation of the 
        grievant (other than an involuntary separation for cause under 
        section 610(a)),'' after ``considering''; and
            (2) by striking ``the grievant or'' and inserting ``the 
        grievant, or''.

SEC. 312. REPEAL OF RECERTIFICATION REQUIREMENT FOR MEMBERS OF THE 
              SENIOR FOREIGN SERVICE.

    Section 305(d) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 
3945(d)) is hereby repealed.

SEC. 313. TECHNICAL AMENDMENTS TO TITLE 5, UNITED STATES CODE, 
              PROVISIONS ON RECRUITMENT, RELOCATION, AND RETENTION 
              BONUSES.

    Title 5, United States Code, is amended--
            (1) in section 5753(a)(2)(A), by inserting before the 
        semicolon at the end the following: ``, but does not include 
        members of the Foreign Service other than chiefs of mission and 
        ambassadors-at-large''; and
            (2) in section 5754(a)(2)(A), by inserting before the 
        semicolon at the end the following: ``, but does not include 
        members of the Foreign Service other than chiefs of mission and 
        ambassadors-at-large''.

SEC. 314. LIMITED APPOINTMENTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE.

    Section 309 of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 3949) is 
amended--
            (1) in subsection (a), by striking ``subsection (b)'' and 
        inserting ``subsections (b) or (c)'';
            (2) in subsection (b)--
                    (A) by amending paragraph (3) to read as follows:
    ``(3) as a career candidate, if--
            ``(A) continued service is determined appropriate to remedy 
        a matter that would be cognizable as a grievance under chapter 
        11; or
            ``(B) the career candidate is called to military active 
        duty pursuant to the Uniformed Services Employment and 
        Reemployment Rights Act of 1994 (Public Law 103-353; codified 
        in chapter 43 of title 38, United States Code) and the limited 
        appointment expires in the course of such military active 
        duty;'';
                    (B) in paragraph (4), by striking ``and'' at the 
                end;
                    (C) in paragraph (5), by striking the period at the 
                end and inserting ``; and''; and
                    (D) by adding at the end the following new 
                paragraph:
    ``(6) in exceptional circumstances where the Secretary determines 
the needs of the Service require the extension of a limited 
appointment--
            ``(A) for a period of time not to exceed 12 months, 
        provided such period of time does not permit additional review 
        by the boards under section 306; or
            ``(B) for the minimum time needed to settle a grievance, 
        claim, or complaint not otherwise provided for in this 
        section.''; and
            (3) by adding at the end the following new subsection:
    ``(c) Noncareer specialist employees who have served five 
consecutive years under a limited appointment may be reappointed to a 
subsequent limited appointment provided there is at least a one year 
break in service before such new appointment. This requirement may be 
waived by the Director General in cases of special need.''.

SEC. 315. STATEMENT OF CONGRESS REGARDING CAREER DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM 
              FOR SENIOR FOREIGN SERVICE.

    Congress declares that the recent changes proposed by the 
Department of State to the career development program for members of 
the Senior Foreign Service will help promote well-rounded and effective 
members of the Senior Foreign Service, and should be implemented as 
planned in the coming years. Congress fully supports the proposed 
changes that require that in order to be eligible for promotion into 
the Senior Foreign Service, a member of the Foreign Service must 
demonstrate over the course of the career of such member the following:
            (1) Operational effectiveness, including a breadth of 
        experience in several regions and over several functions.
            (2) Leadership and management effectiveness.
            (3) Sustained professional language proficiency.
            (4) Responsiveness to Service needs.

SEC. 316. SENSE OF CONGRESS REGARDING ADDITIONAL UNITED STATES CONSULAR 
              POSTS.

    It is the sense of Congress that to help advance United States 
economic, political, and public diplomacy interests, the Secretary of 
State should make best efforts to establish United States consulates or 
other appropriate United States diplomatic presence in Pusan, South 
Korea, Hat Yai, Thailand, and an additional location in India in an 
under-served region.

SEC. 317. OFFICE OF THE CULTURE OF LAWFULNESS.

    (a) Establishment.--There is established in the Bureau for 
International Law Enforcement and Narcotics of the Department of State 
an Office of the Culture of Lawfulness.
    (b) Director and Staff.--The Office shall be headed by a Director 
and staffed by not less than two professional staff.
    (c) Duties.--The Director of the Office shall coordinate and 
increase the effectiveness of existing culture of lawfulness programs 
in the Department that can directly support foreign efforts to develop 
a culture of lawfulness, including--
            (1) seeking coordination between various programs and 
        activities to support international narcotics and other law 
        enforcement, public diplomacy, foreign assistance, and 
        democracy efforts by the personnel of the Department in 
        Washington, D.C., and in United States embassies in foreign 
        countries;
            (2) developing new initiatives to foster a culture of 
        lawfulness through international organizations; and
            (3) ensuring that culture of lawfulness education is 
        included in the curricula of all law enforcement and public 
        security academies and training programs that receive 
        assistance from the United States, and in democracy, civic 
        education, and rule of law assistance programs conducted with 
        foreign governments and nongovernmental organizations.
    (d) Report.--Section 489(a) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 
(22 U.S.C. 2291h(a)) is amended by inserting after paragraph (7) the 
following new paragraph:
            ``(8) In addition, the efforts of the United States to 
        foster the culture of lawfulness in countries around the 
        world.''.

SEC. 318. REVIEW OF HUMAN RESOURCES POLICIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF 
              STATE.

    (a) Bottom-Up Review of Elements of the Department of State.--The 
Secretary of State shall conduct ongoing, thorough reviews of the 
organizational structure and human resource policies of all elements of 
the Department of State to determine those organizational structures 
that are most effectively organized and whether personnel with the 
appropriate skill sets are being hired, trained, and utilized to meet 
national security challenges, including those posed by international 
terrorist threats.
    (b) Emphasis on Diversity.--The review conducted under subsection 
(a) shall include an emphasis on improving the ethnic, racial, 
cultural, and gender diversity of personnel of the Department of State.
    (c) Biennial Report.--The Secretary shall submit to the appropriate 
congressional committees a biennial report on the reviews conducted 
under this section and efforts to improve diversity of the personnel of 
the Department of State.

SEC. 319. WORLDWIDE AVAILABILITY.

    Section 301(b) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 
3491(b)) is amended by adding at the end the following new sentence: 
``At the time of entry into the Service, each member of the Service 
must be worldwide available, as determined by the Secretary of State 
through appropriate medical examinations, unless the Secretary 
determines that a waiver of the worldwide availability requirement is 
required to fulfill a compelling Service need. The Secretary shall 
establish an internal administrative review process for medical 
ineligibility determinations.''.

SEC. 320. TREATMENT OF TERRITORIES AND POSSESSIONS AS PART OF THE 
              GEOGRAPHIC UNITED STATES FOR PURPOSES OF TRANSFER 
              ALLOWANCES.

    Notwithstanding any other provision of law, for purposes of 
transfer allowances for employees of the Department of State under 
section 5924(2)(B) of title 5, United States Code, the territories and 
possessions of the United States, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and 
the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, shall be considered 
part of the geographic United States.

                 TITLE IV--INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

SEC. 401. REDI CENTER.

    The Secretary of State is authorized to provide for the 
participation by the United States in the Regional Emerging Disease 
Intervention (``REDI'') Center in Singapore.

SEC. 402. EXTENSION OF AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATION FOR THE UNITED 
              STATES COMMISSION ON INTERNATIONAL RELIGIOUS FREEDOM.

    (a) In General.--Subsection (a) of section 207 of the International 
Religious Freedom Act of 1998 (22 U.S.C. 6435) is amended by striking 
``$3,000,000 for the fiscal year 2003'' and inserting ``$3,300,000 for 
each of fiscal years 2006 through 2011''.
    (b) Technical Amendment.--Subsection (b) of such section is amended 
by striking ``subparagraph'' and inserting ``subsection''.

SEC. 403. REFORM OF THE INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY.

    (a) Findings With Respect to the International Atomic Energy 
Agency.--Congress finds the following:
            (1) Efforts to prevent the further spread of nuclear 
        weapons capabilities would be enhanced by universal membership 
        in the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).
            (2) The enhanced authorities provided by the Additional 
        Protocol to the Safeguards Agreements between the IAEA and 
        Member States of the IAEA are indispensable to the ability of 
        the IAEA to conduct inspections of nuclear facilities to a high 
        degree of confidence.
            (3) The national security interests of the United States 
        would be enhanced by the universal ratification and 
        implementation of the Additional Protocol.
            (4) The national security interests of the United States 
        would be enhanced by the rapid implementation by all Member 
        States of the United Nations of United Nations Security Council 
        Resolution 1540, which prohibits all Member States from 
        providing any form of support to non-state actors that attempt 
        to manufacture, acquire, possess, develop, transport, transfer, 
        or use nuclear, chemical, or biological weapons and their means 
        of delivery, and requiring all Member States to adopt and 
        enforce appropriate and effective domestic laws criminalizing 
        such acts.
            (5) The national security interests of the United States 
        require that the IAEA possess sufficient authorities and 
        resources to comprehensively and efficiently carry out its 
        responsibilities for inspections and safeguards of nuclear 
        facilities.
            (6) Regularly assessed contributions of Member States to 
        the regular budget of the IAEA are due in the first quarter of 
        each calendar year.
            (7) Currently, the United States does not pay its regularly 
        assessed contribution to the regular budget of the IAEA until 
        the last quarter of each calendar year.
            (8) This delayed payment results in recurring shortages of 
        funds for the IAEA, thus compromising its ability to conduct 
        safeguards inspections and nuclear security activities.
    (b) Findings With Respect to the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty.--
Congress finds the following:
            (1) The Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons 
        (21 UST 483) (commonly referred to as the ``Nuclear 
        Nonproliferation Treaty'' or the ``NPT'') is the foundation for 
        international cooperation to prevent the further spread of 
        nuclear weapons capabilities.
            (2) The NPT was conceived, written, and ratified by State 
        Parties as a treaty for the specific purpose of preventing the 
        proliferation of nuclear weapons and nuclear explosive devices, 
        as stated in the Preamble and first three Articles of the NPT.
            (3) The overriding priority of the NPT is preventing the 
        proliferation of nuclear weapons and nuclear explosive devices.
            (4) Article IV of the NPT conditions the ``inalienable 
        right to develop research, production and use of nuclear energy 
        for peaceful purposes without discrimination'' on conformity 
        with Articles I and II, which obligate signatories ``not to 
        manufacture of otherwise acquire nuclear weapons or other 
        nuclear explosive devices; and not to seek or receive any 
        assistance in the manufacture of nuclear weapons or other 
        nuclear explosive devices''.
            (5) Because the processes used for the enrichment of 
        uranium and the reprocessing of plutonium for peaceful purposes 
        are virtually identical to those needed for military purposes 
        and thereby inherently pose an enhanced risk of proliferation, 
        even under strict international inspections, Article IV of the 
        NPT cannot be interpreted to recognize the inalienable right by 
        every country to enrich uranium or reprocess plutonium.
            (6) Because the factors needed for the development of 
        nuclear energy for peaceful purposes are virtually identical to 
        those required for the development of nuclear weapons and 
        devices, Article X cannot be interpreted to allow a signatory 
        country to develop a nuclear weapons program based on 
        materials, facilities, and equipment it has acquired through 
        its Article IV cooperation.
    (c) Statement of Congress.--Congress declares that--
            (1) all provisions of the NPT must be interpreted within 
        the context of preventing the proliferation of nuclear weapons 
        and nuclear explosive devices;
            (2) Article IV of the NPT, interpreted in conformity with 
        the NPT's purpose, spirit, and freely undertaken obligations by 
        State Parties, does not guarantee every country that is a State 
        Party an inalienable right to enrich uranium or reprocess 
        plutonium; and
            (3) if a State Party chooses to exercise its Article X 
        right of withdrawal from the NPT, such State Party must 
        surrender all of the materials, facilities, and equipment it 
        has acquired through its Article IV cooperation, and no State 
        Party will be recognized as having legally exercised its 
        Article X right of withdrawal from the NPT until it has 
        surrendered all such materials, facilities, and equipment.
    (d) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that--
            (1) the Director General of the IAEA should strengthen 
        efforts to secure universal ratification and implementation of 
        the Additional Protocol; and
            (2) the IAEA possesses statutory authority, including under 
        Articles II, III, VIII, IX, XI, and XII of the IAEA Statute, to 
        undertake nuclear security activities.
    (e) Promotion of Additional Protocol and United Nations Security 
Council Resolution 1540.--
            (1) Universal ratification and implementation; full 
        compliance.--The President shall take such steps as the 
        President determines necessary to encourage--
                    (A) rapid universal ratification and implementation 
                by Member States of the IAEA of the Additional Protocol 
                to the Safeguards Agreements between the IAEA and 
                Member States; and
                    (B) full compliance by all foreign countries with 
                United Nations Security Council Resolution 1540, which 
                calls for the adoption and enforcement by all foreign 
                countries of ``appropriate effective laws which 
                prohibit any non-State actor to manufacture, acquire, 
                possess, develop, transport, transfer or use nuclear, 
                chemical or biological weapons and their means of 
                delivery, in particular for terrorist purposes, as well 
                as attempts to engage in any of the foregoing 
                activities, participate in them as an accomplice, 
                assist or finance them''.
            (2) Suspension of united states non-humanitarian foreign 
        assistance.--The President is authorized to suspend United 
        States non-humanitarian foreign assistance to any country 
        that--
                    (A) has not signed and ratified the Additional 
                Protocol; and
                    (B) has not fully complied with United Nations 
                Security Council Resolution 1540.
            (3) Report.--
                    (A) In general.--Not later than 90 days after the 
                date of the enactment of this Act and annually 
                thereafter until September 31, 2010, the Secretary of 
                State shall submit to the appropriate congressional 
                committees a report on United States efforts to promote 
                full compliance by all countries with United Nations 
                Security Council Resolution 1540, with particular 
                attention to the following:
                            (i) United States efforts in appropriate 
                        international organizations or fora to 
                        elaborate and implement international standards 
                        for such full compliance.
                            (ii) Steps taken by the United States to 
                        assist other countries to meet their 
                        obligations under United Nations Security 
                        Council Resolution 1540.
                    (B) Submission.--The report required under this 
                paragraph may be submitted together with the report on 
                ``Patterns of Global of Terrorism''.
    (f) Payment at Beginning of Calendar Year.--The Secretary of State 
shall take expeditious action to ensure that the United States 
regularly assessed contribution to the IAEA is made at the beginning of 
each calendar year.
    (g) Authorization of Appropriations.--In addition to amounts 
otherwise authorized to be appropriated to the Secretary of State under 
this Act, there are authorized to be appropriated to the Secretary such 
sums as may be necessary to permit the Secretary to ensure that the 
United States regularly assessed contribution of its annual dues to the 
IAEA is provided to the IAEA at the beginning of each calendar year to 
compensate for the current delayed payment described under subsection 
(b).

SEC. 404. PROPERTY DISPOSITION.

    Section 633(e) of the Departments of Commerce, Justice, and State, 
the Judiciary, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2004 (division 
B of Public Law 108-199; 22 U.S.C. 2078(e)) is amended--
            (1) by striking ``The United States, through the Department 
        of State, shall retain ownership of the Palazzo Corpi building 
        in Istanbul, Turkey, and the'' and inserting ``The''; and
            (2) by striking ``at such location'' and inserting ``at an 
        appropriate location''.

                  TITLE V--INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING

SEC. 501. SHORT TITLE.

    This title may be cited as the ``International Broadcasting 
Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 2006 and 2007''.

SEC. 502. MIDDLE EAST BROADCASTING NETWORKS.

    (a) Middle East Broadcasting Networks.--The United States 
International Broadcasting Act of 1994 (22 U.S.C. 6201 et seq.) is 
amended by inserting after section 309 (22 U.S.C. 6208) the following 
new section:

``SEC. 309A. MIDDLE EAST BROADCASTING NETWORKS.

    ``(a) Authority.--Grants authorized under section 305 shall be 
available to make annual grants to the Middle East Broadcasting 
Networks for the purpose of carrying out radio and television 
broadcasting to the Middle East region.
    ``(b) Function.--Middle East Broadcasting Networks shall provide 
radio and television programming consistent with the broadcasting 
standards and broadcasting principles set forth in section 303.
    ``(c) Grant Agreement.--Any grant agreement or grants under this 
section shall be subject to the following limitations and restrictions:
            ``(1) The Board may not make any grant to the non-profit 
        corporation, Middle East Broadcasting Networks, unless its 
        certificate of incorporation provides that--
                    ``(A) The Board of Directors of Middle East 
                Broadcasting Networks shall consist of the members of 
                the Broadcasting Board of Governors established under 
                section 304 and of no other members.
                    ``(B) Such Board of Directors shall make all major 
                policy determinations governing the operation of Middle 
                East Broadcasting Networks, and shall appoint and fix 
                the compensation of such managerial officers and 
                employees of Middle East Broadcasting Networks as it 
                considers necessary to carry out the purposes of the 
                grant provided under this title, except that no officer 
                or employee may be paid basic compensation at a rate in 
                excess of the rate for level II of the Executive 
                Schedule as provided under section 5313 of title 5, 
                United States Code.
            ``(2) Any grant agreement under this section shall require 
        that any contract entered into by Middle East Broadcasting 
        Networks shall specify that all obligations are assumed by 
        Middle East Broadcasting Networks and not by the United States 
        Government.
            ``(3) Any grant agreement shall require that any lease 
        agreement entered into by Middle East Broadcasting Networks 
        shall be, to the maximum extent possible, assignable to the 
        United States Government.
            ``(4) Grants awarded under this section shall be made 
        pursuant to a grant agreement which requires that grant funds 
        be used only for activities consistent with this section, and 
        that failure to comply with such requirements shall permit the 
        grant to be terminated without fiscal obligation to the United 
        States.
            ``(5) Duplication of language services and technical 
        operations between the Middle East Broadcasting Networks 
        (including Radio Sawa), RFE/RL, and the International 
        Broadcasting Bureau will be reduced to the extent appropriate, 
        as determined by the Board.
    ``(d) Not a Federal Agency or Instrumentality.--Nothing in this 
title may be construed to make--
            ``(1) the Middle East Broadcasting Networks a Federal 
        agency or instrumentality; or
            ``(2) the officers or employees of the Middle East 
        Broadcasting Networks officers or employees of the United 
        States Government.''.
    (b) Technical and Conforming Amendments.--Such Act is further 
amended--
            (1) in section 304(g) (22 U.S.C. 6203(g)), by inserting ``, 
        the Middle East Broadcasting Networks,'' after 
        ``Incorporated'';
            (2) in section 305 (22 U.S.C. 6204)--
                    (A) in subsection (a)--
                            (i) in paragraph (5), by striking ``308 and 
                        309'' and inserting ``308, 309, and 309A''; and
                            (ii) in paragraph (6), by striking ``308 
                        and 309'' and inserting ``308, 309, and 309A''; 
                        and
                    (B) in subsection (c), by striking ``308 and 309'' 
                and inserting ``308, 309, and 309A''; and
            (3) in section 307 (22 U.S.C. 6206)--
                    (A) in subsection (a), by striking ``308 and 309'' 
                and inserting ``308, 309, and 309A''; and
                    (B) in subsection (c), in the second sentence, by 
                inserting ``the Middle East Broadcasting Networks,'' 
                after ``Asia,''.
    (c) Technical and Conforming Amendment to Title 5.--Section 
8332(b)(11) of title 5, United States Code, is amended by inserting 
``the Middle East Broadcasting Networks;'' after ``Radio Free Asia;''.

SEC. 503. IMPROVING SIGNAL DELIVERY TO CUBA.

    Section 3 of the Radio Broadcasting to Cuba Act (22 U.S.C. 1465a; 
Public Law 98-111) is amended--
            (1) by striking subsection (b);
            (2) by striking subsection (c) and inserting the following 
        new subsection:
    ``(c) To effect radio broadcasting to Cuba, the Board is authorized 
to utilize the United States International Broadcasting facilities 
located in Marathon, Florida, and the 1180 AM frequency used at those 
facilities. In addition to the above facilities, the Board may 
simultaneously utilize other governmental and nongovernmental 
broadcasting transmission facilities and other frequencies, including 
the Amplitude Modulation (AM) band, the Frequency Modulation (FM) band, 
and the Shortwave (SW) band. The Board may lease time on commercial or 
noncommercial educational AM band, FM band, and SW band radio 
broadcasting stations to carry a portion of the service programs or to 
rebroadcast service programs.'';
            (3) by striking subsection (d);
            (4) by striking subsection (e) and inserting the following 
        new subsection:
    ``(e) Any service program of United States Government radio 
broadcasts to Cuba authorized by this section shall be designated 
`Radio Marti program'.'';
            (5) by striking subsection (f); and
            (6) by redesignating subsections (c) and (e) (as amended by 
        this section) as subsections (b) and (c), respectively.

SEC. 504. ESTABLISHING PERMANENT AUTHORITY FOR RADIO FREE ASIA.

    Section 309 of the United States International Broadcasting Act of 
1994 (22 U.S.C. 6208) is amended--
            (1) in subsection (c)(2), by striking ``, and shall further 
        specify that funds to carry out the activities of Radio Free 
        Asia may not be available after September 30, 2009''; and
            (2) by striking subsection (f).

SEC. 505. PERSONAL SERVICES CONTRACTING PROGRAM.

    Section 504 of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Year 
2003 (Public Law 107-228) is amended--
            (1) in the section heading, by striking ``pilot'';
            (2) in subsection (a)--
                    (A) by striking ``pilot'';
                    (B) by striking ``(in this section referred to as 
                the `program')''; and
                    (C) by striking ``producers, and writers'' and 
                inserting ``and other broadcasting specialists'';
            (3) in subsection (b)(4), by striking ``60'' and inserting 
        ``100''; and
            (4) by striking subsection (c).

SEC. 506. COMMONWEALTH OF THE NORTHERN MARIANA ISLANDS EDUCATION 
              BENEFITS.

    Section 305(a) of the United States International Broadcasting Act 
of 1994 (22 U.S.C. 6204(a)) is amended by inserting after paragraph 
(18) the following new paragraph:
            ``(19)(A) To provide for the payment of primary and 
        secondary school expenses for dependents of personnel stationed 
        in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) at a 
        cost not to exceed expenses authorized by the Department of 
        Defense for such schooling for dependents of members of the 
        Armed Forces stationed in the Commonwealth, if the Board 
        determines that schools available in the Commonwealth are 
        unable to provide adequately for the education of the 
        dependents of such personnel.
            ``(B) To provide transportation for dependents of such 
        personnel between their places of residence and those schools 
        for which expenses are provided under subparagraph (A), if the 
        Board determines that such schools are not accessible by public 
        means of transportation.''.

                TITLE VI--ADVANCE DEMOCRACY ACT OF 2005

SEC. 601. SHORT TITLE.

    This title may be cited as the ``Advance Democratic Values, Address 
Nondemocratic Countries, and Enhance Democracy Act of 2005'' or the 
``ADVANCE Democracy Act of 2005''.

SEC. 602. FINDINGS.

    Congress finds the following:
            (1) All human beings are created equal and possess certain 
        rights and freedoms, including the fundamental right to 
        participate in the political life and government of their 
        respective countries. These inalienable rights are recognized 
        in the Declaration of Independence of the United States and in 
        the Universal Declaration of Human Rights of the United 
        Nations.
            (2) The continued lack of democracy, freedom, and 
        fundamental human rights in some countries is inconsistent with 
        the universal values on which the United States is based and 
        such continued lack of democracy, freedom, and fundamental 
        human rights also poses a national security threat to the 
        United States, its interests, and its friends, as it is in such 
        countries that radicalism, extremism, and terrorism can 
        flourish.
            (3) There is also a correlation between nondemocratic rule 
        and other threats to international peace and security, 
        including threats from war, genocide, famine, poverty, drug 
        trafficking, corruption, refugee flows, human trafficking, 
        religious persecution, environmental degradation, and 
        discrimination against women.
            (4) The transition to democracy must be led from within 
        nondemocratic countries, including by nongovernmental 
        organizations, movements, and individuals, and by nationals of 
        such countries who live abroad. Nevertheless, democratic 
        countries have a number of instruments available for supporting 
        democratic reformers who are committed to promoting effective, 
        nonviolent change in nondemocratic countries.
            (5) United States efforts to promote democracy and protect 
        human rights in countries where they are lacking can be 
        strengthened to improve assistance for such reformers. United 
        States ambassadors and diplomats can play a critical role in 
        such efforts to promote democracy by publicly demonstrating 
        support for democratic principles and supporting democratic 
        reformers. Training and incentives are needed to assist United 
        States officials in strengthening the techniques and skills 
        required to promote democracy.
            (6) A full evaluation of United States funds expended for 
        the support of democracy is also necessary to ensure an 
        efficient and effective use of the resources that are dedicated 
        to these efforts.
            (7) The promotion of democracy requires a broad-based 
        effort with collaboration between all democratic countries, 
        including through the Community of Democracies.
            (8) The promotion of such universal democracy constitutes a 
        long-term challenge that does not always lead to an immediate 
        transition to full democracy, but through a dedicated and 
        integrated approach can achieve universal democracy.

SEC. 603. STATEMENT OF POLICY.

    It shall be the policy of the United States--
            (1) to promote freedom and democracy in foreign countries 
        as a fundamental component of United States foreign policy;
            (2) to affirm fundamental freedoms and human rights in 
        foreign countries and to condemn offenses against those 
        freedoms and rights as a fundamental component of United States 
        foreign policy;
            (3) to use all instruments of United States influence to 
        support, promote, and strengthen democratic principles, 
        practices, and values in foreign countries, including the right 
        to free, fair, and open elections, secret balloting, and 
        universal suffrage;
            (4) to protect and promote fundamental freedoms and rights, 
        including the freedoms of association, of expression, of the 
        press, and of religion, and the right to own private property;
            (5) to protect and promote respect for and adherence to the 
        rule of law in foreign countries;
            (6) to provide appropriate support to organizations, 
        individuals, and movements located in nondemocratic countries 
        that aspire to live in freedom and establish full democracy in 
        such countries;
            (7) to provide, political, economic, and other support to 
        foreign countries that are willingly undertaking a transition 
        to democracy;
            (8) to commit United States foreign policy to the challenge 
        of achieving universal democracy; and
            (9) to strengthen alliances and relationships with other 
        democratic countries in order to better promote and defend 
        shared values and ideals.

SEC. 604. DEFINITIONS.

    In this title:
            (1) Annual report on democracy.--The term ``Annual Report 
        on Democracy'' means the Annual Report on Democracy required 
        under section 612(a).
            (2) Community of democracies and community.--The terms 
        ``Community of Democracies'' and ``Community'' mean the 
        association of democratic countries committed to the global 
        promotion of democratic principles, practices, and values, 
        which held its First Ministerial Conference in Warsaw, Poland, 
        in June 2000.
            (3) Eligible entity.--The term ``eligible entity'' means 
        any nongovernmental organization, international organization, 
        multilateral institution, private foundation, corporation, 
        partnership, association, or other entity, organization, or 
        group engaged in (or with plans to engage in) the promotion of 
        democracy and fundamental rights and freedoms in foreign 
        countries categorized as ``democratic transition countries'' or 
        as ``nondemocratic'' in the most recent Annual Report on 
        Democracy.
            (4) Eligible individual.--The term ``eligible individual'' 
        means any individual engaged in, or who intends to engage in, 
        the promotion of democracy and fundamental rights and freedoms 
        in foreign countries categorized as ``democratic transition 
        countries'' or as ``nondemocratic'' in the most recent Annual 
        Report on Democracy.
            (5) Regional democracy hub and hub.--The terms ``Regional 
        Democracy Hub'' and ``Hub'' mean the Regional Democracy Hubs 
        established under section 611(c)(2).
            (6) Secretary.--The term ``Secretary'' means the Secretary 
        of State.
            (7) Under secretary.--The term ``Under Secretary'' means 
        the Under Secretary of State for Democracy and Global Affairs 
        established under section 1(b) of the State Department Basic 
        Authorities Act of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 2651a(b)), as amended by 
        section 611(a)(2) of this Act.

               Subtitle A--Department of State Activities

SEC. 611. PROMOTION OF DEMOCRACY IN FOREIGN COUNTRIES.

    (a) Codification of Under Secretary of State for Democracy and 
Global Affairs.--Section 1(b) of the State Department Basic Authorities 
Act of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 2651a(b)) is amended--
            (1) by redesignating paragraph (4) as paragraph (5); and
            (2) by inserting after paragraph (3) the following new 
        paragraph:
            ``(4) Under secretary of state for democracy and global 
        affairs.--There shall be in the Department of State, among the 
        Under Secretaries authorized by paragraph (1), an Under 
        Secretary of State for Democracy and Global Affairs, who shall 
        have primary responsibility to assist the Secretary and the 
        Deputy Secretary in the formulation and implementation of 
        United States policies and activities relating to the 
        transition to and development of democracy in nondemocratic 
        countries and to coordinate United States policy on global 
        issues, including issues related to human rights, women's 
        rights, freedom of religion, labor standards and relations, the 
        preservation of the global environment, the status and 
        protection of the oceans, scientific cooperation, narcotics 
        control, law enforcement, population issues, refugees, 
        migration, war crimes, and trafficking in persons. The 
        Secretary may assign such other responsibilities to the Under 
        Secretary for Democracy and Global Affairs as the Secretary 
        determines appropriate or necessary. In particular, the Under 
        Secretary shall have the following responsibilities:
                    ``(A) Coordinating with the Under Secretary for 
                Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs and officers and 
                employees from the regional bureaus of the Department 
                of State to promote the transition to democracy in 
                nondemocratic countries and strengthen development of 
                democracy in countries that are in transition to 
                democracy.
                    ``(B) Advising the Secretary regarding any 
                recommendation requested by any official of any other 
                agency that relates to the human rights situation in a 
                foreign country or the effects on human rights or 
                democracy in a foreign country of an agency program of 
                such official.''.
    (b) Additional Duties for Assistant Secretary of State for 
Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor.--Section 1(c)(2)(A) of the State 
Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 2651a(c)(2)) is 
amended by inserting after the first sentence the following new 
sentence: ``The Assistant Secretary of State for Democracy, Human 
Rights, and Labor shall also be responsible for matters relating to the 
transition to and development of democracy in nondemocratic countries, 
including promoting and strengthening the development of democracy in 
foreign countries that are in the early stages of a transition to 
democracy and evaluating the effectiveness of United States programs 
that promote democracy.''.
    (c) Department of State and United States Missions Abroad.--
            (1) Office related to democratic movements and 
        transitions.--
                    (A) Establishment.--There shall be within the 
                Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor of the 
                Department of State an office that shall be responsible 
                for working with democratic movements and facilitating 
                the transition of nondemocratic countries and 
                democratic transition countries to full democracy.
                    (B) Purpose.--In addition to any other 
                responsibilities conferred on the office, the office 
                shall promote transitions to full democracy in 
                countries that have been categorized as nondemocratic 
                or as democratic transition countries in the most 
                recent Annual Report on Democracy required under 
                section 612(a).
                    (C) Responsibilities.--The Deputy Assistant 
                Secretary of State for Democracy, Human Rights, and 
                Labor described in paragraph (4) and employees of the 
                office shall--
                            (i) develop relations with, consult with, 
                        and provide assistance to nongovernmental 
                        organizations, individuals, and movements that 
                        are committed to the peaceful promotion of 
                        democracy, democratic principles, practices, 
                        and values, and fundamental rights and freedoms 
                        in countries described in subparagraph (B), 
                        including fostering relationships with the 
                        United States Government and the governments of 
                        other democratic countries;
                            (ii) assist officers and employees of 
                        regional bureaus to develop strategies and 
                        programs to promote peaceful change in such 
                        countries;
                            (iii) foster dialogue, to the extent 
                        practicable, between the leaders of such 
                        nongovernmental organizations, individuals, and 
                        movements and the officials of such countries;
                            (iv) create narratives and histories 
                        required under section 616 for the Internet 
                        site for global democracy and human rights and 
                        assist in the preparation of the report 
                        required under section 612; and
                            (v) facilitate, in coordination with public 
                        affairs officers and offices of the Department 
                        of State responsible for public diplomacy 
                        programs in such countries, debates and 
                        discussions, including among young people in 
                        other countries, regarding the values and 
                        benefits of democracy and human rights at 
                        academic institutions in such countries.
            (2) Regional democracy hubs at united states missions 
        abroad.--
                    (A) Pilot program.--
                            (i) In general.--The Secretary shall 
                        establish a Regional Democracy Hub at a United 
                        States mission in two of the following 
                        geographic regions:
                                    (I) The Western Hemisphere.
                                    (II) Europe.
                                    (III) South Asia.
                                    (IV) The Near East.
                                    (V) East Asia and the Pacific.
                                    (VI) Africa.
                            (ii) Director.--Each Regional Democracy Hub 
                        shall be headed by a Director. The Director and 
                        the associated staff shall be selected by the 
                        Secretary of State in consultation with the 
                        Assistant Secretary of State for Democracy, 
                        Human Rights, and Labor.
                    (B) Responsibilities.--Each Regional Democracy Hub 
                shall support the appropriate United States ambassador 
                and United States employees assigned to United States 
                missions in each such geographic region to carry out 
                the responsibilities described in this Act, including 
                assisting Ambassadors and other United States officials 
                in each nondemocratic country or democratic transition 
                country in the geographic region to design and 
                implement strategies for a transition to democracy in 
                such county, including regional strategies as 
                appropriate.
                    (C) Accreditation.--As appropriate, the Department 
                should seek accreditation for the Director to all 
                nondemocratic countries in each geographic region for 
                which each Hub is responsible.
                    (D) Termination.--The Secretary may terminate each 
                Hub established under this paragraph five years after 
                each is established.
                    (E) Continuing responsibilities.--Nothing in this 
                paragraph shall be construed as removing any 
                responsibility under this or any other Act of any chief 
                of mission or other employees of United States 
                diplomatic missions, including the development and 
                implementation of strategies to promote democracy.
                    (F) Authorization of appropriations.--There are 
                authorized to be appropriated to the Secretary such 
                sums as may be necessary to carry out the 
                responsibilities described in subparagraph (B), 
                including hiring additional staff to carry out such 
                responsibilities.
            (3) Responsibilities of the bureau of intelligence and 
        research.--The Assistant Secretary of State for Intelligence 
        and Research should coordinate with the Department of the 
        Treasury, the Department of Justice, the Central Intelligence 
        Agency, other appropriate intelligence agencies, and, as 
        appropriate, with foreign governments to--
                    (A) monitor and document financial assets inside 
                and outside the United States held by leaders of 
                countries determined to be nondemocratic countries or 
                democratic transition countries in the Annual Report on 
                Democracy under section 612(a);
                    (B) identify close associates of such leaders; and
                    (C) monitor and document financial assets inside 
                and outside the United States held by such close 
                associates.
            (4) Coordination.--
                    (A) Deputy assistant secretary of state for 
                democracy, human rights, and labor.--There should be in 
                the Department of State a Deputy Assistant Secretary of 
                State for Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor. Any such 
                Deputy Assistant Secretary shall be in addition to the 
                current number of Deputy Assistant Secretaries. In 
                addition to considering qualified noncareer candidates, 
                the Secretary of State should seek to recruit senior 
                members of the Senior Foreign Service to serve in such 
                position.
                    (B) Responsibilities.--In addition to the 
                responsibilities described in paragraph (1)(C) and such 
                other responsibilities as the Secretary or Assistant 
                Secretary of State for Democracy, Human Rights, and 
                Labor may from time to time designate, the Deputy 
                Assistant Secretary of State for Democracy, Human 
                Rights, and Labor should--
                            (i) coordinate the work of the office 
                        described in paragraph (1) with the work of 
                        other offices and bureaus at the Department of 
                        State and other United States Government 
                        agencies that provide grants and other 
                        assistance to nongovernmental organizations, 
                        individuals, and movements;
                            (ii) forge connections between the United 
                        States and nongovernmental organizations, 
                        individuals, and movements committed to the 
                        promotion of democracy and democratic 
                        principles, practices, and values and seek to 
                        embrace the work of such organizations, 
                        individuals, and movements; and
                            (iii) evaluate the effectiveness of United 
                        States programs that promote democracy.
            (5) Recruitment.--The Secretary shall seek to ensure that, 
        not later than December 31, 2012, not less than 50 percent of 
        the nonadministrative employees serving in the Bureau of 
        Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor are members of the Foreign 
        Service.

SEC. 612. REPORTS.

    (a) Annual Report on Democracy.--
            (1) Preparation and deadline for submission.--The Secretary 
        of State shall prepare an Annual Report on Democracy. The Under 
        Secretary of State for Democracy and Global Affairs, with the 
        assistance of the Assistant Secretary of State for Democracy, 
        Human Rights, and Labor, shall have the principal 
        responsibility of assisting the Secretary in the preparation of 
        the Annual Report. The Under Secretary and Assistant Secretary 
        shall consult with the regional bureaus of the Department of 
        State in the preparation of the Annual Report. Not later than 
        July 1 of each year, the Secretary shall submit to the 
        appropriate congressional committees the Annual Report on 
        Democracy.
            (2) Contents.--The Annual Report on Democracy shall contain 
        the following:
                    (A) Executive summary.--An Executive Summary with a 
                table listing every foreign country that the Secretary 
                determines to be ``nondemocratic'', and a list of 
                countries the Secretary determines to be ``democratic 
                transition countries'' because they are at the early 
                stages of their transition to democracy. The Executive 
                Summary shall contain a short narrative highlighting 
                the status of democracy in each such country.
                            (i) Determination of categorization.--With 
                        respect to a country listed in the Executive 
                        Summary, the Secretary shall determine which of 
                        the categorizations specified under 
                        subparagraph (A) is appropriate by reference to 
                        the principles enshrined in the United Nations 
                        Charter, the Universal Declaration of Human 
                        Rights, the International Covenant on Civil and 
                        Political Rights, the United Nations Commission 
                        on Human Rights Resolution 1499/57 (entitled 
                        ``Promotion of the Right to Democracy''), the 
                        assessments used to determine eligibility for 
                        financial assistance disbursed from the 
                        Millennium Challenge Account, the assessments 
                        of nongovernmental organizations of eligibility 
                        to participate in the meetings of the Community 
                        of Democracies, and the standards established 
                        and adopted by the Community of Democracies. In 
                        addition, the categorization of a country 
                        should be informed by the general consensus 
                        regarding the status of civil and political 
                        rights in such country by major nongovernmental 
                        organizations that conduct assessments of such 
                        conditions in such countries.
                            (ii) Determination of nondemocratic 
                        categorization.--
                                    (I) In general.--The Secretary 
                                shall categorize a country as 
                                nondemocratic if such country fails to 
                                satisfy any of the following 
                                requirements:
                                            (aa) All citizens of such 
                                        county have the right to, and 
                                        are not restricted in practice 
                                        from, fully and freely 
                                        participating in the political 
                                        life of such country regardless 
                                        of gender, race, language, 
                                        religion, or beliefs.
                                            (bb) The national 
                                        legislative body of such 
                                        country and, if directly 
                                        elected, the head of government 
                                        of such country, are chosen by 
                                        free, fair, open, and periodic 
                                        elections, by universal and 
                                        equal suffrage, and by secret 
                                        ballot.
                                            (cc) More than one 
                                        political party in such country 
                                        has candidates who seek elected 
                                        office at the national level 
                                        and such parties are not 
                                        restricted in their political 
                                        activities or their process for 
                                        selecting such candidates, 
                                        except for reasonable 
                                        administrative requirements 
                                        commonly applied in countries 
                                        categorized as fully 
                                        democratic.
                                            (dd) All citizens in such 
                                        country have a right to, and 
                                        are not restricted in practice 
                                        from, fully exercising the 
                                        freedoms of thought, 
                                        conscience, belief, peaceful 
                                        assembly and association, 
                                        speech, opinion, and 
                                        expression, and such country 
                                        has a free, independent, and 
                                        pluralistic media.
                                            (ee) The current government 
                                        of such country did not come to 
                                        power in a manner contrary to 
                                        the rule of law.
                                            (ff) Such country possesses 
                                        an independent judiciary and 
                                        the government of such country 
                                        generally respects the rule of 
                                        law.
                                    (II) Additional considerations.--
                                Notwithstanding the satisfaction by a 
                                country of the requirements specified 
                                under subclause (I), the Secretary may 
                                categorize a country as nondemocratic 
                                if the Secretary determines that such 
                                is appropriate after consideration of 
                                the principles specified under clause 
                                (i) with respect to such country.
                    (B) Status of democracy.--A description of each 
                country on the list described in subparagraph (A), 
                including--
                            (i) an evaluation of trends over the 
                        preceding 12 months towards improvement or 
                        deterioration in the commitment to and 
                        protection of democratic principles, practices, 
                        values, institutions, and processes in each 
                        such country;
                            (ii) an evaluation of the political rights 
                        and freedoms enjoyed by individuals in each 
                        such country and an evaluation of the factors 
                        that prevent each such country from being 
                        categorized as fully democratic; and
                            (iii) for each country previously 
                        categorized as nondemocratic in the Executive 
                        Summary from the preceding 12 months, an 
                        evaluation of any progress made over the 
                        previous calendar year towards achieving a 
                        categorization of democratic transition 
                        country.
                    (C) Strategy for nondemocratic countries.--An in-
                depth examination of each country categorized as 
                nondemocratic in the Executive Summary, including--
                            (i) a strategy developed following 
                        consultations with nongovernmental 
                        organizations, individuals, and movements that 
                        promote democratic principles, practices, and 
                        values in each such country to promote and 
                        achieve transition to full democracy in each 
                        such country;
                            (ii) a summary of any actions taken by the 
                        President with respect to any such country, the 
                        effects of any such actions, and if no such 
                        actions have been taken, a statement explaining 
                        why not;
                            (iii) a summary of any actions taken by the 
                        chief of mission and officials of the United 
                        States in each such country with which the 
                        United States maintains diplomatic and consular 
                        posts with respect to promoting such a 
                        transition within such country and any 
                        activities of the embassy or consulate in such 
                        country to support individuals and 
                        organizations in such country that actively 
                        advocate for such a transition;
                            (iv) a summary of efforts taken by 
                        officials of the United States to speak 
                        directly to the people in each such country, 
                        and in particular, a description of any visits 
                        taken by the chief of mission and other 
                        officials of the United States in each such 
                        country to the colleges and universities and 
                        other institutions in each such country where 
                        young people congregate and learn;
                            (v) a summary of any communications between 
                        United States Government officials, including 
                        the chief of mission in each such country, and 
                        the leader and other high government officials 
                        of each such country concerning respect for 
                        liberty, democracy, and political, social, and 
                        economic freedoms; and
                            (vi) a description and evaluation of the 
                        efforts undertaken by other democratic 
                        countries belonging to the Community of 
                        Democracies to advance democracy in each such 
                        county, including through relevant bodies of 
                        the United Nations, regional organizations and 
                        bilateral policies and foreign assistance and 
                        the extent to which the United States 
                        coordinated United States actions and policies 
                        with such efforts.
            (3) Classified addendum.--If the Secretary determines that 
        it is in the national security interests of the United States, 
        is necessary for the safety of individuals identified in the 
        Annual Report on Democracy, or is necessary to further the 
        purposes of this Act, any information required by paragraph 
        (2), including policies adopted or actions taken by the United 
        States, may be summarized in the Annual Report on Democracy or 
        in the Executive Summary and submitted to the appropriate 
        congressional committees in more detail in a classified 
        addendum.
    (b) One-Time Report on Training and Guidelines for Foreign Service 
Officers and Chiefs of Mission.--The Secretary of State, in 
consultation with the Under Secretary of State for Democracy and Global 
Affairs, shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees a 
one-time report containing a description of the training provided under 
section 619 for Foreign Service officers, including chiefs of mission 
serving or preparing to serve in countries categorized as democratic 
transition countries or nondemocratic in the Annual Report on Democracy 
required under subsection (a), or chiefs of mission in fully democratic 
countries whose job performance could benefit from such training, with 
respect to methods to promote and achieve transition to full democracy 
in each such country, including nonviolent action. The Secretary shall 
submit the report together with the first Annual Report on Democracy 
required under such subsection.

SEC. 613. STRATEGIES TO ENHANCE THE PROMOTION OF DEMOCRACY IN FOREIGN 
              COUNTRIES.

    (a) Working Group on Nondemocratic Countries.--Beginning in the 
year after the second Annual Report on Democracy required under section 
612(a) is submitted and not less than once each year thereafter, the 
Under Secretary of State for Democracy and Global Affairs should 
convene a working group under subsection (c) focused on each country 
categorized as nondemocratic in the most recent such report in order 
to--
            (1) review progress on the action plan with respect to each 
        such country to promote and achieve the transition to full 
        democracy in such country; and
            (2) receive recommendations regarding further action that 
        should be taken with respect to such plan.
    (b) Working Group on Democratic Transition Countries.--Beginning in 
the year after the second Annual Report on Democracy required under 
section 612(a) is submitted and not less than once each year 
thereafter, the Under Secretary of State for Democracy and Global 
Affairs should also convene a working group under subsection (c) 
focused on the progress towards a fully democratic form of governance 
in each country categorized as a democratic transition country in the 
most recent Annual Report that was categorized as nondemocratic in any 
previous Annual Report.
    (c) Members of Working Groups.--The working groups referred to in 
subsections (a) and (b) should include officers and employees of the 
Department of State and appropriate representatives from other relevant 
government agencies, including the United States Agency for 
International Development, the Department of the Treasury, and the 
Department of Defense.
    (d) Consultations With Chiefs of Missions.--The chief of mission 
for each country categorized as nondemocratic or a democratic 
transition country in the most recent Annual Report on Democracy shall 
meet with the Under Secretary of State for Democracy and Global Affairs 
at least once each year to discuss the transition to full democracy in 
such country, including any actions the chief of mission has taken to 
implement the action plan for such country included in such report.

SEC. 614. ACTIVITIES BY THE UNITED STATES TO PROMOTE DEMOCRACY AND 
              HUMAN RIGHTS IN FOREIGN COUNTRIES.

    (a) Freedom Investment Act of 2002.--The Freedom Investment Act of 
2002 (subtitle E of title VI of Public Law 107-228) is amended--
            (1) in section 663(a), (relating to human rights activities 
        at the Department of State)--
                    (A) in paragraph (1), by striking ``and'' at the 
                end;
                    (B) by redesignating paragraph (2) as paragraph 
                (4);
                    (C) by inserting after paragraph (1) the following 
                new paragraphs:
            ``(2) a United States mission abroad in a country that has 
        been categorized as nondemocratic in the most recent Annual 
        Report on Democracy (as required under section 612(a) of the 
        Advance Democratic Values, Address Nondemocratic Countries, and 
        Enhance Democracy Act of 2005) should have at least one 
        political officer who shall have primary responsibility for 
        monitoring and promoting democracy and human rights in such 
        country;
            ``(3) the level of seniority of any such political officer 
        should be in direct relationship to the severity of the 
        problems associated with the establishment of full democracy 
        and respect for human rights in such country; and''; and
                    (D) in paragraph (4), as so redesignated, by 
                striking ``monitoring human rights developments'' and 
                all that follows through ``recommendation'' and 
                inserting the following: ``monitoring and promoting 
                democracy and human rights, including a political 
                officer described in paragraphs (2) and (3), in a 
                foreign country should be made after consultation with 
                and upon the recommendation''; and
            (2) in section 665(c) (relating to reports on actions taken 
        by the United States to encourage respect for human rights), by 
        striking the second sentence and adding at the end the 
        following new sentences: ``If the Secretary elects to submit 
        such information as a separate report, such report may be 
        submitted as part of the Annual Report on Democracy required 
        under section 612(a) of the Advance Democratic Values, Address 
        Nondemocratic Countries, and Enhance Democracy Act of 2005. If 
        the Secretary makes such an election, such report shall be 
        organized so as to contain a separate section for each country 
        to which such information applies, together with a short 
        narrative describing the extrajudicial killing, torture, or 
        other serious violations of human rights that are indicated to 
        have occurred in each such country.''.
    (b) Foreign Assistance Act of 1961.--The Foreign Assistance Act of 
1961 (22 U.S.C. 2151 et seq.) is amended--
            (1) in section 116(d) (22 U.S.C. 2151n(d)), by striking 
        paragraph (10) and inserting the following new paragraph:
            ``(10) for each country with respect to which the report 
        indicates that extrajudicial killings, torture, or other 
        serious violations of human rights have occurred in the 
        country, a strategy, including a specific list of priorities 
        and an action plan, to end such practices in the country, and 
        any actions taken in the previous year to end such practices in 
        the country; and''; and
            (2) in section 502B(b) (22 U.S.C. 2304(b)), by striking the 
        sixth sentence and inserting the following new sentence: ``Such 
        report shall also include, for each country with respect to 
        which the report indicates that extrajudicial killings, 
        torture, or other serious violations of human rights have 
        occurred in the country, a strategy, including a specific list 
        of priorities and an action plan, to end such practices in the 
        country, and any actions taken in the previous year to end such 
        practices in the country.''.

SEC. 615. DEMOCRACY PROMOTION AND HUMAN RIGHTS ADVISORY BOARD.

    (a) Establishment.--There is established a Democracy Promotion and 
Human Rights Advisory Board.
    (b) Purpose and Duties.--The Board shall advise and provide 
recommendations to the Secretary of State, the Under Secretary of State 
for Democracy and Global Affairs, the Assistant Secretary of State for 
Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor, the Director of the Office for 
Reconstruction and Stabilization of the Department of State, and the 
Assistant Administrator for the Bureau of Democracy, Conflict and 
Humanitarian Assistance of the United States Agency for International 
Development concerning United States policies regarding the promotion 
of democracy, the means of coordinating United States policies and 
programs related to the promotion of democracy, and United States 
policies regarding the establishment of universal democracy, including 
the following:
            (1) Reviewing and making recommendations regarding the 
        overall United States strategy for promoting democracy and 
        human rights in partly democratic and nondemocratic countries, 
        including methods for incorporating the promotion of democracy 
        and human rights into United States diplomacy, the use of 
        international organizations to further United States democracy 
        promotion goals, and ways in which the United States can work 
        with other countries and the Community of Democracies to 
        further such purposes.
            (2) Recommendations regarding specific strategies to 
        promote democracy in countries categorized as nondemocratic or 
        as democratic transition countries in the most recent Annual 
        Report on Democracy under section 612(a) and methods for 
        consulting and coordinating with individuals (including 
        expatriates) and nongovernmental organizations that promote 
        democratic principles, practices, and values.
            (3) Recommendations regarding the use of--
                    (A) programs related to the promotion of democracy 
                and human rights administered by the United States 
                Agency for International Development; and
                    (B) the Human Rights and Democracy Fund, 
                established under section 664 of the Freedom Investment 
                Act of 2002 (subtitle E of title VI of Public Law 107-
                228).
            (4) Recommendations regarding regulations to be promulgated 
        concerning--
                    (A) the standards of performance to be met by 
                members of the Foreign Service, including chiefs of 
                mission, under section 405(d) of the Foreign Service 
                Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 3965(d)); and
                    (B) the development of programs to promote 
                democracy in foreign countries under section 614, 
                relating to programs undertaken by United States 
                missions in foreign countries and the activities of 
                chiefs of mission.
    (c) Study on Democracy Assistance.--
            (1) In general.--Not later than 18 months after the 
        appointment of five members of the Board, the Board shall 
        submit to the President, appropriate congressional committees, 
        and the Secretary a study on United States democracy 
        assistance.
            (2) Contents.--The study shall include--
                    (A) a comprehensive review and an overall 
                evaluation of the efficiency and effectiveness of 
                United States appropriations for the promotion of 
                democracy, including--
                            (i) information regarding the amount of 
                        money dedicated to such purpose each fiscal 
                        year;
                            (ii) an identification of the international 
                        organizations, nongovernmental organizations, 
                        multilateral institutions, individuals, private 
                        groups (including corporations and other 
                        businesses), and government agencies and 
                        departments receiving such funds for such 
                        purpose;
                            (iii) information regarding the efficiency 
                        and effectiveness of the use of such funds to 
                        promote a transition to democracy in 
                        nondemocratic countries with a special emphasis 
                        on activities related to the promotion of 
                        democracy under subsection (b)(3)(B), relating 
                        to the Human Rights and Democracy Fund; and
                            (iv) information regarding the efficiency 
                        and effectiveness of the use of such funds to 
                        promote and sustain democracy in countries that 
                        are already fully democratic or democratic 
                        transition countries;
                    (B) a review of--
                            (i) whether United States international 
                        broadcasts influence citizens of countries 
                        categorized as nondemocratic in the most recent 
                        Annual Report on Democracy and the impact of 
                        increasing such broadcasts to such countries 
                        relative to the cost of such increases, 
                        including information relating to an assessment 
                        of programming on the means of nonviolent 
                        protest and democratic change; and
                            (ii) the advantages and disadvantages of 
                        supporting private media sources that are not 
                        controlled or owned by the United States to 
                        reach citizens of such countries and the 
                        mechanisms that should be used to provide such 
                        support;
                    (C) policy recommendations to the President and 
                appropriate congressional committees regarding ways to 
                improve United States programs for the promotion of 
                democracy, including coordination of such programs; and
                    (D) recommendations for reform of United States 
                Government agencies involved in the promotion of 
                democracy.
    (d) Membership.--
            (1) Appointment.--The Board shall be composed of nine 
        members, who shall be citizens of the United States and who 
        shall not be officers or employees of the United States. The 
        Secretary shall appoint all such members. Not more than five 
        members may be affiliated with the same political party.
            (2) Selection.--Members of the Board shall be selected from 
        among distinguished individuals noted for their knowledge and 
        experience in fields relevant to the issues to be considered by 
        the Board, including issues related to the promotion of 
        democracy, international relations, management and organization 
        of foreign assistance or comparable programs, methods and means 
        of nonviolent protest, academic study and debate of democracy, 
        human rights, and international law.
            (3) Time for appointment.--The appointment of members to 
        the Board under paragraph (1) shall be made not later than 120 
        days after the date of the enactment of this Act.
            (4) Term of service and sunset.--Each member shall be 
        appointed to the Board for a term that shall expire on the date 
        that is one year after the date of the submission of the study 
        under subsection (c) or for any additional period determined by 
        the Secretary pursuant to paragraph (5).
            (5) Sunset.--The Board shall terminate on the date that is 
        one year after the date of the submission of the study under 
        such subsection unless the Secretary determines that it is in 
        the interest of the Department to extend the Board for a period 
        of an additional five years.
            (6) Security clearances.--The Secretary shall ensure that 
        all members of the Board, and appropriate experts and 
        consultants under paragraph (7)(E), obtain relevant security 
        clearances in an expeditious manner.
            (7) Operation.--
                    (A) Chair.--The Secretary shall appoint one member 
                of the Board to chair the Board. The Board shall meet 
                at the call of the Chair.
                    (B) Travel expenses.--Members of the Board shall be 
                allowed travel expenses, including per diem in lieu of 
                subsistence, at rates authorized for employees of 
                agencies under subchapter I of chapter 57 of title 5, 
                United States Code, while away from their homes or 
                regular places of business in the performance of 
                service for the Board.
                    (C) Office space and administrative assistance.--
                Upon the request of the chairperson of the Board, the 
                Secretary shall provide reasonable and appropriate 
                office space, supplies, and administrative assistance.
                    (D) Applicability of certain other laws.--Nothing 
                in this section shall be construed to cause the Board 
                to be considered an agency or establishment of the 
                United States, or to cause members of the Board to be 
                considered officers or employees of the United States. 
                Executive branch agencies may conduct programs and 
                activities and provide services in support of the 
                activities duties of the Board, notwithstanding any 
                other provision of law. The Federal Advisory Committee 
                Act (5 U.S.C. App.) shall not apply to the Board.
                    (E) Experts and consultants.--The Board may procure 
                temporary and intermittent services under section 
                3109(b) of title 5, United States Code.
    (e) Authorization of Appropriations.--There is authorized to be 
appropriated to the Board such sums as may be necessary for each of 
fiscal years 2006, 2007, and 2008.

SEC. 616. ESTABLISHMENT AND MAINTENANCE OF INTERNET SITE FOR GLOBAL 
              DEMOCRACY AND HUMAN RIGHTS.

    (a) Establishment.--In order to facilitate access by individuals 
and nongovernmental organizations in foreign countries to documents, 
streaming video and audio, and other media regarding democratic 
principles, practices, and values, and the promotion and strengthening 
of democracy, the Secretary of State, in cooperation with the Under 
Secretary of State for Democracy and Global Affairs, the Under 
Secretary for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs, and the Assistant 
Secretary of State for Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor, shall 
establish and maintain an Internet site for global democracy and human 
rights.
    (b) Contents.--The Internet site for global democracy established 
under subsection (a) shall include the following information:
            (1) The Executive Summary prepared under section 
        612(a)(2)(A), but only to the extent that information contained 
        therein is not classified.
            (2) Narratives and histories of significant democratic 
        movements in foreign countries, particularly regarding 
        successful nonviolent campaigns to oust dictatorships.
            (3) Narratives relating to the importance of the 
        establishment of and respect for fundamental freedoms.
            (4) Major human rights reports by the United States 
        Government or any other documents, references, or links to 
        external Internet sites the Secretary or Under Secretary 
        determines appropriate, including reference to or links to 
        training materials regarding successful movements in the past, 
        including translations of such materials, as appropriate.

SEC. 617. PROGRAMS BY UNITED STATES MISSIONS IN FOREIGN COUNTRIES AND 
              ACTIVITIES OF CHIEFS OF MISSION.

    (a) Development of Programs to Promote Democracy in Foreign 
Countries.--Each chief of mission in each foreign country categorized 
as nondemocratic in the most recent Annual Report on Democracy, with 
the assistance of the director of the relevant Regional Hub, shall--
            (1) develop, as part of annual program planning, a strategy 
        to promote democracy in each such foreign country and to 
        provide visible and material support to individuals and 
        nongovernmental organizations in each such country that are 
        committed to democratic principles, practices, and values, such 
        as--
                    (A) consulting and coordinating with such 
                individuals and organizations regarding the promotion 
                of democracy;
                    (B) visiting local landmarks and other local sites 
                associated with nonviolent protest in support of 
                democracy and freedom from oppression;
                    (C) holding periodic public meetings with such 
                individuals and organizations to discuss democracy and 
                political, social, and economic freedoms;
                    (D) issuing public condemnation of severe 
                violations of internationally recognized human rights 
                (as such term is described in section 116(a) of the 
                Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2151n(a)), 
                violations of religious freedom, including particularly 
                severe violations of religious freedom (as such terms 
                are defined in paragraphs (11) and (13) of section 3 of 
                the International Religious Freedom Act of 1998 (22 
                U.S.C. 6402)), political repression, and government-
                tolerated or -condoned trafficking in persons; and
                    (E) providing technical, financial, and such other 
                support to such individuals and organizations;
            (2) hold ongoing discussions with the leaders of each such 
        nondemocratic country regarding a transition to full democracy 
        and the development of political, social, and economic freedoms 
        and respect for human rights, including freedom of religion or 
        belief, in such country; and
            (3) conduct meetings with civil society, interviews with 
        media that can directly reach citizens of each such country, 
        and discussions with students and young people of each such 
        country regarding a transition to democracy and the development 
        of political, social, and economic freedoms in each such 
        country.
    (b) Public Outreach in Foreign Countries.--Each chief of mission or 
principal officer should spend time at universities and other 
institutions of higher learning to--
            (1) debate and discuss values and policies that promote 
        democracy; and
            (2) communicate, promote, and defend such United States 
        values and policies.
    (c) Access to United States Missions.--The Secretary is encouraged 
to allow access to a United States diplomatic or consular mission in 
each foreign country categorized as a democratic transition country or 
as nondemocratic in the most recent Annual Report on Democracy by 
individuals and representatives of nongovernmental organizations in 
each such country who are committed to democratic principles, 
practices, and values in each such country.

SEC. 618. TRAINING FOR FOREIGN SERVICE OFFICERS.

    (a) Training in Democracy and the Promotion of Democracy and Human 
Rights.--Section 708 of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 
4028) is amended by adding at the end the following new subsection:
    ``(c) Training on Global Democracy Promotion.--
            ``(1) In general.--In addition to the training required 
        under subsections (a) and (b), the Secretary of State, in 
        cooperation with other relevant officials, including the Under 
        Secretary of State for Democracy and Global Affairs, and the 
        Director of the National Foreign Affairs Training Center of the 
        Foreign Service Institute of the Department of State, shall 
        establish as part of the training provided after December 31, 
        2006, for members of the Service, including all chiefs of 
        mission and deputy chiefs of mission, instruction in how to 
        strengthen and promote democracy through peaceful means in 
        consultation with individuals and nongovernmental organizations 
        that support democratic principles, practices, and values. In 
        particular, such instruction shall be mandatory for members of 
        the Service having reporting or other responsibilities relating 
        to internal political developments and human rights, including 
        religious freedom, in nondemocratic countries or democratic 
        transition countries as categorized in the most recent Annual 
        Report on Democracy as required under section 612(a) of the 
        Advance Democratic Values, Address Nondemocratic Countries, and 
        Enhance Democracy Act of 2005, including for chiefs of mission 
        and deputy chiefs of mission, and shall be completed before the 
        time that such member or chief of mission assumes a post (or, 
        if such is not practical, within the first year of assuming 
        such post).
            ``(2) Contents of training.--The training required under 
        paragraph (1) shall include instruction, a training manual, and 
        other materials regarding the following:
                    ``(A) International documents and United States 
                policy regarding electoral democracy and respect for 
                human rights.
                    ``(B) United States policy regarding the promotion 
                and strengthening of democracy around the world, with 
                particular emphasis on the transition to democracy in 
                nondemocratic countries.
                    ``(C) For any member, chief of mission, or deputy 
                chief of mission who is to be assigned to a foreign 
                country that is categorized as nondemocratic in the 
                Annual Report on Democracy, instruction regarding ways 
                to promote democracy in such country and providing 
                technical, financial, and other support to individuals 
                (including expatriated citizens) and nongovernmental 
                organizations in such country that support democratic 
                principles, practices, and values.
                    ``(D) The protection of internationally recognized 
                human rights (including the protection of religious 
                freedom) and standards related to such rights, 
                provisions of United States law related to such rights, 
                diplomatic tools to promote respect for such rights, 
                the protection of individuals who have fled their 
                countries due to violations of such rights (including 
                the role of United States embassies in providing access 
                to the United States Refugee Admissions Program) and 
                the relationship between respect for such rights and 
                democratic development and national security. The 
                Director of the National Foreign Affairs Training 
                Center of the Foreign Service Institute of the 
                Department of State shall consult with nongovernmental 
                organizations involved in the protection and promotion 
                of such rights and the United States Commission on 
                International Religious Freedom (established under 
                section 201(a) of the International Religious Freedom 
                Act of 1998 (22 U.S.C. 6431(a)) in developing the 
                training required by this subparagraph.''.
    (b) Other Training.--The Secretary of State shall ensure that the 
training described in subsection (a) is provided to members of the 
civil service who are assigned in the United States or abroad who have 
reporting or other responsibilities relating to internal political 
developments and human rights in countries that are categorized as 
democratic transition countries or nondemocratic in the Annual Report 
on Democracy required under section 612(a).
    (c) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated such sums as may be necessary to develop appropriate 
programs and materials to accomplish the training required under 
subsection (c) of section 708 of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 
U.S.C. 4028), as added by subsection (a).
    (d) Clerical Amendments.--Section 708 of the Foreign Service Act of 
1980, as amended by subsection (a), is further amended--
            (1) in subsection (a) by striking ``(a) The'' and inserting 
        ``(a) Training on Human Rights.--The''; and
            (2) in subsection (b) by striking ``(b) The'' and inserting 
        ``(b) Training on Refugee Law and Religious Persecution.--
        The''.

SEC. 619. PERFORMANCE PAY; PROMOTIONS; FOREIGN SERVICE AWARDS.

    (a) Performance Pay.--Section 405(d) of the Foreign Service Act of 
1980 (22 U.S.C. 3965(d)) is amended by inserting after the second 
sentence the following new sentence: ``Meritorious or distinguished 
service in the promotion of democracy in foreign countries, including 
contact with and support of individuals and nongovernmental 
organizations that promote democracy in a foreign country categorized 
as nondemocratic in the most recent Annual Report on Democracy (as 
required under section 612(a) of the Advance Democratic Values, Address 
Nondemocratic Countries, and Enhance Democracy Act of 2005), shall also 
serve as a basis for granting awards under this section.''.
    (b) Promotions.--Section 603(b) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 
(22 U.S.C. 4003(b)) is amended by adding at the end the following new 
sentence: ``Precepts for selection boards shall also, where applicable, 
include an evaluation of whether members of the Service and members of 
the Senior Foreign Service have met the standards of performance 
established by the Secretary pursuant to section 619(c) of the Advance 
Democratic Values, Address Nondemocratic Countries, and Enhance 
Democracy Act of 2005, or have served in a position in which the 
primary responsibility is to monitor or promote democracy or human 
rights.''.
    (c) Regulations and Evaluations Concerning Standards of Performance 
and Programs to Promote Democracy.--With respect to members of the 
Foreign Service, including all chiefs of mission, who are assigned to 
foreign countries categorized as nondemocratic in the most recent 
Annual Report on Democracy, the Secretary shall prescribe regulations 
concerning the standards of performance to be met under sections 405(d) 
and 603(b) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 3965(d) and 
4003(b)), as amended by subsections (a) and (b), respectively, and the 
development of programs to promote democracy in foreign countries under 
section 617. The requirements of sections 617 and 618(a) shall serve as 
one of the bases for performance criteria in evaluating chiefs of 
mission and those officers serving in a position in which the primary 
responsibility is to monitor or promote democracy or human rights.
    (d) Foreign Service Awards.--Section 614 of the Foreign Service Act 
of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 4013) is amended by adding at the end the following 
new sentence: ``Distinguished or meritorious service in the promotion 
of democracy in foreign countries, including contact with and support 
of individuals and nongovernmental organizations that promote democracy 
in a foreign country categorized as nondemocratic in the most recent 
Annual Report on Democracy (as required under section 612(a) of the 
Advance Democratic Values, Address Nondemocratic Countries, and Enhance 
Democracy Act of 2005), shall also serve as a basis for granting awards 
under this section.''.

SEC. 620. APPOINTMENTS.

    (a) Chiefs of Mission.--Section 304(a)(1) of the Foreign Service 
Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 3944(a)(1)) is amended by adding at the end the 
following new sentence: ``If the country in which the individual is to 
serve is categorized as nondemocratic in the most recent Annual Report 
on Democracy (as required under section 612(a) of the Advance 
Democratic Values, Address Nondemocratic Countries, and Enhance 
Democracy Act of 2005), the individual should possess clearly 
demonstrated competence in and commitment to the promotion of democracy 
in such country, including competence in promoting democratic 
principles, practices, and values through regular interaction with 
individuals, including students and young people within such country, 
who support and advocate such principles, practices, and values.''.
    (b) Report to Congress.--Section 304(b) of such Act (22 U.S.C. 
3944(b)) is amended by adding at the end the following new paragraph:
            ``(3) If an individual (with respect to section 302(a)) or 
        a member of the Service (with respect to section 302(b)) is 
        nominated by the President to be a chief of mission in a 
        country categorized as nondemocratic in an Annual Report on 
        Democracy (required under section 612(a) of the Advance 
        Democratic Values, Address Nondemocratic Countries, and Enhance 
        Democracy Act of 2005), and if such individual or such member 
        has previously served as chief of mission in a country that was 
        so categorized, the President shall, at the time of nomination, 
        submit to the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate a 
        written report summarizing the actions that such individual or 
        member took during the period of such prior service to promote 
        democracy and human rights in such country, including actions 
        in furtherance of the strategy contained in such report.''.

         Subtitle B--Alliances With Other Democratic Countries

SEC. 631. ALLIANCES WITH OTHER DEMOCRATIC COUNTRIES.

    (a) Finding.--Congress finds that it is in the national interest of 
the United States, including for humanitarian, economic, social, 
political, and security reasons, to forge alliances with democratic 
countries to work together to promote and protect--
            (1) shared democratic principles, practices, and values; 
        and
            (2) political, social, and economic freedoms around the 
        world.
    (b) Purposes.--The purposes of this subtitle are to encourage new 
ways of forging alliances with democratic countries in order to--
            (1) promote and protect democratic principles, practices, 
        and values, including the right to free, fair, and open 
        elections, secret balloting, and universal suffrage;
            (2) promote and protect fundamental shared political, 
        social, and economic freedoms, including the freedoms of 
        association, of expression, of the press, of religion, and to 
        own private property;
            (3) promote and protect respect for the rule of law;
            (4) develop, adopt, and pursue strategies to advance common 
        interests in international organizations and multilateral 
        institutions to which members of the alliance of democratic 
        countries belong; and
            (5) provide political, economic, and other necessary 
        support to countries that are undergoing a transition to 
        democracy.
    (c) Sense of Congress Regarding Participation.--It is the sense of 
Congress that any foreign country that is categorized as nondemocratic 
in the most recent Annual Report on Democracy under section 612(a) 
should not participate in any alliance of democratic countries aimed at 
working together to promote democracy.

SEC. 632. SENSE OF CONGRESS REGARDING THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A DEMOCRACY 
              CAUCUS.

    (a) Findings.--Congress finds that with the passage of the 
Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 (Public Law 
108-458), Congress--
            (1) encouraged the establishment of a Democracy Caucus 
        within the United Nations, the United Nations Human Rights 
        Commission, the United Nations Conference on Disarmament, and 
        at other broad-based international organizations; and
            (2) required increased training in multilateral diplomacy 
        for members of the Foreign Service and appropriate members of 
        the Civil Service to support such an establishment.
    (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that the 
creation of a Democracy Caucus in each international organization and 
multilateral institution of which the United States is a member will 
not only improve the internal governance of such organizations but will 
also strengthen the implementation of commitments by such organizations 
and institutions regarding democracy and human rights.

SEC. 633. ANNUAL DIPLOMATIC MISSIONS ON MULTILATERAL ISSUES.

    The Secretary of State, acting through the principal officers 
responsible for advising the Secretary on international organizations, 
should ensure that a high level delegation from the United States is 
sent on an annual basis to consult with key foreign governments in 
every region to promote United States policies, including issues 
related to democracy and human rights, at key international fora, 
including the United Nations General Assembly, the United Nations Human 
Rights Commission or other multilateral human rights body, the 
Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, and the United 
Nations Education, Science, and Cultural Organization.

SEC. 634. STRENGTHENING THE COMMUNITY OF DEMOCRACIES.

    (a) Formal Mechanisms for the Community of Democracies.--It is the 
sense of Congress that the Community of Democracies should develop a 
more formal mechanism for carrying out work between ministerial 
meetings, including hiring appropriate staff to carry out such work, 
and should, as appropriate, establish a headquarters.
    (b) Detail of Personnel.--The Secretary is authorized to detail on 
a nonreimbursable basis any employee of the Department of State to any 
country that is a member of the Convening Group of the Community of 
Democracies.
    (c) Regional Group in the Community of Democracies.--It is the 
sense of Congress that regional groups within the Community of 
Democracies should be established and strengthened in order to 
facilitate coordination of common positions and action on multilateral 
strategies to promote and consolidate democracy.
    (d) International Center for Democratic Transition.--
            (1) Sense of congress.--It is the sense of Congress that 
        the United States should, along with contributions from private 
        individuals, support the initiative of the Government of 
        Hungary and the governments of other European countries to 
        establish a International Center for Democratic Transition to 
        support transitions to full democracy.
            (2) Authorization of appropriations.--There is authorized 
        to be appropriated for a grant to the International Center for 
        Democratic Transition $1,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2006, 
        2007, and 2008. Amounts appropriated under this paragraph shall 
        remain available until expended.
            (3) Use of funds.--Any grant made in fiscal year 2006 by 
        the Secretary to the International Center for Democratic 
        Transition under paragraph (2) may be used for the 
        establishment and operation of the Center and for programs and 
        activities of the Center. Any grant or voluntary contribution 
        made in any subsequent fiscal year by the Secretary to the 
        Center under such paragraph may be used for programs and 
        activities of the Center.

             Subtitle C--Funding for Promotion of Democracy

SEC. 641. POLICY.

    It shall be the policy of the United States to provide financial 
assistance to eligible entities and eligible individuals in order to 
assist such entities and individuals in the promotion of democracy in 
countries categorized as nondemocratic in the most recent Annual Report 
on Democracy under section 612(a).

SEC. 642. HUMAN RIGHTS AND DEMOCRACY FUND.

    (a) Purposes of the Human Rights and Democracy Fund.--In addition 
to uses currently approved for the Human Rights and Democracy Fund, the 
Secretary of State, acting through the Assistant Secretary of State for 
Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor shall use amounts appropriated to 
the Human Rights and Democracy Fund under subsection (e) to provide 
assistance to eligible entities and eligible individuals to promote 
democracy in foreign countries categorized as nondemocratic in the most 
recent Annual Report on Democracy under section 612(a). The promotion 
of democracy in such countries for which such assistance may be 
provided may include the following activities:
            (1) The publication and distribution of books and the 
        creation and distribution of other media relating to 
        information about current events in such country and 
        educational programming designed to provide information 
        regarding democracy, the rule of law, free, fair and open 
        elections, free market economics, fundamental human rights 
        (including the rights of freedom of speech and of religion and 
        the rights to be free from slavery and bondage), and successful 
        democratic movements in history, including educational programs 
        for leaders and members of democratic movements to convey 
        information to such individuals regarding the means of 
        nonviolent force and the methods of nonviolent action.
            (2) The translation into languages spoken in such countries 
        of relevant programming and existing books, videos, and other 
        publications relating to the subjects specified in paragraph 
        (1).
            (3) The promotion of political pluralism and the rule of 
        law within such countries, including the promotion of 
        nongovernmental organizations and movements that promote 
        democratic principles, practices, and values.
            (4) The creation of programs for student groups to work 
        with citizens of such countries who are committed to democratic 
        reforms and to the promotion of a transition to democracy.
            (5) The creation of training programs for citizens of such 
        countries concerning international legal obligations to support 
        democracy and human rights, including religious freedom.
            (6) Support for nongovernmental organizations which have 
        experience with the Community of Democracies to assist the 
        Community of Democracies and its Convening Group.
    (b) Freedom Investment Act of 2002.--Section 664(b) of the Freedom 
Investment Act of 2002 (subtitle E of title VI of Public Law 107-228; 
relating to the purposes of the Human Rights and Democracy Fund) is 
amended--
            (1) in paragraph (4), by striking ``and'' at the end;
            (2) by redesignating paragraph (5) as paragraph (6);
            (3) by inserting after paragraph (4) the following new 
        paragraph:
            ``(5) to support the study of democracy abroad, including 
        support for debates and discussions at academic institutions, 
        regarding the values and benefits of democracy; and''; and
            (4) in paragraph (6), as redesignated by paragraph (2) of 
        this subsection, by striking ``(4)'' and inserting ``(5)''.
    (c) Administrative Authorities.--Assistance provided through the 
Human Rights and Democracy Fund may be provided to eligible entities 
and eligible individuals in foreign countries notwithstanding any 
provision of law that prohibits assistance to a foreign country or to a 
government of a foreign country.
    (d) Annual Report on the Status of the Human Rights and Democracy 
Fund.--Not later than 60 days after the conclusion of each fiscal year, 
the Assistant Secretary of State for Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor 
shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees an annual 
report on the status of the Human Rights and Democracy Fund. Each such 
annual report shall contain the following information:
            (1) An identification of each eligible entity and eligible 
        individual who received assistance during the previous fiscal 
        year under subsection (b) and a summary of the activities of 
        each such recipient.
            (2) An account of projects funded and outside contributions 
        received during the previous fiscal year.
            (3) A balance sheet of income and outlays current as of the 
        conclusion of the fiscal year to which such report is relevant.
    (e) Authorization of Appropriations.--
            (1) In general.--Of the funds available to carry out 
        chapter 4 of Part II of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 for 
        each of fiscal years 2006 and 2007, there are authorized to be 
        appropriated to the Human Rights and Democracy Fund to carry 
        out the purposes of this section $50,000,000 for fiscal year 
        2006 and $60,000,000 for fiscal year 2007. Amounts appropriated 
        under this section shall remain available until expended.
            (2) Administrative expenses.--Not more than five percent of 
        amounts appropriated to the Human Rights and Democracy Fund for 
        each fiscal year may be applied toward administrative expenses 
        associated with carrying out this section.
            (3) Contributions.--The Secretary may accept contributions 
        to the Human Rights and Democracy Fund from the governments of 
        other democratic countries, private foundations, private 
        citizens, and other nongovernmental sources.

                    Subtitle D--Presidential Actions

SEC. 651. INVESTIGATION OF VIOLATIONS OF INTERNATIONAL HUMANITARIAN 
              LAW.

    (a) In General.--The President, with the assistance of the 
Secretary of State, the Under Secretary of State for Democracy and 
Global Affairs, and the Ambassador-at-Large for War Crimes Issues, 
shall collect information regarding incidents that may constitute 
crimes against humanity, genocide, slavery, or other violations of 
international humanitarian law by leaders or other government officials 
of foreign countries categorized as nondemocratic or as democratic 
transition countries in the most recent Annual Report on Democracy 
under section 612(a).
    (b) Accountability.--The President shall consider what actions can 
be taken to ensure that such leaders or other government officials of 
foreign countries who are identified in accordance with subsection (a) 
as responsible for crimes against humanity, genocide, slavery, or other 
violations of international humanitarian law are brought to account for 
such crimes in an appropriately constituted tribunal.

SEC. 652. PRESIDENTIAL COMMUNICATIONS.

    (a) Finding.--Congress finds that direct communications from the 
President to citizens of countries that are categorized as 
nondemocratic in the most recent Annual Report on Democracy would be 
extremely beneficial to demonstrate that the United States supports 
such citizens and the efforts and actions of such citizens to promote 
and achieve transition to democracy in such countries.
    (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that--
            (1) from time to time as the President shall determine 
        appropriate, the President should broadcast a message to the 
        citizens of countries categorized as nondemocratic in the most 
        recent Annual Report on Democracy under section 612(a) 
        expressing the support of the United States for such citizens, 
        discussing democratic principles, practices, and values, and 
        political, social, and economic freedoms, and condemning 
        violations of internationally recognized human rights (as such 
        term is described in section 116(a) of the Foreign Assistance 
        Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2151n(a))), violations of religious 
        freedom, including particularly severe violations of religious 
        freedom (as such terms are defined in paragraphs (11) and (13) 
        of section 3 of the International Religious Freedom Act of 1998 
        (22 U.S.C. 6402)), political repression, and government-
        tolerated or condoned trafficking in persons that occur in such 
        country; and
            (2) the President should encourage leaders of other 
        democratic countries to make similar broadcasts.

TITLE VII--STRATEGIC EXPORT CONTROL AND SECURITY ASSISTANCE ACT OF 2005

                     Subtitle A--General Provisions

SEC. 701. SHORT TITLE.

    This title may be cited as the ``Strategic Export Control and 
Security Assistance Act of 2005''.

SEC. 702. DEFINITIONS.

    In this title:
            (1) Appropriate congressional committees.--The term 
        ``appropriate congressional committees'' means--
                    (A) the Committee on International Relations and 
                the Committee on Armed Services of the House of 
                Representatives; and
                    (B) the Committee on Foreign Relations and the 
                Committee on Armed Services of the Senate.
            (2) Defense articles and defense services.--The term 
        ``defense articles and defense services'' has the meaning given 
        the term in section 47(7) of the Arms Export Control Act (22 
        U.S.C. 2794 note).
            (3) Dual use.--The term ``dual use'' means, with respect to 
        goods or technology, those goods or technology that are 
        specifically designed or developed for civil purposes but which 
        also may be used or deployed in a military or proliferation 
        mode. Such term does not include purely commercial items.
            (4) Export.--The term ``export'' has the meaning given that 
        term in section 120.17 of the International Traffic in Arms 
        Regulations, and includes re-exports, transfers, and re-
        transfers by any means.
            (5) Export administration regulations.--The term ``Export 
        Administration Regulations'' means those regulations contained 
        in sections 730 through 774 of title 15, Code of Federal 
        Regulations (or successor regulations).
            (6) Foreign government.--The term ``foreign government'' 
        has the meaning given the term in section 38(g)(9)(B) of the 
        Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2778(g)(9)(B)).
            (7) Foreign person.--The term ``foreign person'' has the 
        meaning given the term in section 38(g)(9)(C) of the Arms 
        Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2778(g)(9)(C)).
            (8) Good.--The term ``good'' has the meaning given the term 
        in section 16(3) of the Export Administration Act of 1979 (50 
        U.S.C. App. 2415(3)).
            (9) International traffic in arms regulations.--The term 
        ``International Traffic in Arms Regulations'' means those 
        regulations contained in sections 120 through 130 of title 22, 
        Code of Federal Regulations (or successor regulations).
            (10) Item.--The term ``item'' means any good or technology, 
        defense article or defense service subject to the export 
        jurisdiction of the United States under law or regulation.
            (11) License.--The term ``license'' means an official 
        written document of the United States Government issued 
        pursuant to the Export Administration Regulations or the 
        International Traffic in Arms Regulations, as the case may be, 
        authorizing a specific export.
            (12) Missile technology control regime; mtcr.--The term 
        ``Missile Technology Control Regime'' or ``MTCR'' has the 
        meaning given the term in section 11B(c)(2) of the Export 
        Administration Act of 1979 (50 U.S.C. App. 2401b(c)(2)).
            (13) Missile technology control regime annex; mtcr annex.--
        The term ``Missile Technology Control Regime Annex'' or ``MTCR 
        Annex'' has the meaning given the term in section 11B(c)(4) of 
        the Export Administration Act of 1979 (50 U.S.C. App. 
        2401b(c)(4)).
            (14) Person.--The term ``person'' has the meaning given the 
        term in section 38(g)(9)(E) of the Arms Export Control Act (22 
        U.S.C. 2778(g)(9)(E)).
            (15) Strategic export control.--The term ``strategic export 
        control'' means the control of items subject to the export 
        jurisdiction of the United States pursuant to the International 
        Traffic in Arms Regulations or the Export Administration 
        Regulations.
            (16) Technology.--The term ``technology'' has the meaning 
        given the term in section 16(4) of the Export Administration 
        Act of 1979 (50 U.S.C. App. 2415(4)).
            (17) United states munitions list.--The term ``United 
        States Munitions List'' means the list referred to in section 
        38(a)(1) of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2778(a)(1)).

SEC. 703. DECLARATION OF POLICY.

    Congress declares that, at a time of evolving threats and changing 
relationships with other countries, United States strategic export 
controls are in urgent need of a comprehensive review in order to 
assure such controls are achieving their intended purposes of 
protecting the national security interests of the United States in the 
Global War on Terrorism and of promoting the foreign policy purposes of 
the United States, in particular by assuring that--
            (1) export license procedures are properly designed to 
        prioritize readily which exports may be approved quickly for 
        United States friends and allies and which require greater 
        scrutiny in order to safeguard national interests;
            (2) technology related to the military superiority of the 
        United States Armed Forces is safeguarded during and after 
        export to a high level of confidence; and
            (3) overlapping and duplicative functions among the 
        responsible departments and agencies of the Government of the 
        United States are consolidated and integrated wherever 
        appropriate in order to enhance efficiency, information 
        sharing, and the consistent execution of United States policy.

    Subtitle B--Revising and Strengthening Strategic Export Control 
                                Policies

SEC. 711. AMENDMENTS TO THE STATE DEPARTMENT BASIC AUTHORITIES ACT OF 
              1956.

    (a) Under Secretary for Arms Control and International Security.--
Section 1(b)(2) of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 
(22 U.S.C. 2651a(b)(2)) is amended--
            (1) in the first sentence, by striking ``There'' and 
        inserting the following:
                    ``(A) In general.--There''; and
            (2) by adding at the end the following new subparagraph:
                    ``(B) Duties.--The Under Secretary for Arms Control 
                and International Security shall be responsible for--
                            ``(i) coordinating and executing a United 
                        States strategy for strengthening multilateral 
                        export controls;
                            ``(ii) coordinating the activities of all 
                        bureaus and offices of the Department of State 
                        that have responsibility for export control 
                        policy, licensing, or assistance; and
                            ``(iii) serving as the chairperson of the 
                        Strategic Export Control Board established 
                        under section 712 of the Strategic Export 
                        Control and Security Assistance Act of 2005.''.
    (b) Deputy Under Secretary for Strategic Export Control.--Section 
1(b)(2) of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (22 
U.S.C. 2651a(b)(2)), as amended by subsection (a), is further amended 
by adding at the end the following new subparagraph:
                    ``(C) Deputy under secretary for strategic export 
                control.--There shall be in the Department of State a 
                Deputy Under Secretary for Strategic Export Control who 
                shall have primary responsibility to assist the Under 
                Secretary for Arms Control and International Security 
                in carrying out the responsibility of the Under 
                Secretary described in subparagraph (B)(iii).''.
    (c) Defense Trade Controls Registration Fees.--Section 45 of the 
State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 2717) is 
amended--
            (1) in paragraph (2), by striking ``and'' at the end;
            (2) in paragraph (3), by striking the period at the end and 
        inserting ``; and''; and
            (3) by adding at the end the following new paragraph:
            ``(4) functions of the Strategic Export Control Board 
        established under section 712 of the Strategic Export Control 
        and Security Assistance Act of 2005.''.

SEC. 712. STRATEGIC EXPORT CONTROL BOARD.

    (a) Establishment.--There is established a Strategic Export Control 
Board (in this section referred to as the ``Board''). The Board shall 
consist of representatives from the Department of Commerce, the 
Department of Defense, the Department of Homeland Security, the 
Department of Justice, the National Security Council, the intelligence 
community (as defined in section 3(4) of the National Security Act of 
1947 (50 U.S.C. 401a(4)), and other appropriate departments and 
agencies of the Government of the United States, and the Under 
Secretary for Arms Control and International Security of the Department 
of State. The Under Secretary for Arms Control and International 
Security shall serve as the chairperson of the Board.
    (b) Functions.--The Board shall--
            (1) conduct a comprehensive review of United States 
        strategic export controls in the context of the Global War on 
        Terrorism in order to strengthen controls by regulation, where 
        appropriate, and to formulate legislative proposals for any new 
        authorities that are needed for counter-terrorism purposes;
            (2) develop a strategy for ensuring a high level of 
        confidence in the export control of any items important to the 
        current and future military superiority of the United States 
        Armed Forces, including in particular the security of sensitive 
        software through the use of tamper-resistant security software 
        and other emerging technologies;
            (3) design standards and best practices for information 
        assurance and protection for the robust information technology 
        systems, such as virtual private networks, already utilized by 
        United States defense firms in the conduct of their export 
        control regulated activities with foreign partners, which can 
        also gain the support of United States friends and allies;
            (4) formulate, with the assistance of the United States 
        defense industry and the support of United States friends and 
        allies, an automated international delivery confirmation system 
        for commercial shipments of lethal and other high risk items in 
        order to afford improved protection against attempts to disrupt 
        international supply chains or to divert sensitive items to 
        gray arms markets;
            (5) prepare recommendations for the President and Congress, 
        as appropriate, with respect to--
                    (A) the consolidation of overlapping or duplicative 
                functions among the responsible departments and 
                agencies of the Government of the United States in such 
                areas as enforcement, end use monitoring, export 
                licensing, watch lists, and related areas;
                    (B) the cost-savings associated with integration of 
                export licensing staffs and the promulgation of 
                integrated export control regulations; and
                    (C) the resultant rationalization of budgetary 
                resources to be authorized among the responsible 
                departments and agencies of the United States 
                Government;
            (6) establish the necessary departmental and inter-agency 
        controls that will ensure legitimate exports by United States 
        business organizations can be readily identified and generally 
        approved within 10 days, but no later than 30 days in more 
        complex cases, except in unusual circumstances, such as those 
        requiring congressional notification or foreign government 
        assurances;
            (7) review and revise, where appropriate, plans for 
        modernizing information technology systems of the relevant 
        departments and agencies of the Government of the United States 
        involved in export licensing, export enforcement, and screening 
        of involved private parties to ensure efficient, reliable, and 
        secure intra-governmental networks, at the earliest practicable 
        date among the relevant departments and agencies and United 
        States exporters; and
            (8) develop a strategy for strengthening the multilateral 
        control regimes or developing new regimes, as appropriate, to 
        augment or supplement existing international arrangements.
    (c) Report by Comptroller General.--Not later than one year, two 
years, and three years after the date of the enactment of this Act, the 
Comptroller General of the United States shall submit to the 
appropriate congressional committees a report that contains--
            (1) an independent assessment of progress made by the Board 
        in carrying out its functions under paragraphs (1) through (8) 
        of subsection (b);
            (2) the budgetary impact of each of the recommendations 
        prepared under subsection (b)(5) and any additional 
        recommendations prepared by the Comptroller General and the 
        budgetary impact of such recommendations; and
            (3) a certification as to whether the Comptroller General 
        had access to sufficient information to enable the Comptroller 
        General to make informed judgments on the matters covered by 
        the report.

SEC. 713. AUTHORIZATION FOR ADDITIONAL LICENSE AND COMPLIANCE OFFICERS.

    (a) Funding.--Of the amounts authorized to be appropriated under 
section 101 of this Act, up to $13,000,000 shall be available for each 
of the fiscal years 2006 and 2007 for salaries and expenses related to 
the assignment of additional full time license and compliance officers 
in the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls of the Department of 
State.
    (b) Notification.--None of the funds authorized under subsection 
(a) may be made available until 15 days after the date on which the 
Secretary of State submits a written report to the congressional 
committees specified in section 634A(a) of the Foreign Assistance Act 
of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2394-1(a)) in accordance with the procedures 
applicable to reprogramming notifications under such section, which 
sets forth the plans and timetable of the Department of State for 
measurable improvements in the quality and timeliness of the service it 
provides in support of United States Armed Forces abroad and routine 
exports by United States business organizations, as well as for the 
elaboration of enhanced compliance measures appropriate to the 
heightened security environment for arms exports during the Global War 
on Terrorism.

           Subtitle C--Procedures Relating to Export Licenses

SEC. 721. TRANSPARENCY OF JURISDICTIONAL DETERMINATIONS.

    (a) Declaration of Policy.--Congress declares that the complete 
confidentiality surrounding several thousand commodity classification 
determinations made each year by the Department of Commerce pursuant to 
the Export Administration Regulations and several hundred commodity 
jurisdiction determinations made each year by the Department of State 
pursuant to the International Traffic in Arms Regulations is not 
necessary to protect legitimate proprietary interests of persons or 
their prices and customers, is not in the best interests of the 
security and foreign policy interests of the United States, is 
inconsistent with the need to ensure a level playing field for United 
States exporters, and detracts from United States efforts to promote 
greater transparency and responsibility by other countries in their 
export control systems.
    (b) Publication Requirement.--The Secretary of Commerce and the 
Secretary of State shall--
            (1) upon making a commodity classification determination or 
        a commodity jurisdiction classification, as the case may be, 
        referred to in subsection (a) in response to a request by a 
        private person, publish in the Federal Register, not later than 
        30 days after the date of the determination--
                    (A) a description of the item, including 
                performance levels or other technical characteristics 
                where appropriate;
                    (B) an explanation of whether the item is 
                controlled under the International Traffic in Arms 
                Regulations or the Export Administration Regulations; 
                and
                    (C) the United States Munitions List designation or 
                export control classification number under which the 
                item has been designated or classified, as the case may 
                be,
        except that the name of the name of the person, the person's 
        business organization, customers, or prices are not required to 
        be published; and
            (2) maintain on their respective Internet websites an 
        archive, that is accessible to the general public and other 
        departments and agencies of the United States, of the 
        determinations published in the Federal Register under 
        paragraph (1).
    (c) Report.--Not later than 120 days after the date of the 
enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State and the Secretary of 
Commerce shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees a 
joint report that contains a description of the plans to implement the 
requirements of this section.
    (d) Requirement.--Notwithstanding any other provision of law, 
beginning 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the 
Secretary of Commerce may make a commodity classification determination 
referred to in subsection (a), and the Secretary of State may make a 
commodity jurisdiction determination referred to in subsection (a), in 
response to a request by a private person only in accordance with the 
requirements of subsection (b).

SEC. 722. CERTIFICATIONS RELATING TO EXPORT OF CERTAIN DEFENSE ARTICLES 
              AND DEFENSE SERVICES.

    (a) Reports on Commercial and Governmental Military Exports; 
Congressional Action.--Section 36(c) of the Arms Export Control Act (22 
U.S.C. 2776(c)) is amended--
            (1) in the first sentence of paragraph (1), by inserting 
        after ``$1,000,000 or more'' the following: ``, or, 
        notwithstanding section 27(g) of this Act, for any special 
        comprehensive authorization under sections 120-130 of title 22, 
        Code of Federal Regulations (commonly known as the 
        `International Traffic in Arms Regulations') for the export of 
        defense articles or defense services in an aggregate amount of 
        $100,000,000 or more'';
            (2) in paragraph (2)--
                    (A) in subparagraph (A), by adding ``and'' at the 
                end;
                    (B) by striking subparagraph (B); and
                    (C) by redesignating subparagraph (C) as 
                subparagraph (B); and
            (3) in the matter preceding subparagraph (A) of paragraph 
        (5), by inserting ``or paragraph (2)'' after ``paragraph (1)''.
    (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that the 
Department of State should revise its procedures in order to improve 
the timeliness and quality of service it is providing to United States 
exporters concerning matters requiring notification to Congress under 
sections 3 and 36 of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2753 and 
2776) by--
            (1) expediting its internal and interagency processes such 
        that consultations with the Committee on International 
        Relations of the House of Representatives and the Committee on 
        Foreign Relations of the Senate commence not later than 30 days 
        following receipt of a proposal requiring notification;
            (2) providing informal notice to such Committees within 10 
        days of receipt of such a proposal, such that questions by the 
        Committees may be addressed wherever feasible in conjunction 
        with the Department's processing; and
            (3) making each interval in the processing of the proposal 
        transparent to United States exporters through the Internet 
        website of the Department.

SEC. 723. PRIORITY FOR UNITED STATES MILITARY OPERATIONS.

    The Secretary of State may not accord higher priority in the 
adjudication of munitions export licenses to any measure included 
within the ``Defense Trade Security Initiative'' announced by the 
Department of State in May 2000 over the processing of licenses in 
support of Operation Enduring Freedom, Operation Iraqi Freedom, or any 
other military operation involving the United States Armed Forces.

SEC. 724. LICENSE OFFICER STAFFING AND WORKLOAD.

    Section 36(a) Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2776(a)) is 
amended--
            (1) in paragraph (11), by striking ``and'' at the end;
            (2) in paragraph (12), by striking the period at the end 
        and inserting ``; and''; and
            (3) by adding at the end the following new paragraph:
            ``(13) a report on the number of civilian and military 
        officers assigned to munitions export licensing at the 
        Department of State and their average weekly workload for both 
        open and closed cases.''.

SEC. 725. DATABASE OF UNITED STATES MILITARY ASSISTANCE.

    Section 655 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2415) 
is amended by striking subsection (c) and inserting the following new 
subsection:
    ``(c) Availability of Report Information on the Internet.--
            ``(1) Requirement for database.--The Secretary of State, in 
        consultation with the Secretary of Defense, shall make 
        available to the public the unclassified portion of each such 
        report in the form of a database that is available via the 
        Internet and that may be searched by various criteria.
            ``(2) Schedule for updating.--Not later than April 1 of 
        each year, the Secretary of State shall make available in the 
        database the information contained in the annual report for the 
        fiscal year ending the previous September 30.''.

SEC. 726. TRAINING AND LIAISON FOR SMALL BUSINESSES.

    (a) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that it is 
increasingly important that the Secretary of State, in administering 
the licensing, registration, compliance, and other authorities 
contained in section 38 of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 
2778), should provide up-to-date training and other educational 
assistance to small businesses in the United States aerospace and 
defense industrial sector.
    (b) Small Business Liaison.--Not later than 180 days after the date 
of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall designate, within the 
Office of Defense Trade Controls of the Department of State, a 
coordinator for small business affairs. The coordinator shall serve as 
a liaison for small businesses in the United States aerospace and 
defense industrial sector with respect to licensing and registration 
requirements in order to facilitate the compliance and other forms of 
participation by such small businesses in the United States munitions 
control system, including by providing training, technical assistance, 
and through other efforts as may be appropriate.

SEC. 727. COMMERCIAL COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE TECHNICAL DATA.

    Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this 
Act, the Secretary of State, in consultation with the Secretary of 
Defense, shall amend the International Traffic in Arms Regulations to 
provide for the export without a license of communications satellite 
technical data, at a level established by the Secretary of Defense, in 
instances in which--
            (1) the exporter is a person registered under section 38(b) 
        of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2778(b));
            (2) the purpose of the export is to market a sale of a 
        United States manufactured communications satellite solely for 
        commercial or civil end use;
            (3) no party to the transaction is proscribed under section 
        126.1 of the Regulations or otherwise restricted from receiving 
        United States defense articles; and
            (4) each end user or recipient has agreed in writing not to 
        reexport or retransfer the United States furnished technical 
        data to any other person without the prior written consent of 
        the United States Government.

SEC. 728. REPORTING REQUIREMENT FOR UNLICENSED EXPORTS.

    Section 655(b) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 
2415(b)) is amended--
            (1) in paragraph (2), by striking ``or'' at the end;
            (2) in paragraph (3), by striking the period at the end and 
        inserting ``; or''; and
            (3) by adding at the end the following:
            ``(4) were exported without a license under section 38 of 
        the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2778) pursuant to an 
        exemption established under the International Traffic in Arms 
        Regulations, other than defense articles exported in 
        furtherance of a letter of offer and acceptance under the 
        Foreign Military Sales program or a technical assistance or 
        manufacturing license agreement, including the specific 
        exemption provision in the regulation under which the export 
        was made.''.

    Subtitle D--Terrorist-Related Provisions and Enforcement Matters

SEC. 731. SENSITIVE TECHNOLOGY TRANSFERS TO FOREIGN PERSONS LOCATED 
              WITHIN THE UNITED STATES.

    (a) Weapons Transfers.--Pursuant to regulations issued under 
section 38(g)(6) of the Arms Export Control (22 U.S.C. 2778(g)(6)), the 
President shall require a license for the transfer of any defense 
articles and defense services, other than a firearm for personal use, 
specified in a report required under subsection (c) to a foreign person 
located within the United States (other than to a foreign government, 
unless such government is proscribed under section 126.1 of the 
International Traffic in Arms Regulations or otherwise restricted from 
receiving defense articles and defense services).
    (b) Dual Use Transfers.--Notwithstanding any other provision of 
law, the President may require a license under the Export 
Administration Regulations for the transfer of any dual use goods and 
technology, other than a firearm for personal use, specified in a 
report required under subsection (c) to a foreign person located within 
the United States.
    (c) Report.--Not later than 180 days after the date of the 
enactment of this Act, and annually thereafter, the Secretary of State, 
in consultation with the Attorney General and the Secretary of Homeland 
Security, shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees a 
report that specifies those items which warrant scrutiny and 
enforcement by the Government of the United States through license 
procedures prior to a transfer to a foreign person located within the 
United States in order to deter efforts on the part of such person to 
acquire such items for terrorist or other unlawful purposes.

SEC. 732. CERTIFICATION CONCERNING EXEMPT WEAPONS TRANSFERS ALONG THE 
              NORTHERN BORDER OF THE UNITED STATES.

    Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this 
Act, and annually thereafter, the Secretary of State, in consultation 
with the Secretary of Homeland Security, shall submit to the 
appropriate congressional committees a written report certifying that--
            (1) provisions of the International Traffic in Arms 
        Regulations permitting unlicensed temporary imports into the 
        United States from Canada by any person of any unclassified 
        defense article on the United States Munitions List do not 
        present a risk to the national security of the United States; 
        and
            (2) personnel of the Bureau of Customs and Border 
        Protection of the Department of Homeland Security located along 
        the northern border of the United States have adequate written 
        guidance from the Department of State which permits them to 
        effectively enforce provisions of the International Traffic in 
        Arms Regulations permitting unlicensed exports to Canada of 
        certain items on the United States Munitions List.

SEC. 733. COMPREHENSIVE NATURE OF UNITED STATES ARMS EMBARGOES.

    (a) Findings; Sense of Congress.--
            (1) Findings.--Congress finds that--
                    (A) governments to which the Government of the 
                United States prohibits by law or policy the transfer 
                of implements of war, including material, components, 
                parts, and other defense articles and defense services 
                (as defined in paragraphs (3) and (4) of section 47 of 
                the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2794(3) and 
                (4)), respectively) continue to seek to evade these 
                embargoes through increasingly sophisticated illegal 
                acquisitions via the ``international gray arms market'' 
                and by seeking to exploit weaknesses in the export 
                control system of the United States and its friends and 
                allies; and
                    (B) the strict and comprehensive application of 
                arms embargoes referred to in subparagraph (A), 
                including those embargoes established by the United 
                Nations Security Council, is of fundamental importance 
                to the security and foreign policy interests of the 
                United States.
            (2) Sense of congress.--It is the sense of Congress that 
        the United States Government should continue to provide a 
        leadership role internationally in ensuring the effectiveness 
        of arms embargoes referred to in paragraph (1).
    (b) Scope of Embargoes.--Section 38 of the Arms Export Control Act 
(22 U.S.C. 2778) is amended by adding at the end the following:
    ``(k) Whenever the United States maintains an arms embargo pursuant 
to United States law, or through public notice by the President or 
Secretary of State pursuant to the authorities of this Act, no defense 
article or defense service subject to sections 120-130 of title 22, 
Code of Federal Regulations (commonly known as the `International 
Traffic in Arms Regulations') and no dual use good or technology 
subject to sections 730-774 of title 15, Code of Federal Regulations 
(commonly known as the `Export Administration Regulations') shall be 
knowingly sold or transferred for military end use to the military, 
intelligence or other security forces of the embargoed government, 
including any associated governmental agency, subdivision, entity, or 
other person acting on their behalf, unless, at a minimum and without 
prejudice to any additional requirements established in United States 
law or regulation, the sale or transfer is approved through issuance of 
a license by the Secretary of State or the Secretary of Commerce, as 
the case may be.''.
    (c) Report.--Not later than 120 days after the date of the 
enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State, in consultation with the 
Secretary of Commerce and the Secretary of Defense, shall submit to the 
appropriate congressional committees a report that describes the 
actions taken to ensure the effective implementation of section 38(k) 
of the Arms Export Control Act, as added by subsection (b).

SEC. 734. CONTROL OF ITEMS ON MISSILE TECHNOLOGY CONTROL REGIME ANNEX.

    (a) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that all 
proposals to export or transfer to foreign persons by other means, 
whether in the United States or abroad, and any other activities 
subject to regulation under section 38, 39, or 40 of the Arms Export 
Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2778, 2779, or 2780), relating to items on the 
Missile Technology Control Regime Annex, should be accorded stringent 
control and scrutiny consistent with the purposes of section 71 of the 
Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2797).
    (b) Control of Items on MTCR Annex.--The Secretary of State, in 
coordination with the Secretary of Commerce, the Attorney General, and 
the Secretary of Defense, shall ensure that all items on the MTCR Annex 
are subject to stringent control by the Government of the United States 
pursuant to the International Traffic in Arms Regulations and the 
Export Administration Regulations.
    (c) Certification.--Not later than March 1 of each year, the 
Secretary of State, in coordination with the Secretary of Commerce, the 
Attorney General and the Secretary of Defense, shall submit to the 
appropriate congressional committees a report that contains--
            (1) a certification that the requirement of subsection (b) 
        has been met for the prior year, or if the requirement has not 
        been met, the reasons therefor; and
            (2) a description of the updated coverage, if any, of the 
        regulations referred to in subsection (b) with respect to all 
        items on the MTCR Annex and an explanation of any areas of 
        overlap or omissions, if any, among the regulations.

SEC. 735. UNLAWFUL USE OF UNITED STATES DEFENSE ARTICLES.

    (a) Ineligibility for Terrorist Related Transactions.--Section 
3(c)(1) of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2753(c)(1)) is 
amended--
            (1) in each of subparagraphs (A) and (B), by striking ``or 
        any predecessor Act,'' and inserting ``any predecessor Act, or 
        licensed or approved under section 38 of this Act, to carry out 
        a transaction with a country, the government of which the 
        Secretary of State has determined is a state sponsor of 
        international terrorism for purposes of section 6(j)(1) of the 
        Export Administration Act of 1979 (50 U.S.C. App. 2405(j)(1)), 
        or otherwise uses such defense articles or defense services''; 
        and
            (2) by adding at the end the following:
    ``(C) In this section, the term `transaction' means the taking of 
any action, directly or indirectly, by a foreign country that would be 
a transaction prohibited by section 40 of this Act with respect to the 
United States Government and United States persons.''.
    (b) Reporting Requirement.--Section 3(e) of the Arms Export Control 
Act (22 U.S.C. 2753(e)) is amended by inserting after ``the Foreign 
Assistance Act of 1961,'' the following: ``regardless of whether the 
article or service has been sold or otherwise furnished by the United 
States Government or licensed under section 38 of this Act,''.

SEC. 736. PURPOSES OF ARMS SALES.

    Section 4 of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2754) is 
amended in the first sentence by inserting after ``solely for internal 
security'' the following: ``(including antiterrorism and border 
security)''.

  Subtitle E--Strengthening United States Missile Nonproliferation Law

SEC. 741. PROBATIONARY PERIOD FOR FOREIGN PERSONS.

    (a) In General.--Notwithstanding any other provision of law, upon 
the expiration, or the granting of a waiver, on or after January 1, 
2003, of sanctions against a foreign person imposed under section 73(a) 
of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2797b(a)) or under section 
11B(b)(1) of the Export Administration Act of 1979 (50 U.S.C. App. 
2410b(b)(1)), as continued in effect under the International Emergency 
Economic Powers Act, a license shall be required, for a period of not 
less than three years, for the export to that foreign person of all 
items controlled for export under section 5 or 6 of the Export 
Administration Act of 1979 (50 U.S.C. App. 2404, 2405), as continued in 
effect under the International Emergency Economic Powers Act, in 
accordance with the Export Administration Regulations.
    (b) Termination.--Subsection (a) shall not apply to a foreign 
person 30 days after the President notifies the Committee on 
International Relations of the House of Representatives and the 
Committee on Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs and the Committee on 
Foreign Relations of the Senate that the President has determined 
that--
            (1) the foreign person has--
                    (A) ceased all activity related to the original 
                imposition of sanctions under section 73(a) of the Arms 
                Export Control Act or section 11B(b)(1) of the Export 
                Administration Act of 1979, as the case may be; and
                    (B) has instituted a program of transparency 
                measures under which the United States will be able to 
                verify, for a period of at least 3 years, that the 
                foreign person is not engaging in prohibited activities 
                under those provisions of law referred to in paragraph 
                (1); and
            (2) there has been an appropriate resolution of the 
        original violation or violations, such as financial penalties, 
        incarceration, destruction of prohibited items, or other 
        appropriate measures taken to prevent a recurrence of the 
        violation or violations.
    (c) Waiver.--Subsection (a) shall not apply to a foreign person 
if--
            (1) the President issues a waiver of sanctions imposed upon 
        that person under section 73(a) of the Arms Export Control Act 
        or under section 11B(b)(1) of the Export Administration Act of 
        1979, on the basis that the waiver is essential to the national 
        security of the United States;
            (2) the President designates the waiver as classified 
        information (as defined in section 606 of the National Security 
        Act of 1947 (50 U.S.C. 426)); and
            (3) the President transmits to the committees referred to 
        in subsection (b)--
                    (A) a justification for designating the waiver as 
                classified information; and
                    (B) a description of--
                            (i) any discussions with the foreign 
                        person, concerning the activities that were the 
                        subject of the sanctions, that have been 
                        conducted by United States Government 
                        officials, or by officials of the government of 
                        the country that has jurisdiction over the 
                        foreign person or in which the foreign person 
                        conducted such activities; and
                            (ii) any actions that the foreign person, 
                        or the government of the country that has 
                        jurisdiction over the foreign person or in 
                        which the foreign person conducted the 
                        activities that were the subject of the 
                        sanctions, has taken to prevent a recurrence of 
                        the same or similar activities.

SEC. 742. STRENGTHENING UNITED STATES MISSILE PROLIFERATION SANCTIONS 
              ON FOREIGN PERSONS.

    (a) Arms Export Control Act.--Section 73(a)(2) of the Arms Export 
Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2797b(a)(2)) is amended by striking ``2 years'' 
each place it appears and inserting ``4 years''.
    (b) Public Information.--Section 73(e)(2) of the Arms Export 
Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2797b(e)(2)) is amended by adding at the end the 
following new sentences: ``Such report may be classified only to the 
extent necessary to protect intelligence sources and methods. If the 
report is so classified, the President shall make every effort to 
acquire sufficient alternative information that would allow a 
subsequent unclassified version of the report to be issued.''.
    (c) Export Administration Act of 1979.--Any sanction imposed on a 
foreign person under section 11B(b)(1) of the Export Administration Act 
of 1979 (50 U.S.C. App. 2410b(b)(1)), as continued in effect under the 
International Emergency Economic Powers Act, shall be in effect for a 
period of four years beginning on the date on which the sanction was 
imposed.
    (d) Applicability.--The amendments made by subsections (a) and (b) 
and the provisions of subsection (c) shall apply to all sanctions 
imposed under section 73(a) of the Arms Export Control Act or section 
11B(b)(1) of the Export Administration Act of 1979, as continued in 
effect under the International Emergency Economic Powers Act, by reason 
of acts giving rise to such sanctions that were committed by foreign 
persons on or after January 1, 2004.

SEC. 743. COMPREHENSIVE UNITED STATES MISSILE PROLIFERATION SANCTIONS 
              ON ALL RESPONSIBLE FOREIGN PERSONS.

    (a) Arms Export Control Act.--Section 73(a) of the Arms Export 
Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2797b(a)) is amended by adding at the end the 
following new paragraph:
    ``(3)(A) Sanctions imposed upon a foreign person under paragraph 
(2) shall also be imposed on any governmental entity that the President 
determines exercises effective control over, benefits from, or directly 
or indirectly facilitates the activities of that foreign person.
    ``(B) When a sanction is imposed on a foreign person under 
paragraph (2), the President may also impose that sanction on any other 
person or entity that the President has reason to believe has or may 
acquire prohibited items with the intent to transfer to that foreign 
person, or provide to that foreign person access to, such items. In 
this subparagraph, `prohibited items' are items that may not be 
exported to that foreign person on account of the sanction imposed on 
that foreign person.
    ``(C) The President may also prohibit, for such period of time as 
the President may determine, any transaction or dealing, by a United 
States person or within the United States, with any foreign person on 
whom sanctions have been imposed under this subsection.
    ``(D) The President shall report on an annual basis to the 
Committee on International Relations of the House of Representatives 
and the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate the identity of 
any foreign person that engages in any transaction or activity with a 
foreign person on whom sanctions have been imposed under this 
subsection that either--
            ``(i) would be the basis for imposing sanctions under 
        subparagraph (B) but for which sanctions have not been imposed; 
        or
            ``(ii) would be the basis for imposing sanctions under 
        subparagraph (C) if the transaction or activity had been 
        carried out by a United States person or by a person in the 
        United States.
Such report shall be unclassified to the maximum extent feasible, but 
may include a classified annex.''.
    (b) Definition of Person.--Section 74(a)(8)(A) of the Arms Export 
Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2797c(a)(8)(A)) is amended to read as follows:
            ``(8)(A) The term `person' means--
                            ``(i) a natural person;
                            ``(ii) a corporation, business association, 
                        partnership, society, trust, transnational 
                        corporation, or transnational joint venture, 
                        any other nongovernmental entity, organization, 
                        or group, and any governmental entity;
                            ``(iii) any subsidiary, subunit, or parent 
                        entity of any business enterprise or other 
                        organization or entity listed in clause (ii); 
                        and
                            ``(iv) any successor of any business 
                        enterprise or other organization or entity 
                        listed in clause (ii) or (iii); and''.
    (c) Export Administration Act of 1979.--
            (1) Sanctions imposed on governmental entities.--Any 
        sanction imposed on a foreign person under section 11B(b)(1)(B) 
        of the Export Administration Act of 1979 (50 U.S.C. App. 
        2410b(b)(1)(B)), as continued in effect under the International 
        Emergency Economic Powers Act (in this subsection referred to 
        as a ``dual use sanction''), shall also be imposed on any 
        governmental entity that the President determines exercises 
        effective control over, benefits from, or directly or 
        indirectly facilitates the activities of that foreign person.
            (2) Other entities.--When a dual use sanction is imposed on 
        a foreign person, the President may also impose that sanction 
        on any other person or entity that the President has reason to 
        believe has or may acquire prohibited items with the intent to 
        transfer to that foreign person, or provide to that foreign 
        person access to, such items. In this paragraph, ``prohibited 
        items'' are items that may not be exported to that foreign 
        person on account of the dual use sanction imposed on that 
        foreign person.
            (3) Transactions by third parties.--The President may also 
        prohibit, for such period of time as he may determine, any 
        transaction or dealing, by a United States person or within the 
        United States, with any foreign person on whom dual use 
        sanctions have been imposed.
            (4) Report.--The President shall submit on an annual basis 
        to the Committee on International Relations of the House of 
        Representatives and the Committee on Banking, Housing and Urban 
        Affairs and the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate a 
        report that contains the identity of any foreign person that 
        engages in any transaction or activity with a foreign person on 
        whom dual use sanctions have been imposed that either--
                    (A) would be the basis for imposing dual use 
                sanctions under paragraph (2) but for which such 
                sanctions have not been imposed; or
                    (B) would be the basis for imposing dual use 
                sanctions under paragraph (3) if the transaction or 
                activity had been carried out by a United States person 
                or by a person in the United States.
        Such report shall be unclassified to the maximum extent 
        feasible, but may include a classified annex.
            (5) Definitions.--In this subsection:
                    (A) Missile equipment or technology.--The term 
                ``missile equipment or technology'' has the meaning 
                given that term in section 11B(c) of the Export 
                Administration Act of 1979 (50 U.S.C. App. 2410b(c)).
                    (B) Person.--
                            (i) The term ``person'' means--
                                    (I) a natural person;
                                    (II) a corporation, business 
                                association, partnership, society, 
                                trust, transnational corporation, or 
                                transnational joint venture, any other 
                                nongovernmental entity, organization, 
                                or group, and any governmental entity;
                                    (III) any subsidiary, subunit, or 
                                parent entity of any business 
                                enterprise or other organization or 
                                entity listed in subclause (II); and
                                    (IV) any successor of any business 
                                enterprise or other organization or 
                                entity listed in subclause (II) or 
                                (III).
                            (ii) In the case of countries where it may 
                        be impossible to identify a specific 
                        governmental entity referred to in clause (i), 
                        the term ``person'' means--
                                    (I) all activities of that 
                                government relating to the development 
                                or production of any missile equipment 
                                or technology; and
                                    (II) all activities of that 
                                government affecting the development or 
                                production of aircraft, electronics, 
                                and space systems or equipment.
                    (C) United states person.--The term ``United States 
                person'' has the meaning given that term in section 
                16(2) of the Export Administration Act of 1979 (50 
                U.S.C. App. 2415(2)).
    (d) Effective Date.--The amendments made by subsections (a) and (b) 
shall apply with respect to sanctions imposed on or after January 1, 
2004, on foreign persons under section 73(a)(2) of the Arms Export 
Control Act, and the provisions of subsection (c) shall apply with 
respect to sanctions imposed on or after January 1, 2004, on foreign 
persons under section 11B(b)(1) of the Export Administration Act of 
1979 (50 U.S.C. App. 2410b(b)(1)), as continued in effect under the 
International Emergency Economic Powers Act.

         Subtitle F--Security Assistance and Related Provisions

SEC. 751. AUTHORITY TO TRANSFER NAVAL VESSELS TO CERTAIN FOREIGN 
              COUNTRIES.

    (a) Authority to Transfer by Grant.--The President is authorized to 
transfer vessels to foreign countries on a grant basis under section 
516 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2321j), as 
follows:
            (1) Greece.--To the Government of Greece, the OSPREY class 
        minehunter coastal ship PELICAN (MHC-53).
            (2) Egypt.--To the Government of Egypt, the OSPREY class 
        minehunter coastal ships CARDINAL (MHC-60) and RAVEN (MHC-61).
            (3) Pakistan.--To the Government of Pakistan, the SPRUANCE 
        class destroyer ship FLETCHER (DD-992).
            (4) Turkey.--To the Government of Turkey, the SPRUANCE 
        class destroyer ship CUSHING (DD-985).
    (b) Authority to Transfer by Sale.--The President is authorized to 
transfer vessels to foreign countries on a sale basis under section 21 
of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2761), as follows:
            (1) India.--To the Government of India, the AUSTIN class 
        amphibious transport dock ship TRENTON (LPD-14).
            (2) Greece.--To the Government of Greece, the OSPREY class 
        minehunter coastal ship HERON (MHC-52).
            (3) Turkey.--To the Government of Turkey, the SPRUANCE 
        class destroyer ship O'BANNON (DD-987).
    (c) Grants not Counted in Annual Total of Transferred Excess 
Defense Articles.--The value of a vessel transferred to another country 
on a grant basis pursuant to authority provided by subsection (a) shall 
not be counted against the aggregate value of excess defense articles 
transferred to countries in any fiscal year under section 516(g) of the 
Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2321j(g)).
    (d) Costs of Transfers.--Any expense incurred by the United States 
in connection with a transfer authorized under subsection (a) or (b) 
shall be charged to the recipient.
    (e) Repair and Refurbishment in United States Shipyards.--To the 
maximum extent practicable, the President shall require, as a condition 
of the transfer of a vessel under this section, that the country to 
which the vessel is transferred have such repair or refurbishment of 
the vessel as is needed, before the vessel joins the naval forces of 
that country, performed at a shipyard located in the United States, 
including a United States Navy shipyard.
    (f) Expiration of Authority.--The authority to transfer a vessel 
under this section shall expire at the end of the two-year period 
beginning on the date of the enactment of this Act.

SEC. 752. TRANSFER OF OBSOLETE AND SURPLUS ITEMS FROM KOREAN WAR 
              RESERVES STOCKPILE AND REMOVAL OR DISPOSAL OF REMAINING 
              ITEMS.

    (a) Transfer of Items in Korean Stockpile.--
            (1) Authority.--Notwithstanding section 514 of the Foreign 
        Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2321h), the President is 
        authorized to transfer to the Republic of Korea, in return for 
        concessions to be negotiated by the Secretary of Defense, any 
        or all of the items described in paragraph (2).
            (2) Covered items.--The items referred to in paragraph (1) 
        are munitions, equipment, and materiel such as tanks, trucks, 
        artillery, mortars, general purpose bombs, repair parts, 
        barrier material, and ancillary equipment, if such items are--
                    (A) obsolete or surplus items;
                    (B) in the inventory of the Department of Defense;
                    (C) intended for use as reserve stocks for the 
                Republic of Korea; and
                    (D) as of the date of the enactment of this Act, 
                located in a stockpile in the Republic of Korea.
            (3) Valuation of concessions.--(A) The value of concessions 
        negotiated pursuant to paragraph (1) shall be at least equal 
        to--
                    (i) the fair market value of the items transferred; 
                minus
                    (ii) the savings to the Department of Defense of 
                the cost of removal of the items from the Republic of 
                Korea and disposal of the items that would have been 
                incurred by the Department but for the transfer of the 
                items pursuant to paragraph (1), not to exceed the fair 
                market value of the items transferred.
            (B) The concessions may include cash compensation, service, 
        waiver of charges otherwise payable by the United States, such 
        as charges for demolition of United States-owned or United 
        States-intended munitions, and other items of value.
            (4) Prior notifications of proposed transfers.--Not less 
        than 30 days before making a transfer under the authority of 
        this subsection, the President shall transmit to the Committees 
        on Armed Services and International Relations of the House of 
        Representatives and the Committees on Armed Services and 
        Foreign Relations of the Senate a detailed notification of the 
        proposed transfer, which shall include an identification of the 
        items to be transferred and the concessions to be received.
            (5) Termination of authority.--No transfer may be made 
        under the authority of this subsection more than three years 
        after the date of the enactment of this Act.
    (b) Removal or Disposal of Remaining Items in Korean Stockpile.--
The President shall provide for the removal or disposal of all items 
described in subsection (a)(2) that are not transferred pursuant to the 
authority of subsection (a) by not later than four years after the date 
of the enactment of this Act.

SEC. 753. EXTENSION OF PAKISTAN WAIVERS.

    The Act entitled ``An Act to authorize the President to exercise 
waivers of foreign assistance restrictions with respect to Pakistan 
through September 30, 2003, and for other purposes'', approved October 
27, 2001 (Public Law 107-57; 115 Stat. 403), is amended--
            (1) in section 1(b)--
                    (A) in the heading, by striking ``Fiscal Years 2005 
                and 2006'' and inserting ``Fiscal Years 2006 and 
                2007''; and
                    (B) in paragraph (1), by striking ``2005 or 2006'' 
                and inserting ``2006 or 2007'';
            (2) in section 3(2), by striking ``and 2006'' and inserting 
        ``2006, and 2007''; and
            (3) in section 6, by striking ``2006'' and inserting 
        ``2007''.

SEC. 754. REPORTING REQUIREMENT FOR FOREIGN MILITARY TRAINING.

    Subsection (a)(1) of section 656 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 
1961 (22 U.S.C. 2416) is amended--
            (1) by striking ``January 31'' and inserting ``March 1''; 
        and
            (2) by striking ``and all such training proposed for the 
        current fiscal year''.

SEC. 755. CERTAIN SERVICES PROVIDED BY THE UNITED STATES IN CONNECTION 
              WITH FOREIGN MILITARY SALES.

    (a) Quality Assurance, Inspection, Contract Administration, and 
Contract Audit Defense Services.--Section 21(h)(1)(A) of the Arms 
Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2761(h)(1)(A)) is amended by inserting 
after ``North Atlantic Treaty Organization'' the following: ``or the 
Governments of Australia, New Zealand, Japan, or Israel''.
    (b) Cataloging Data and Services.--Section 21(h)(2) of the Arms 
Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2761(h)(2)) is amended by striking ``or 
to any member government of that Organization if that Organization or 
member government'' and inserting ``, to any member of that 
Organization, or to the Governments of Australia, New Zealand, Japan, 
or Israel if that Organization, member government, or the Governments 
of Australia, New Zealand, Japan, or Israel''.

SEC. 756. MARITIME INTERDICTION PATROL BOATS FOR MOZAMBIQUE.

    (a) In General.--Of the amounts made available to carry out section 
23 of the Arms Export Control Act for fiscal year 2006, there is 
authorized to be appropriated $1,000,000 for refurbishment, delivery, 
operational training, and related costs associated with the provision 
of not more than four excess coastal patrol boats to the Government of 
Mozambique for maritime patrol and interdiction activities.
    (b) Availability.--Amounts appropriated pursuant to the 
authorization of appropriations under subsection (a) are authorized to 
remain available until September 30, 2007.

SEC. 757. REIMBURSEMENT FOR INTERNATIONAL MILITARY EDUCATION AND 
              TRAINING.

    Section 541 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2347) 
is amended--
            (1) in the first sentence, by striking ``The President'' 
        and inserting ``(a) The President''; and
            (2) by adding at the end the following new subsection:
    ``(b) The President shall seek reimbursement for military education 
and training furnished under this chapter from countries using 
assistance under section 23 of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 
2763; relating to the Foreign Military Financing Program) to purchase 
such military education and training at a rate comparable to the rate 
charged to countries receiving grant assistance for military education 
and training under this chapter.''.

            TITLE VIII--NUCLEAR BLACK MARKET ELIMINATION ACT

SEC. 801. SHORT TITLE.

    This title may be cited as the ``Nuclear Black Market Elimination 
Act of 2005''.

      Subtitle A--Sanctions for Transfers of Nuclear Enrichment, 
Reprocessing, and Weapons Technology, Equipment and Materials Involving 
                     Foreign Persons and Terrorists

SEC. 811. AUTHORITY TO IMPOSE SANCTIONS ON FOREIGN PERSONS.

    (a) Determination of Nuclear Activities by Foreign Persons.--
Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the President is authorized 
to impose any or all of the sanctions described in subsection (b) 
whenever the President determines that a foreign person participated, 
on or after the date of the enactment of this Act, in the export, 
transfer or trade of--
            (1) nuclear enrichment or reprocessing equipment, 
        materials, or technology to any nonnuclear-weapon state (as 
        defined in section 102(c) of the Arms Export Control Act) 
        that--
                    (A) does not possess functioning nuclear enrichment 
                or reprocessing plants as of January 1, 2004; and
                    (B)(i) does not have in force an additional 
                protocol with the International Atomic Energy Agency 
                for the application of safeguards (as derived from IAEA 
                document INFCIRC/540 and related corrections and 
                additions); or
                    (ii) is developing, manufacturing, or acquiring a 
                nuclear explosive device; or
            (2) any nuclear explosive device, or design information or 
        component, equipment, materials, or other items or technology 
        that--
                    (A) is designated for national export controls 
                under the Nuclear Supplier Group Guidelines for the 
                Export of Nuclear Material, Equipment and Technology 
                (published by the International Atomic Energy Agency as 
                IAEA document INFICRC/254/Rev. 6/Part 1 and subsequent 
                revisions) and the Guidelines for Transfers of Nuclear-
                Related Dual-Use Equipment, Material, and Related 
                Technology (published as IAEA document INFCIRC/254/Rev. 
                5/ Part 2 and subsequent revisions); and
                    (B) contributes to the development, manufacture, or 
                acquisition of a nuclear explosive device by--
                            (i) a nonnuclear weapon state; or
                            (ii) a foreign person.
    (b) Sanctions.--The sanctions referred to in subsection (a) that 
are to be imposed on a foreign person are the following:
            (1) No assistance may be provided to the foreign person 
        under the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, and the foreign 
        person may not participate in any assistance program of the 
        United States Government. Any such assistance being provided to 
        the foreign person, and any participation in such assistance 
        program by the foreign person, on the date on which the 
        sanction under this paragraph is imposed, shall be terminated 
        as of such date.
            (2) The United States Government may not sell any defense 
        articles, defense services, or design or construction services 
        to the foreign person under the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 
        or the Arms Export Control Act, and any contract to sell such 
        articles or services, under either such Act, that is in effect 
        on the date on which the sanction under this paragraph is 
        imposed, shall be terminated as of such date.
            (3) Licenses or any other approval may not be issued for 
        the export or import to the foreign person of any defense 
        articles or defense services under the Arms Export Control Act 
        or its implementing regulations. Any such license or approval 
        that is in effect on the on the date on which the sanction 
        under this paragraph is imposed, shall be terminated as of such 
        date.
            (4) Licenses or any other approval may not be issued for 
        the export to the foreign person of any goods or technology 
        subject to the jurisdiction of the Export Administration 
        Regulations under chapter VII of title 15, Code of Federal 
        Regulations (or successor regulations), other than food and 
        other agricultural commodities, medicines and medical 
        equipment. Any such license or approval that is in effect on 
        the on the date on which the sanction under this paragraph is 
        imposed, shall be terminated as of such date.
    (c) Period Sanctions in Effect.--The sanctions referred to in 
subsection (b) should be imposed for not less than two years, but may 
be imposed for longer periods. The President may suspend after one year 
any sanction imposed pursuant to this section 15 days after submitting 
to the appropriate congressional committees a report explaining--
            (1) the reasons for modifying or terminating the sanction;
            (2) how the purposes of this Act and United States national 
        security are furthered by such modification or termination; and
            (3) what measures the United States will take or is taking 
        to ensure that the foreign person will not engage in similar 
        activities in the future.

SEC. 812. PRESIDENTIAL NOTIFICATION ON ACTIVITIES OF FOREIGN PERSONS.

    (a) Reports to Congress.--Not later than 180 days after enactment 
of this Act and no later than January 31 of each year thereafter, the 
President shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees a 
report detailing any activity by any foreign person described in 
section 811. This report shall also include a description of any 
sanctions that have been imposed and their duration.
    (b) Publication.--When the President imposes sanctions under 
section 811, the President shall, to the maximum extent unclassified, 
publish in the Federal Register, not later than 15 days after reporting 
such sanctions to the appropriate congressional committees under 
subsection (a), the identity of each sanctioned foreign person, the 
period for which sanctions will be in effect, and the reasons for the 
sanctions.

   Subtitle B--Further Actions Against Corporations Associated With 
                       Sanctioned Foreign Persons

SEC. 821. FINDINGS.

    The Congress finds the following:
            (1) Foreign persons and corporations engaging in nuclear 
        black-market activities are motivated by reasons of commercial 
        gain and profit.
            (2) Sanctions targeted solely against the business 
        interests of the sanctioned person or business concern may be 
        unsuccessful in halting these proliferation activities, as the 
        sanctions may be seen merely as the cost of doing business, 
        especially if the business interests of the parent or 
        subsidiary corporate entities are unaffected by the sanctions.
            (3) Such narrow targeting of sanctions creates the 
        incentive to create shell and ``carve-out'' corporate entities 
        to perform the proliferation activities and attract sanctions, 
        leaving all other aspects of the larger corporation unaffected.
            (4) To dissuade corporations from allowing their associated 
        commercial entities or persons from engaging in proliferation 
        black-market activities, they must also be made to suffer 
        financial loss and commercial disadvantage, and parent and 
        subsidiary commercial enterprises must be held responsible for 
        the proliferation activities of their associated entities.
            (5) If a corporation perceives that the United States 
        Government will do everything possible to make its commercial 
        activity difficult around the world, then that corporation has 
        a powerful commercial incentive to prevent any further 
        proliferation activity by its associated entities.
            (6) Therefore, the United States Government should seek to 
        increase the risk of commercial loss for associated corporate 
        entities for the proliferation actions of their subsidiaries.

SEC. 822. CAMPAIGN BY UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS.

    The President shall instruct all agencies of the United States 
Government to make every effort in their interactions with foreign 
government and business officials to persuade foreign governments and 
relevant corporations not to engage in any business transaction with a 
foreign person sanctioned under section 811, including any parent or 
subsidiary of the sanctioned foreign person, for the duration of the 
sanctions.

SEC. 823. COORDINATION.

    The Secretary of State shall coordinate the actions of the United 
States Government under section 822.

SEC. 824. REPORT.

    Not later than one year after the date of the enactment of this Act 
and annually thereafter, the Secretary of State shall report to the 
appropriate congressional committees on the actions taken by the United 
States to carry out section 822.

   Subtitle C--Incentives for Proliferation Interdiction Cooperation

SEC. 831. AUTHORITY TO PROVIDE ASSISTANCE TO COOPERATIVE COUNTRIES.

    The President is authorized to provide, on such terms as the 
President considers appropriate, assistance under section 832 to any 
country that cooperates with the United States and with other countries 
allied with the United States to prevent the transport and 
transshipment of items of proliferation concern in its national 
territory or airspace or in vessels under its control or registry.

SEC. 832. TYPES OF ASSISTANCE.

    The assistance authorized under section 831 is the following:
            (1) Assistance under section 23 of the Arms Export Control 
        Act.
            (2) Assistance under chapters 4 and 5 of part II of the 
        Foreign Assistance Act of 1961.
            (3) Drawdown of defense equipment and services under 
        section 516 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961.

SEC. 833. CONGRESSIONAL NOTIFICATION.

    Assistance authorized under this subtitle may not be provided until 
at least 30 days after the date on which the President has provided 
notice thereof to the appropriate congressional committees, in 
accordance with the procedures applicable to reprogramming 
notifications under section 634A(a) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 
1961.

SEC. 834. LIMITATION.

    Assistance may be provided to a country under section 831 in no 
more than three fiscal years.

SEC. 835. USE OF ASSISTANCE.

    To the extent practicable, assistance provided under this subtitle 
shall be used to enhance the capability of the recipient country to 
prevent the transport and transshipment of items of proliferation 
concern in its national territory or airspace, or in vessels under its 
control or registry, including through the development of a legal 
framework in that country to enhance such capability by criminalizing 
proliferation, enacting strict export controls, and securing sensitive 
materials within its borders.

SEC. 836. LIMITATION ON SHIP OR AIRCRAFT TRANSFERS TO UNCOOPERATIVE 
              COUNTRIES.

    Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the United States may 
not transfer any excess defense article that is a vessel or an aircraft 
to a country that has not agreed that it will support and assist 
efforts by the United States to interdict items of proliferation 
concern until thirty days after the date on which the President has 
provided notice of the proposed transfer to the appropriate 
congressional committees in accordance with the procedures applicable 
to reprogramming notifications under section 634A(a) of the Foreign 
Assistance Act of 1961, in addition to any other requirement of law.

         Subtitle D--Rollback of Nuclear Proliferation Networks

SEC. 841. NONPROLIFERATION AS A CONDITION OF UNITED STATES ASSISTANCE.

    United States foreign assistance should only be provided to 
countries that--
            (1) are not cooperating with any non-nuclear weapon state 
        or any foreign group or individual who may be engaged in, 
        planning, or assisting international terrorism in the 
        development of a nuclear explosive device or its means of 
        delivery and are taking all necessary measures to prevent their 
        nationals and other persons and entities subject to their 
        jurisdiction from participating in such cooperation; and
            (2) are fully and completely cooperating with the United 
        States in its efforts to eliminate nuclear black-market 
        networks or activities.

SEC. 842. REPORT ON IDENTIFICATION OF NUCLEAR PROLIFERATION NETWORK 
              HOST COUNTRIES.

    (a) Report.--
            (1) In general.--Not later than 90 days after the date of 
        the enactment of this Act and annually thereafter, the 
        President shall submit a report to the appropriate 
        congressional committees that--
                    (A) identifies any country in which manufacturing, 
                brokering, shipment, transshipment, or other activity 
                occurred in connection with the transactions of the 
                nuclear proliferation network that supplied Libya, 
                Iran, North Korea, and possibly other countries or 
                entities, and
                    (B) includes any additional information with 
                respect to any country and any other nuclear 
                proliferation networks or activities and the foreign 
                persons believed to be participating therein, including 
                any information relating to the participation of any 
                foreign person in the export, transfer, or trade 
                described in section 811.
            (2) Additional information.--The report under paragraph (1) 
        shall also include a description of the extent to which each 
        country described in the report is, in the opinion of the 
        President, fully cooperating with the United States in its 
        efforts to eliminate the nuclear proliferation network 
        described in paragraph (1)(A) and any other nuclear 
        proliferation networks or activities. The President shall base 
        the determination regarding a country's cooperation with the 
        United States in part on the degree to which the country has 
        satisfied United States requests for assistance and 
        information, including whether the United States has asked and 
        been granted direct investigatory access to key persons 
        involved in a nuclear proliferation network.
    (b) Classification.--Reports under this section shall be 
unclassified to the maximum extent possible.

SEC. 843. SUSPENSION OF ARMS SALES LICENSES AND DELIVERIES TO NUCLEAR 
              PROLIFERATION NETWORK HOST COUNTRIES.

    (a) Suspension.--Upon submission of the report and any additional 
information under section 842 to the appropriate congressional 
committees, the President shall suspend all licenses issued under the 
Arms Export Control Act, and shall prohibit any licenses to be issued 
under that Act, to any country described in the report or additional 
information, until such time as the President certifies to the 
appropriate congressional committees that such country--
            (1)(A) has fully investigated or is fully investigating the 
        activities of any person or entity within its territory that 
        has participated in the nuclear proliferation network or 
        activities; and
            (B) has taken or is taking effective steps to permanently 
        halt similar illicit nuclear proliferation or acquisition 
        activities;
            (2) has been or is fully cooperating with the United States 
        and other appropriate international organizations in 
        investigating and eliminating the nuclear proliferation 
        network, any successor networks operating within its territory, 
        or other illicit proliferation and acquisition activities; and
            (3) has enacted or is enacting new laws, promulgated 
        decrees or regulations, or established practices designed to 
        prevent future such activities from occurring within its 
        territory.
    (b) Waiver.--The President may waive the requirements of subsection 
(a) in a fiscal year if--
            (1) the President has certified to the appropriate 
        congressional committees that the waiver is important to the 
        national security of the United States; and
            (2) five days have elapsed since making the certification 
        under paragraph (1).

                     Subtitle E--General Provisions

SEC. 851. DEFINITIONS.

    In this title:
            (1) Participated.--The term ``participated'' means to have 
        sold, transferred, brokered, financed, assisted, delivered or 
        otherwise provided or received, and includes any conspiracy or 
        attempt to participate in any of the preceding activities, as 
        well as facilitating such activities by any other person.
            (2) Foreign person.--The term ``foreign person'' has the 
        meaning provided in section 38(g)(9)(C) of the Arms Export 
        Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2778(g)(9)(C)) and includes, for 
        purposes of subsections (a) and (b) of section 811, successors, 
        assigns, subsidiaries, and subunits and other business 
        organizations or associations in which that person may be 
        deemed to have a controlling interest.
            (3) Excess defense article.--The term ``excess defense 
        article'' has the meaning given that term in section 644(g) of 
        the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2403(g)).
            (4) Items of proliferation concern.--The term ``items of 
        proliferation concern'' means any equipment, materials, or 
        technology that could materially support the research, 
        development, manufacturing, or acquisition by any means of a 
        nuclear explosive device, a chemical or biological weapon, or 
        missile with a payload of 500 kilograms or greater and with a 
        range of 300 kilometers or greater.
            (5) Person.--The term ``person''--
                    (A) means a natural person as well as a 
                corporation, business association, partnership, 
                society, trust, any other nongovernmental entity, 
                organization, or group, and any governmental entity, or 
                subsidiary, subunit, or parent entity thereof, and any 
                successor of any such entity; and
                    (B) in the case of a country where it may be 
                impossible to identify a specific governmental entity 
                referred to in subparagraph (A), means all activities 
                of that government relating to the development or 
                production of any nuclear equipment or technology.
            (6) United states foreign assistance.--The term ``United 
        States foreign assistance'' means assistance under the foreign 
        operations, export financing, and related programs 
        appropriations Act for a fiscal year, and assistance under the 
        Foreign Assistance Act of 1961.

                TITLE IX--EAST ASIA SECURITY ACT OF 2005

SEC. 901. SHORT TITLE.

    This title may be cited as the ``East Asia Security Act of 2005''.

SEC. 902. STATEMENTS OF POLICY.

    Congress--
            (1) previously expressed its strong concerns in House 
        Resolution 57 of February 2, 2005, and Senate Resolution 91 of 
        March 17, 2005, with the transfer of armaments and related 
        technology to the People's Republic of China by member states 
        of the European Union, which increased eightfold from 2001 to 
        2003, and with plans to terminate in the near future the arms 
        embargo they imposed in 1989 following the Tiananmen Square 
        massacre;
            (2) welcomes deferral of a decision by the European Council 
        to terminate its arms embargo following adoption of those 
        Resolutions, the President's visit to Europe, and growing 
        concern among countries in the regions and the general public 
        on both sides of the Atlantic;
            (3) welcomes the decision by the European Parliament on 
        April 14, 2005, by a vote of 421 to 85, to oppose the lifting 
        of the European Union's arms embargo on the People's Republic 
        of China, and resolutions issued by a number of elected 
        parliamentary bodies in Europe also opposing the lifting of the 
        arms embargo;
            (4) also welcomes the onset of a strategic dialogue between 
        the European Commission and the Government of the United States 
        on the security situation in East Asia, through which it is 
        hoped a greater understanding will emerge of the consequences 
        of European assistance to the military buildup of the People's 
        Republic of China for peace and stability in that region, to 
        the security interests of the United States and its friends and 
        allies in the region, and, in particular, to the safety of 
        United States Armed Forces whose presence in the region has 
        been a decisive factor in ensuring peace and prosperity since 
        the end of World War II;
            (5) hopes that a more intensive dialogue with Europe on 
        this matter will clarify for United States friends and allies 
        in Europe how their ``non-lethal'' arms transfers improve the 
        force projection of the People's Republic of China, are far 
        from benign, and enhance the prospects for the threat or use of 
        force in resolving the status of Taiwan, a troubling prospect 
        made more ominous by recent adoption of a new law by the 
        Chinese National People's Congress expressly authorizing the 
        use of force;
            (6) also hopes that this dialogue will result in an 
        important new consensus between the United States and its 
        European partners on the need for coordinated policies which 
        encourage the development of democracy in the People's Republic 
        of China and which discourage, not assist, China's unjustified 
        military buildup and pursuit of weapons that threaten its 
        neighbors;
            (7) however, deeply regrets that none of the European 
        friends and allies of the United States who have been 
        transferring arms to the People's Republic of China has 
        announced a cessation or even a temporary halt to those 
        transfers while this new dialogue with the United States 
        ensues, and notes with concern that such European friends and 
        allies have provided little, if any, transparency to the United 
        States Government into the full range and capabilities of all 
        of the armaments and related technology that they have 
        transferred to date and continue even now to do so;
            (8) is further troubled by public reports describing well 
        known European companies as suppliers to weapons programs of 
        the People's Republic of China, who are also participants in 
        numerous sensitive United States Government weapons programs, 
        and the increased risks of diversion of United States weapons 
        technology to China inherent in such an undesirable situation; 
        and
            (9) in view of the gravity of European arms sales to the 
        People's Republic of China, which have not abated, believes it 
        is necessary to make provision for greater scrutiny and 
        oversight with respect to those areas of international armament 
        cooperation that present increased levels of risk to the 
        security interests of the United States and to authorize 
        appropriate measures which the President may draw on in 
        deterring foreign support for China's military buildup in order 
        to safeguard the national security interests of the United 
        States and peace and security in East Asia.

SEC. 903. REPORT ON FOREIGN MILITARY EXPORTS TO CHINA.

    (a) Report.--The President shall, at the times specified in 
subsection (b), transmit to the appropriate congressional committees a 
report that identifies every person of a member country of the European 
Union, and any other foreign person the President may consider 
appropriate, with respect to whom there is credible information 
indicating that the person, on or after January 1, 2005, exported to--
            (1) the People's Republic of China any item on the 
        Wassenaar Munitions List of July 12, 1996, and subsequent 
        revisions; or
            (2) the military, intelligence, or other security forces of 
        the People's Republic of China--
                    (A) any item on the Wassenaar List of Dual Use 
                Goods and Technologies of July 12, 1996, and subsequent 
                revisions; or
                    (B) any other dual use item if the item is 
                intended, entirely or in part, for use with an item 
                described in paragraph (1).
    (b) Timing of Report.--The report required under subsection (a) 
shall be transmitted not later than 180 days after the date of the 
enactment of this Act and not later than the end of each 12-month 
period thereafter.
    (c) Exceptions.--A foreign person is not required to be identified 
in a report required under subsection (a) if the person--
            (1) was identified in a previous report transmitted under 
        subsection (a) on account of a particular export, except to the 
        extent that the export may have continued, involved additional 
        transfers, or was larger, more significant, or different in 
        nature than described in the previous report;
            (2) was engaged solely in an export on behalf of, or in 
        concert with, the Government of the United States; or
            (3) was engaged in an export which, as determined by the 
        President, would be exempt from the restrictions of section 
        902(a) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 
        1990 and 1991 (Public Law 101-246; 22 U.S.C. 2151 note), if the 
        export were subject to the jurisdiction of the United States, 
        by reason of the issuance of a report under section 902(b) of 
        such Act.
    (d) Form.--If the President considers it appropriate, reports 
transmitted under subsection (a), or appropriate parts thereof, may be 
transmitted in classified form.

SEC. 904. REPORT ON CHINA ARMS TRANSFER POLICIES OF COUNTRIES 
              PARTICIPATING IN UNITED STATES DEFENSE COOPERATIVE 
              PROJECTS; CERTAIN LICENSE REQUIREMENTS.

    (a) Statement of Policy.--Congress is concerned with the 
significant additional risk of unlawful use and diversion of sensitive 
United States weapons system research, design, and development arising 
from cooperative research and development projects with foreign 
governments and foreign persons who may also transfer arms and related 
technology to the People's Republic of China.
    (b) Report.--The President shall, at the times specified in 
subsection (c), transmit to the appropriate congressional committees a 
report that--
            (1) identifies every foreign government with respect to 
        which the United States is carrying out a cooperative project 
        described in subsection (d) and whose policies or practices, on 
        or after the date of the enactment of this Act, permit the 
        export of any item described in paragraph (1), or subparagraph 
        (A) or (B) of paragraph (2), of section 903(a); and
            (2) describes the cooperative projects and policies or 
        practices referred to in paragraph (1) of every foreign 
        government identified under such paragraph.
    (c) Timing of Report.--The report required under subsection (b)--
            (1) shall be transmitted not later than 180 days after the 
        date of the enactment of this Act and not later than the end of 
        each 12-month period thereafter; and
            (2) may be included in the report required under section 
        903, as the President determines appropriate.
    (d) Cooperative Projects.--The cooperative projects referred to in 
subsection (b) are projects carried out under section 27 of the Arms 
Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2767) or section 2350a, 2358, or a 
memorandum of understanding under section 2531 of title 10, United 
States Code.
    (e) License Requirements.--
            (1) Requirement.--Notwithstanding any other provision of 
        law, a license under section 38 of the Arms Export Control Act 
        (22 U.S.C. 2778) shall be required for the export of defense 
        articles or defense services by any person who is not an 
        officer or employee of the Government of the United States in 
        furtherance of a cooperative project described in subsection 
        (d) with a country identified in a report transmitted under 
        subsection (b).
            (2) Congressional notification.--The issuance of a license 
        pursuant to paragraph (1) shall be subject to the same 
        requirements as are applicable to the export of items described 
        in section 36(c) of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 
        2776(c)) (without regard to the dollar amount requirements 
        relating to contracts contained in such section), including the 
        transmittal of information and the application of congressional 
        review procedures in accordance with such section.
            (3) Exceptions.--The Secretary of State shall not be 
        required to apply the license requirement of paragraph (1)--
                    (A) in the case of contracts or subcontracts in 
                effect on the date of the enactment of this Act, 
                including the exercise of options for production 
                quantities to satisfy United States operational 
                military requirements;
                    (B) if the Secretary determines in writing that the 
                person or other entity to which the export of defense 
                articles or defense services would be made is a sole 
                source supplier of the articles or services, that the 
                articles or services are essential, and that the 
                articles or services are not readily or reasonably 
                available;
                    (C) in the case of routine servicing and 
                maintenance, to products or services provided under 
                contracts entered into before transmittal of the report 
                required under subsection (b), if the Secretary 
                determines in writing that alternative sources are not 
                readily or reasonably available; or
                    (D) with respect to other defense articles or 
                defense services, the export of which without a license 
                the Secretary determines in writing is essential to the 
                national security of the United States and provides 
                written notification thereof to the appropriate 
                congressional committees.
            (4) Publication in the federal register.--The Secretary of 
        State shall publish in the Federal Register each determination 
        made under paragraph (3).

SEC. 905. CERTAIN FOREIGN OWNERSHIP AND CONTROL OF DEFENSE ARTICLES IN 
              THE UNITED STATES.

    (a) Statement of Policy.--Congress determines that special care 
should be taken by the United States with respect to foreign persons 
who sell arms and related technology to the People's Republic of China, 
while simultaneously seeking ownership of United States defense 
articles or defense services, including the results of United States 
Government funded defense research and development, through the 
acquisition or control of United States defense firms, directly or 
through their subsidiaries and affiliates based in the United States.
    (b) License Requirements.--
            (1) Requirement.--The President shall require a license 
        pursuant to regulations issued under section 38(g)(6) of the 
        Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2778(g)(6)) for the transfer 
        of ownership or control of United States defense articles or 
        defense services arising from the acquisition or control of a 
        person required to be registered under section 38(b)(1) of such 
        Act (22 U.S.C. 2778(b)(1)), or any subsidiary, division, 
        affiliate or other entity thereof, whenever the person gaining 
        acquisition or control is--
                    (A) a foreign national of the People's Republic of 
                China or a foreign person otherwise subject to the 
                jurisdiction, ownership, or control of the People's 
                Republic of China;
                    (B) a foreign person identified in a report 
                transmitted under section 903 or having its principal 
                place of business in a country described in a report 
                transmitted under section 904; or
                    (C) a United States person owned or controlled by a 
                foreign person, including a subsidiary or affiliate of 
                a foreign person described in subparagraph (B).
            (2) Additional requirement.--A license under section 
        38(g)(6) of the Arms Export Control Act for a person described 
        in paragraph (1)(A) shall not be issued until 30 days after the 
        date on which the President transmits a report that contains a 
        determination of the President that--
                    (A) the Government of the People's Republic of 
                China meets the requirements of section 902(b)(1) of 
                the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 
                1990 and 1991 (Public Law 101-246; 22 U.S.C. 2151 
                note); or
                    (B) it is in the national interest of the United 
                States to issue the license.
    (c) Congressional Notification.--The issuance of a license pursuant 
to subsection (b) shall be subject to the same requirements as are 
applicable to the export of items described in section 36(c) of the 
Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2776(c)) (without regard to the 
dollar amount requirements relating to contracts contained in such 
section), including the transmittal of information and the application 
of congressional review procedures in accordance with such section.
    (d) Exception.--The issuance of a license pursuant to subsection 
(b) shall not be required in the case of an amendment to a munitions 
license or a change in registration arising from a sale or transfer of 
ownership or control of United States defense articles or defense 
services to a person described in subparagraph (A), (B), or (C) of 
subsection (b)(1) that was approved prior to the date of enactment of 
this Act unless the President determines that it is in the national 
security interests of the United States to require the issuance of a 
new license pursuant to subsection (b).

SEC. 906. CHINESE MILITARY END USE OF DUAL USE EXPORTS.

    (a) Statement of Policy.--Congress welcomes the understanding 
reached at the Wassenaar Arrangement's December 2003 plenary meeting to 
require governmental authorization for the transfer of non-listed dual 
use items intended for military end use in a destination subject to any 
relevant regional arms embargo or to any United Nations Security 
Council resolution.
    (b) Reports.--
            (1) Report to secretary of commerce.--As prescribed in 
        regulations issued under the Export Administration Act of 1979 
        (as continued in effect under the International Emergency 
        Economic Powers Act), a United States person who exports an 
        item described in subparagraph (A) or (B) of section 903(a)(2) 
        for military end use shall, not later than 15 days after the 
        item is exported, submit to the Secretary of Commerce a report 
        that contains a description of all shipment information, 
        including a description of the item and the quantity, value, 
        port of exit, and end user.
            (2) Report to congress.--Not later than 60 days after the 
        end of each calendar quarter, the Secretary of Commerce shall 
        submit to the appropriate congressional committees a written 
        report that contains a compilation all of information submitted 
        in each report to the Secretary under paragraph (1) for the 
        prior calendar quarter.
    (c) Definition.--In this section, the term ``military end use'' 
means, with respect to an item, the item is or may be intended, 
entirely or in part, for use in conjunction with an item described on 
the Wassenaar Munitions List of July 12, 1996, and subsequent 
revisions.

SEC. 907. APPLICATION OF MEASURES TO CERTAIN FOREIGN PERSONS.

    (a) Application of Measures.--Subject to sections 908 and 909, the 
President may apply with respect to any foreign person (including a 
foreign government) identified in a report transmitted under section 
903, and shall apply with respect to any foreign person (including a 
foreign government) identified in more than one report transmitted 
under section 903, any or all of the following measures:
            (1) Research and development.--Denial of participation in 
        existing and new cooperative research and development programs 
        and projects under section 27 of the Arms Export Control Act 
        (22 U.S.C. 2767) or sections 2350a, 2358, or a memorandum of 
        understanding under 2531 of title 10, United States Code.
            (2) Control of united states defense firms.--Prohibition of 
        ownership and control of any business organization required to 
        be registered with the United States Government as a 
        manufacturer or exporter of defense articles or defense 
        services under section 38(b)(1) of the Arms Export Control Act 
        (22 U.S.C. 2778(b)(1)).
            (3) Security assistance.--Prohibition on participation in 
        any foreign military sales under chapter 2 of the Arms Export 
        Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2761 et seq.) or any design and 
        construction sales under chapter 2A of such Act (22 U.S.C. 
        2769).
            (4) Munitions list approvals.--Prohibition on licenses and 
        other forms of approval under section 38 of the Arms Export 
        Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2778) for the export of any item on the 
        United States Munitions List as in effect on August 8, 1995.
    (b) Application of Additional Measures.--Subject to sections 908 
and 909, and notwithstanding any other provision of law, the President 
may, with respect to any foreign person (including a foreign 
government) identified in a report transmitted under section 903, and 
shall, with respect to any foreign person (including a foreign 
government) identified in more than one report transmitted under 
section 903--
            (1) suspend the use of any license exemption and expedited 
        license procedure established in the International Traffic in 
        Arms Regulations or other provisions of law for the export or 
        temporary import of defense articles and defense services;
            (2) require the execution of a non-transfer and end use 
        certificate for the export of any defense articles and defense 
        services; and
            (3) require, as a condition of issuance of any license for 
        the export of defense articles and defense services, United 
        States access to and verification of the items after the export 
        of the items or alternative measures to ensure compliance with 
        restrictions on the transfer of the items to third-parties.
    (c) Effective Date of Measures.--Measures applied pursuant to 
subsection (a) or (b) shall be effective with respect to a foreign 
person (including a foreign government) no later than--
            (1) 30 days after the report identifying the foreign person 
        is transmitted, if the report is transmitted on or before the 
        date required by section 903(b); or
            (2) on the date that the report identifying the foreign 
        person is transmitted, if the report is transmitted more than 
        30 days after the date required by section 903(b).
    (d) Duration of Measures.--Measures applied pursuant to subsection 
(a) shall be for a period of 2 years or longer, as the President 
determines appropriate. Measures applied pursuant to subsection (b) 
shall be, at a minimum, consistent with the duration of the license and 
the normal requirements for record keeping established in the 
International Traffic in Arms Regulations or longer, as the President 
determines appropriate.
    (e) Publication in Federal Register.--The application of measures 
to a foreign person pursuant to subsection (a) or (b) shall be 
announced by notice published in the Federal Register, except if the 
President determines that doing so would be inconsistent with the 
protection of classified information.

SEC. 908. PROCEDURES IF DISCRETIONARY MEASURES ARE NOT APPLIED.

    (a) Requirement to Notify Congress.--If the President does not 
exercise the authority of subsection (a) or (b) of section 907 to apply 
any or all of the discretionary measures described in such subsection 
with respect to a foreign person identified in a report transmitted 
under section 903, the President shall so notify the appropriate 
congressional committees not later than the effective date under 
section 907(c) for measures with respect to that person.
    (b) Written Justification.--Any notification transmitted by the 
President under subsection (a) shall include a written justification 
describing in detail the facts and circumstances relating specifically 
to the foreign person identified in a report transmitted under section 
903 that support the President's decision not to exercise the authority 
of subsection (a) or (b) of section 907 with respect to that person.
    (c) Form.--If the President considers it appropriate, the 
notification of the President under subsection (a), and the written 
justification under subsection (b), or appropriate parts thereof, may 
be transmitted in classified form.

SEC. 909. DETERMINATIONS EXEMPTING FOREIGN PERSONS FROM MANDATORY 
              MEASURES.

    (a) Waiver.--Any mandatory measure described in section 907 shall 
not apply with respect to a foreign person if the President transmits 
to the appropriate congressional committees a report that contains a 
determination of the President that--
            (1) on the basis of information provided by that person or 
        the foreign government having primary jurisdiction over the 
        person, the person did not, on or after January 1, 2005, 
        knowingly export to the People's Republic of China the item the 
        apparent export of which caused the person to be identified in 
        a report transmitted under section 903; or
            (2) the foreign government having primary jurisdiction over 
        the person has entered into a written agreement with the United 
        States which--
                    (A) is binding under international law;
                    (B) prohibits further exports of any item described 
                in paragraph (1), or subparagraph (A) or (B) of 
                paragraph (2), of section 903(a) by any person subject 
                to its jurisdiction;
                    (C) is supported by the foreign government's 
                adoption of policies and procedures providing for 
                credible implementation of the requirements in 
                subparagraphs (A) and (B);
                    (D) does not constrain the President's authority to 
                impose measures under this act in the event of a future 
                export of concern by the same or other persons subject 
                to the jurisdiction of the foreign government party to 
                the agreement; and
                    (E) is submitted to the appropriate congressional 
                committees 30 days prior to its entry into force.
    (b) Additional Waiver.--Any mandatory measure described in section 
907 shall not apply to a foreign person if the President determines 
that it is important to the counterterrorism, nonproliferation, or 
other national security interests of the United States and transmits to 
the appropriate congressional committees a report in writing that 
contains such determination.
    (c) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that the 
President should--
            (1) strengthen international coordination and execution of 
        arms export policy through the development of bilateral and 
        multilateral agreements under subsection (a)(2), particularly 
        with member states of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization 
        (NATO), Japan, Australia and New Zealand, and exercise the 
        waivers provided under this section in all appropriate 
        instances that further this objective; and
            (2) whenever the President determines that the measures 
        described in section 907 should be applied, that the measures 
        be applied comprehensively with respect to the affected foreign 
        person's affiliates and subsidiaries, wherever located, in 
        order to deter to the fullest extent possible a recurrence or 
        continuation of the export giving rise to the President's 
        determination.
    (d) Form.--If the President considers it appropriate, the 
determination and report of the President under subsection (a), or 
appropriate parts thereof, may be transmitted in classified form.

SEC. 910. DEFINITIONS.

    In this title:
            (1) Appropriate congressional committees.--The term 
        ``appropriate congressional committees'' means--
                    (A) the Committee on International Relations and 
                the Committee on Armed Services of the House of 
                Representatives; and
                    (B) the Committee on Foreign Relations and the 
                Committee on Armed Services of the Senate.
            (2) Defense articles and defense services.--The term 
        ``defense articles and defense services'' has the meaning given 
        the term in section 47(7) of the Arms Export Control Act (22 
        U.S.C. 2794 note).
            (3) Dual use.--The term ``dual use'' means, with respect to 
        goods or technology, those goods or technology that are 
        specifically designed or developed for civil purposes but which 
        also may be used or deployed in a military or proliferation 
        mode. Such term does not include purely commercial items.
            (4) Export.--The term ``export'' has the meaning given that 
        term in section 120.17 of the International Traffic in Arms 
        Regulations, and includes re-exports, transfers, and 
        retransfers by any means.
            (5) Export administration regulations.--The term ``Export 
        Administration Regulations'' means those regulations contained 
        in sections 730 through 774 of title 15, Code of Federal 
        Regulations (or successor regulations).
            (6) Foreign government.--The term ``foreign government'' 
        has the meaning given the term in section 38(g)(9)(B) of the 
        Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2778(g)(9)(B)).
            (7) Foreign person.--The term ``foreign person'' has the 
        meaning given the term in section 38(g)(9)(C) of the Arms 
        Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2778(g)(9)(C)).
            (8) Good.--The term ``good'' has the meaning given the term 
        in section 16(3) of the Export Administration Act of 1979 (50 
        U.S.C. App. 2415(3)).
            (9) International traffic in arms regulations.--The term 
        ``International Traffic in Arms Regulations'' means those 
        regulations contained in sections 120 through 130 of title 22, 
        Code of Federal Regulations (or successor regulations).
            (10) Item.--The term ``item'' means any good or technology, 
        defense article or defense service subject to the export 
        jurisdiction of the United States under law or regulation.
            (11) License.--The term ``license'' means an official 
        written document of the United States Government issued 
        pursuant to the Export Administration Regulations or the 
        International Traffic in Arms Regulations, as the case may be, 
        authorizing a specific export.
            (12) Other forms of approval.--The term ``other forms of 
        approval'' includes any authorization, rule or exemption 
        contained in any statute or regulation that permits an export 
        without a license.
            (13) Ownership or control.--The term ``ownership or 
        control'' has the meaning given the term in section 122.2(c) of 
        the International Traffic in Arms Regulations.
            (14) Person.--The term ``person'' has the meaning given the 
        term in section 38(g)(9)(E) of the Arms Export Control Act (22 
        U.S.C. 2778(g)(9)(E)).
            (15) Technology.--The term ``technology'' has the meaning 
        given the term in section 16(4) of the Export Administration 
        Act of 1979 (50 U.S.C. App. 2415(4)).
            (16) United states munitions list.--The term ``United 
        States Munitions List'' means the list referred to in section 
        38(a)(1) of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2778(a)(1)).

                 TITLE X--FOREIGN ASSISTANCE PROVISIONS

   Subtitle A--Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 and Related Provisions

        CHAPTER 1--PART I OF THE FOREIGN ASSISTANCE ACT OF 1961

SEC. 1001. ASSISTANCE TO ESTABLISH CENTERS FOR THE TREATMENT OF 
              OBSTETRIC FISTULA IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES.

    (a) Amendment.--Section 104(c) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 
1961 (22 U.S.C. 2151b(c)) is amended--
            (1) by redesignating paragraph (4) as paragraph (5); and
            (2) by inserting after paragraph (3) the following new 
        paragraph:
    ``(4)(A) In carrying out the purposes of this subsection, the 
President is authorized to furnish assistance, on such terms and 
conditions as the President may determine, for the establishment and 
operation of not less than twelve centers for the treatment and 
prevention of obstetric fistula at appropriate sites in developing 
countries.
    ``(B) In selecting sites for the establishment of centers pursuant 
to subparagraph (A), the President should seek the consultation and 
advice of United States embassy officials, appropriate nongovernmental 
organizations, and local government officials in developing countries 
with high rates of obstetric fistula, with particular emphasis on 
countries in Africa.
    ``(C) Each center established pursuant to subparagraph (A) shall, 
to the maximum extent practicable, carry out the following repair and 
rehabilitation activities:
            ``(i) The provision of surgery to repair obstetric fistula 
        in women who do not otherwise have the resources to pay for 
        such surgery and the provision of necessary post-surgery care 
        and support for such women.
            ``(ii) increased access for women to emergency obstetrical 
        care, including increased access to skilled birth attendants 
        and care facilities.
            ``(iii) Assistance related to surgery and post-surgery care 
        and support described in clause (i), including the provision of 
        transportation to and from the center for women in need of such 
        transportation and the provision of necessary temporary shelter 
        and food assistance to women in need of such shelter and food 
        assistance.
    ``(D) Each center established pursuant to subparagraph (A) may 
carry out the following prevention activities:
            ``(i) Activities to reduce the incidence of obstetric 
        fistula, including the conduct of appropriate seminars and the 
        dissemination of appropriate educational materials, such as 
        brochures, pamphlets, and posters.
            ``(ii) Activities to expand abstinence education, 
        postponement of marriage and childbearing until after the 
        teenage years, and activities to expand access to family 
        planning services for the prevention of pregnancies among women 
        whose age or health status place them at high risk of prolonged 
        or obstructed childbirth.
    ``(E) Each center established pursuant to subparagraph (A) shall, 
to the maximum extent practicable, ensure that women who suffer from 
obstetric fistula as a result of sexual abuse during conflicts or as a 
result of official abuse receive preference in receiving services 
described in clauses (i), (ii), and (iii) of subparagraph (C).
    ``(F) Not later than January 31, 2008, the President shall prepare 
and transmit to Congress a report on the implementation of this 
paragraph for fiscal years 2006 and 2007.
    ``(G) In this paragraph, the term `obstetric fistula' means a 
rupture or hole in tissues surrounding a woman's vagina, bladder, or 
rectum that occurs when the woman is in obstructed childbirth for a 
prolonged period of time without adequate medical attention.''.
    (b) Funding.--Of the amounts made available for each of the fiscal 
years 2006 and 2007 to carry out sections 104 and 496 of the Foreign 
Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2151b and 2293), $5,000,000 for 
fiscal year 2006 and $7,500,000 for fiscal year 2007 is authorized to 
be available to carry out section 104(c)(4) of such Act (as added by 
subsection (a)).

SEC. 1002. SUPPORT FOR SMALL AND MEDIUM ENTERPRISES IN SUB-SAHARAN 
              AFRICA.

    Section 240 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2200) 
is amended by adding at the end the following:
    ``(c) Support for Small and Medium Enterprises in Sub-Saharan 
Africa.--
            ``(1) Support.--The Corporation is commended for its 
        activities in support of the development of small and medium 
        enterprises, and is encouraged to exercise its authorities to 
        promote investments in financial institutions that are duly 
        incorporated in sub-Saharan African countries, to the extent 
        that the purpose of such investments is to expand investment 
        and lending opportunities to small and medium enterprises 
        that--
                    ``(A) are substantially owned by nationals of sub-
                Saharan African countries; and
                    ``(B) are engaged in domestic commerce or 
                international trade in sectors such as housing, 
                agriculture, fishing, textiles and apparel, tourism, 
                electronics, technology, manufacturing, and services.
            ``(2) Consideration.--In making a determination to provide 
        insurance and financing to financial institutions referred to 
        in paragraph (1), the Corporation should take into 
        consideration the extent to which a project establishes and 
        implements a nondiscrimination in lending policy to prohibit 
        discrimination based on ethnicity, sex, color, race, religion, 
        physical disability, marital status, or age.
            ``(3) Technical assistance.--In supporting a project 
        referred to in paragraph (1), the Corporation may provide 
        technical assistance to--
                    ``(A) improve the quality of management of 
                financial institutions referred to in paragraph (1) to 
                ensure the safety and stability of such institutions;
                    ``(B) create in such financial institutions 
                effective credit risk management systems to improve the 
                quality of the assets of such institutions and the 
                ability of such institutions to research and assess the 
                overall credit risk of critical industries in the 
                domestic economy; and
                    ``(C) support effective credit risk management by 
                developing internal credit rating systems and credit 
                assessment tools that improve the ability of such 
                financial institutions to evaluate individual credit 
                worthiness and measure the overall amount of risk posed 
                by the total number of borrowers.''.

SEC. 1003. ASSISTANCE TO SUPPORT DEMOCRACY IN ZIMBABWE.

    Of the amounts made available for each of the fiscal years 2006 and 
2007 to carry out chapters 1 and 10 of part I of the Foreign Assistance 
Act of 1961 and chapter 4 of part II of such Act, $12,000,000 for each 
such fiscal year is authorized to be available, consistent with the 
provisions of the Zimbabwe Democracy and Economic Recovery Act of 2001 
(Public Law 107-99; 22 U.S.C. 2151 note), to support--
            (1) the restoration of democratic legitimacy and foster a 
        free and fair electoral process in Zimbabwe, particularly 
        through legislative process training for members of Parliament;
            (2) capacity building for civil society organizations to 
        effectively provide information on the political process to 
        citizens, defend the legal rights of minorities, women and 
        youth, document the level of adherence by the Government of 
        Zimbabwe to national and international civil and human rights 
        standards, and monitor and report on the entire electoral 
        process in Zimbabwe;
            (3) organizational capacity-building training for political 
        parties in Zimbabwe;
            (4) poll watcher training for party and civil society 
        election observers in Zimbabwe; and
            (5) the reestablishment of independent media through 
        overseas broadcasts and Internet sites.

SEC. 1004. RESTRICTIONS ON UNITED STATES VOLUNTARY CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE 
              UNITED NATIONS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM.

    (a) Limitation.--Of the amounts made available for each of fiscal 
years 2006 and 2007 for United States voluntary contributions to the 
United Nations Development Program, an amount equal to the amount the 
United Nations Development Program will spend in Burma during each 
fiscal year (including all funds administered by the United Nations 
Development Program in Burma) shall be withheld unless during such 
fiscal year the Secretary of State submits to the appropriate 
congressional committees the certification described in subsection (b).
    (b) Certification.--The certification referred to in subsection (a) 
is a certification by the Secretary that all programs and activities of 
the United Nations Development Program (including all programs and 
activities administered by the United Nations Development Program) in 
Burma--
            (1) are focused on eliminating human suffering and 
        addressing the needs of the poor;
            (2) are undertaken only through international or private 
        voluntary organizations that are independent of the State Peace 
        and Development Council (SPDC) (formerly the State Law and 
        Order Restoration Council or SLORC);
            (3) provide no financial, political, or military benefit, 
        including the provision of goods, services, or per diems, to 
        the SPDC or any agency or entity of, or affiliated with, the 
        SPDC, including any entity whose members are ineligible for 
        admission to the United States by reason of such membership 
        under any provision of section 212(a) of the Immigration and 
        Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1182(a)) (including the Myanmar 
        Maternal and Child Welfare Association (MMCWA), the Myanmar 
        Council of Churches (MCC), the Myanmar Medical Association 
        (MMA), the Myanmar Women Affairs Federation (MWAF), and the 
        Union of Solidarity Development Association (USDA)); and
            (4) are carried out only after consultation with the 
        leadership of the National League for Democracy and the 
        leadership of the National Coalition Government of the Union of 
        Burma.
            (5) Report.--Not later than 180 days after the date of the 
        enactment of this Act and every 180 days thereafter during 
        fiscal years 2006 and 2007, the Secretary shall submit to the 
        appropriate congressional committees a report on--
                    (A) all programs and activities of the United 
                Nations Development Program (including all programs and 
                activities administered by the United Nations 
                Development Program) in Burma; and
                    (B) all recipients and subrecipients of funds 
                provided under such programs and activities.

SEC. 1005. ASSISTANCE FOR THE OFFICE OF THE POLICE OMBUDSMAN FOR 
              NORTHERN IRELAND.

    Of the amounts made available for each of the fiscal years 2006 and 
2007 to carry out section 481 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 
U.S.C. 2291), $100,000 for each such fiscal year is authorized to be 
available for--
            (1) specialized investigative training, including training 
        in the United States, of personnel of the Office of the Police 
        Ombudsman for Northern Ireland; and
            (2) advisory support to the Office of the Police Ombudsman 
        for Northern Ireland for the development and strengthening of 
        its investigative capacity in order to ensure that policing in 
        Northern Ireland is carried out in compliance with 
        internationally recognized human rights standards.

SEC. 1006. REPORT ON FOREIGN LAW ENFORCEMENT TRAINING AND ASSISTANCE.

    Section 489(a) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 
2291h(a)), as amended by section 317(d) of this Act, is further amended 
by adding at the end the following new paragraph:
            ``(9)(A) A separate section on all foreign law enforcement 
        training and assistance that is provided to foreign law 
        enforcement personnel and other related governmental 
        authorities by the Department of State, the Department of 
        Defense, the Department of Justice, and the United States 
        Agency for International Development during the previous fiscal 
        year and all such training proposed for the current fiscal 
        year.
            ``(B) The section on foreign law enforcement training and 
        assistance shall include the following:
                    ``(i) For each law enforcement training activity--
                            ``(I) the purpose of the activity and the 
                        foreign policy justification for the activity;
                            ``(II) the number of foreign law 
                        enforcement personnel who are provided 
                        training, their units of operation, and 
                        countries of origin;
                            ``(III) the type of training activity;
                            ``(IV) the location of the training 
                        activity;
                            ``(V) the department or agency of the 
                        United States Government which is conducting 
                        the training, by unit or office; and
                            ``(VI) the cost of the training activity 
                        and the specific budgetary account from which 
                        the cost is paid.
                    ``(ii) For other law enforcement assistance--
                            ``(I) the purpose of the assistance and the 
                        foreign policy justification for the 
                        assistance;
                            ``(II) the type of assistance;
                            ``(III) the department or agency of the 
                        United States Government which is providing the 
                        assistance, by unit or office, where 
                        applicable; and
                            ``(IV) the cost of the assistance and the 
                        specific budgetary account from which the cost 
                        is paid.
                    ``(iii) For each country--
                            ``(I) the aggregate number of students 
                        trained;
                            ``(II) the aggregate cost of the law 
                        enforcement training and other law enforcement 
                        assistance; and
                            ``(III) a plan describing the law 
                        enforcement assistance and rule of law programs 
                        of the relevant departments and agencies of the 
                        United States Government.
            ``(C) Form.--The report required by this paragraph shall be 
        in unclassified form but may include a classified annex.''.

SEC. 1007. REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO THE LARGEST EXPORTING AND IMPORTING 
              COUNTRIES OF CERTAIN PRECURSOR CHEMICALS.

    (a) Reporting Requirements.--Section 489(a) of the Foreign 
Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2291h(a)), as amended by sections 
317(d) and 906 of this Act, is further amended by adding at the end the 
following new paragraph:
            ``(10)(A) A separate section that contains the following:
                    ``(i) An identification of the five countries that 
                exported the largest amount of pseudoephedrine, 
                ephedrine, and phenylpropanolamine during the preceding 
                calendar year.
                    ``(ii) An identification of the five countries that 
                imported the largest amount of precursor chemicals 
                described in clause (i) during the preceding calendar 
                year and have the highest rate of diversion of such 
                precursor chemicals for use in the illicit production 
                of methamphetamine.
                    ``(iii) An economic analysis of the total worldwide 
                production of the precursor chemicals described in 
                clause (i) as compared to the legitimate demand for 
                such precursor chemicals worldwide.
            ``(B) The identification of countries that imported the 
        largest amount of precursor chemicals under subparagraph 
        (A)(ii) shall be based on the following:
                    ``(i) An economic analysis that estimates the 
                legitimate demand for such precursor chemicals in such 
                countries as compared to the actual or estimated amount 
                of such chemicals that is imported into such countries.
                    ``(ii) The best available data and other 
                information regarding the production of methamphetamine 
                in such countries and the diversion of such precursor 
                chemicals for use in the production of 
                methamphetamine.''.
    (b) Annual Certification Procedures.--Section 490(a) of the Foreign 
Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2291j(a)) is amended--
            (1) in paragraph (1), by striking ``major illicit drug 
        producing country or major drug-transit country'' and inserting 
        ``major illicit drug producing country, major drug-transit 
        country, or country identified under clause (i) or (ii) of 
        section 489(a)(10)(A) of this Act''; and
            (2) in paragraph (2), by inserting after ``(as determined 
        under subsection (h))'' the following: ``or country identified 
        under clause (i) or (ii) of section 489(a)(10)(A) of this 
        Act''.

SEC. 1008. ASSISTANCE FOR DISASTER MITIGATION EFFORTS.

    (a) Findings.--Congress finds the following:
            (1) The devastating impacts of natural disasters can be 
        mitigated by assisting communities to build in safer locations, 
        construct sturdier dwellings, enforce sound building codes and 
        practices, and protect natural ecosystems.
            (2) By 2050, two billion people are expected to be 
        especially vulnerable to floods due to growing populations, 
        indiscriminate logging, rapid urbanization, and increasing 
        development along coasts and in other hazardous regions.
            (3) According to a study by the World Bank and the United 
        States Geological Survey during the 1990s, $40 billion invested 
        in preventive measures could have saved $280 billion in 
        disaster relief funds and saved countless lives.
    (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that the 
Secretary of State, in consultation with the heads of other appropriate 
departments and agencies of the Government of the United States, should 
develop an initiative to encourage the use of disaster mitigation 
techniques, including techniques described in subsection (a)(1), by 
foreign governments in regions considered especially vulnerable to 
natural disasters.
    (c) Amendment to the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961.--Section 
491(b) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2292(b)) is 
amended by adding at the end the following new sentence: ``Assistance 
relating to disaster preparedness under the preceding sentence shall 
include assistance to encourage the use of disaster mitigation 
techniques, including to assist communities to build in safer 
locations, construct sturdier dwellings, enforce sound building codes 
and practices, and protect natural ecosystems.''.

SEC. 1009. ASSISTANCE TO PROMOTE DEMOCRACY IN BELARUS.

    Of the amounts made available for each of the fiscal years 2006 and 
2007 to carry out chapters 11 and 12 of part I of the Foreign 
Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2295 et seq. and 2296 et seq.) and 
the FREEDOM Support Act (22 U.S.C. 5801 et seq.), $12,000,000 for each 
such fiscal year is authorized to be available for assistance for the 
promotion of democracy in the Republic of Belarus, including free and 
fair electoral processes, the development of political parties and 
nongovernmental organizations, promoting democracy and respect for 
human rights and the rule of law, independent media, and international 
exchanges and training programs for leaders and members of the 
democratic forces that foster civil society.

SEC. 1010. ASSISTANCE FOR MATERNAL AND PRENATAL CARE FOR CERTAIN 
              INDIVIDUALS OF BELARUS AND UKRAINE INVOLVED IN THE 
              CLEANUP OF THE CHORNOBYL DISASTER.

    Of the amounts made available for each of the fiscal years 2006 and 
2007 to carry out chapters 11 and 12 of part I of the Foreign 
Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2295 et seq. and 2296 et seq.) and 
the FREEDOM Support Act (22 U.S.C. 5801 et seq.), such sums as may be 
necessary for each such fiscal year are authorized to be available for 
assistance to improve maternal and prenatal care, especially for the 
purpose of helping prevent birth defects and pregnancy complications, 
for individuals in the Republic of Belarus and Ukraine involved in the 
cleanup of the region affected by the Chornobyl disaster.

SEC. 1011. ASSISTANCE TO ADDRESS NON-INFECTIOUS DISEASES IN FOREIGN 
              COUNTRIES.

    (a) Statement of Policy.--Congress declares the following:
            (1) Medical evidence indicates that non-infectious 
        diseases, like heart disease and obesity, are on the rise 
        worldwide.
            (2) In response to these statistics, the current allocation 
        of funds appropriated to the United States Agency for 
        International Development for Child Survival and Maternal 
        Health, Vulnerable Children, HIV/AIDS, Infectious Diseases, 
        Reproductive Health and Family Planning, and the Global Fund to 
        Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria does not address 
        noninfectious diseases.
    (b) Authorization of Assistance.--The President, acting through the 
Administrator of the United States Agency for International 
Development, is authorized to provide assistance, on such terms and 
conditions as the President may determine, to address non-infectious 
diseases in foreign countries.

        CHAPTER 2--PART II OF THE FOREIGN ASSISTANCE ACT OF 1961

SEC. 1021. ECONOMIC SUPPORT FUND ASSISTANCE FOR EGYPT.

    (a) Findings.--Congress finds the following:
            (1) Despite more than $28 billion in economic assistance 
        provided by the United States to Egypt since 1975, Egypt's 
        economy and educational systems are underdeveloped and 
        democratic development remains extremely limited. Egypt remains 
        near the bottom of many indices of growth and human 
        development.
            (2) Egypt's economic troubles, if not addressed through 
        programs to develop Egypt's private sector, could destabilize 
        the country.
            (3) United States programs to promote growth in Egypt, 
        including traditional development assistance as well as 
        programs that attempt to link disbursement of cash assistance 
        to the adoption of economic reforms by the Government of Egypt, 
        have had, at best, mixed success.
            (4) The United States has provided more than $32 billion in 
        military assistance to Egypt since 1979.
            (5) Egypt is currently at peace with all its neighbors.
            (6) Egypt and the United States entered into an agreement 
        in March 2005, whereby Egypt undertook to accomplish certain 
        reform-oriented policies primarily related to its financial 
        sector, and the United States undertook, subject to its 
        constitutional processes, to provide Egypt with cash 
        assistance. This program of financial reform is important and 
        should continue, supported by assistance in the form of cash 
        transferred from the United States, but not in amounts in 
        excess of amounts already agreed to and not for lesser policy 
        reforms than have already been agreed to.
            (7) The model of an agreement for policy change between the 
        United States and Egypt, similar but not identical to, the 
        concept of a ``Millennium Challenge'' compact that emphasizes 
        performance and outcomes, would be a way to reinvigorate a 
        program for the development of the Egyptian economy that has 
        languished for years, and would give more Egyptians a stake in 
        the proper planning and execution of programs to assist in 
        their country's development.
    (b) Statement of Policy.--It shall be the policy of the United 
States--
            (1) to acknowledge that--
                    (A) threats to Egypt's stability derive far more 
                from domestic problems, such as inadequate economic 
                growth, deficient educational and health-care systems, 
                and lack of political freedom, than from external 
                dangers; and
                    (B) external threats to Egyptian stability are, in 
                fact, minimal;
            (2) to provide non-military assistance to Egypt which 
        results in actual, sustainable, and, to the extent possible, 
        measurable outcomes in terms of economic growth, poverty 
        reduction, humanitarian conditions, health, education, and 
        political reform;
            (3) to restructure Egypt's assistance package over time so 
        as to diminish military assistance and end the reduction of 
        economic assistance and to begin the process of this 
        restructuring without delay; and
            (4) to ensure that this restructuring is done in such a 
        manner that ensures that maintenance and spare parts for 
        existing Egyptian military equipment is not jeopardized and 
        that Egyptian military purchases and projects to which the 
        United States has already committed itself be funded fully in 
        accordance with previous understandings.
    (c) Amendment to the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961.--
            (1) In general.--Chapter 4 of part II of the Foreign 
        Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2346 et seq; relating to the 
        ``Economic Support Fund'') is amended by inserting after 
        section 534 the following new section:

``SEC. 535. REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO ASSISTANCE FOR EGYPT.

    ``(a) Requirement for Assistance.--Assistance may be provided for 
Egypt under this chapter for a fiscal year only if Egypt provides to 
the United States for the fiscal year a proposal described in 
subsection (b) that is evaluated and approved in accordance with 
subsection (c).
    ``(b) Proposal.--
            ``(1) In general.--A proposal described in this subsection 
        is a proposal that reflects Egyptian priorities to use 
        assistance provided under this chapter to meet the requirements 
        of paragraph (2).
            ``(2) Requirements.--The requirements described in this 
        paragraph are--
                    ``(A) promoting economic growth (including economic 
                freedom);
                    ``(B) reducing poverty;
                    ``(C) improving humanitarian conditions among the 
                poorest individuals in Egypt;
                    ``(D) improving education and health systems for 
                the people of Egypt;
                    ``(E) reducing corruption in the public and private 
                sectors; and
                    ``(F) strengthening democratic institutions and 
                individual freedoms.
    ``(c) Evaluation and Approval of Proposal.--
            ``(1) Evaluation.--The President, acting through the 
        Secretary of State, and in consultation with the Secretary of 
        the Treasury, the United States Trade Representative, and the 
        Administrator of the United States Agency for International 
        Development, shall evaluate the proposal provided to the United 
        States pursuant to subsection (a) to determine the extent to 
        which the proposal meets the requirements of subparagraphs (A) 
        through (F) of subsection (b)(2).
            ``(2) Approval.--The President shall approve the proposal 
        only if the President determines that--
                    ``(A) the proposal sufficiently meets the 
                requirements of subparagraphs (A) through (F) of 
                subsection (b)(2) in a manner that achieves, in 
                particular, lasting economic growth and poverty 
                reduction and substantially strengthened democratic 
                institutions and individual freedoms; and
                    ``(B) the Government of Egypt--
                            ``(i) has adopted and implemented reforms 
                        necessary to implement the proposal;
                            ``(ii) has implemented the proposal 
                        provided to the United States and approved for 
                        the prior fiscal year in accordance with the 
                        requirements of subparagraphs (A) through (F) 
                        of subsection (b)(2); and
                            ``(iii) has demonstrated high standards of 
                        fiduciary controls and accountability with 
                        respect to assistance provided for Egypt under 
                        this chapter.
    ``(d) Suspension and Termination of Assistance.--The President, 
acting through the Secretary of State, may suspend or terminate 
assistance in whole or in part for Egypt under this chapter if the 
President determines that the Government of Egypt is not implementing 
the proposal in accordance with the requirements of subparagraphs (A) 
through (F) of subsection (b)(2).
    ``(e) Cash Assistance.--
            ``(1) Requirement.--Notwithstanding any other provision of 
        this section, cash assistance may be provided to Egypt under 
        this chapter for a fiscal year pursuant to the memorandum of 
        understanding specified in paragraph (2) only if a proposal 
        provided to the United States pursuant to subsection (a) for 
        the fiscal year has been evaluated and approved in accordance 
        with subsection (c).
            ``(2) Memorandum of understanding.--The memorandum of 
        understanding specified in this paragraph is the memorandum of 
        understanding agreed to by the Government of the United States 
        and the Government of Egypt in March 2005, including any 
        modification to the memorandum of understanding, except--
                    ``(A) a modification to increase the amounts of 
                assistance agreed to be provided under the memorandum 
                of understanding; or
                    ``(B) a modification to reduce significantly the 
                scope of, or to extend significantly the time for, the 
                performance by Egypt of obligations that it has 
                undertaken under the memorandum of understanding.
    ``(f) Congressional Notification.--Assistance may not be obligated 
for Egypt under this chapter until 30 days after the date on which the 
President has provided notice thereof to the Committee on International 
Relations and the Committee on Appropriations of the House of 
Representatives and to the Committee on Foreign Relations and the 
Committee on Appropriations of the Senate in accordance with the 
procedures applicable to reprogramming notifications under section 
634A(a) of this Act.
    ``(g) Report.--The President, acting through the Secretary of 
State, shall prepare and transmit to the Committee on International 
Relations of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Foreign 
Relations of the Senate a report for each fiscal year that contains--
            ``(1) the proposal provided to the United States pursuant 
        to subsection (a) for the fiscal year; and
            ``(2) the evaluation of the proposal carried out pursuant 
        to subsection (c)(1).
    ``(h) Rule of Construction.--The provisions of this section or 
subsections (d) or (f) of section 1021 of the Foreign Relations 
Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 2006 and 2007, shall not be superseded 
except by a provision of law enacted after the date of the enactment of 
such Act, which specifically repeals, modifies, or supersedes the 
provisions of this section or subsections (d) or (f) of section 1021 of 
such Act, as the case may be.''.
            (2) Effective date.--The amendment made by paragraph (1) 
        shall apply with respect to assistance for Egypt under chapter 
        4 of part II of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 for fiscal 
        year 2007 and each subsequent fiscal year.
    (d) Military Assistance Levels for Egypt; Transfer Requirement.--
The following amounts available for assistance for Egypt under section 
23 of Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2763; relating to the 
``Foreign Military Financing'' program) shall be transferred to and 
consolidated with amounts available for assistance for Egypt under 
chapter 4 of part II of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 
2346 et seq.; relating to the ``Economic Support Fund''):
            (1) For fiscal year 2006, the amount that exceeds 
        $1,260,000,000.
            (2) For fiscal year 2007, the amount that exceeds 
        $1,220,000,000.
            (3) For fiscal year 2008, the amount that exceeds 
        $1,180,000,000.
    (e) Cash-Flow Financing for Egypt.--As soon as practicable after 
the date of the enactment of this Act, the President shall modify the 
program of cash-flow financing for Egypt under section 23 of the Arms 
Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2763; relating to the ``Foreign Military 
Financing'' program) so as to accomplish the purposes of the policy set 
forth in paragraphs (3) and (4) of subsection (b) of this section.
    (f) Transfer of Certain Interest for Egypt.--For fiscal year 2006 
and subsequent fiscal years, any interest earned from amounts in an 
interest bearing account for Egypt to which funds made available under 
section 23 of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2763; relating to 
the ``Foreign Military Financing'' program) are disbursed--
            (1) shall be transferred to and consolidated with amounts 
        available for assistance for the Middle East Partnership 
        Initiative under chapter 4 of part II of the Foreign Assistance 
        Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2346 et seq.; relating to the ``Economic 
        Support Fund''); and
            (2) shall be allocated for democracy and governance 
        programs for Egypt, including direct support for 
        nongovernmental organizations.

SEC. 1022. INTER-ARAB DEMOCRATIC CHARTER.

    (a) Strategy.--The Secretary of State, acting through the Assistant 
Secretary for Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor, and in consultation 
with the Assistant Secretary for Near East Affairs and the Assistant 
Secretary for Western Hemisphere Affairs, shall develop and implement a 
strategy to--
            (1) support, including through the provision of technical 
        assistance, efforts to establish an Inter-Arab Democratic 
        Charter to promote human rights and democracy in the Near East 
        region; and
            (2) support and promote coordination among human rights 
        organizations, pro-democracy advocates, and civil society 
        members from both the Near East region and the Western 
        Hemisphere to assist in efforts to establish the Inter-Arab 
        Democratic Charter referred to in paragraph (1).
    (b) Report.--Section 665(c) of the Foreign Relations Authorization 
Act, Fiscal Year 2003 (Public Law 107-228; 22 U.S.C. 2151n note) as 
amended by section 614(a)(2) of this Act, is further amended by 
inserting after the first sentence the following new sentence: ``As 
part of such separate report, the Secretary shall include information 
on efforts by the Department of State to develop and implement the 
strategy to support efforts to establish an Inter-Arab Democratic 
Charter pursuant to section 708(a) of the Foreign Relations 
Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 2006 and 2007.''.
    (c) Funding.--Of the amounts made available for each of the fiscal 
years 2006 and 2007 to carry out chapter 4 of part II of the Foreign 
Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2346 et seq.; relating to the 
``Economic Support Fund''), including amounts made available to carry 
out the Human Rights and Democracy Fund and the Middle East Partnership 
Initiative, such sums as may be necessary for each such fiscal year is 
authorized to be available to the Secretary to carry out this section 
and the amendments made by this section.

SEC. 1023. MIDDLE EAST PARTNERSHIP INITIATIVE.

    (a) Funding.--Of the amounts made available for each of the fiscal 
years 2006 and 2007 to carry out chapter 4 of part II of the Foreign 
Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2346 et seq.; relating to the 
``Economic Support Fund''), such sums as may be necessary for each such 
fiscal year is authorized to be available to the Secretary of State to 
carry out programs and activities of the Middle East Partnership 
Initiative.
    (b) Requirement.--Not less than 50 percent of amounts made 
available for each of the fiscal years 2006 and 2007 to carry out the 
Middle East Partnership Initiative shall be used to--
            (1) strengthen civil society, particularly nongovernmental 
        organizations, and expand female and minority participation in 
        the political, economic, and educational sectors of countries 
        participating in the Initiative; and
            (2) strengthen the rule of law and promote democratic 
        values and institutions, particularly through--
                    (A) developing and implementing standards for free 
                and fair election in countries participating in the 
                Initiative; and
                    (B) supporting inter-regional efforts to promote 
                democracy in countries under authoritarian rule, 
                including through the Community of Democracies and 
                Forum for the Future.

SEC. 1024. WEST BANK AND GAZA PROGRAM.

    (a) Oversight.--For each of the fiscal years 2006 and 2007, the 
Secretary of State shall certify to the appropriate congressional 
committees not later than 30 days prior to the initial obligation of 
funds for the West Bank and Gaza that procedures have been established 
to ensure that the Comptroller General of the United States will have 
access to appropriate United States financial information in order to 
review the use of United States assistance for the West Bank and Gaza 
funded under chapter 4 of part II of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 
(22 U.S.C. 2346 et seq.; relating to the ``Economic Support Fund'').
    (b) Vetting.--Prior to any obligation of funds for each of the 
fiscal years 2006 and 2007 to carry out chapter 4 of part II of the 
Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 for assistance for the West Bank and 
Gaza, the Secretary of State shall take all appropriate steps to ensure 
that such assistance is not provided to or through any individual or 
entity that the Secretary knows, or has reason to believe, advocates, 
plans, sponsors, engages in, or has engaged in, terrorist activity. The 
Secretary of State shall, as appropriate, establish procedures 
specifying the steps to be taken in carrying out this subsection and 
shall terminate assistance to any individual or entity which the 
Secretary has determined advocates, plans, sponsors, or engages in 
terrorist activity.
    (c) Prohibition.--None of the funds made available for each of the 
fiscal years 2006 and 2007 to carry out chapter 4 of part II of the 
Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 for the West Bank and Gaza program may 
be made available for the purpose of recognizing or otherwise honoring 
individuals who commit, or have committed, acts of terrorism.
    (d) Audits.--
            (1) In general.--The Administrator of the United States 
        Agency for International Development shall ensure that 
        independent audits of all contractors and grantees, and 
        significant subcontractors and subgrantees, under the West Bank 
        and Gaza Program, are conducted for each of the fiscal years 
        2006 and 2007 to ensure, among other things, compliance with 
        this section.
            (2) Audits by inspector general of usaid.--Of the funds 
        available for each of the fiscal years 2006 and 2007 to carry 
        out chapter 4 of part II of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 
        that are made available for assistance for the West Bank and 
        Gaza, up to $1,000,000 for each such fiscal year may be used by 
        the Office of the Inspector General of the United States Agency 
        for International Development for audits, inspections, and 
        other activities in furtherance of the requirements of 
        paragraph (1). Such funds are in addition to funds otherwise 
        available for such purposes.
    (e) Definition.--In this subsection, the term ``appropriate 
congressional committees'' means--
            (1) the Committee on Appropriations and the Committee on 
        International Relations of the House of Representatives; and
            (2) the Committee on Appropriations and the Committee on 
        Foreign Relations of the Senate.

SEC. 1025. ECONOMIC SUPPORT FUND ASSISTANCE FOR VENEZUELA.

    There are authorized to be appropriated to the President $9,000,000 
for each of the fiscal years 2006 and 2007 for assistance under chapter 
4 of part II of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2346 et 
seq.; relating to the ``Economic Support Fund'') to fund activities 
which support political parties, the rule of law, civil society, an 
independent media, and otherwise promote democratic, accountable 
governance in Venezuela.

       CHAPTER 3--PART III OF THE FOREIGN ASSISTANCE ACT OF 1961

SEC. 1031. SUPPORT FOR PRO-DEMOCRACY AND HUMAN RIGHTS ORGANIZATIONS IN 
              CERTAIN COUNTRIES.

    Section 620A(a) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 
2371(a)) is amended by adding at the end the following new sentence: 
``The prohibition contained in the preceding sentence shall not apply 
with respect to assistance under part I (including chapter 4 of part 
II) of this Act provided in support of programs of a pro-democracy or 
human rights organization located or operating in a country described 
in such sentence, if, at least 30 days before obligating funds for such 
assistance, the Secretary of State notifies (in classified or 
unclassified form) the congressional committees specified in section 
634A(a) of this Act in accordance with the procedures applicable to 
reprogramming notifications under that section that the pro-democracy 
or human rights organization opposes the use of terrorism, supports 
democracy and respect for human rights, including the equality of women 
and ethnic and religious minorities, and supports freedoms of the 
press, speech, association, and religion.''.

SEC. 1032. LIMITATION ON ASSISTANCE TO THE PALESTINIAN AUTHORITY.

    (a) Declaration of Policy.--It shall be the policy of the United 
States to promote the emergence of a democratic Palestinian government 
that--
            (1) denounces and combats terrorism;
            (2) has agreed to disarm and dismantle any terrorist 
        agency, network, or facility;
            (3) has agreed to work to eliminate incitement and the 
        commemoration of terrorists in Palestinian society;
            (4) has agreed to respect the boundaries and sovereignty of 
        its neighbors; and
            (5) acknowledges, respects, and upholds the human rights of 
        all people.
    (b) Amendment.--Chapter 1 of part III of the Foreign Assistance Act 
of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2351 et seq.) is amended--
            (1) by redesignating the second section 620G (as added by 
        section 149 of Public Law 104-164 (110 Stat. 1436)) as section 
        620J; and
            (2) by adding at the end the following new section:

``SEC. 620K. LIMITATION ON ASSISTANCE TO THE PALESTINIAN AUTHORITY.

    ``(a) Limitations.--
            ``(1) Certification requirement.--Assistance may be 
        provided under this Act or any other provision of law to the 
        Palestinian Authority only during a period for which a 
        certification described in subsection (b) is in effect.
            ``(2) Amount of assistance requirement.--Of the total 
        amount of funds that are available for assistance under this 
        Act or any other provision of law to the Palestinian Authority 
        during a period for which a certification described in 
        subsection (b) is in effect, not more than 25 percent of such 
        amount may be obligated and expended during any calendar 
        quarter.
    ``(b) Certification.--A certification described in this subsection 
is a certification transmitted by the President to Congress that 
contains a determination of the President that--
            ``(1) providing direct assistance to the Palestinian 
        Authority is important to the national security interests of 
        the United States; and
            ``(2) the Palestinian Authority--
                    ``(A) is committed to and has initiated the process 
                of purging from its security services individuals with 
                ties to terrorism;
                    ``(B) has made demonstrable progress toward 
                dismantling the terrorist infrastructure, confiscating 
                unauthorized weapons, arresting and bringing terrorists 
                to justice, destroying unauthorized arms factories, 
                thwarting and preempting terrorist attacks, and is 
                fully cooperating with Israel's security services;
                    ``(C) has made demonstrable progress toward halting 
                all anti-Israel incitement in Palestinian Authority-
                controlled electronic and print media and in schools, 
                mosques, and other institutions it controls, and is 
                replacing these materials, including textbooks, with 
                materials that promote tolerance, peace, and 
                coexistence with Israel;
                    ``(D) has taken effective steps to ensure 
                democracy, the rule of law, and an independent 
                judiciary, and has adopted other reforms such as 
                ensuring transparent and accountable governance;
                    ``(E) is committed to ensuring that all elections 
                within areas it administers to be free, fair, and 
                transparent; and
                    ``(F) is undertaking verifiable efforts to ensure 
                the financial transparency and accountability of all 
                government ministries and operations.
    ``(c) Recertifications.--Not later than 90 days after the date on 
which the President transmits to Congress an initial certification 
under subsection (b), and every 6 months thereafter--
            ``(1) the President shall transmit to Congress a 
        recertification that the requirements contained in subsection 
        (b) are continuing to be met; or
            ``(2) if the President is unable to make such a 
        recertification, the President shall transmit to Congress a 
        report that contains the reasons therefor.
    ``(d) Congressional Notification.--Assistance made available under 
this Act or any other provision of law to the Palestinian Authority may 
not be provided until 15 days after the date on which the President has 
provided notice thereof to the Committee on International Relations and 
the Committee on Appropriations of the House of Representatives and to 
the Committee on Foreign Relations and the Committee on Appropriations 
of the Senate in accordance with the procedures applicable to 
reprogramming notifications under section 634A(a) of this Act.
    ``(e) Definition of Calendar Quarter.--In this section, the term 
`calendar quarter' means any three-month period beginning on January 1, 
April 1, July 1, or October 1 of a calendar year.''.
    (c) Report by Comptroller General.--Not later than 180 days after 
the date of the enactment of this Act, the Comptroller General of the 
United States shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees 
a report that contains a review of the extent to which United States 
assistance to the Palestinian Authority under the Foreign Assistance 
Act of 1961 or any other provision of law is properly audited by the 
Department of State, the United States Agency for International 
Development, and all other relevant departments and agencies of the 
Government of the United States.

SEC. 1033. ASSISTANCE FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT FORCES.

    (a) In General.--Section 660(b) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 
1961 (22 U.S.C. 2420(b)) is amended--
            (1) in paragraph (6)--
                    (A) by inserting ``to any national, regional, 
                district, municipal, or other sub-national governmental 
                entity of a foreign country'' after ``with respect to 
                assistance''; and
                    (B) by striking ``, and the provision of 
                professional'' and all that follows through 
                ``democracy'';
            (2) in paragraph (7), by striking the period at the end and 
        inserting a semicolon; and
            (3) by adding at the end the following new paragraphs:
            ``(8) with respect to assistance to combat corruption in 
        furtherance of the objectives for which programs are authorized 
        to be established under section 133 of this Act;
            ``(9) with respect to the provision of professional public 
        safety training to any national, regional, district, municipal, 
        or other sub-national governmental entity of a foreign country, 
        particularly training in international recognized standards of 
        human rights, the rule of law, conflict prevention, and the 
        promotion of civilian police roles that support democratic 
        governance and foster improved police relations between law 
        enforcement forces and the communities in which they serve;
            ``(10) with respect to assistance to combat trafficking in 
        persons, particularly trafficking in persons by organized 
        crime; or
            ``(11) with respect to assistance in direct support of 
        developing capabilities for and deployment to impending or 
        ongoing peace operations of the United Nations or comparable 
        regional organizations.''.
    (b) Technical Amendments.--Section 660 of the Foreign Assistance 
Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2420) is amended--
            (1) in subsection (b) (as amended by subsection (a) of this 
        section)--
                    (A) by striking paragraph (2);
                    (B) in paragraph (4), by striking ``or'' at the 
                end;
                    (C) in paragraph (7), by moving the margin 2 ems to 
                the left; and
                    (D) by redesignating paragraphs (3) through (11) as 
                paragraphs (2) through (10), respectively; and
            (2) by striking subsection (d).

                  Subtitle B--Other Provisions of Law

SEC. 1041. AMENDMENTS TO THE AFGHANISTAN FREEDOM SUPPORT ACT OF 2002.

    (a) Declaration of Policy.--It shall be the policy of the United 
States to--
            (1) assist Afghanistan in the preparation of parliamentary 
        elections which are currently scheduled to take place on 
        September 18, 2005;
            (2) urge donor governments and institutions to provide 
        significant financial support to support the United Nations 
        Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA) in carrying out such 
        parliamentary elections;
            (3) assist legitimate and recognized parliamentary 
        candidates and future elected parliamentary officials in 
        carrying out the responsibilities and duties of their elected 
        offices; and
            (4) assist Afghanistan in the preparation for future 
        presidential and parliamentary elections.
    (b) Purposes of Assistance.--Section 102 of the Afghanistan Freedom 
Support Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7512) is amended--
            (1) by redesignating paragraphs (5) through (9) as 
        paragraphs (7) through (11), respectively; and
            (2) by inserting after paragraph (4) the following new 
        paragraphs:
            ``(5) to ensure that parliamentary and presidential 
        elections in Afghanistan are carried out in a free, fair, and 
        transparent manner;
            ``(6) to provide assistance to legitimate and recognized 
        parliamentary candidates and future elected parliamentary 
        officials in Afghanistan to better educate such candidates and 
        officials on parliamentary procedures, anticorruption, 
        transparency, and good governance;''.
    (c) Activities Supported.--Section 103(a)(5)(C) of the Afghanistan 
Freedom Support Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7513(a)(5)(C)) is amended--
            (1) by striking clauses (iii) and (iv);
            (2) by redesignating clauses (v) through (vii) as clauses 
        (xi) through (xiii), respectively;
            (3) by inserting after clause (ii) the following new 
        clauses:
                            ``(iii) programs to promote comprehensive 
                        public information campaigns, including 
                        nationwide voter and civic education, for the 
                        public, candidates, and political parties, and 
                        special efforts with respect to provinces in 
                        which small percentages of women voted in the 
                        October 2004 presidential elections;
                            ``(iv) programs to accelerate disarmament, 
                        demobilization, and reintegration processes to 
                        ensure that candidates and political groups are 
                        not influenced or supported by armed militias;
                            ``(v) programs to support the registration 
                        of new voters and the preparation of voter 
                        rolls;
                            ``(vi) programs to support the vetting 
                        process of candidates for the parliamentary 
                        elections to ensure that such candidates are 
                        eligible under the relevant Afghan election 
                        requirements;
                            ``(vii) programs to educate legitimate and 
                        recognized parliamentary candidates on campaign 
                        procedures and processes;
                            ``(viii) capacity-building programs and 
                        advanced professional training programs for 
                        senior Afghan Government officials and future 
                        elected parliamentary officials in matters 
                        related to parliamentary procedures, anti-
                        corruption, accountability to constituencies, 
                        transparency, good governance, and other 
                        matters related to democratic development;
                            ``(ix) exchange programs to bring to the 
                        United States future elected parliamentary 
                        officials and senior officials of legitimate 
                        and recognized political parties for 
                        educational activities regarding legislative 
                        procedures, debate, and general campaign and 
                        legislative instruction;
                            ``(x) programs to support nongovernmental 
                        organizations and other civil society 
                        organizations that will assist in civil and 
                        voter education programs and overall democracy 
                        development programs;'';
            (4) in clause (xii) (as redesignated), by striking ``and'' 
        at the end;
            (5) in clause (xiii) (as redesignated), by striking the 
        period at the end and inserting ``; and''; and
            (6) by adding at the end the following new clause:
                            ``(xiv) other similar activities consistent 
                        with the purposes set forth in subsection 
                        (a).''.
    (d) Authorization of Appropriations.--Section 103(a)(5)(C) of the 
Afghanistan Freedom Support Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7513(a)(5)(C)), as 
amended by subsection (c), is further amended--
            (1) in the matter preceding clause (i), by striking ``To 
        support'' and inserting ``(i) To support'';
            (2) by redesignating clauses (i) through (xiv) as 
        subclauses (I) through (XIV), respectively; and
            (3) by adding at the end the following new clause:
                    ``(ii) Of the amounts made available for each of 
                the fiscal years 2006 and 2007 to carry out chapter 1 
                of part I of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 and 
                chapter 4 of part II of such Act, $50,000,000 for each 
                such fiscal year is authorized to be available to the 
                President to carry out subclauses (III) through (X) of 
                clause (i).''.
    (e) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that the 
President should take all necessary and appropriate steps to encourage 
all donor governments and institutions to provide full financial and 
logistical support to the United Nations Assistance Mission in 
Afghanistan (UNAMA) to carry out the parliamentary elections in 
Afghanistan, which are currently scheduled to take place on September 
18, 2005, so as to--
            (1) ensure the parliamentary elections are legitimate and 
        free from influence, intimidation, and violence by local 
        militia leaders and illicit narcotics terrorist organizations;
            (2) make certain that all Afghans who want to vote may do 
        so and may be educated about their choice in parliamentary 
        candidates;
            (3) provide that all legitimate and recognized 
        parliamentary candidates and officials of legitimate and 
        recognized political parties are informed and educated on 
        campaign procedures and processes;
            (4) provide that future parliamentary officials and senior 
        officials of legitimate and recognized political parties are 
        informed and educated on the legislative procedures and process 
        through exchange programs; and
            (5) assure sufficient funds for deployment of international 
        observers for the upcoming parliamentary elections and future 
        presidential and parliamentary elections.

SEC. 1042. AMENDMENTS TO THE TIBETAN POLICY ACT OF 2002.

    (a) Bilateral Assistance.--Section 616 of the Tibetan Policy Act of 
2002 (Public Law 107-228; 22 U.S.C. 6901 note) is amended--
            (1) by redesignating subsection (d) as subsection (e); and
            (2) by inserting after subsection (c) the following new 
        subsection:
    ``(d) United States Assistance.--
            ``(1) Assistance.--The President shall provide grants to 
        nongovernmental organizations to support sustainable economic 
        development, cultural and historical preservation, health care, 
        education, and environmental sustainability projects for 
        Tibetans inside Tibet that are designed in accordance with the 
        principles contained in subsection (e).
            ``(2) Role of special coordinator.--The United States 
        Special Coordinator for Tibetan Issues (established under 
        section 621(a)) shall review and approve all projects carried 
        out pursuant to paragraph (1).
            ``(3) Authorization of appropriations.--There are 
        authorized to be appropriated to the President to carry out 
        this subsection $6,000,000 for fiscal year 2006 and $8,000,000 
        for fiscal year 2007.''.
    (b) Language Training.--Section 619 of the Tibetan Policy Act of 
2002 (Public Law 107-228; 22 U.S.C. 6901 note) is amended to read as 
follows:

``SEC. 619. REQUIREMENT FOR TIBETAN LANGUAGE TRAINING.

    ``The Secretary shall ensure at least one Foreign Service officer 
assigned to a United States post in the People's Republic of China 
responsible for monitoring developments in Tibet has at least six 
months of Tibetan language training prior to taking up such assignment 
at such post, unless such officer possesses equivalent fluency. If the 
Secretary determines that training resources and timing permit, such 
officer shall receive one year of such training.''.
    (c) Special Coordinator for Tibetan Issues.--Section 621 of the 
Tibetan Policy Act of 2002 (Public Law 107-228; 22 U.S.C. 6901 note) is 
amended by adding at the end the following new subsection:
    ``(e) Personnel.--The Secretary shall assign dedicated personnel to 
the Office of the Special Coordinator for Tibetan Issues sufficient to 
assist in the management of the responsibilities of this section and 
section 616(d)(2).''.

SEC. 1043. AMENDMENTS TO THE ANGLO-IRISH AGREEMENT SUPPORT ACT OF 1986.

    (a) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that--
            (1) United States assistance for the International Fund for 
        Ireland (``International Fund'') has contributed greatly to the 
        economic development of Northern Ireland and that both 
        objectives of the Anglo-Irish Agreement Support Act of 1986 
        (Public Law 99-415), economic development and reconciliation, 
        remain critical to achieving a just and lasting peace in the 
        region, especially in the economically-depressed areas; and
            (2) since policing reform is a significant part of winning 
        public confidence and acceptance in the new form of government 
        in Northern Ireland, the International Fund is encouraged to 
        support programs that enhance relations between communities, 
        and between the police and the communities they serve, promote 
        human rights training for police, and enhance peaceful 
        mediation in neighborhoods of continued conflict.
    (b) Amendments.--
            (1) Findings and purposes.--Section 2(b) of the Anglo-Irish 
        Agreement Support Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-415) is amended by 
        adding at the end the following new sentence: ``Furthermore, 
        the International Fund is encouraged to support programs that 
        enhance relations between communities, and between the police 
        and the communities they serve, promote human rights training 
        for police, enhance peaceful mediation in neighborhoods of 
        continued conflict, promote training programs to enhance the 
        new district partnership police boards recommended by the 
        Patten Commission, and assist in the transition of former 
        British military installations and prisons into sites for 
        peaceful, community-supported activities, such as housing, 
        retail, and commercial development.''.
            (2) United states contributions to the international 
        funds.--Section 3 of the Anglo-Irish Agreement Support Act of 
        1986 is amended by adding at the end the following new 
        subsection:
    ``(c) Fiscal Years 2006 and 2007.--Of the amounts made available 
for fiscal years 2006 and 2007 to carry out chapter 4 of part II of the 
Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2346 et seq.; relating to the 
economic support fund), there are authorized to be appropriated 
$20,000,000 for each such fiscal year for United States contributions 
to the International Fund. Amounts appropriated pursuant to the 
authorization of appropriations under the preceding sentence are 
authorized to remain available until expended. Of the amount authorized 
to be appropriated for fiscal years 2006 and 2007 under this 
subsection, it is the sense of Congress that not less than 35 percent 
of such amount for each such fiscal year should be used to carry out 
the last sentence of section 2(b).''.
            (3) Annual reports.--Section 6(1) of the Anglo-Irish 
        Agreement Support Act of 1986 is amended by adding at the end 
        before the semicolon the following: ``, specifically through 
        improving local community relations and relations between the 
        police and the people they serve''.

SEC. 1044. ASSISTANCE FOR DEMOBILIZATION AND DISARMAMENT OF FORMER 
              IRREGULAR COMBATANTS IN COLOMBIA.

    (a) Authorization.--Amounts made available for fiscal year 2006 and 
each subsequent fiscal year for assistance for the Republic of Colombia 
under this Act or any other provision of law may be made available for 
assistance for the demobilization and disarmament of former members of 
foreign terrorist organizations in Colombia, specifically the United 
Self-Defense Forces of Colombia (AUC), the Revolutionary Armed Forces 
of Colombia (FARC) and the National Liberation Army (ELN), if the 
Secretary of State makes a certification described in subsection (b) to 
the appropriate congressional committees prior to the initial 
obligation of amounts for such assistance for the fiscal year involved.
    (b) Certification.--A certification described in this subsection is 
a certification that--
            (1) assistance for the fiscal year will be provided only 
        for individuals who have verifiably renounced and terminated 
        any affiliation or involvement with foreign terrorist 
        organizations;
            (2) the Government of Colombia is continuing to provide 
        full cooperation with the Government of the United States 
        relating to extradition requests involving leaders and members 
        of the foreign terrorist organizations involved in murder, 
        kidnapping, narcotics trafficking, and other violations of 
        United States law; and
            (3) the Government of Colombia has established a concrete 
        and workable framework for dismantling the organizational 
        structures of foreign terrorist organizations that adequately 
        balances the need for both reconciliation and justice with 
        concerns for fundamental human rights.
    (c) Definitions.--In this section:
            (1) Appropriate congressional committees.--The term 
        ``appropriate congressional committees'' means--
                    (A) the Committee on Appropriations and the 
                Committee on International Relations of the House of 
                Representatives; and
                    (B) the Committee on Appropriations and the 
                Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate.
            (2) Foreign terrorist organization.--The term ``foreign 
        terrorist organization'' means an organization designated as a 
        terrorist organization under section 219 of the Immigration and 
        Nationality Act.

SEC. 1045. SUPPORT FOR FAMINE RELIEF IN ETHIOPIA.

    (a) Demonstration Insurance Project.--The Secretary of State is 
authorized to make a United States voluntary contribution to the United 
Nations World Food Program to establish and carry out a demonstration 
insurance project in the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia using 
weather derivatives to transfer the risk of catastrophic drought 
resulting in famine from vulnerable subsistence farmers to 
international capital markets for the purpose of protecting vulnerable 
subsistence farmers against income and asset losses during natural 
disasters.
    (b) Report.--Not later than one year and two years after the date 
of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall submit to the 
appropriate congressional committees a report on the implementation of 
the project referred to in subsection (a).
    (c) Authorization of Appropriations.--There is authorized to be 
appropriated to the Secretary to carry out this section up to 
$4,000,000 for fiscal year 2006.

SEC. 1046. ASSISTANCE TO PROMOTE DEMOCRACY AND HUMAN RIGHTS IN VIETNAM.

    (a) Finding.--Congress finds that the Socialist Republic of Vietnam 
is a one-party state, ruled and controlled by the Communist Party of 
Vietnam, which continues to deny the right of citizens to change their 
government, prohibits independent political, labor, and social 
organizations, and continues to commit serious human rights violations, 
including the detention and imprisonment of persons for the peaceful 
expression of dissenting religious and political views.
    (b) Policy.--It is the policy of the United States--
            (1) to limit United States nonhumanitarian assistance 
        provided to the Government of Vietnam, not to exceed the amount 
        so provided for fiscal year 2005, unless the President 
        certifies to Congress not later than 30 days after the date of 
        the enactment of this Act that, during the 12-month period 
        preceding such certification, Vietnam has made substantial 
        progress toward--
                    (A) releasing political and religious prisoners;
                    (B) respecting religious freedom and other 
                universally recognized human rights;
                    (C) allowing open access to the United States for 
                its refugee program;
                    (D) cooperating fully toward providing information 
                concerning the locations of members of the United 
                States Armed Forces who continue to be officially 
                listed as missing in action as a result of the Vietnam 
                conflict;
                    (E) respecting the rights of ethnic minorities in 
                the Central Highlands; and
                    (F) ensuring that it is not acting in complicity 
                with organizations engaged in the trafficking of human 
                persons; and
            (2) to ensure that programs of educational and cultural 
        exchange with Vietnam actively promote progress towards freedom 
        and democracy in Vietnam by ensuring that Vietnamese nationals 
        who have already demonstrated a commitment to these values are 
        included in such programs.
    (c) Definition.--In this section, the term ``United States 
nonhumanitarian assistance'' means--
            (1) any assistance under the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 
        (including programs under title IV of chapter 2 of part I of 
        such Act, relating to the Overseas Private Investment 
        Corporation), other than--
                    (A) disaster relief assistance, including any 
                assistance under chapter 9 of part I of such Act;
                    (B) assistance which involves the provision of food 
                (including monetization of food) or medicine;
                    (C) assistance for refugees; and
                    (D) assistance to combat HIV/AIDS, including any 
                assistance under section 104A of such Act; and
            (2) sales, or financing on any terms, under the Arms Export 
        Control Act.
    (d) Authorization.--
            (1) In general.--The President is authorized to provide 
        assistance to nongovernmental organizations and organizations 
        to promote democracy and internationally recognized human 
        rights in Vietnam.
            (2) Authorization of appropriations.--There are authorized 
        to be appropriated to the President $2,000,000 to carry out 
        paragraph (1).

SEC. 1047. TRANSFER OF MARINE PATROL AIRCRAFT TO THE GOVERNMENT OF 
              COLOMBIA.

    (a) Transfer Authority.--The Secretary of State, acting through the 
Assistant Secretary of the Bureau for International Narcotics and Law 
Enforcement Affairs, is authorized to procure for transfer to the 
Government of Colombia two tactical, unpressurized marine patrol 
aircraft for use by the Colombian Navy to interdict and disable drug 
trafficking vessels in and near the territorial waters of Colombia. 
Such transfers may be on a grant or lease basis, as appropriate.
    (b) Authorization of Appropriations.--There is authorized to be 
appropriated to the Secretary to carry out this section $25,000,000 for 
fiscal year 2006.

SEC. 1048. TRAINING AND ASSISTANCE TO IDENTIFY UNKNOWN VICTIMS WHO WERE 
              ABDUCTED AND MURDERED IN CIUDAD JUAREZ, MEXICO.

    (a) Statement of Congress.--Congress urges the President and 
Secretary of State to incorporate the investigative and preventative 
efforts of the Government of Mexico in the bilateral agenda between the 
Government of Mexico and the Government of the United States and to 
continue to express concern to the Government of Mexico over the 
abductions and murders of young women since 1993 in the Mexican city of 
Ciudad Juarez.
    (b) Training and Assistance.--The Secretary of State is authorized 
to provide training and assistance to identify unknown victims who were 
murdered in the Mexican city of Ciudad Juarez through forensic 
analysis, including DNA testing, conducted by independent, impartial 
experts who are sensitive to the special needs and concerns of the 
victims' families, as well as efforts to make these services available 
to any families who have doubts about the results of prior forensic 
testing.
    (c) Authorization of Appropriations.--There is authorized to be 
appropriated to the Secretary of State $500,000 for fiscal year 2006 to 
carry out subsection (b).

                  Subtitle C--Miscellaneous Provisions

SEC. 1051. REPORT ON UNITED STATES WEAPONS TRANSFERS, SALES, AND 
              LICENSING TO HAITI.

    (a) Report.--Not later than 180 days after the date of the 
enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State shall submit to the 
appropriate congressional committees a report on all United States 
weapons transfers, sales, and licensing to the Government of the 
Republic of Haiti for the period beginning on October 4, 1991, and 
ending on the date of the enactment of this Act.
    (b) Contents.--The report required by subsection (a) shall include 
a detailed description of each of the following:
            (1) The names of the individuals or governmental entities 
        to which weapons were transferred, sold, or licensed.
            (2) The number and types of weapons transferred, sold, or 
        licensed.
            (3) The safeguards, if any, that were required prior to the 
        transfer, sale, or license of the weapons.
    (c) Definition.--In this section, the term ``United States weapons 
transfers, sales, and licensing'' means transfers, sales, and licensing 
of weapons under--
            (1) section 38 of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 
        2778); or
            (2) chapter 8 of part I of the Foreign Assistance Act of 
        1961 (22 U.S.C. 2291 et seq.).

SEC. 1052. SENSE OF CONGRESS REGARDING ASSISTANCE FOR REGIONAL HEALTH 
              EDUCATION AND TRAINING PROGRAMS.

    (a) Statement of Policy.--Congress recognizes that many health 
problems are not country specific. Instead many health issues can be 
categorized and treated more effectively on a regional basis.
    (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that the United 
States Agency for International Development should use up to five 
percent of country-specific health program funds, as needed, to address 
regional health education and training needs in instances in which it 
would be more cost effective to implement health education and training 
programs on a regional basis.

SEC. 1053. SENSE OF CONGRESS REGARDING ASSISTANCE FOR REGIONAL HEALTH 
              CARE DELIVERY.

    (a) Statement of Policy.--Congress declares the following:
            (1) Health systems in developing countries for allocating 
        and managing health resources are dysfunctional and incapable 
        of addressing evolving epidemiological and demographical 
        changes.
            (2) Neither regional nor countrywide health problems can be 
        adequately addressed without the infrastructure for health 
        systems in place.
            (3) The areas in Africa, Europe, Eurasia, the Middle East, 
        and Asia with the greatest health problems all lack the 
        infrastructure for health systems that can support providers 
        and contain the cost of treatment.
    (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that the United 
States Agency for International Development should use up to five 
percent of country-specific health program funds, as needed, to support 
projects to create and improve indigenous capacity for health care 
delivery in regions in which such projects are most needed.

SEC. 1054. SENSE OF CONGRESS REGARDING ELIMINATION OF EXTREME POVERTY 
              IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES.

    It is the sense of Congress that--
            (1) the elimination of extreme poverty in developing 
        countries should be a major priority of United States foreign 
        policy;
            (2) the Unites States should further demonstrate its 
        leadership and commitment to eliminating extreme poverty by 
        working with developing countries, donor countries, and 
        multilateral institutions committed to the necessary reforms, 
        policies, and practices that reduce extreme poverty in 
        developing countries and by pursuing greater coordination with 
        key allies and international partners; and
            (3) the President, acting through the Administrator of the 
        United States Agency for International Development, and in 
        consultation with the heads of other appropriate departments 
        and agencies of the Government of the United States, 
        international organizations, international financial 
        institutions, recipient governments, civil society 
        organizations, and other appropriate entities, should develop a 
        comprehensive strategy to eliminate extreme poverty in 
        developing countries that involves foreign assistance, foreign 
        and local private investment, technical assistance, private-
        public partnerships, and debt relief.

SEC. 1055. SENSE OF CONGRESS REGARDING UNITED STATES FOREIGN 
              ASSISTANCE.

    It is the sense of Congress that--
            (1) United States foreign assistance should be used to 
        support local capacity-building in developing countries and 
        should focus on improving the institutional capacities of 
        developing countries in order to promote long-term development; 
        and
            (2) the Department of State, the United States Agency for 
        International Development, and the Millennium Challenge 
        Corporation should increase their efforts to enhance recipient 
        country participation in the planning of development programs, 
        promote recipient country ownership of the programs, and build 
        local capacity within the recipient country.

SEC. 1056. SENSE OF CONGRESS REGARDING ASSISTANCE FOR CHALDOASSYRIANS 
              AND OTHER INDIGENOUS CHRISTIANS IN IRAQ.

    (a) Findings.--Congress finds the following:
            (1) ChaldoAssyrians and other indigenous Christians in Iraq 
        welcome the opportunity following Iraq's liberation to move 
        beyond the days of repression and persecution and toward 
        greater prosperity by cooperating in the development of a 
        democratic, pluralistic state.
            (2) Religious and ethnic discrimination has driven half of 
        Iraq's indigenous Christians into diaspora since the 1960s and 
        now threatens to create a mass exodus, thereby depriving Iraq 
        of one of its oldest and most distinctive ethnic communities.
    (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that--
            (1) all relevant departments and agencies of the Government 
        of the United States should pay special attention to the 
        welfare of ChaldoAssyrians and other indigenous Christians in 
        Iraq in order to prevent a mass exodus that would detrimentally 
        affect the preservation of diversity in the Middle East and the 
        promotion of general tolerance for others; and
            (2) the President, acting through the Administrator of the 
        United States Agency for International Development, should 
        allocate funds specifically for the promotion of the welfare, 
        education, and resettlement of ChaldoAssyrians and other 
        indigenous Christians in Iraq where they may be currently 
        prevented from returning to their homes.

                    TITLE XI--REPORTING REQUIREMENTS

SEC. 1101. TRANS-SAHARA COUNTER-TERRORISM INITIATIVE.

    (a) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that efforts by 
the Government of the United States to expand the Pan Sahel Initiative 
into a robust counter-terrorism program in the Saharan region of 
Africa, to be known as the ``Trans-Sahara Counter Terrorism 
Initiative'', should be strongly supported.
    (b) Report.--
            (1) In general.--Not later than 120 days after the date of 
        the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State shall submit 
        to the appropriate congressional committees a detailed 
        strategy, in classified form, regarding the plan of the 
        Government of the United States to expand the Pan Sahel 
        Initiative into a robust counter-terrorism program in the 
        Saharan region of Africa, to be known as the ``Trans-Sahara 
        Counter Terrorism Initiative''.
            (2) Contents.--The report shall include the following:
                    (A) The names of the countries that will 
                participate in the Initiative.
                    (B) A description of the types of security 
                assistance necessary to create rapid reaction security 
                forces in order to bolster the capacity of the 
                countries referred to in subparagraph (A) to govern 
                their borders.
                    (C) A description of training to ensure respect for 
                human rights and civilian authority by rapid reaction 
                security forces referred to in subparagraph (B) and 
                other appropriate individuals and entities of the 
                countries referred to in subparagraph (A).
                    (D) A description of the types of public diplomacy 
                and related assistance that will be provided to promote 
                development and counter radical Islamist elements that 
                may be gaining a foothold in the region.
            (3) Update.--The Secretary shall submit to the appropriate 
        congressional committees an update of the report required by 
        this subsection not later than one year after the date of the 
        initial submission of the report under this subsection.
    (c) Cooperation of Other Departments and Agencies.--The head of 
each appropriate department and agency of the Government of the United 
States shall cooperate fully with, and assist in the implementation of, 
the strategy described in subsection (b)(1) and shall make such 
resources and information available as is necessary to ensure the 
success of the Initiative described in such subsection.

SEC. 1102. ANNUAL PATTERNS OF GLOBAL TERRORISM REPORT.

    (a) Requirement of Report.--Section 140(a) Foreign Relations 
Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1988 and 1989 (22 U.S.C. 2656f(a)) is 
amended--
            (1) in the heading, by striking ``Country Reports on 
        Terrorism'' and inserting ``Patterns of Global Terrorism 
        Report''; and
            (2) in the matter preceding paragraph (1), by inserting ``, 
        the Committee on International Relations of the House of 
        Representatives,'' after ``Speaker of the House of 
        Representatives''.
    (b) Assessments With Respect to Foreign Countries in Which Acts of 
Terrorism Occurred.--Section 140(a)(1)(A)(i) of the Foreign Relations 
Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1988 and 1989 (22 U.S.C. 
2656f(a)(1)(A)(i)) is amended--
            (1) by striking ``which were, in the opinion of the 
        Secretary, of major significance;'' and inserting ``, 
        including--''; and
            (2) by adding at the end the following new subclauses:
                            ``(I) the number of such acts of terrorism 
                        or attempted acts of terrorism;
                            ``(II) the number of individuals, including 
                        United States citizens, who were killed or 
                        injured in such acts of terrorism;
                            ``(III) the methods, and relative frequency 
                        of methods, utilized in such acts of terrorism; 
                        and
                            ``(IV) assessments of individuals who were 
                        responsible for such acts of terrorism and the 
                        relationships of such individuals to terrorist 
                        groups;''.
    (c) Information With Respect to Terrorist Groups.--Section 
140(a)(2) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1988 
and 1989 (22 U.S.C. 2656f(a)(2)) is amended by inserting after ``and 
any other known international terrorist group'' the following ``or 
emerging terrorist group''.
    (d) Information With Respect to All Foreign Countries.--Section 
140(a) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1988 
and 1989 (22 U.S.C. 2656f(a)) is amended--
            (1) in paragraph (2), by adding ``and'' at the end after 
        the semicolon;
            (2) in paragraph (3)--
                    (A) in the matter preceding subparagraph (A), by 
                striking ``from which the United States Government'' 
                and all that follows through ``United States citizens 
                or interests'' and inserting ``worldwide'';
                    (B) in subparagraph (A)--
                            (i) by striking ``the individual or'';
                            (ii) by striking ``the act'' and inserting 
                        ``acts of terrorism''; and
                            (iii) by striking ``and'' at the end;
                    (C) in subparagraph (B) by striking ``against 
                United States citizens in the foreign country''; and
                    (D) by adding at the end the following new 
                subparagraph:
                    ``(C) the extent to which the government of the 
                foreign country is not cooperating with respect to the 
                matters described in subparagraphs (A) and (B) and 
                other matters relating to counterterrorism efforts.''; 
                and
            (3) by striking paragraph (4).
    (e) Existing Provisions to Be Included in Report.--Section 140(b) 
of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1988 and 1989 
(22 U.S.C. 2656f(b)) is amended--
            (1) in the matter preceding paragraph (1), by striking 
        ``should to the extent feasible'' and inserting ``shall'';
            (2) in paragraph (1)--
                    (A) in the matter preceding subparagraph (A), by 
                inserting ``and (a)(3)'' after ``subsection 
                (a)(1)(A)'';
                    (B) by redesignating subparagraphs (A), (B), and 
                (C) as subparagraphs (B), (C), and (D), respectively;
                    (C) by inserting before subparagraph (B) (as 
                redesignated) the following new subparagraph:
                    ``(A) a separate list, in chronological order, of 
                all acts of international terrorism described in 
                subsection (a)(1)(A);'';
                    (D) in subparagraph (C) (as redesignated), by 
                striking ``affecting American citizens or facilities''; 
                and
                    (E) in subparagraph (D) (as redesignated)--
                            (i) in clause (i), by adding at the end 
                        before the semicolon the following: ``by the 
                        government of the country, government 
                        officials, nongovernmental organizations, 
                        quasi-governmental organizations, or nationals 
                        of the country'';
                            (ii) in clause (v), by adding ``and'' at 
                        the end after the semicolon; and
                            (iii) by adding at the end the following 
                        new clause:
                            ``(vi) other types of indirect support for 
                        international terrorism, such as inciting acts 
                        of terrorism or countenance of acts of 
                        terrorism by the government of the country, 
                        government officials, nongovernmental 
                        organizations, quasi-governmental 
                        organizations, or nationals of the country;'';
            (3) in paragraph (3)--
                    (A) in subparagraph (E), by striking ``and'' at the 
                end;
                    (B) in subparagraph (F), by adding ``and'' at the 
                end; and
                    (C) by adding at the end the following new 
                subparagraph:
                    ``(G) information on the stated intentions and 
                patterns of activities of terrorist groups described in 
                subsection (a)(2), capabilities and membership of such 
                groups, recruitment and fundraising activities of such 
                groups, and the relationships of such groups to 
                criminal organizations, including organizations 
                involved in illicit narcotics trafficking;''; and
            (4) by redesignating paragraphs (3) and (4) (as added by 
        section 701(a)(2)(C) of the Intelligence Authorization Act for 
        Fiscal Year 2005 (Public Law 108-487; 118 Stat. 3961)) as 
        paragraphs (6) and (7), respectively.
    (f) New Provisions to Be Included in Report.--Section 140(b) of the 
Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1988 and 1989 (22 
U.S.C. 2656f(b)), as amended by subsection (e), is further amended--
            (1) in paragraph (6) (as redesignated), by striking ``and'' 
        at the end;
            (2) in paragraph (7) (as redesignated), by striking the 
        period at the end and inserting a semicolon; and
            (3) by adding at the end the following new paragraphs:
            ``(8) an analysis of the efforts of multilateral 
        organizations (excluding international financial institutions) 
        to combat international terrorism, including efforts of the 
        United Nations and its affiliated organizations, regional 
        multilateral organizations, and nongovernmental organizations;
            ``(9) a list of countries of concern with respect to the 
        financing of terrorism; and
            ``(10) an analysis of policy goals of the United States for 
        counterterrorism efforts in the subsequent calendar year.''.
    (g) Classification of Report.--Section 140(c) of the Foreign 
Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1988 and 1989 (22 U.S.C. 
2656f(c)) is amended to read as follows:
    ``(c) Classification of Report.--The report required by subsection 
(a) shall be submitted in unclassified form and shall contain a 
classified annex as necessary.''.
    (h) Inter-Agency Process for Compilation of Report.--Section 140 of 
Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1988 and 1989 (22 
U.S.C. 2656f) is amended--
            (1) by redesignating subsections (d) and (e) as subsections 
        (e) and (f), respectively; and
            (2) by inserting after subsection (c) the following new 
        subsection:
    ``(d) Inter-Agency Process for Compilation of Report.--The 
Secretary of State shall, in preparing the report required by 
subsection (a), establish an inter-agency process to--
            ``(1) consult and coordinate with other appropriate 
        officials of the Government of the United States who are 
        responsible for collecting and analyzing counterterrorism 
        intelligence; and
            ``(2) utilize, to the maximum extent practicable, such 
        counterterrorism intelligence and analyses.''.
    (i) Comparability Standard With Prior Report.--Section 140 of 
Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1988 and 1989 (22 
U.S.C. 2656f), as amended by subsection (h), is further amended--
            (1) by redesignating subsections (e) and (f) (as 
        redesignated) as subsections (f) and (g), respectively; and
            (2) by inserting after subsection (d) (as added by 
        subsection (h)) the following new subsection:
    ``(e) Comparability Standard With Prior Report.--The Secretary of 
State shall, in preparing the report required by subsection (a), use 
standards, criteria, and methodologies in a consistent manner so that 
statistical comparisons may be made among different reports. If 
significant changes are made to any such standards, criteria, or 
methodology, the Secretary shall, in consultation with other 
appropriate officials of the Government of the United States, make 
appropriate adjustments, using the best available methods, so that the 
data provided in each report is comparable to the data provided in 
prior reports.''.
    (j) Definitions.--Section 140(f)(1) of Foreign Relations 
Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1988 and 1989 (as redesignated) is 
amended to read as follows:
            ``(1) the term `international terrorism' means--
                    ``(A) terrorism involving citizens or the territory 
                of more than one country; or
                    ``(B) terrorism involving citizens and the 
                territory of one country which is intended to 
                intimidate or coerce not only the civilian population 
                or government of such country but also other civilian 
                populations or governments;''.
    (k) Reporting Period.--Section 140(g) Foreign Relations 
Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1988 and 1989 (as redesignated) is 
amended to read as follows:
    ``(g) Reporting Period.--The report required under subsection (a) 
shall cover the events of the calendar year preceding the calender year 
in which the report is transmitted.''.
    (l) Appearance of Secretary of State Before Congress.--Section 140 
of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1988 and 1989 
(22 U.S.C. 2656f) is amended by adding at the end the following new 
subsection:
    ``(h) Appearance of Secretary of State Before Congress.--
            ``(1) In general.--The Secretary of State shall appear 
        before Congress at annual hearings, as specified in paragraph 
        (2), regarding the provisions included in the report required 
        under subsection (a).
            ``(2) Schedule.--The Secretary of State shall appear 
        before--
                    ``(A) the Committee on International Relations of 
                the House of Representatives on or about May 20 of even 
                numbered calendar years;
                    ``(B) the Committee on Foreign Relations of the 
                Senate on or about May 20 of odd numbered calendar 
                years; and
                    ``(C) either Committee referred to in subparagraph 
                (A) or (B), upon request, following the scheduled 
                appearance of the Secretary before the other Committee 
                under subparagraph (A) or (B).''.
    (m) Conforming Amendments.--
            (1) Section heading.--The heading of section 140 of the 
        Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1988 and 1989 
        (22 U.S.C. 2656f) is amended to read as follows:

``SEC. 140. ANNUAL PATTERNS OF GLOBAL TERRORISM REPORT.''.

            (2) Table of contents.--The table of contents of such Act 
        (as contained in section 1(b) of such Act) is amended in the 
        item relating to section 140 to read as follows:

``Sec. 140. Annual patterns of global terrorism report.''.
    (n) Effective Date.--The amendments made by this section apply with 
respect to the report required to be transmitted under section 140 of 
the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1988 and 1989 (22 
U.S.C. 2656f), by April 30, 2007, and by April 30 of each subsequent 
year.

SEC. 1103. DUAL GATEWAY POLICY OF THE GOVERNMENT OF IRELAND.

    (a) In General.--The Secretary of State shall review the dual 
gateway policy and determine the effects the discontinuation of such 
policy might have on the economy of the United States and the economy 
of western Ireland before the United States takes any action that could 
lead to the discontinuation of such policy.
    (b) Economic Impact Study.--In determining the effects that the 
discontinuation of such policy might have on the economy of the United 
States, the Secretary, in consultation with the heads of other 
appropriate departments and agencies, shall consider the effects the 
discontinuation of such policy might have on United States businesses 
operating in western Ireland, Irish businesses operating in and around 
Shannon Airport, and United States air carriers serving Ireland.
    (c) Report.--Not later than 180 days after the date of the 
enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall submit to the appropriate 
congressional committees a report describing the determinations made 
under subsection (a), together with any recommendations for United 
States action.
    (d) Definition.--In this section, the term ``dual gateway policy'' 
means the policy of the Government of Ireland requiring certain air 
carriers serving Dublin Airport to undertake an equal numbers of 
flights to Shannon Airport and Dublin Airport during each calendar 
year.

SEC. 1104. STABILIZATION IN HAITI.

    Not later than one year after the date of the enactment of this Act 
and one year thereafter, the Secretary of State shall submit to the 
appropriate congressional committees a report on United States efforts 
to--
            (1) assist in the disarmament of illegally armed forces in 
        Haiti, including through a program of gun exchanges;
            (2) assist in the reform of the Haitian National Police; 
        and
            (3) support stabilization in Haiti.

SEC. 1105. VERIFICATION REPORTS TO CONGRESS.

    Section 403(a) of the Arms Control and Disarmament Act (22 U.S.C. 
2593a(a)) is amended in the matter preceding paragraph (1)--
            (1) by striking ``prepared by the Secretary of State with 
        the concurrence of the Director of Central Intelligence and in 
        consultation with the Secretary of Defense, the Secretary of 
        Energy, and the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff,''; and
            (2) by inserting ``, as the President considers 
        appropriate'' after ``include''.

SEC. 1106. PROTECTION OF REFUGEES FROM NORTH KOREA.

    Section 305(a) of the North Korean Human Rights Act of 2004 (Public 
Law 108-333; 22 U.S.C. 7845) is amended--
            (1) in paragraph (1), by striking ``and'' at the end;
            (2) in paragraph (2), by striking the period at the end and 
        inserting ``; and''; and
            (3) by adding at the end the following new paragraph:
            ``(3) a detailed description of the measures undertaken by 
        the Secretary of State to carry out section 303, including 
        country-specific information with respect to United States 
        efforts to secure the cooperation and permission of the 
        governments of countries in East and Southeast Asia to 
        facilitate United States processing of North Koreans seeking 
        protection as refugees. The information required by this 
        paragraph may be provided in a classified format, if 
        necessary.''.

SEC. 1107. ACQUISITION AND MAJOR SECURITY UPGRADES.

    Section 605(c) of the Secure Embassy Construction and 
Counterterrorism Act of 1999 (title VI of the Admiral James W. Nance 
and Meg Donovan Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 2000 
and 2001; Public Law 106-113--Appendix G) is amended--
            (1) in the heading, by striking ``Semiannual'';
            (2) in the matter preceding paragraph (1), by striking 
        ``June 1 and''; and
            (3) in paragraph (1)(A), by striking ``two fiscal 
        quarters'' and inserting ``year''.

SEC. 1108. SERVICES FOR CHILDREN WITH AUTISM AT OVERSEAS MISSIONS.

    (a) Study.--With respect to countries in which there is at least 
one mission of the United States, the Secretary of State shall conduct 
a study of the availability of programs that address the special needs 
of children with autism, including the availability of speech 
therapists and pediatric occupational therapists at Department of 
Defense sponsored schools. Such study shall include the estimated 
incidence of autism among dependents of members of the Foreign Service 
and dependents of specialist Foreign Service personnel. Such study 
shall also include an analysis of the possibility of establishing 
``Educational Centers of Excellence'' for such children.
    (b) Report.--Not later than 30 days after the completion of the 
study required under subsection (a), the Secretary shall submit to the 
appropriate congressional committees a report containing the findings 
of the study together with any recommendations for related action.

SEC. 1109. INCIDENCE AND PREVALENCE OF AUTISM WORLDWIDE.

    (a) Study.--
            (1) In general.--The Secretary of State shall direct the 
        United States representative to the Executive Board of the 
        United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) to use the voice and 
        vote of the United States to urge UNICEF to provide for the 
        conduct of a study of the incidence and prevalence of autism 
        spectrum disorders (in this section referred to as ``autism'') 
        worldwide.
            (2) Conduct of study.--The study should--
                    (A) evaluate the incidence and prevalence of autism 
                in all countries worldwide and compare such incidence 
                and prevalence to the incidence and prevalence of 
                autism in the United States and evaluate the 
                reliability of the information obtained from each 
                country in carrying out this subparagraph; and
                    (B) evaluate the feasibility of establishing a 
                method for the collection of information relating to 
                the incidence and prevalence of autism in all countries 
                worldwide.
    (b) Report.--The Secretary of State shall direct the United States 
representative to the Executive Board of UNICEF to use the voice and 
vote of the United States to urge UNICEF to--
            (1) provide for the preparation of a report that contains 
        the results of the study described in subsection (a); and
            (2) provide for the availability of the report on the 
        Internet website of UNICEF.
    (c) Funding.--Of the amounts made available for fiscal year 2006 to 
carry out section 301 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 
2221), $1,500,000 is authorized to be available for a voluntary 
contribution to UNICEF to conduct the study described in subsection (a) 
and prepare the report described in subsection (b).

SEC. 1110. INTERNET JAMMING.

    (a) Report.--Not later than March 1 of the year following the date 
of the enactment of this Act, the Chairman of the Broadcasting Board of 
Governors shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees a 
report on the status of state-sponsored and state-directed Internet 
jamming by repressive foreign governments and a description of efforts 
by the United States to counter such jamming. Each report shall list 
the countries the governments of which pursue Internet censorship or 
jamming and provide information concerning the government agencies or 
quasi-governmental organizations of such governments that engage in 
Internet jamming.
    (b) Form.--If the Chairman determines that such is appropriate, the 
Chairman may submit such report together with a classified annex.

SEC. 1111. DEPARTMENT OF STATE EMPLOYMENT COMPOSITION.

    (a) Statement of Policy.--In order for the Department of State to 
accurately represent all people in the United States, the Department 
must accurately reflect the diversity of the United States.
    (b) Report on Minority Recruitment.--Section 324 of the Foreign 
Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Year 2003 (Public Law 107-228) is 
amended--
            (1) in the matter preceding paragraph (1), by striking 
        ``April 1, 2003, and April 1, 2004,'' and inserting ``April 1, 
        2006, and April 1, 2007,''; and
            (2) in paragraphs (1) and (2), by striking ``minority 
        groups'' each place it appears and inserting ``minority groups 
        and women''.
    (c) Acquisition.--Section 324 of such Act is further amended by 
adding at the end the following new paragraph:
            ``(3) For the immediately preceding 12-month period for 
        which such information is available--
                    ``(A) the numbers and percentages of small, 
                minority-owned, or disadvantaged businesses that 
                provide goods and services to the Department as a 
                result of contracts with the Department during such 
                period;
                    ``(B) the total number of such contracts;
                    ``(C) the total dollar value of such contracts; and
                    ``(D) and the percentage value represented by such 
                contract proportionate to the total value of all 
                contracts held by the Department.''.
    (d) Use of Funds.--The provisions of section 325 of such Act shall 
apply to funds authorized to be appropriated under section 101(1)(G) of 
this Act.

SEC. 1112. INCITEMENT TO ACTS OF DISCRIMINATION.

    (a) Inclusion of Information Relating to Incitement to Acts of 
Discrimination in Annual Country Reports on Human Right Practices.--
            (1) Countries receiving economic assistance.--Section 
        116(d) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 
        2151n(d)), as amended by section 614(b)(1) of this Act, is 
        further amended--
                    (A) in paragraph (10), by striking ``and'' at the 
                end;
                    (B) in paragraph (11)(C), by striking the period at 
                the end and inserting ``; and''; and
                    (C) by adding at the end the following new 
                paragraph:
            ``(12) wherever applicable, a description of the nature and 
        extent of--
                    ``(A) propaganda in foreign government and foreign 
                government-controlled media and other sources, 
                including foreign government-produced educational 
                materials and textbooks, that attempt to justify or 
                promote racial hatred or incite acts of violence 
                against any race or people;
                    ``(B) complicity or involvement by the foreign 
                government in the creation of such propaganda or 
                incitement of acts of violence against any race or 
                people; and
                    ``(C) a description of the actions, if any, taken 
                by the foreign government to eliminate such propaganda 
                or incitement.''.
            (2) Countries receiving security assistance.--Section 
        502B(b) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 
        2304(b)), as amended by section 614(b)(2) of this Act, is 
        further amended by inserting after the ninth sentence the 
        following new sentence: ``Each report under this section shall 
        also include, wherever applicable, a description of the nature 
        and extent of propaganda in foreign government and foreign 
        government-controlled media and other sources, including 
        foreign government-produced educational materials and 
        textbooks, that attempt to justify or promote racial hatred or 
        incite acts of violence against any race or people, complicity 
        or involvement by the foreign government in the creation of 
        such propaganda or incitement of acts of violence against any 
        race or people, and a description of the actions, if any, taken 
        by the foreign government to eliminate such propaganda or 
        incitement.''.
    (b) Effective Date of Amendment.--The amendment made by subsection 
(a) shall take effect on the date of the enactment of this Act and 
apply beginning with the first report submitted by the Secretary of 
State under sections 116(d) and 502B(b) of the Foreign Assistance Act 
of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2151n(d) and 2304(b)) after such date.

SEC. 1113. CHILD MARRIAGE.

    (a) One Time Report.--Not later than 180 days after the date of the 
enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State shall submit to the 
appropriate congressional committees a one time report on the practice 
of the custom of child marriage in countries around the world. The 
report shall include the following information:
            (1) A separate section for each country, as applicable, 
        describing the nature and extent of child marriage in such 
        country.
            (2) A description of the actions, if any, taken by the 
        government of each such country, where applicable, to revise 
        the laws of such country and institutionalize comprehensive 
        procedures and practices to eliminate child marriage.
            (3) A description of the actions taken by the Department of 
        State and other Federal departments and agencies to encourage 
        foreign governments to eliminate child marriage and to support 
        the activities of non-governmental organizations dedicated to 
        eliminating child marriage and supporting its victims.
    (b) Inclusion of Information Relating to Child Marriage in Annual 
Country Reports on Human Rights Practices.--
            (1) Countries receiving economic assistance.--Section 
        116(d) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 
        2151n(d)), as amended by sections 614(b)(1) and 1013(a)(1) of 
        this Act, is further amended--
                    (A) in paragraph (11)(C), by striking ``and'' at 
                the end;
                    (B) in paragraph (12)(C), by striking the period at 
                the end and inserting ``; and''; and
                    (C) by adding at the end the following new 
                paragraph:
            ``(13)(A) wherever applicable, a description of the nature 
        and extent of laws and traditions in each country that enable 
        or encourage the practice of child marriage; and
            ``(B) a description of the actions, if any, taken by the 
        government of each such country to revise the laws of such 
        country and institutionalize comprehensive procedures and 
        practices to eliminate child marriage.''.
            (2) Countries receiving security assistance.--Section 
        502B(b) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 
        2304(b)), as amended by sections 614(b)(2) and 1013(a)(2) of 
        this Act, is further amended by inserting after the tenth 
        sentence the following new sentence: ``Each report under this 
        section shall also include, wherever applicable, a description 
        of the nature and extent of laws and traditions in each country 
        that enable or encourage the practice of child marriage and a 
        description of the actions, if any, taken by the government of 
        each such country to revise the laws of such country and 
        institutionalize comprehensive procedures and practices to 
        eliminate child marriage.''.
    (c) Effective Date of Amendment.--The amendment made by subsection 
(b) shall take effect on the date of the enactment of this Act and 
apply beginning with the first report submitted by the Secretary of 
State under sections 116(d) and 502B(b) of the Foreign Assistance Act 
of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2151n(d) and 2304(b)) after the report required 
under subsection (a).

SEC. 1114. MAGEN DAVID ADOM SOCIETY.

    (a) Findings.--Section 690(a) of the Foreign Relations 
Authorization Act, Fiscal Year 2003 (Public Law 107-228), is amended by 
adding at the end the following:
            ``(5) Since the founding of the Magen David Adom Society in 
        1930, the American Red Cross has regarded it as a sister 
        national society forging close working ties between the two 
        societies and has consistently advocated recognition and 
        membership of the Magen David Adom Society in the International 
        Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement.
            ``(6) The American Red Cross and the Magen David Adom 
        Society signed an important memorandum of understanding in 
        November 2002, outlining areas for strategic collaboration, and 
        the American Red Cross will encourage other societies to 
        establish similar agreements with the Magen David Adom 
        Society.''.
    (b) Sense of Congress.--Section 690(b) of such Act is amended--
            (1) in paragraph (3), by striking ``and'' at the end;
            (2) by redesignating paragraph (4) as paragraph (5); and
            (3) by inserting after paragraph (3) the following new 
        paragraph:
            ``(4) the High Contracting Parties to the Geneva 
        Conventions of August 12, 1949, should adopt the October 12, 
        2000, draft additional protocol which would accord 
        international recognition to an additional distinctive emblem; 
        and''.
    (c) Report.--Section 690 of such Act is further amended by adding 
at the end the following new subsection:
    ``(c) Report.--Not later than 60 days after the date of the 
enactment of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 2006 
and 2007, and one year thereafter, the Secretary of State shall submit 
a report, on a classified basis if necessary, to the appropriate 
congressional committees describing--
            ``(1) efforts by the United States to obtain full 
        membership for the Magen David Adom Society in the 
        International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement;
            ``(2) efforts by the International Committee of the Red 
        Cross to obtain full membership for the Magen David Adom 
        Society in the International Red Cross and Red Crescent 
        Movement;
            ``(3) efforts of the High Contracting Parties to the Geneva 
        Conventions of August 12, 1949, to adopt the October 12, 2000, 
        draft additional protocol to the Geneva Conventions;
            ``(4) the extent to which the Magen David Adom Society is 
        participating in the activities of the International Red Cross 
        and Red Crescent Movement; and
            ``(5) efforts by any state, member, or official of the 
        International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement to prevent, 
        obstruct, or place conditions upon--
                    ``(A) adoption by the High Contracting Parties to 
                the Geneva Conventions of August 12, 1949, of the 
                October 12, 2000, draft additional protocol to the 
                Geneva Conventions; and
                    ``(B) full participation of the Magen David Adom 
                Society in the activities of the International Red 
                Cross and Red Crescent Movement.''.

SEC. 1115. DEVELOPMENTS IN AND POLICY TOWARD INDONESIA.

    (a) Statement of Congress Relating to Recent Developments, Human 
Rights, and Reform.--Congress--
            (1) recognizes the remarkable progress in democratization 
        and decentralization made by Indonesia in recent years and 
        commends the people of Indonesia on the pace and scale of those 
        continuing reforms;
            (2) reaffirms--
                    (A) its deep condolences to the people of Indonesia 
                for the profound losses inflicted by the December 26, 
                2004, earthquake and tsunami; and
                    (B) its commitment to generous United States 
                support for relief and long term reconstruction efforts 
                in affected areas;
            (3) expresses its hope that in the aftermath of the tsunami 
        tragedy the Government of Indonesia and other parties will 
        succeed in reaching and implementing a peaceful, negotiated 
        settlement of the long-standing conflict in Aceh;
            (4) commends the Government of Indonesia for allowing broad 
        international access to Aceh after the December 2004 tsunami, 
        and urges that international nongovernmental organizations and 
        media be allowed unfettered access throughout Indonesia, 
        including in Papua and Aceh;
            (5) notes with grave concern that--
                    (A) reform of the Indonesian security forces has 
                not kept pace with democratic political reform, and 
                that the Indonesian military is subject to inadequate 
                civilian control and oversight, lacks budgetary 
                transparency, and continues to emphasize an internal 
                security role within Indonesia;
                    (B) members of the Indonesian security forces 
                continue to commit many serious human rights 
                violations, including killings, torture, rape, and 
                arbitrary detention, particularly in areas of communal 
                and separatist conflict; and
                    (C) the Government of Indonesia largely fails to 
                hold soldiers and police accountable for extrajudicial 
                killings and other serious human rights abuses, both 
                past and present, including atrocities committed in 
                East Timor prior to its independence from Indonesia;
            (6) condemns the intimidation and harassment of human 
        rights and civil society organizations by members of the 
        Indonesian security forces and military-backed militia groups, 
        and urges a complete investigation of the fatal poisoning of 
        prominent human rights activist Munir in September 2004; and
            (7) urges the Government of Indonesia and the Indonesian 
        military to continue to provide full, active, and unfettered 
        cooperation to the Federal Bureau of Investigation of the 
        Department of Justice in its investigation of the August 31, 
        2002, attack near Timika, Papua, which killed three people 
        (including two Americans, Rick Spier and Ted Burgon) and 
        injured 12 others, and to pursue the indictment, apprehension, 
        and prosecution of all parties responsible for that attack.
    (b) Findings Relating to Papua.--Congress finds the following:
            (1) Papua, a resource-rich province whose indigenous 
        inhabitants are predominantly Melanesian, was formerly a colony 
        of the Netherlands.
            (2) While Indonesia has claimed Papua as part of its 
        territory since its independence in the late 1940s, Papua 
        remained under Dutch administrative control until 1962.
            (3) On August 15, 1962, Indonesia and the Netherlands 
        signed an agreement at the United Nations in New York (commonly 
        referred to as the ``New York Agreement'') which transferred 
        administration of Papua first to a United Nations Temporary 
        Executive Authority (UNTEA), and then to Indonesia in 1963, 
        pending an ``act of free choice . . . to permit the inhabitants 
        to decide whether they wish to remain with Indonesia''.
            (4) In the New York Agreement, Indonesia formally 
        recognized ``the eligibility of all adults [in Papua] . . . to 
        participate in [an] act of self-determination to be carried out 
        in accordance with international practice'', and pledged ``to 
        give the people of the territory the opportunity to exercise 
        freedom of choice . . . before the end of 1969''.
            (5) In July and August 1969, Indonesia conducted an ``Act 
        of Free Choice'', in which 1,025 selected Papuan elders voted 
        unanimously to join Indonesia, in circumstances that were 
        subject to both overt and covert forms of manipulation.
            (6) In the intervening years, indigenous Papuans have 
        suffered extensive human rights abuses, natural resource 
        exploitation, environmental degradation, and commercial 
        dominance by immigrant communities, and some individuals and 
        groups estimate that more than 100,000 Papuans have been killed 
        during Indonesian rule, primarily during the Sukarno and 
        Suharto administrations.
            (7) While the United States supports the territorial 
        integrity of Indonesia, Indonesia's historical reliance on 
        force for the maintenance of control has been 
        counterproductive, and long-standing abuses by security forces 
        have galvanized independence sentiments among many Papuans.
            (8) While the Indonesian parliament passed a Special 
        Autonomy Law for Papua in October 2001 that was intended to 
        allocate greater revenue and decision making authority to the 
        Papuan provincial government, the promise of special autonomy 
        has not been effectively realized and has been undermined in 
        its implementation, such as by conflicting legal directives 
        further subdividing the province in apparent contravention of 
        the law and without the consent of appropriate provincial 
        authorities.
            (9) Rather than demilitarizing its approach, Indonesia has 
        reportedly sent thousands of additional troops to Papua, and 
        military operations in the central highlands since the fall of 
        2004 have displaced thousands of civilians into very vulnerable 
        circumstances, contributing further to mistrust of the central 
        government by many indigenous Papuans.
            (10) According to the 2004 Annual Country Report on Human 
        Rights Practices of the Department of State, in Indonesia 
        ``security force members murdered, tortured, raped, beat, and 
        arbitrarily detained civilians and members of separatist 
        movements'' and ``police frequently and arbitrarily detained 
        persons without warrants, charges, or court proceedings'' in 
        Papua.
    (c) Reporting Requirements.--
            (1) Report on special autonomy.--Not later than 180 days 
        after the date of the enactment of this Act and one year 
        thereafter, the Secretary of State shall submit to the 
        appropriate congressional committees a report detailing 
        implementation of special autonomy for Papua and Aceh. Such 
        reports shall include--
                    (A) an assessment of the extent to which each 
                province has enjoyed an increase in revenue allocations 
                and decision making authority;
                    (B) a description of access by international press 
                and non-governmental organizations to each province;
                    (C) an assessment of the role played by local civil 
                society in governance and decision making;
                    (D) a description of force levels and conduct of 
                Indonesian security forces in each province; and
                    (E) a description of United States efforts to 
                promote respect for human rights in each province.
            (2) Report on the 1969 act of free choice.--Not later than 
        180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the 
        Secretary of State shall submit to the appropriate 
        congressional committees a report analyzing the 1969 Act of 
        Free Choice.

SEC. 1116. MURDERS OF UNITED STATES CITIZENS JOHN BRANCHIZIO, MARK 
              PARSON, AND JOHN MARIN LINDE.

    (a) Findings.--Congress makes the following findings:
            (1) On October 15, 2003, a convoy of clearly identified 
        United States diplomatic vehicles was attacked by Palestinian 
        terrorists in Gaza resulting in the death of United States 
        citizens John Branchizio, Mark Parson, and John Marin Linde, 
        and the injury of a fourth United States citizen.
            (2) John Branchizio, Mark Parson, and John Marin Linde were 
        contract employees providing security to United States 
        diplomatic personnel who were visiting Gaza in order to 
        identify potential Palestinian candidates for Fulbright 
        Scholarships.
            (3) A senior official of the Palestinian Authority was 
        reported to have stated on September 22, 2004, that 
        ``Palestinian security forces know who was behind the killing'' 
        of John Branchizio, Mark Parson, and John Marin Linde.
            (4) Following her visit to Israel and the West Bank on 
        February 7, 2005, Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice announced 
        that she had been ``assured by President Abbas of the 
        Palestinian Authority's intention to bring justice to those who 
        murdered three American personnel in the Gaza in 2003''.
            (5) Since the attack on October 15, 2003, United States 
        Government personnel have been prohibited from all travel in 
        Gaza.
            (6) The United States Rewards for Justice program is 
        offering a reward of up to $5,000,000 for information leading 
        to the arrest or conviction of any persons involved in the 
        murder of John Branchizio, Mark Parson, and John Marin Linde.
    (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that--
            (1) the continued inability or unwillingness of the 
        Palestinian Authority to actively and aggressively pursue the 
        murderers of United States citizens John Branchizio, Mark 
        Parson, and John Marin Linde and bring them to justice calls 
        into question the Palestinian Authority's viability as a 
        partner for the United States in resolving the Palestinian-
        Israeli conflict;
            (2) future United States assistance to the Palestinian 
        Authority may be affected, and the continued operation of the 
        PLO Representative Office in Washington may be jeopardized, if 
        the Palestinian Authority does not fully and effectively 
        cooperate in bringing to justice the murderers of John 
        Branchizio, Mark Parson, and John Marin Linde; and
            (3) it is in the vital national security interest of the 
        United States to safeguard, to the greatest extent possible 
        consistent with their mission, United States diplomats and all 
        embassy and consulate personnel, and to use the full power of 
        the United States to bring to justice any individual or entity 
        that threatens, jeopardizes, or harms them.
    (c) Report.--Not later than 30 days after the date of the enactment 
of this Act, and every 120 days thereafter, the Secretary of State 
shall submit a report, on a classified basis if necessary, to the 
appropriate congressional committees describing--
            (1) efforts by the United States to bring to justice the 
        murderers of United States citizens John Branchizio, Mark 
        Parson, and John Marin Linde;
            (2) a detailed assessment of efforts by the Palestinian 
        Authority to bring to justice the murderers of John Branchizio, 
        Mark Parson, and John Marin Linde, including--
                    (A) the number of arrests, interrogations, and 
                interviews by Palestinian Authority officials related 
                to the case;
                    (B) the number of Palestinian security personnel 
                and man-hours assigned to the case;
                    (C) the extent of personal supervision or 
                involvement by the President and Ministers of the 
                Palestinian Authority; and
                    (D) the degree of cooperation between the United 
                States and the Palestinian Authority in regards to this 
                case;
            (3) a specific assessment by the Secretary of whether the 
        Palestinian efforts described in paragraph (2) constitute the 
        best possible effort by the Palestinian Authority; and
            (4) any additional steps or initiatives requested or 
        recommended by the United States that were not pursued by the 
        Palestinian Authority.
    (d) Certification.--The requirement to submit a report under 
subsection (c) shall no longer apply if the Secretary of State 
certifies to the appropriate congressional committees that the 
murderers of United States citizens John Branchizio, Mark Parson, and 
John Marin Linde have been identified, arrested, and brought to 
justice.
    (e) Definition.--In this section, the term ``appropriate 
congressional committees'' means--
            (1) the Committee on International Relations and the 
        Committee on Appropriations of the House of Representatives; 
        and
            (2) the Committee on Foreign Relations and the Committee on 
        Appropriations of the Senate.

SEC. 1117. DIPLOMATIC RELATIONS WITH ISRAEL.

    (a) Findings.--Congress makes the following findings:
            (1) Israel is a friend and ally of the United States whose 
        security is vital to regional stability and United States 
        interests.
            (2) Israel currently maintains diplomatic relations with 
        160 countries, 33 countries do not have any diplomatic 
        relations with Israel, and one country has partial relations 
        with Israel.
            (3) The Government of Israel has been actively seeking to 
        establish formal relations with a number of countries.
            (4) After 57 years of existence, Israel deserves to be 
        treated as an equal country by its neighbors and the world 
        community.
    (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that the United 
States should assist Israel in its efforts to establish diplomatic 
relations.
    (c) Report.--Not later than 90 days after the date of the enactment 
of this Act and annually thereafter, the Secretary of State shall 
submit to the appropriate congressional committees a report that 
includes the following information (in classified or unclassified form, 
as appropriate):
            (1) Actions taken by representatives of the United States 
        to encourage other countries to establish full diplomatic 
        relations with Israel.
            (2) Specific responses solicited and received by the 
        Secretary from countries that do not maintain full diplomatic 
        relations with Israel with respect to their attitudes toward 
        and plans for entering into diplomatic relations with Israel.
            (3) Other measures being undertaken, and measures that will 
        be undertaken, by the United States to ensure and promote 
        Israel's full participation in the world diplomatic community.
    (d) Definition.--In this section, the term ``appropriate 
congressional committees'' means--
            (1) the Committee on International Relations and the 
        Committee on Appropriations of the House of Representatives; 
        and
            (2) the Committee on Foreign Relations and the Committee on 
        Appropriations of the Senate.

SEC. 1118. TAX ENFORCEMENT IN COLOMBIA.

    Not later than 90 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, 
the Secretary of State shall submit to the Committee on International 
Relations of the House of Representatives, the Committee on Foreign 
Relations of the Senate, the Committee on Appropriations of the House 
of Representatives, and the Committee on Appropriations of the Senate a 
report detailing challenges to tax code enforcement in Colombia. This 
report shall include, as a percentage of Colombia's gross domestic 
product, an estimate of current tax revenue, an estimate of potential 
additional tax revenue if Colombia's existing tax laws were fully 
enforced, and a discussion of how such additional revenue could be used 
to achieve the objectives of Plan Colombia, including supporting and 
expanding Colombia's security forces and increasing the availability of 
alternative livelihoods for illicit crop growers and former combatants.

SEC. 1119. PROVISION OF CONSULAR AND VISA SERVICES IN PRISTINA, KOSOVA.

    (a) Report.--Not later than 90 days after the date of the enactment 
of this Act, the Secretary of State shall submit to the appropriate 
congressional committees a report describing the possibility of 
providing consular and visa services at the United States Office 
Pristina, Kosovo (USOP) to residents of Kosova.
    (b) Contents.--The report required under subsection (a) shall 
contain the following information:
            (1) The reasons why consular and visa services are not 
        currently offered at the USOP, even though the Office has been 
        in operation for more than five years.
            (2) Plans for providing consular and visa services at the 
        USOP, including conditions required before such services would 
        be provided and the planned timing for providing such services.
            (3) An explanation of why consular and visa services will 
        not be offered at the USOP by January 1, 2007, if such services 
        are not planned to be offered by such date.
            (4) The number of residents of Kosova who apply for their 
        visas outside of Kosova for each calendar year from 2000-2005.

SEC. 1120. DEMOCRACY IN PAKISTAN.

    Not later than December 31 in each of fiscal years 2006 and 2007, 
the President shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees 
a report that contains a description of the extent to which, over the 
preceding 12-month period, the Government of Pakistan has restored a 
fully functional democracy in Pakistan in which free, fair, and 
transparent elections are held.

SEC. 1121. STATUS OF THE SOVEREIGNTY OF LEBANON.

    (a) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that--
            (1) all parties in the Middle East and internationally 
        should exert every effort to implement in its entirety the 
        provisions of United Nations Security Council Resolution 1559 
        (2004), which, among other things--
                    (A) calls for ``strict respect'' for Lebanon's 
                sovereignty, territorial integrity, unity, and 
                political independence ``under the sole and exclusive 
                authority of the Government of Lebanon throughout 
                Lebanon'';
                    (B) calls upon all remaining foreign forces to 
                withdraw from Lebanon;
                    (C) calls for the ``disbanding and disarmament of 
                all Lebanese and non-Lebanese militias''; and
                    (D) supports the extension of the control of the 
                Government of Lebanon over all Lebanese territory;
            (2) in accordance with United Nations Security Council 
        Resolution 1559, all militias in Lebanon, including Hizballah, 
        should be disbanded and disarmed at the earliest possible 
        opportunity, and the armed forces of Lebanon should take full 
        control of all of Lebanon's territory and borders;
            (3) the Government of Lebanon is responsible for the 
        disbanding and disarming of the militias, including Hizballah, 
        and preventing the flow of armaments and other military 
        equipment to the militias, including Hizballah, from Syria, 
        Iran, and other external sources;
            (4) Hizballah utilizes its resources to operate its 
        television station, al-Manar, to recruit terrorists and incite 
        violence, which contributes to instability in Lebanon and 
        throughout the region;
            (5) the Government of Lebanon should take steps to address 
        the threat posed by al-Manar, including by revoking its 
        license;
            (6) the Government of the United States should closely 
        monitor progress toward full implementation of all aspects of 
        United Nations Security Council Resolution 1559, particularly 
        the matters described in subparagraphs (A) through (D) of 
        paragraph (1);
            (7) the Government of the United States should closely 
        monitor the Government of Lebanon's efforts to stanch the flow 
        of armaments and other military equipment to Hizballah and 
        other militias from external sources, such as Syria and Iran;
            (8) the United States and its allies should consider 
        providing training and other assistance to the armed forces of 
        Lebanon to enhance their ability to disarm Hizballah and other 
        militias and stanch the flow of arms to Hizballah and other 
        militias; and
            (9) United States assistance provided to Lebanon after the 
        date of the enactment of this Act may be affected if Lebanon 
        does not make every effort to disarm militias, including 
        Hizballah, and to deny them re-armament.
    (b) Report.--Not later than 120 days after the date of the 
enactment of this Act, and every 180 days thereafter, the Secretary of 
State shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees a report 
that describes and evaluates--
            (1) the extent to which armed militias continue to operate 
        in Lebanon and the progress of the Government of Lebanon to 
        disband and disarm such militias;
            (2) the extent to which the Government of Lebanon is 
        committed to disbanding and disarming Hizballah and other 
        militias and stanching the flow of arms to Hizballah and other 
        militias;
            (3) the progress of the armed forces of Lebanon to deploy 
        to and take full control of all of Lebanon's borders;
            (4) the extent to which countries in the region attempt to 
        direct arms to Lebanon-based militias or allow their territory 
        to be traversed for this purpose and the extent to which these 
        armament efforts succeed;
            (5) the routes and means used by external sources 
        attempting to supply arms to the Lebanon-based militias the 
        countries that are involved in these efforts;
            (6) the efforts of the United States and its allies to 
        facilitate the process of disbanding and disarming Lebanon-
        based militias and stanching the flow of weapons to such 
        militias;
            (7) any recommendations for legislation to support the 
        disbanding and disarming of Lebanon-based militias; and
            (8) efforts by the Government of Lebanon and the United 
        States and its allies to end broadcasts by al-Manar.
    (c) Form.--The report required by subsection (b) shall be submitted 
in unclassified form and may contain a classified annex if necessary.
    (d) Certification.--The requirement to submit a report under 
subsection (b) shall no longer apply if the Secretary certifies to the 
appropriate congressional committees that all Lebanon-based militias 
have been disbanded and disarmed and the armed forces of Lebanon are 
deployed to and in full control of Lebanon's borders.

SEC. 1122. ACTIVITIES OF INTERNATIONAL TERRORIST ORGANIZATIONS IN LATIN 
              AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN.

    (a) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that--
            (1) activities in Latin America and the Caribbean by 
        international terrorist organizations and their affiliates and 
        supporters represent a direct threat to the national security 
        of the United States and hemispheric stability;
            (2) international terrorist organizations, such as 
        Hezbollah and Hamas, have profited and taken advantage of the 
        dearth or weakened state of the rule of law in many Latin 
        American and Caribbean countries to further their own aims; and
            (3) the United States should work cooperatively with 
        countries of Latin America and the Caribbean to expose and 
        prevent such activities.
    (b) Report.--Not later than 180 days after the date of the 
enactment of this Act, and not later than June 30 of the year 
thereafter, the Secretary of State shall submit to the appropriate 
congressional committees a report on the activities of international 
terrorist organizations in Latin America and the Caribbean. The report 
shall include the following:
            (1) An assessment of the membership, stated intentions, 
        recruitment, and terrorist fundraising capabilities of each 
        international terrorist organization operating in Latin America 
        and the Caribbean.
            (2) An assessment of the relationship of each such 
        international terrorist organization with other criminal 
        enterprises or terrorist organizations for fundraising and 
        other criminal purposes.
            (3) An assessment of the activities of each such 
        international terrorist organization.
    (c) Form.--The report required by subsection (b) shall be submitted 
in unclassified form but may contain a classified annex.

SEC. 1123. ANALYSIS OF EMPLOYING WEAPONS SCIENTISTS FROM THE FORMER 
              SOVIET UNION IN PROJECT BIOSHIELD.

    (a) Report.--Not later than November 1, 2006, the Secretary of 
State, after consultation with the Secretary of Health and Human 
Services, shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees a 
report containing an analysis of--
            (1) the scientific and technological contributions that 
        scientists formerly employed in the former Soviet Union in the 
        field of biological warfare could make to the research and 
        development of biomedical countermeasures;
            (2) the practical alternative methods through which the 
        services of such scientists could be employed so as to 
        facilitate the application of the knowledge and experience of 
        such scientists to such research and development;
            (3) the cost-effectiveness of those methods of employing 
        the services of such scientists; and
            (4) the desirability and national security implications of 
        providing employment opportunities for such scientists in the 
        field of research and development of biomedical countermeasures 
        for purposes of biological weapons nonproliferation.
    (b) Recommendations.--Each Secretary shall also include in the 
report required under subsection (a) any recommendations of each for 
appropriate legislation to address the issues analyzed in the report.
    (c) Definition.--In this section, the term ``biomedical 
countermeasures'' means a drug (as such term is defined in section 
201(g)(1) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (21 U.S.C. 
321(g)(1))), biological product (as such term is defined in section 
351(i) of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 262(i))), or device 
(as such term is defined in section 201(h) of the Federal Food, Drug, 
and Cosmetic Act (21 U.S.C. 321(h))) that is used--
            (1) in the diagnosis, cure, mitigation, treatment, or 
        prevention of harm from any biological, chemical, radiological, 
        or nuclear agent that may cause a public health emergency 
        affecting national security; or
            (2) in diagnosis, cure, mitigation, treatment, or 
        prevention of harm from a condition that may result in adverse 
        health consequences or death.

SEC. 1124. EXTRADITION OF VIOLENT CRIMINALS FROM MEXICO TO THE UNITED 
              STATES.

    (a) Findings.--Congress finds the following:
            (1) Mexico is unable to extradite criminals who face life 
        sentences without the possibility of parole because of a 2001 
        decision of the Mexican Supreme Court.
            (2) As a result of this ruling, Mexico is unable to 
        extradite to the United States numerous suspects wanted for 
        violent crimes committed in the United States unless the United 
        States assures Mexico that these criminals will not face life 
        imprisonment without the possibility of parole.
            (3) The attorneys general from all 50 States have asked the 
        Government of the United States to continue to address this 
        extradition issue with the Government of Mexico.
            (4) The Government of the United States and the Government 
        of Mexico have experienced positive cooperation on numerous 
        matters relevant to their bilateral relationship, including 
        increased cooperation on extraditions.
    (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that the 
Government of the United States should encourage the Government of 
Mexico to continue to work closely with the Mexican Supreme Court to 
urge the Court to re-visit its October 2001 ruling so that the 
possibility of life imprisonment without parole will not have an effect 
on the timely extradition of criminal suspects from Mexico to the 
United States.
    (c) Reports.--
            (1) Annual number and status of formal extradition requests 
        made to mexico by the united states.--Not later than six months 
        after the date of the enactment of this Act and annually 
        thereafter, the Secretary of State shall submit to the 
        appropriate congressional committees a report that includes--
                    (A) the number of formal requests made to the 
                Government of Mexico by the Government of the United 
                States for the extradition of Mexican nationals 
                suspected of or convicted in abstentia for crimes 
                committed in the United States in the preceding fiscal 
                year, the names of such nationals, the crimes of which 
                each such national is suspected or has been convicted 
                in abstentia, a detailed disposition of the status of 
                each such extradition request, and the progress that 
                has been made with respect to each such extradition 
                request in the preceding fiscal year; and
                    (B) the number of such nationals who Mexico has 
                extradited to the United States in response to formal 
                extradition requests for such nationals in the 
                preceding fiscal year.
            (2) Aggregate number and status of formal extradition 
        requests made to mexico by the united states.--Not later than 
        six months after the date of the enactment of this Act and 
        annually thereafter, the Secretary of State shall submit to the 
        appropriate congressional committees a report that includes--
                    (A) the number of formal requests made to the 
                Government of Mexico by the Government of the United 
                States for the extradition of Mexican nationals 
                suspected of or convicted in abstentia for crimes 
                committed in the United States since the signing of the 
                Extradition treaty, with appendix, between the United 
                States and Mexico, signed at Mexico City on May 4, 1978 
                (31 UST 5059), including the names of such nationals, 
                the crimes of which each such national is suspected or 
                has been convicted in abstentia, a detailed disposition 
                of the status of each such extradition request, and the 
                progress that has been made with respect to each such 
                extradition request since such signing; and
                    (B) the number of such nationals who Mexico has 
                extradited to the United States in response to formal 
                extradition requests for such nationals since the 
                signing of the Extradition treaty, with appendix 
                between the United States and Mexico.
            (3) Cooperation by the united states with extradition 
        requests from mexico.--Not later than six months after the date 
        of the enactment of this Act and annually thereafter, the 
        Secretary of State shall submit to the appropriate 
        congressional committees a report that includes--
                    (A) the number of United States nationals who the 
                United States has extradited to Mexico in response to 
                formal extradition requests for such nationals by 
                Mexico in the preceding fiscal year; and
                    (B) the number of United States nationals who the 
                United States has extradited to Mexico in response to 
                formal extradition requests for such nationals by 
                Mexico since the signing of the Extradition treaty, 
                with appendix between the United States and Mexico.
    (d) Form.--If the Secretary of State determines that such is 
appropriate, the Secretary may submit a report required under 
subsection (c) with a classified annex.

SEC. 1125. ACTIONS OF THE 661 COMMITTEE.

    (a) Report.--Not later than 120 days after the date of the 
enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State shall submit to the 
appropriate congressional committees a report on United States 
decisions, actions, communications, and deliberations in the 661 
Committee of the United Nations regarding the issues of overpricing of 
contracts, kickbacks from sales of humanitarian goods, efforts to 
correct and revalue the remaining contracts in the post-Saddam Hussein 
regime era, oil smuggling, and trade protocols. The report shall 
examine the process by which the United States made its decisions in 
the 661 Committee, the officials in the United States Government 
involved in these decisions, and the names of the officials who made 
the final decisions. The report shall also include information 
detailing the positions of the other members states of the 661 
Committee with respect to the issues described in this subsection.
    (b) Inclusion of Supporting Documents.--The report required under 
subsection (a) shall contain all supporting documents with respect to 
the decisions, actions, communications, and deliberations referred in 
such subsection.
    (c) Format.--If the Secretary determines that such is appropriate, 
the Secretary may submit the report required under subsection (a) with 
a classified annex.
    (d) Definition.--In this section, the term ``661 Committee'' means 
the committee within the United Nations that was tasked with 
administering the United Nations oil for food program.

SEC. 1126. ELIMINATION OF REPORT ON REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS.

    Section 12 of the Foreign Service Buildings Act, 1926 (22 U.S.C. 
303) is hereby repealed.

SEC. 1127. ALIEN SMUGGLING AND TRAFFICKING IN PERSONS FROM ECUADOR.

    (a) In General.--Not later than six months after the date of the 
enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State shall submit to the 
appropriate congressional committees a report, based on a cost-benefit 
analysis, that examines and describes the most effective use, across 
all responsible Federal departments and agencies, of United States 
security assistance (including assistance under chapter 8 of part I of 
the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2291 et seq.; relating to 
international narcotics control)) to Ecuador, including the use of 
intelligence gathering and surveillance, to establish mechanisms to--
            (1) prevent and interdict alien smuggling, including 
        trafficking in persons, from Ecuador, either at land points of 
        assembly, or later at sea;
            (2) prevent potential concealment of terrorists attempting 
        to enter the United States within the smuggled group; and
            (3) identify and prosecute individuals or organizations 
        that engage in or promote such alien smuggling.
    (b) Cooperation in Preparation.--The Secretary shall prepare the 
report referred to in subsection (a) in cooperation with the Secretary 
of Homeland Security, who shall specifically address the roles and 
impacts of alien smuggling from Ecuador on United States air and 
surface assets assigned to counternarcotics missions in the eastern 
Pacific Ocean.

SEC. 1128. EXTRADITIONS OF AFGHAN DRUG TRAFFICKERS AND DRUG KINGPINS.

    Not later than 90 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, 
the Secretary of State shall submit to the appropriate congressional 
committees a report describing all pending United States requests for 
extradition from Afghanistan of illicit drug traffickers and drug 
kingpins who are under indictment in the United States. Such report 
shall also include a description of the status and response to such 
requests from the Government of Afghanistan.

SEC. 1129. FUNDING FOR NONGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS UNDER THE 
              PRESIDENT'S EMERGENCY PLAN FOR AIDS RELIEF.

    Not later than 90 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, 
the Secretary of State shall submit to the appropriate congressional 
committees a report that--
            (1) identifies by name each nongovernmental organization 
        that has received funding under the President's Emergency Plan 
        for AIDS Relief on or after the date of the enactment of the 
        United States Leadership Against HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis, and 
        Malaria Act of 2003 (Public Law 108-25), the date on which the 
        funding was provided to the organization, and the date on which 
        the organization filed a statement with the Government of the 
        United States certifying that the organization has in effect a 
        policy explicitly opposing prostitution and sex trafficking; 
        and
            (2) contains a description of the plan of the Department of 
        State to audit compliance by each nongovernmental organization 
        that receives funding under the President's Emergency Plan for 
        AIDS Relief to have and adhere to a policy explicitly opposing 
        prostitution and sex trafficking and to submit to the 
        appropriate congressional committees the results of such audit.

       TITLE XII--HENRY J. HYDE UNITED NATIONS REFORM ACT OF 2005

SEC. 1201. SHORT TITLE.

    This title may be cited as the ``Henry J. Hyde United Nations 
Reform Act of 2005''.

SEC. 1202. DEFINITIONS.

    In this title:
            (1) Employee.--The term ``employee'' means an individual 
        who is employed in the general services, professional staff, or 
        senior management of the United Nations, including contractors 
        and consultants.
            (2) General assembly.--The term ``General Assembly'' means 
        the General Assembly of the United Nations.
            (3) Member state.--The term ``Member State'' means a Member 
        State of the United Nations. Such term is synonymous with the 
        term ``country''.
            (4) Secretary.--The term ``Secretary'' means the Secretary 
        of State.
            (5) Secretary general.--The term ``Secretary General'' 
        means the Secretary General of the United Nations.
            (6) Security council.--The term ``Security Council'' means 
        the Security Council of the United Nations.
            (7) Specialized agencies and specialized agencies of the 
        united nations.--The terms ``specialized agencies'' and 
        ``specialized agencies of the United Nations'' mean--
                    (A) the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO);
                    (B) the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA);
                    (C) the International Civil Aviation Organization 
                (ICAO);
                    (D) the International Fund for Agricultural 
                Development (IFAD);
                    (E) the International Labor Organization (ILO);
                    (F) the International Maritime Organization (IMO);
                    (G) the International Telecommunication Union 
                (ITU);
                    (H) the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and 
                Cultural Organization (UNESCO);
                    (I) the United Nations Industrial Development 
                Organization (UNIDO);
                    (J) the Universal Postal Union (UPU);
                    (K) the World Health Organization (WHO) and its 
                regional agencies;
                    (L) the World Meteorological Organization (WMO); 
                and
                    (M) the World Intellectual Property Organization 
                (WIPO).

SEC. 1203. STATEMENT OF CONGRESS.

    Congress declares that, in light of recent history, it is incumbent 
upon the United Nations to enact significant reform measures if it is 
to restore the public trust and confidence necessary for it to achieve 
the laudable goals set forth in its Charter. To this end, the following 
Act seeks to reform the United Nations.

          Subtitle A--Mission and Budget of the United Nations

SEC. 1211. UNITED STATES FINANCIAL CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE UNITED NATIONS.

    (a) Statements of Policy.--
            (1) In general.--It shall be the policy of the United 
        States to use its voice, vote, and influence at the United 
        Nations to--
                    (A) pursue a streamlined, efficient, and 
                accountable regular assessed budget of the United 
                Nations; and
                    (B) shift funding mechanisms of certain 
                organizational programs of the United Nations specified 
                under paragraph (4) from the regular assessed budget to 
                voluntarily funded programs.
            (2) United states contributions.--It shall be the policy of 
        the United States to--
                    (A) redirect United States contributions to the 
                United Nations to achieve the policy objectives 
                described in paragraph (1)(B); and
                    (B) redirect a portion of funds from the following 
                organizational programs to pursue the policy objectives 
                described in paragraph (1)(A):
                            (i) Public Information.
                            (ii) General Assembly affairs and 
                        conference services.
            (3) Future biennium budgets.--It shall be the policy of the 
        United States to use its voice, vote, and influence at the 
        United Nations to ensure that future biennial budgets of the 
        United Nations, as agreed to by the General Assembly, reflect 
        the shift in funding mechanisms described in paragraph (1)(B) 
        and the redirection of funds described in paragraph (2).
            (4) Certain organizational programs.--The organizational 
        programs referred to in paragraph (1)(B) are the following:
                    (A) Economic and social affairs.
                    (B) Least-developed countries, landlocked 
                developing countries and small island developing 
                States.
                    (C) United Nations support for the New Partnership 
                for Africa's Development.
                    (D) Trade and development.
                    (E) International Trade Center UNCTAD/WTO.
                    (F) Environment.
                    (G) Human settlements.
                    (H) Crime prevention and criminal justice.
                    (I) International drug control.
                    (J) Economic and social development in Africa.
                    (K) Economic and social development in Asia and the 
                Pacific.
                    (L) Economic development in Europe.
                    (M) Economic and social development in Latin 
                America and the Caribbean.
                    (N) Economic and social development in Western 
                Asia.
                    (O) Regular program of technical cooperation.
                    (P) Development account.
                    (Q) Protection of and assistance to refugees.
                    (R) Palestine refugees.
    (b) Authorization With Respect to the Regular Assessed Budget of 
the United Nations.--Subject to the amendment made by subsection (c), 
the Secretary of State is authorized to make contributions toward the 
amount assessed to the United States by the United Nations for the 
purpose of funding the regular assessed budget of the United Nations.
    (c) United States Financial Contributions to the United Nations.--
Section 11 of the United Nations Participation Act of 1945 (22 U.S.C. 
287e-3) is amended to read as follows:

``SEC. 11. UNITED STATES FINANCIAL CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE UNITED NATIONS.

    ``(a) Policy of the United States Relating to the Regular Assessed 
Budget of the United Nations.--
            ``(1) In general.--The President shall direct the United 
        States Permanent Representative to the United Nations to use 
        the voice, vote, and influence of the United States at the 
        United Nations to--
                    ``(A) pursue a streamlined, efficient, and 
                accountable regular assessed budget of the United 
                Nations; and
                    ``(B) shift funding mechanisms of certain 
                organizational programs of the United Nations specified 
                under paragraph (2) of subsection (c) from the regular 
                assessed budget to voluntarily funded programs.
            ``(2) United states contributions.--It shall be the policy 
        of the United States to--
                    ``(A) redirect United States contributions to the 
                United Nations to achieve the policy objectives 
                described in paragraph (1)(B); and
                    ``(B) redirect a portion of funds from the 
                following organizational programs to pursue the policy 
                objectives described in paragraph (1)(A):
                            ``(i) Public Information.
                            ``(ii) General Assembly affairs and 
                        conferences services.
            ``(3) Future biennium budgets.--The President shall direct 
        the United States Permanent Representative to the United 
        Nations to use the voice, vote, and influence of the United 
        States at the United Nations to ensure that the shifting of 
        funding mechanisms under paragraph (1)(B) and redirecting of 
        contributions under paragraph (2) be reflected in future 
        resolutions agreed to by the General Assembly for the regular 
        assessed budget of the United Nations for the period of a 
        current biennium. To achieve the policies described in 
        paragraphs (1) and (2), the United States Permanent 
        Representative to the United Nations shall withhold the support 
        of the United States for a consensus for such budget until such 
        time as such budget is reflective of such policies.
    ``(b) 22 Percent Limitation.--In accordance with section 1171 of 
the Henry J. Hyde United Nations Reform Act of 2005, the Secretary may 
not make a contribution to a regularly assessed biennial budget of the 
United Nations in an amount greater than 22 percent of the amount 
calculable under subsection (c).
    ``(c) Annual Dues.--
            ``(1) In general.--For annual dues paid by the United 
        States to the United Nations each fiscal year, the percentage 
        specified in subsection (b) shall be multiplied by one-half of 
        the amount of the regularly assessed budget of the United 
        Nations for a current biennial period, as agreed to by 
        resolution of the General Assembly.
            ``(2) Calculation with respect to certain organizational 
        programs for redirection.--The percentage specified in 
        subsection (b) shall be multiplied by one-half of the sum of 
        amounts budgeted by resolution of the General Assembly for a 
        current biennial period for the following certain 
        organizational programs:
                    ``(A) Economic and social affairs.
                    ``(B) Least-developed countries, landlocked 
                developing countries and small island developing 
                States.
                    ``(C) United Nations support for the New 
                Partnership for Africa's Development.
                    ``(D) Trade and development.
                    ``(E) International Trade Center UNCTAD/WTO.
                    ``(F) Environment.
                    ``(G) Human settlements.
                    ``(H) Crime prevention and criminal justice.
                    ``(I) International drug control.
                    ``(J) Economic and social development in Africa.
                    ``(K) Economic and social development in Asia and 
                the Pacific.
                    ``(L) Economic development in Europe.
                    ``(M) Economic and social development in Latin 
                America and the Caribbean.
                    ``(N) Economic and social development in Western 
                Asia.
                    ``(O) Regular program of technical cooperation.
                    ``(P) Development account.
                    ``(Q) Protection of and assistance to refugees.
                    ``(R) Palestine refugees.
            ``(3) Redirection of funds.--Of amounts appropriated for 
        contributions towards payment of regular assessed dues to the 
        United Nations for 2008 and each subsequent year, if the 
        funding mechanisms of one or more of the organizational 
        programs of the United Nations specified in paragraph (2) have 
        not been shifted from the regular assessed budget to 
        voluntarily funded programs in accordance with subsection 
        (a)(1), the Secretary shall ensure that such amounts in each 
        such fiscal year that are specified for each such 
        organizational program pursuant to the resolution agreed to by 
        the General Assembly for the regular assessed budget of the 
        United Nations for the period of a current biennium are 
        redirected from payment of the assessed amount for the regular 
        assessed budget as follows:
                    ``(A) Subject to not less than 30 days prior 
                notification to Congress, the Secretary shall expend an 
                amount, not to exceed 40 percent of the amount 
                specified for each such organizational program pursuant 
                to the resolution agreed to by the General Assembly for 
                the regular assessed budget of the United Nations for 
                the period of a current biennium, as a contribution to 
                an eligible organizational program specified in 
                paragraph (4).
                    ``(B) Subject to not less than 30 days prior 
                notification to Congress, the Secretary shall expend 
                the remaining amounts under this paragraph to 
                voluntarily funded United Nations specialized agencies, 
                funds, or programs.
            ``(4) Eligible organizational programs.--The eligible 
        organizational programs referred to in paragraph (3)(A) for 
        redirection of funds under such paragraph are the following:
                    ``(A) Internal oversight.
                    ``(B) Human rights.
                    ``(C) Humanitarian assistance.
                    ``(D) An organizational program specified in 
                subparagraphs (A) through (P) of paragraph (2), subject 
                to paragraph (5).
            ``(5) Expenditure of remaining amounts to certain 
        organization programs.--
                    ``(A) Voluntary contribution.--Subject to not less 
                than 30 days prior notification to Congress and the 
                limitation specified under subparagraph (B), the 
                Secretary is authorized to make a voluntary 
                contribution to an organizational program of the United 
                Nations specified in subparagraphs (A) through (P) of 
                paragraph (2) of any amounts not contributed in a 
                fiscal year to an eligible organizational program 
                specified in subparagraphs (A) through (C) of paragraph 
                (4).
                    ``(B) 10 percent limitation.--A voluntary 
                contribution under subparagraph (A) to an 
                organizational program of the United Nations specified 
                in subparagraphs (A) through (P) of paragraph (2) may 
                not exceed 10 percent of the total contribution made 
                under paragraph (3)(A).
    ``(d) Further Calculation With Respect to Budgets for Public 
Information and General Assembly Affairs and Conference Services.--
            ``(1) 22 percent limitation.--The Secretary may not make a 
        contribution to a regularly assessed biennial budget of the 
        United Nations in an amount greater than 22 percent of the 
        amount calculable under paragraph (2).
            ``(2) Annual dues each fiscal year.--
                    ``(A) In general.--For annual dues paid by the 
                United States to the United Nations each fiscal year, 
                the percentage specified in paragraph (1) shall be 
                multiplied by one-half of the amount of the regularly 
                assessed budget of the United Nations for a current 
                biennial period, as agreed to by resolution of the 
                General Assembly.
                    ``(B) Calculation with respect to public 
                information and general assembly affairs and conference 
                services.--With respect to such United States annual 
                dues, the percentage specified in paragraph (1) shall 
                be multiplied by one-half of the sum of amounts 
                budgeted by resolution of the General Assembly for the 
                2004-2005 biennial period for the following 
                organizational programs:
                            ``(i) Public Information.
                            ``(ii) General Assembly affairs and 
                        conferences services.
                    ``(C) Redirection of funds.--
                            ``(i) In general.--The President shall 
                        direct the United States Permanent 
                        Representative to the United Nations to make 
                        every effort, including the withholding of 
                        United States support for a consensus budget of 
                        the United Nations, to reduce the budgets of 
                        the organizational programs specified in 
                        subparagraph (B) for 2007 by 10 percent against 
                        the budgets of such organizational programs for 
                        the 2004-2005 biennial period. If the budgets 
                        of such organizational programs are not so 
                        reduced, 20 percent the amount determined under 
                        subparagraph (B) for contributions towards 
                        payment of regular assessed dues for 2007 shall 
                        be redirected from payment for the amount 
                        assessed for United States annual contributions 
                        to the regular assessed budget of the United 
                        Nations.
                            ``(ii) Specific amounts.--The Secretary 
                        shall make the amount determined under clause 
                        (i) available as a contribution to an eligible 
                        organizational program specified in 
                        subparagraphs (A) through (C) of paragraph (4) 
                        of subsection (c).
            ``(3) Policy with respect to 2008-2009 biennial period and 
        subsequent biennial periods.--
                    ``(A) In general.--The President shall direct the 
                United States Permanent Representative to the United 
                Nations to make every effort, including the withholding 
                of United States support for a consensus budget of the 
                United Nations, to reduce the budgets of the 
                organizational programs specified in subparagraph (B) 
                of paragraph (2) for the 2008-2009 biennial period and 
                each subsequent biennial period by 20 percent against 
                the budgets of such organizational programs for the 
                2004-2005 biennial period.
                    ``(B) Certification.--In accordance with section 
                1171 of the Henry J. Hyde United Nations Reform Act of 
                2005, a certification shall be required that certifies 
                that the reduction in budgets described in subparagraph 
                (A) has been implemented.''.
    (d) Effective Date.--The amendment made by subsection (c) shall 
take effect and apply beginning on October 1, 2006.
    (e) Limitation on United States Contributions to UNRWA.--The 
Secretary of State may not make a contribution to the United Nations 
Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA) 
in an amount greater than the highest contribution to UNRWA made by an 
Arab country, but may not exceed 22 percent of the total budget of 
UNRWA. For purposes of this subsection, an Arab country includes the 
following: Algeria, Bahrain, Comoros, Dijibouti, Egypt, Iran, Jordan, 
Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Mauritania, Morocco, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, 
Somalia, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, the United Arab Emirates, Iraq, and 
Yemen.
    (f) Policy Relating to Zero Nominal Growth.--It shall be the policy 
of the United States to use the voice, vote, and influence of the 
United States at the United Nations to make every effort to enforce 
zero nominal growth in all assessed dues to the regular budget of the 
United Nations, its specialized agencies, and its funds and programs.
    (g) 5.6 Rule.--It shall be the policy of the United States to use 
the voice, vote, and influence of the United States at the United 
Nations to actively enforce the 5.6 rule at the United Nations, 
requiring the Secretariat to identify low-priority activities in the 
budget proposal. The United Nations should strengthen the 5.6 rule by 
requiring that managers identify the lowest priority activities 
equivalent to 15 percent of their budget request or face an across the 
board reduction of such amount.
    (h) Annual Publication.--It shall be the policy of the United 
States to use the voice, vote, and influence of the United States at 
the United Nations to ensure the United Nations is annually publishing 
a list of all subsidiary bodies and their functions, budgets, and 
staff.
    (i) Scale of Assessments.--
            (1) In general.--The President shall direct the United 
        States Permanent Representative to the United Nations to use 
        the voice, vote, and influence of the United States at the 
        United Nations to make every effort to ensure that the 
        difference between the scale of assessments for the five 
        permanent members of the Security Council is not greater than 
        five times that of any other permanent member of the Security 
        Council.
            (2) Denial of use of veto.--If the Secretary of State 
        determines that a permanent member of the Security Council with 
        veto power is not in compliance with the requirement described 
        in paragraph (1), the President shall direct the United States 
        Permanent Representative to the United Nations to use the 
        voice, vote, and influence of the United States at the United 
        Nations to make every effort to deny to such permanent member 
        the use of the veto power of such permanent member until such 
        time as such permanent member satisfies the requirement of such 
        paragraph.

SEC. 1212. WEIGHTED VOTING.

    It shall be the policy of the United States to actively pursue 
weighted voting with respect to all budgetary and financial matters in 
the Administrative and Budgetary Committee and in the General Assembly 
in accordance with the level of the financial contribution of a Member 
State to the regular assessed budget of the United Nations.

SEC. 1213. BUDGET CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS.

    (a) Certification.--In accordance with section 1171, a 
certification shall be required that certifies that the conditions 
described in subsection (b) have been satisfied.
    (b) Conditions.--The conditions under this subsection are the 
following:
            (1) New budget practices for the united nations.--The 
        United Nations is implementing budget practices that--
                    (A) require the maintenance of a budget not in 
                excess of the level agreed to by the General Assembly 
                at the beginning of each United Nations budgetary 
                biennium, unless increases are agreed to by consensus 
                and do not exceed ten percent; and
                    (B) require the identification of expenditures by 
                the United Nations by functional categories such as 
                personnel, travel, and equipment.
            (2) Program evaluation.--
                    (A) Existing authority.--The Secretary General and 
                the Director General of each specialized agency have 
                used their existing authorities to require program 
                managers within the United Nations Secretariat and the 
                Secretariats of the specialized agencies to conduct 
                evaluations in accordance with the standardized 
                methodology referred to in subparagraph (B) of--
                            (i) United Nations programs approved by the 
                        General Assembly; and
                            (ii) programs of the specialized agencies.
                    (B) Development of evaluation criteria.--
                            (i) United nations.--The Office of Internal 
                        Oversight Services has developed a standardized 
                        methodology for the evaluation of United 
                        Nations programs approved by the General 
                        Assembly, including specific criteria for 
                        determining the continuing relevance and 
                        effectiveness of the programs.
                            (ii) Specialized agencies.--Patterned on 
                        the work of the Office of Internal Oversight 
                        Services of the United Nations, each 
                        specialized agency has developed a standardized 
                        methodology for the evaluation of the programs 
                        of the agency, including specific criteria for 
                        determining the continuing relevance and 
                        effectiveness of the programs.
                    (C) Report.--The Secretary General is assessing 
                budget requests and, on the basis of evaluations 
                conducted under subparagraph (B) for the relevant 
                preceding year, submits to the General Assembly a 
                report containing the results of such evaluations, 
                identifying programs that have satisfied the criteria 
                for continuing relevance and effectiveness, and an 
                identification of programs that have not satisfied such 
                criteria and should be terminated.
                    (D) Sunset of programs.--Consistent with the July 
                16, 1997, recommendations of the Secretary General 
                regarding a sunset policy and results-based budgeting 
                for United Nations programs, the United Nations and 
                each specialized agency has established and is 
                implementing procedures to require all new programs 
                approved by the General Assembly to have a specific 
                sunset date.

SEC. 1214. ACCOUNTABILITY.

    (a) Certification of Creation of Independent Oversight Board.--In 
accordance with section 1171, a certification shall be required that 
certifies that the following reforms related to the establishment of an 
Independent Oversight Board (IOB) have been adopted by the United 
Nations:
            (1) An IOB is established from existing United Nations 
        budgetary and personnel resources. Except as provided in this 
        subsection, the IOB shall be an independent entity within the 
        United Nations and shall not be subject to budget authority or 
        organizational authority of any entity within the United 
        Nations.
            (2) The head of the IOB shall be a Director, who shall be 
        nominated by the Secretary General and who shall be subject to 
        Security Council approval by a majority vote. The IOB shall 
        also consist of four other board members who shall be nominated 
        by the Secretary General and subject to Security Council 
        approval by a majority vote. The IOB shall be responsible to 
        the Security Council and the Director and board members shall 
        each serve terms of six years, except that the terms of the 
        initial board shall be staggered so that no more than two board 
        members' terms will expire in any one year. No board member may 
        serve more than two terms. An IOB board member may be removed 
        for cause by a majority vote of the Security Council. The 
        Director shall appoint a professional staff headed by a Chief 
        of Staff and may employ contract staff as needed.
            (3) The IOB shall receive operational and budgetary funding 
        through appropriations by the General Assembly from existing 
        levels of United Nations budgetary and personnel resources, and 
        shall not be dependent upon any other entity, bureau, division, 
        department, or specialized agency of the United Nations for 
        such funding.
            (4) While the IOB shall have the authority to evaluate all 
        operations of the United Nations, the primary mission of the 
        IOB is to oversee the Office of Internal Oversight Services and 
        the Board of External Auditors. The IOB may direct the Office 
        of Internal Oversight Services or the Board of External 
        Auditors to initiate, abandon, or modify the scope of an 
        investigation. Every three months or more frequently when 
        appropriate, the IOB shall submit, as appropriate, to the 
        Secretary General, the Security Council, the General Assembly, 
        or the Economic and Social Council a report on its activities, 
        relevant observations, and recommendations relating to its 
        audit operations, including information relating to the 
        inventory and status of investigations by the Office of 
        Internal Oversight Services.
            (5) In extraordinary circumstances and with the concurrence 
        of the Secretary General or the Security Council by majority 
        vote, the IOB may augment the Office of Internal Oversight 
        Services with a special investigator and staff consisting of 
        individuals who are not employees of the United Nations, to 
        investigate matters involving senior officials of the United 
        Nations or of its specialized agencies when allegations of 
        serious misconduct have been made and such a special 
        investigation is necessary to maintain public confidence in the 
        integrity of the investigation. A special investigator and 
        staff shall comply with all United Nations financial disclosure 
        and conflict of interest rules, including the filing of an 
        individual Annual Financial Disclosure Form in accordance with 
        subsection (c).
            (6) The IOB shall recommend annual budgets for the Office 
        of Internal Oversight Services and the Board of External 
        Auditors.
            (7)(A) The IOB shall review the Final Report of the 
        Independent Inquiry Committee (IIC) into the United Nations Oil 
        for Food Program (OFF). The IOB's review should focus on the 
        adequacy of the IIC's Final Report or any subsequent reports of 
        the IIC or of any possible successor to the IIC. The IOB's 
        review of the IIC's Final Report should address the Final 
        Report's treatment of and adequacy in the following areas--
                    (i) OFF's operations from inception through the 
                transfer of power from the Coalition Provisional 
                Authority to the interim Iraqi government;
                    (ii) claims of oil smuggling, illegal surcharges on 
                oil and commissions on commodity contracts, illegal 
                kick-backs, use of oil allocations to influence foreign 
                government officials and international people of 
                influence, and use of funds for military purposes;
                    (iii) the involvement, directly or indirectly, of 
                any entity, bureau, division, department, specialized 
                agency, or employee (including the Secretary General) 
                of the United Nations, including any employee of the 
                specialized agencies of the United Nations or any 
                employee or officer of the Secretariat;
                    (iv) the IIC's findings, discovery and use of 
                evidence, and investigation practices; and
                    (v) the extent of cooperation by the United Nations 
                with requests by Congress for testimony, interviews, 
                documents, correspondence, reports, memoranda, books, 
                papers, accounts, or records related to the Oil for 
                Food Program.
            (B) Subsequent to the IOB's review, the IOB shall determine 
        in a written report whether the IIC investigation is incomplete 
        or inadequate in any respects and whether any additional 
        investigation is justified. If the IOB determines that 
        additional investigation is warranted, it shall appoint, in 
        accordance with paragraph (5), a special investigator and staff 
        consisting of individuals who are not employees of the United 
        Nations and to identify specific areas within the OFF to 
        investigate.
    (b) Certification of United Nations Reforms of the Office of 
Internal Oversight Services.--In accordance with section 1171, a 
certification shall be required that certifies that the following 
reforms related to the Office of Internal Oversight Services (OIOS) 
have been adopted by the United Nations:
            (1) The OIOS is designated as an independent entity within 
        the United Nations. The OIOS shall not be subject to budget 
        authority or organizational authority of any entity within the 
        United Nations except as provided in this section.
            (2) The regular assessed budget of the United Nations shall 
        fully fund the Internal Oversight Budget from existing levels 
        of United Nations budgetary and personnel resources and shall 
        not be dependent upon any other entity, bureau, division, 
        department, or specialized agency of the United Nations for 
        such funding.
            (3) All United Nations officials, including officials from 
        any entity, bureau, division, department, or specialized agency 
        of the United Nations, may--
                    (A) make a recommendation to the OIOS to initiate 
                an investigation of any aspect of the United Nations; 
                or
                    (B) report to the OIOS information or allegations 
                of misconduct or inefficiencies within the United 
                Nations.
            (4) The OIOS may, sua sponte, initiate and conduct an 
        investigation or audit of any entity, bureau, division, 
        department, specialized agency, employee (including the 
        Secretary General) of the United Nations, including any 
        employee of the specialized agencies of the United Nations, or 
        contractor or consultant for the United Nations or its 
        specialized agencies.
            (5) At least every three months and more frequently when 
        appropriate, the OIOS shall submit to the IOB a report 
        containing an inventory and status of its investigations.
            (6) The OIOS shall establish procedures for providing 
        ``whistle-blower'' status and employment protections for all 
        employees of the United Nations, including employees of the 
        specialized agencies of the United Nations, who provide 
        informational leads and testimony related to allegations of 
        wrongdoing. Such procedures shall be adopted throughout the 
        United Nations. Such status and protection may not be conferred 
        on the Secretary General.
            (7) The OIOS shall annually publish a public report 
        determining the proper number, distribution, and expertise of 
        auditors within the OIOS necessary to carry out present and 
        future duties of the OIOS, including assessing the staffing 
        requirements needed to audit United Nations contracting 
        activities throughout the contract cycle from the bid process 
        to contract performance.
            (8) Not later than six months after the date of the 
        enactment of this Act, the Director shall establish a position 
        of Associate Director of OIOS for Specialized Agencies and 
        Funds and Programs who shall be responsible for supervising the 
        OIOS liaison or oversight duties for each of the specialized 
        agencies and funds and programs of the United Nations. With the 
        concurrence of the Director, the Associate Director of OIOS for 
        Specialized Agencies and Funds and Programs may, from existing 
        levels of United Nations budgetary and personnel resources, 
        hire and appoint necessary OIOS staff, including staff serving 
        within and located at specialized agencies and funds and 
        programs permanently or as needed to liaison with existing 
        audit functions within each specialized agency and fund and 
        program.
            (9) Not later than six months after the date of the 
        enactment of this Act, the Director shall establish a position 
        of Associate Director of OIOS for Peacekeeping Operations, who 
        shall be responsible for the oversight and auditing of the 
        field offices attached to United Nations peacekeeping 
        operations. The Associate Director of OIOS for Peacekeeping 
        Operations shall receive informational leads and testimony from 
        any person regarding allegations of wrongdoing by United 
        Nations officials or peacekeeping troops or regarding 
        inefficiencies associated with United Nations peacekeeping 
        operations. The Associate Director of OIOS for Peacekeeping 
        Operations shall be responsible for initiating, conducting, and 
        overseeing investigations within peacekeeping operations.
            (10) Not later than six months after the date of the 
        enactment of this Act, the Director shall establish a position 
        of Associate Director of OIOS for Procurement and Contract 
        Integrity, who shall be responsible for auditing and inspecting 
        procurement and contracting win the United Nations, including 
        within the specialized agencies. The Associate Director of OIOS 
        for Procurement and Contract Integrity shall receive 
        informational leads and testimony from any person regarding 
        allegations of wrongdoing by United Nations officials or 
        regarding inefficiencies associated with United Nations 
        procurement or contracting activities. The Associate Director 
        of OIOS for Procurement and Contract Integrity shall be 
        responsible for initiating, conducting, and overseeing 
        investigations of procurement and contract activities. Not 
        later than 12 months after the establishment of the position of 
        Associate Director of OIOS for Procurement and Contract 
        Integrity, the Director, with the assistance of the Associate 
        Director of OIOS for Procurement and Contract Integrity, shall 
        undertake a review of contract procedures to ensure that 
        practices and policies are in place to ensure that--
                    (A) the United Nations has ceased issuing single 
                bid contracts except for such contracts issued during 
                an emergency situation that is justified by the Under 
                Secretary General for Management;
                    (B) the United Nations has established effective 
                controls to prevent conflicts of interest in the award 
                of contracts; and
                    (C) the United Nations has established effective 
                procedures and policies to ensure effective and 
                comprehensive oversight and monitoring of United 
                Nations contract performance.
    (c) Certification of Establishment of United Nations Office of 
Ethics.--In accordance with section 1171, a certification shall be 
required that certifies that the following reforms related to the 
establishment of a United Nations Office of Ethics have been adopted by 
the United Nations:
            (1) A United Nations Office of Ethics (UNOE) is 
        established. The UNOE shall be an independent entity within the 
        United Nations and shall not be subject to budget authority or 
        organizational authority of any entity within the United 
        Nations. The UNEO shall be responsible for establishing, 
        managing, and enforcing a code of ethics for all employees of 
        United Nations and its specialized agencies. The UNEO shall 
        also be responsible for providing such employees with annual 
        training related to such code. The head of the UNEO shall be a 
        Director who shall be nominated by the Secretary General and 
        who shall be subject to Security Council approval by majority 
        vote. The UNOE shall promulgate ethics rules, including the 
        following:
                    (A) No employee of any United Nations entity, 
                bureau, division, department, or specialized agency may 
                be compensated while participating in the domestic 
                politics of the country of such employee, except for 
                voting or acting as part of a Security Council, General 
                Assembly, or legitimately authorized United Nations 
                mission or assignment.
                    (B) No United Nations entity, bureau, division, 
                department, or specialized agency may hire an 
                individual convicted in a generally recognized court of 
                a democratically-elected government with an independent 
                judiciary and an extradition treaty with the United 
                States and the European Union for any crime or crimes 
                involving financial misfeasance, malfeasance, fraud, or 
                perjury.
                    (C) The employment of an employee of any United 
                Nations entity, bureau, division, department, or 
                specialized agency who is convicted in a generally 
                recognized court of a democratically-elected government 
                with an independent judiciary and an extradition treaty 
                with the United States and the European Union of any 
                crime or crimes involving financial misfeasance, 
                malfeasance, fraud, or perjury shall be subject to 
                termination.
                    (D) If an employee of any United Nations entity, 
                bureau, division, department, or specialized agency has 
                contact regarding the disposition of ongoing internal 
                United Nations operations or decisions with an 
                individual who is not an employee or official of the 
                government of a Member State (or a similarly situated 
                individual), with an individual who is not officially 
                employed by any United Nations entity, bureau, 
                division, department, or specialized agency, or with an 
                individual who is not a working member of the media, a 
                memorandum of such contact shall be prepared by such 
                employee and, upon request, be made available to Member 
                States.
            (2) The UNEO shall receive operational and budgetary 
        funding through appropriations by the General Assembly from 
        existing levels of United Nations budgetary and personnel 
        resources and shall not be dependent upon any other entity, 
        bureau, division, department, or specialized agency of the 
        United Nations for such funding.
            (3) The Director of the UNEO shall, not later than six 
        months after the date of its establishment, publish a report 
        containing proposals for implementing a system for the filing 
        and review of individual Annual Financial Disclosure Forms by 
        each employee of the United Nations, including by each employee 
        of its specialized agencies, at the P-5 level and above and by 
        all contractors and consultants compensated at any salary 
        level. Such system shall be in place and operational not later 
        than six months after the date of the publication of the 
        report. Such completed forms shall be made available to the 
        Office of Internal Oversight Services at the request of the 
        Director of the Office of Internal Oversight Services. Such 
        system shall seek to identify and prevent conflicts of interest 
        by United Nations employees and shall be comparable to the 
        system used for such purposes by the United States Government. 
        Such report shall also address broader reforms of the ethics 
        program for the United Nations, including--
                    (A) the effect of the establishment of ethics 
                officers throughout all organizations within the United 
                Nations;
                    (B) the effect of retention by the UNEO of Annual 
                Financial Disclosure Forms;
                    (C) proposals for making completed Annual Financial 
                Disclosure Forms available to the public on request 
                through their Member State's mission to the United 
                Nations;
                    (D) proposals for annual disclosure to the public 
                of information related to the annual salaries and 
                payments, including pension payments and buyouts, of 
                employees of the United Nations, including employees of 
                its specialized agencies, and of consultants;
                    (E) proposals for annual disclosure to the public 
                of information related to per diem rates for all 
                bureaus, divisions, departments, or specialized 
                agencies within the United Nations;
                    (F) proposals for disclosure upon request by the 
                Ambassador of a Member State of information related to 
                travel and per diem payments made from United Nations 
                funds to any person; and
                    (G) proposals for annual disclosure to the public 
                of information related to travel and per diem rates and 
                payments made from United Nations funds to any person.
    (d) Certification of United Nations Establishment of Position of 
Chief Operating Officer.--In accordance with section 1171, a 
certification shall be required that certifies that the following 
reforms related to the establishment of the position of a Chief 
Operating Officer have been adopted by the United Nations:
            (1) There is established the position of Chief Operating 
        Officer (COO). The COO shall report to the Secretary General.
            (2) The COO shall be responsible for formulating general 
        policies and programs for the United Nations in coordination 
        with the Secretary General and in consultation with the 
        Security Council and the General Assembly. The COO shall be 
        responsible for the daily administration, operation and 
        supervision, and the direction and control of the business of 
        the United Nations. The Chief Operating Officer shall also 
        perform such other duties and may exercise such other powers as 
        from time to time may be assigned to the COO by the Secretary 
        General.
    (e) Certification of Access by Member States to Reports and Audits 
by Board of External Auditors.--In accordance with section 1171, a 
certification shall be required that certifies that Member States may, 
upon request, have access to all reports and audits completed by the 
Board of External Auditors.
    (f) Waiver of Immunity.--The President shall direct the United 
States Permanent Representative to the United Nations to use the voice, 
vote, and influence of the United States at the United Nations to 
ensure that the Secretary General exercises the right and duty of the 
Secretary General under section 20 of the Convention on the Privileges 
and Immunities of the United Nations to waive the immunity of any 
United Nations official in any case in which such immunity would impede 
the course of justice. In exercising such waiver, the Secretary General 
is urged to interpret the interests of the United Nations as favoring 
the investigation or prosecution of a United Nations official who is 
credibly under investigation for having committed a serious criminal 
offense or who is credibly charged with a serious criminal offense.
    (g) Certification of United Nations Cooperation Relating to Oil-
for-Food Program.--
            (1) Actions.--In accordance with section 1171, a 
        certification shall be required that certifies that the 
        following actions relating to the oil-for-food program have 
        been taken by the United Nations:
                    (A) The United Nations Secretary General has 
                authorized the release to a law enforcement authority 
                of any Member State (upon request by the permanent 
                representative to the United Nations of such Member 
                State on behalf of such law enforcement authority) or 
                to a national legislative authority authentic copies of 
                any document in the possession of the United Nations, 
                including any document in the possession of a person 
                who was engaged on a contract basis to provide goods or 
                services to the United Nations, that in the judgment of 
                such requesting law enforcement authority or national 
                legislative authority directly or indirectly concerns 
                the oil-for-food program or a sanction imposed on Iraq 
                related to the oil-for-food program.
                    (B) The United Nations has waived any immunity 
                enjoyed by any United Nations official from the 
                judicial process in the United States for any civil or 
                criminal acts or omissions under Federal or State law 
                that may have transpired within the jurisdiction of the 
                United States in connection with the oil-for-food 
                program.
            (2) Definition.--As used in this subsection, the term 
        ``oil-for-food program'' means the program established and 
        administered pursuant to United Nations Security Council 
        Resolution 986 (April 14, 1995) and subsequent United Nations 
        resolutions to permit the sale of petroleum products exported 
        from Iraq and to use the revenue generated from such sale for 
        humanitarian assistance.

SEC. 1215. TERRORISM AND THE UNITED NATIONS.

    The President shall direct the United States Permanent 
Representative to the United Nations to use the voice, vote, and 
influence of the United States at the United Nations to work toward 
adoption by the General Assembly of--
            (1) a definition of terrorism that builds upon the 
        recommendations of the Secretary General's High-Level Panel on 
        Threats, Challenges, and Change, and includes as an essential 
        component of such definition any action that is intended to 
        cause death or serious bodily harm to civilians with the 
        purpose of intimidating a population or compelling a government 
        or an international organization to do, or abstain from doing, 
        any act; and
            (2) a comprehensive convention on terrorism that includes 
        the definition described in paragraph (1).

SEC. 1216. UNITED NATIONS TREATY BODIES.

    The United States shall withhold from United States contributions 
to the regular assessed budget of the United Nations for a biennial 
period amounts that are proportional to the percentage of such budget 
that are expended with respect to a United Nations human rights treaty 
monitoring body or committee that was established by--
            (1) a convention (without any protocols) or an 
        international covenant (without any protocols) to which the 
        United States is not party; or
            (2) a convention, with a subsequent protocol, if the United 
        States is a party to neither.

SEC. 1217. EQUALITY AT THE UNITED NATIONS.

    (a) Inclusion of Israel in WEOG.--
            (1) In general.--The President shall direct the United 
        States Permanent Representative to the United Nations to use 
        the voice, vote, and influence of the United States to expand 
        the Western European and Others Group (WEOG) in the United 
        Nations to include Israel as a permanent member with full 
        rights and privileges.
            (2) Notification to congress.--Not later than six months 
        after the date of the enactment of this Act and every six 
        months thereafter for the next six years, the Secretary of 
        State shall notify the appropriate congressional committees 
        concerning the treatment of Israel in the United Nations and 
        the expansion of WEOG to include Israel as a permanent member.
    (b) Department of State Review and Report.--
            (1) In general.--To avoid duplicative efforts and funding 
        with respect to Palestinian interests and to ensure balance in 
        the approach to Israeli-Palestinian issues, the Secretary 
        shall, not later than 60 days after the date of the enactment 
        of this Act--
                    (A) conduct an audit of the functions of the 
                entities listed in paragraph (2); and
                    (B) submit to the appropriate congressional 
                committees a report containing recommendations for the 
                elimination of such duplicative entities and efforts.
            (2) Entities.--The entities referred to in paragraph (1) 
        are the following:
                    (A) The United Nations Division for Palestinian 
                Rights.
                    (B) The Committee on the Exercise of the 
                Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People.
                    (C) The United Nations Special Coordinator for the 
                Middle East Peace Process and Personal Representative 
                to the Palestine Liberation Organization and the 
                Palestinian Authority.
                    (D) The NGO Network on the Question of Palestine.
                    (E) The Special Committee to Investigate Israeli 
                Practices Affecting the Human Rights of the Palestinian 
                People and Other Arabs of the Occupied Territories.
                    (F) Any other entity the Secretary determines 
                results in duplicative efforts or funding or fails to 
                ensure balance in the approach to Israeli-Palestinian 
                issues.
    (c) Implementation by Permanent Representative.--
            (1) In general.--The President shall direct the United 
        States Permanent Representative to the United Nations to use 
        the voice, vote, and influence of the United States at the 
        United Nations to seek the implementation of the 
        recommendations contained in the report required under 
        subsection (b)(1).
            (2) Withholding of funds.--Until such recommendations have 
        been implemented, the United States shall withhold from United 
        States contributions to the regular assessed budget of the 
        United Nations for a biennial period amounts that are 
        proportional to the percentage of such budget that are expended 
        for such entities.
    (d) GAO Audit.--The Comptroller General of the United States of the 
Government Accountability Office shall conduct an audit of--
            (1) the status of the implementation of the recommendations 
        contained in the report required under subsection (b)(1); and
            (2) United States actions and achievements under subsection 
        (c).

SEC. 1218. REPORT ON UNITED NATIONS REFORM.

    (a) In General.--Not later than 180 days after the date of the 
enactment of this Act, and one year thereafter, the Secretary shall 
submit to the appropriate congressional committees a report on United 
Nations reform since 1990.
    (b) Contents.--The report required under paragraph (1) shall 
describe--
            (1) the status of the implementation of management reforms 
        within the United Nations and its specialized agencies;
            (2) the number of outputs, reports, or other items 
        generated by General Assembly resolutions that have been 
        eliminated;
            (3) the progress of the General Assembly to modernize and 
        streamline the committee structure and its specific 
        recommendations on oversight and committee outputs, consistent 
        with the March 2005 report of the Secretary General entitled 
        ``In larger freedom: towards development, security and human 
        rights for all'';
            (4) the status of the review by the General Assembly of all 
        mandates older than five years and how resources have been 
        redirected to new challenges, consistent with such March 2005 
        report of the Secretary General;
            (5) the continued utility and relevance of the Economic and 
        Financial Committee and the Social, Humanitarian, and Cultural 
        Committee, in light of the duplicative agendas of those 
        committees and the Economic and Social Council; and
            (6) whether the United Nations or any of its specialized 
        agencies has contracted with any party included on the Lists of 
        Parties Excluded from Federal Procurement and Nonprocurement 
        Programs.

SEC. 1219. REPORT ON UNITED NATIONS PERSONNEL.

    (a) In General.--Not later than one year after the date of the 
enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State shall submit to the 
appropriate congressional committees a report--
            (1) concerning the progress of the General Assembly to 
        modernize human resource practices, consistent with the March 
        2005 report of the Secretary General entitled ``In larger 
        freedom: towards development, security and human rights for 
        all''; and
            (2) containing the information described in subsection (b).
    (b) Contents.--The report shall include--
            (1) a comprehensive evaluation of human resources reforms 
        at the United Nations, including an evaluation of--
                    (A) tenure;
                    (B) performance reviews;
                    (C) the promotion system;
                    (D) a merit-based hiring system and enhanced 
                regulations concerning termination of employment of 
                employees; and
                    (E) the implementation of a code of conduct and 
                ethics training;
            (2) the implementation of a system of procedures for filing 
        complaints and protective measures for work-place harassment, 
        including sexual harassment;
            (3) policy recommendations relating to the establishment of 
        a rotation requirement for nonadministrative positions;
            (4) policy recommendations relating to the establishment of 
        a prohibition preventing personnel and officials assigned to 
        the mission of a Member State to the United Nations from 
        transferring to a position within the United Nations 
        Secretariat that is compensated at the P-5 level and above;
            (5) policy recommendations relating to a reduction in 
        travel allowances and attendant oversight with respect to 
        accommodations and airline flights; and
            (6) an evaluation of the recommendations of the Secretary 
        General relating to greater flexibility for the Secretary 
        General in staffing decisions to accommodate changing 
        priorities.

SEC. 1220. REPORT ON UNITED STATES CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE UNITED NATIONS.

    Not later than one year after the date of the enactment of this 
Act, the Director of the Office of Management and Budget shall submit 
to the Committee on International Relations of the House of 
Representatives, the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate, the 
Committee on Appropriations of the House of Representatives, and the 
Committee on Appropriations of the Senate a report on United States 
contributions to the United Nations. Such report shall examine 
assessed, voluntary, in-kind, and all other United States 
contributions.

SEC. 1221. UNITED NATIONS SECURITY COUNCIL AND LEBANON.

    (a) Resolution 1559.--The President shall direct the United States 
Permanent Representative to the United Nations to use the voice, vote, 
and influence of the United States at the United Nations to make every 
effort to ensure that the Security Council is undertaking the necessary 
steps to secure the implementation of Security Council Resolution 1559, 
including--
            (1) deploying United Nations inspectors to verify and 
        certify to the Security Council that--
                    (A) all foreign forces, including intelligence, 
                security, and policing forces, have been withdrawn from 
                Lebanon; and
                    (B) all militias in Lebanon have been permanently 
                disarmed and dismantled and their weapons have been 
                decommissioned; and
            (2) continuing the presence of United Nations elections 
        monitoring teams in Lebanon to verify and certify to the 
        Security Council that--
                    (A) citizens of Lebanon are not being targeted for 
                assassination by foreign forces, in particular by 
                foreign forces of Syria, or by their proxies, as a 
                means of intimidation and coercion in an effort to 
                manipulate the political process in Lebanon;
                    (B) elections in Lebanon are being conducted in a 
                fair and transparent manner and are free of foreign 
                interference; and
                    (C) that such foreign forces, or their proxies, are 
                not seeking to infringe upon the territorial integrity 
                or political sovereignty of Lebanon.
    (b) United States Action.--If the steps described in paragraphs (1) 
and (2) of subsection (a) have not been verified and certified to the 
Security Council by July 31, 2005, or by the date that is not later 
than 30 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, whichever is 
sooner, the President shall direct the United States Permanent 
Representative to the United Nations to use the voice, vote, and 
influence of the United States at the United Nations to secure the 
adoption of a resolution in the Security Council imposing punitive 
measures on the governments of countries whose forces remain in Lebanon 
in violation of Security Council Resolution 1559 and who directly, or 
through proxies, are infringing upon the territorial integrity or 
political sovereignty of Lebanon.

SEC. 1222. POLICY WITH RESPECT TO EXPANSION OF THE SECURITY COUNCIL.

    It shall be the policy of the United States to use the voice, vote, 
and influence of the United States at the United Nations to oppose any 
proposals on expansion of the Security Council if such expansion 
would--
            (1) diminish the influence of the United States on the 
        Security Council;
            (2) include veto rights for any new members of the Security 
        Council; or
            (3) undermine the effectiveness of the Security Council.

SEC. 1223. GENOCIDE AND THE UNITED NATIONS.

    (a) United States Action.--The President shall direct the United 
States Permanent Representative to the United Nations to use the voice, 
vote, and influence of the United States at the United Nations to make 
every effort to ensure the formal adoption and implementation of 
mechanisms to--
            (1) suspend the membership of a Member State if it is 
        determined that the government of such Member State is engaged 
        in or complicit in, either by commission or omission, acts of 
        genocide, ethnic cleansing, or crimes against humanity;
            (2) impose an arms and trade embargo and travel 
        restrictions on, and freeze the assets of, all groups and 
        individuals responsible for committing or allowing such acts of 
        genocide, ethnic cleansing, or crimes against humanity to 
        occur;
            (3) deploy a United Nations peacekeeping operation or 
        authorize and support the deployment of a peacekeeping 
        operation from an international or regional organization to the 
        Member State with a mandate to stop such acts of genocide, 
        ethnic cleansing, or crimes against humanity;
            (4) deploy monitors from the United Nations High 
        Commissioner for Refugees to the area in the Member State where 
        such acts of genocide, ethnic cleansing, or crimes against 
        humanity are occurring; and
            (5) authorize the establishment of an international 
        commission of inquiry into such acts of genocide, ethnic 
        cleansing, or crimes against humanity.
    (b) Certification.--In accordance with section 1171, a 
certification shall be required that certifies that the mechanisms 
described in subsection (a) have been adopted and implemented.

SEC. 1224. ANTI-SEMITISM AND THE UNITED NATIONS.

    (a) In General.--The President shall direct the United States 
Permanent Representative to the United Nations to use the voice, vote, 
and influence of the United States at the United Nations to make every 
effort to--
            (1) ensure the issuance and implementation of a directive 
        by the Secretary General or the Secretariat, as appropriate, 
        that--
                    (A) requires all employees of the United Nations 
                and its specialized agencies to officially and publicly 
                condemn anti-Semitic statements made at any session of 
                the United Nations or its specialized agencies, or at 
                any other session sponsored by the United Nations;
                    (B) requires employees of the United Nations and 
                its specialized agencies to be subject to punitive 
                action, including immediate dismissal, for making anti-
                Semitic statements or references;
                    (C) proposes specific recommendations to the 
                General Assembly for the establishment of mechanisms to 
                hold accountable employees and officials of the United 
                Nations and its specialized agencies, or Member States, 
                that make such anti-Semitic statements or references in 
                any forum of the United Nations or of its specialized 
                agencies; and
                    (D) develops and implements education awareness 
                programs about the Holocaust and anti-Semitism 
                throughout the world, as part of an effort to combat 
                intolerance and hatred;
            (2) work to secure the adoption of a resolution by the 
        General Assembly that establishes the mechanisms described in 
        paragraph (1)(C); and
            (3) continue working toward further reduction of anti-
        Semitic language and anti-Israel resolutions in the United 
        Nations and its specialized agencies.
    (b) Certification.--In accordance with section 1171, a 
certification shall be required that certifies that the requirements 
described in subsection (a) have been satisfied.

 Subtitle B--Human Rights and the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC)

SEC. 1231. HUMAN RIGHTS.

    (a) Statement of Policy.--It shall be the policy of the United 
States to use its voice, vote, and influence at the United Nations to 
ensure that a credible and respectable Human Rights Council or other 
human rights body is established within the United Nations whose 
participating Member States uphold the values embodied in the Universal 
Declaration of Human Rights.
    (b) Human Rights Reforms at the United Nations.--The President 
shall direct the United States Permanent Representative to the United 
Nations to ensure that the following human rights reforms have been 
adopted by the United Nations:
            (1) A Member State that fails to uphold the values embodied 
        in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights shall be 
        ineligible for membership on any United Nations human rights 
        body.
            (2) A Member State shall be ineligible for membership on 
        any United Nations human rights body if such Member State is--
                    (A) subject to sanctions by the Security Council; 
                or
                    (B) under a Security Council-mandated investigation 
                for human rights abuses.
            (3) A Member State that is currently subject to an adopted 
        country specific resolution, in the principal body in the 
        United Nations for the promotion and protection of human 
        rights, relating to human rights abuses perpetrated by the 
        government of such country in such country, or has been the 
        subject of such an adopted country specific resolution in such 
        principal body within the previous three years, shall be 
        ineligible for membership on any United Nations human rights 
        body. For purposes of this subsection, an adopted country 
        specific resolution shall not include consensus resolutions on 
        advisory services.
            (4) A Member State that violates the principles of a United 
        Nations human rights body to which it aspires to join shall be 
        ineligible for membership on such body.
            (5) No human rights body has a standing agenda item that 
        relates only to one country or region.
            (6) The practice of considering in the principal body in 
        the United Nations for the promotion and protection of human 
        rights country specific resolutions relating to human rights 
        abuses perpetrated by the government of a Member State within 
        such Member State shall not be eliminated.
    (c) Certification.--In accordance with section 1171, a 
certification shall be required that certifies that the human rights 
reforms described under subsection (b) have been adopted by the United 
Nations.
    (d) Prevention of Abuse of ``No Action'' Motions.--The United 
States Permanent Representative shall work to prevent abuse of ``no 
action'' motions, particularly as such motions relate to country 
specific resolutions.
    (e) Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human 
Rights.--
            (1) Statement of policy.--It shall be the policy of the 
        United States to continue to strongly support the Office of the 
        United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights.
            (2) Certification.--In accordance with section 1171, a 
        certification shall be required that certifies that the Office 
        of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights has 
        been given greater authority in field operation activities, 
        such as in the Darfur region of Sudan and in the Democratic 
        Republic of Congo, in furtherance of the purpose and mission of 
        the United Nations.
    (f) Prohibition on Contact With Member States Subject to 
Sanctions.--An employee from of any United Nations entity, bureau, 
division, department, or specialized agency may not have unauthorized 
contact, including business contact, with a Member State that is 
subject to United Nations sanctions.

SEC. 1232. ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL COUNCIL (ECOSOC).

    (a) Statement of Policy.--It shall be the policy of the United 
States to use its voice, vote, and influence at the United Nations to--
            (1) abolish secret voting in the Economic and Social 
        Council (ECOSOC);
            (2) ensure that, until such time as the Commission on Human 
        Rights of the United Nations is abolished, only countries that 
        are not ineligible for membership on a human rights body in 
        accordance with paragraphs (1) through (4) of section 1131(b) 
        shall be considered for membership on the Commission on Human 
        Rights; and
            (3) ensure that after candidate countries are nominated for 
        membership on the Commission on Human Rights, the Economic and 
        Social Council conducts a recorded vote to determine such 
        membership.
    (b) Certification.--In accordance with section 1171, a 
certification shall be required that certifies that the policies 
described in subsection (a) have been implemented by the Economic and 
Social Council.

SEC. 1233. UNITED NATIONS DEMOCRACY FUND.

    (a) In General.--The President shall direct the United States 
Permanent Representative to the United Nations to use the voice, vote, 
and influence of the United States at the United Nations to make every 
effort to--
            (1) establish a Democracy Fund at the United Nations to be 
        administered by Member States of the United Nations Democracy 
        Caucus;
            (2) secure political and financial support for the 
        Democracy Fund from Member States of the United Nations 
        Democracy Caucus; and
            (3) establish criteria that limits recipients of assistance 
        from the Democracy Fund to Member States that--
                    (A) are not ineligible for membership on any United 
                Nations human rights body, in accordance with 
                paragraphs (1) through (4) of section 1131(b); and
                    (B) are determined by the Secretary of State to be 
                emerging democracies or democracies in transition.
    (b) Policy Relating to Funding for the Democracy Fund.--It shall be 
the policy of the United States to shift contributions of the United 
States to the regularly assessed budget of the United Nations for a 
biennial period to initiate and support the Democracy Fund referred to 
in subsection (a).
    (c) Certification.--In accordance with section 1171, a 
certification shall be required that certifies that the requirements 
described in subsection (a) have been satisfied.

             Subtitle C--International Atomic Energy Agency

SEC. 1241. INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY.

    (a) Enforcement and Compliance.--
            (1) Office of compliance.--
                    (A) Establishment.--The President shall direct the 
                United States Permanent Representative to International 
                Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to use the voice, vote, and 
                influence of the United States at the IAEA to establish 
                an Office of Compliance in the Secretariat of the IAEA.
                    (B) Operation.--The Office of Compliance shall--
                            (i) function as an independent body 
                        composed of technical experts who shall work in 
                        consultation with IAEA inspectors to assess 
                        compliance by IAEA Member States and provide 
                        recommendations to the IAEA Board of Governors 
                        concerning penalties to be imposed on IAEA 
                        Member States that fail to fulfill their 
                        obligations under IAEA Board resolutions;
                            (ii) base its assessments and 
                        recommendations on IAEA inspection reports; and
                            (iii) shall take into consideration 
                        information provided by IAEA Board Members that 
                        are one of the five nuclear weapons states as 
                        recognized by the Treaty on the Non-
                        Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (21 UST 483) 
                        (commonly referred to as the ``Nuclear 
                        Nonproliferation Treaty'' or the ``NPT'').
                    (C) Staffing.--The Office of Compliance shall be 
                staffed from existing personnel in the Department of 
                Safeguards of the IAEA or the Department of Nuclear 
                Safety and Security of the IAEA.
            (2) Special committee on safeguards and verification.--
                    (A) Establishment.--The President shall direct the 
                United States Permanent Representative to the IAEA to 
                use the voice, vote, and influence of the United States 
                at the IAEA to establish a Special Committee on 
                Safeguards and Verification.
                    (B) Responsibilities.--The Special Committee 
                shall--
                            (i) improve the ability of the IAEA to 
                        monitor and enforce compliance by Member States 
                        of the IAEA with the Nuclear Nonproliferation 
                        Treaty and the Statute of the International 
                        Atomic Energy Agency; and
                            (ii) consider which additional measures are 
                        necessary to enhance the ability of the IAEA, 
                        beyond the verification mechanisms and 
                        authorities contained in the Additional 
                        Protocol to the Safeguards Agreements between 
                        the IAEA and Member States of the IAEA, to 
                        detect with a high degree of confidence 
                        undeclared nuclear activities by a Member 
                        State.
            (3) Penalties with respect to the iaea.--
                    (A) In general.--The President shall direct the 
                United States Permanent Representative to the IAEA to 
                use the voice, vote, and influence of the United States 
                at the IAEA to ensure that a Member State of the IAEA 
                that is under investigation for a breach of or 
                noncompliance with its IAEA obligations or the purposes 
                and principles of the Charter of the United Nations has 
                its privileges suspended, including--
                            (i) limiting its ability to vote on its 
                        case;
                            (ii) being prevented from receiving any 
                        technical assistance; and
                            (iii) being prevented from hosting 
                        meetings.
                    (B) Termination of penalties.--The penalties 
                specified under subparagraph (A) shall be terminated 
                when such investigation is concluded and such Member 
                State is no longer in such breach or noncompliance.
            (4) Penalties with respect to the nuclear nonproliferation 
        treaty.--The President shall direct the United States Permanent 
        Representative to the IAEA to use the voice, vote, and 
        influence of the United States at the IAEA to ensure that a 
        Member State of the IAEA that is found to be in breach of, in 
        noncompliance with, or has withdrawn from the Nuclear 
        Nonproliferation Treaty shall return to the IAEA all nuclear 
        materials and technology received from the IAEA, any Member 
        State of the IAEA, or any Member State of the Nuclear 
        Nonproliferation Treaty.
    (b) United States Contributions.--
            (1) Voluntary contributions.--Voluntary contributions of 
        the United States to the IAEA should primarily be used to fund 
        activities relating to Nuclear Safety and Security or 
        activities relating to Nuclear Verification.
            (2) Limitation on use of funds.--The President shall direct 
        the United States Permanent Representative to the IAEA to use 
        the voice, vote, and influence of the United States at the IAEA 
        to--
                    (A) ensure that funds for safeguards inspections 
                are prioritized for countries that have newly 
                established nuclear programs or are initiating nuclear 
                programs; and
                    (B) block the allocation of funds for any other 
                IAEA development, environmental, or nuclear science 
                assistance or activity to a country--
                            (i) the government of which the Secretary 
                        of State has determined, for purposes of 
                        section 6(j) of the Export Administration Act 
                        of 1979, section 620A of the Foreign Assistance 
                        Act of 1961, section 40 of the Arms Export 
                        Control Act, or other provision of law, is a 
                        government that has repeatedly provided support 
                        for acts of international terrorism and the 
                        government of which the Secretary has 
                        determined has not dismantled and surrendered 
                        its weapons of mass destruction programs under 
                        international verification;
                            (ii) that is under investigation for a 
                        breach of or noncompliance with its IAEA 
                        obligations or the purposes and principles of 
                        the Charter of the United Nations; or
                            (iii) that is in violation of its IAEA 
                        obligations or the purposes and principles of 
                        the Charter of the United Nations.
            (3) Detail of expenditures.--The President shall direct the 
        United States Permanent Representative to the IAEA to use the 
        voice, vote, and influence of the United States at the IAEA to 
        secure, as part of the regular budget presentation of the IAEA 
        to Member States of the IAEA, a detailed breakdown by country 
        of expenditures of the IAEA for safeguards inspections and 
        nuclear security activities.
    (c) Membership.--
            (1) In general.--The President shall direct the United 
        States Permanent Representative to the IAEA to use the voice, 
        vote, and influence of the United States at the IAEA to block 
        the membership on the Board of Governors of the IAEA for a 
        Member State of the IAEA that has not signed and ratified the 
        Additional Protocol and--
                    (A) is under investigation for a breach of or 
                noncompliance with its IAEA obligations or the purposes 
                and principles of the Charter of the United Nations; or
                    (B) that is in violation of its IAEA obligations or 
                the purposes and principles of the Charter of the 
                United Nations.
            (2) Criteria.--The United States Permanent Representative 
        to the IAEA shall make every effort to modify the criteria for 
        Board membership to reflect the principles described in 
        paragraph (1).
    (d) Small Quantities Protocol.--The President shall direct the 
United States Permanent Representative to the IAEA to use the voice, 
vote, and influence of the United States at the IAEA to make every 
effort to ensure that the IAEA changes the policy regarding the Small 
Quantities Protocol in order to--
            (1) rescind and eliminate the Small Quantities Protocol;
            (2) require that any IAEA Member State that has previously 
        signed a Small Quantities Protocol to sign, ratify, and 
        implement the Additional Protocol, provide immediate access for 
        IAEA inspectors to its nuclear-related facilities, and agree to 
        the strongest inspections regime of its nuclear efforts; and
            (3) require that any IAEA Member State that does not comply 
        with paragraph (2) to be ineligible to receive nuclear 
        material, technology, equipment, or assistance from any IAEA 
        Member State and subject to the penalties described in 
        subsection (a)(3).
    (e) Nuclear Program of Iran.--
            (1) United states action.--The President shall direct the 
        United States Permanent Representative to the IAEA to use the 
        voice, vote, and influence of the United States at the IAEA to 
        make every effort to ensure the adoption of a resolution by the 
        IAEA Board of Governors that makes Iran ineligible to receive 
        any nuclear material, technology, equipment, or assistance from 
        any IAEA Member State and ineligible for any IAEA assistance 
        not related to safeguards inspections or nuclear security until 
        the IAEA Board of Governors determines that Iran--
                    (A) is providing full access to IAEA inspectors to 
                its nuclear-related facilities;
                    (B) has fully implemented and is in compliance with 
                the Additional Protocol; and
                    (C) has permanently ceased and dismantled all 
                activities and programs related to nuclear-enrichment 
                and reprocessing.
            (2) Penalties.--If an IAEA Member State is determined to 
        have violated the prohibition on assistance to Iran described 
        in paragraph (1) before the IAEA Board of Governors determines 
        that Iran has satisfied the conditions described in 
        subparagraphs (A) through (C) of such paragraph, such Member 
        State shall be subject to the penalties described in subsection 
        (a)(3), shall be ineligible to receive nuclear material, 
        technology, equipment, or assistance from any IAEA Member 
        State, and shall be ineligible to receive any IAEA assistance 
        not related to safeguards inspections or nuclear security until 
        such time as the IAEA Board of Governors makes such 
        determination with respect to Iran.
    (f) Report.--Not later than six months after the date of the 
enactment of this Act and annually for two years thereafter, the 
President shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees a 
report on the implementation of this section.

SEC. 1242. SENSE OF CONGRESS REGARDING THE NUCLEAR SECURITY ACTION PLAN 
              OF THE IAEA.

    It is the sense of Congress that the national security interests of 
the United States are enhanced by the Nuclear Security Action Plan of 
the IAEA and the Board of Governors should recommend, and the General 
Conference should adopt, a resolution incorporating the Nuclear 
Security Action Plan into the regular budget of the IAEA.

                        Subtitle D--Peacekeeping

SEC. 1251. SENSE OF CONGRESS REGARDING REFORM OF UNITED NATIONS 
              PEACEKEEPING OPERATIONS.

    It is the sense of Congress that--
            (1) although United Nations peacekeeping operations have 
        contributed greatly toward the promotion of peace and stability 
        for the past 57 years and the majority of peacekeeping 
        personnel who have served under the United Nations flag have 
        done so with honor and courage, the record of United Nations 
        peacekeeping has been severely tarnished by operational 
        failures and unconscionable acts of misconduct; and
            (2) if the reputation of and confidence in United Nations 
        peacekeeping operations is to be restored, fundamental and far-
        reaching reforms, particularly in the areas of planning, 
        management, training, conduct, and discipline, must be 
        implemented without delay.

SEC. 1252. STATEMENT OF POLICY RELATING TO REFORM OF UNITED NATIONS 
              PEACEKEEPING OPERATIONS.

    It shall be the policy of the United States to pursue reform of 
United Nations peacekeeping operations in the following areas:
            (1) Planning and management.--
                    (A) Global audit.--As the size, cost, and number of 
                United Nations peacekeeping operations have increased 
                substantially over the past decade, an independent 
                audit of each such operation, with a view toward 
                ``right-sizing'' operations and ensuring that such 
                operations are cost effective, should be conducted and 
                its findings reported to the Security Council.
                    (B) Review of mandates and closing operations.--In 
                conjunction with the audit described in subparagraph 
                (A), the United Nations Department of Peacekeeping 
                Operations should conduct a comprehensive review of all 
                United Nations peacekeeping operation mandates, with a 
                view toward identifying objectives that are practical 
                and achievable, and report its findings to the Security 
                Council. In particular, the review should consider the 
                following:
                            (i) Activities that fall beyond the scope 
                        of traditional peacekeeping activities should 
                        be delegated to a new Peacebuilding Commission, 
                        described in paragraph (3).
                            (ii) Long-standing operations that are 
                        static and cannot fulfill their mandate should 
                        be downsized or closed.
                            (iii) Where there is legitimate concern 
                        that the withdrawal from a country of an 
                        otherwise static United Nations peacekeeping 
                        operation would result in the resumption of 
                        major conflict, a burden-sharing arrangement 
                        that reduces the level of assessed 
                        contributions, similar to that currently 
                        supporting the United Nations Peacekeeping 
                        Force in Cyprus, should be explored and 
                        instituted.
                    (C) Leadership.--As peacekeeping operations become 
                larger and increasingly complex, the Secretariat should 
                adopt a minimum standard of qualifications for senior 
                leaders and managers, with particular emphasis on 
                specific skills and experience, and current senior 
                leaders and managers who do not meet those standards 
                should be removed or reassigned.
                    (D) Pre-deployment training.--Pre-deployment 
                training on interpretation of the mandate of the 
                operation, specifically in the areas of use of force, 
                civilian protection and field conditions, the Code of 
                Conduct, HIV/AIDS, and human rights should be 
                mandatory, and all personnel, regardless of category or 
                rank, should be required to sign an oath that each has 
                received and understands such training as a condition 
                of participation in the operation.
                    (E) Gratis military personnel.--The General 
                Assembly should lift restrictions on the utilization at 
                the headquarters in New York, the United States, of the 
                Department of Peacekeeping Operations of gratis 
                military personnel by the Department so that the 
                Department may accept secondments from Member States of 
                military personnel with expertise in mission planning, 
                logistics, and other operational specialties.
            (2) Conduct and discipline.--
                    (A) Adoption of a uniform code of conduct.--A 
                single, uniform Code of Conduct that has the status of 
                a binding rule and applies equally to all personnel 
                serving in United Nations peacekeeping operations, 
                regardless of category or rank, should be promulgated, 
                adopted, and enforced.
                    (B) Understanding the code of conduct.--All 
                personnel, regardless of category or rank, should 
                receive training on the Code of Conduct prior to 
                deployment with a peacekeeping operation, in addition 
                to periodic follow-on training. In particular--
                            (i) all personnel, regardless of category 
                        or rank, should be provided with a personal 
                        copy of the Code of Conduct that has been 
                        translated into the national language of such 
                        personnel, regardless of whether such language 
                        is an official language of the United Nations;
                            (ii) all personnel, regardless of category 
                        or rank, should sign an oath that each has 
                        received a copy of the Code of Conduct, that 
                        each pledges to abide by the Code of Conduct, 
                        and that each understands the consequences of 
                        violating the Code of Conduct, including 
                        immediate termination of the participation of 
                        such personnel in the peacekeeping operation to 
                        which such personnel is assigned as a condition 
                        of appointment to such operation; and
                            (iii) peacekeeping operations should 
                        conduct educational outreach programs to reach 
                        local communities where peacekeeping personnel 
                        of such operations are based, including 
                        explaining prohibited acts on the part of 
                        United Nations peacekeeping personnel and 
                        identifying the individual to whom the local 
                        population may direct complaints or file 
                        allegations of exploitation, abuse, or other 
                        acts of misconduct.
                    (C) Monitoring mechanisms.--Dedicated monitoring 
                mechanisms, such as the Personnel Conduct Units already 
                deployed to support United Nations peacekeeping 
                operations in Haiti, Liberia, Burundi, and the 
                Democratic Republic of Congo, should be present in each 
                operation to monitor compliance with the Code of 
                Conduct, and--
                            (i) should report simultaneously to the 
                        Head of Mission, the United Nations Department 
                        of Peacekeeping Operations, and the Associate 
                        Director of OIOS for Peacekeeping Operations 
                        (established under section 1114(b)(9)); and
                            (ii) should be tasked with designing and 
                        implementing mission-specific measures to 
                        prevent misconduct, conduct follow-on training 
                        for personnel, coordinate community outreach 
                        programs, and assist in investigations, as OIOS 
                        determines necessary and appropriate.
                    (D) Investigations.--A permanent, professional, and 
                independent investigative body should be established 
                and introduced into United Nations peacekeeping 
                operations. In particular--
                            (i) the investigative body should include 
                        professionals with experience in investigating 
                        sex crimes, as well as experts who can provide 
                        guidance on standards of proof and evidentiary 
                        requirements necessary for any subsequent legal 
                        action;
                            (ii) provisions should be included in a 
                        Model Memorandum of Understanding that obligate 
                        Member States that contribute troops to a 
                        peacekeeping operation to designate a military 
                        prosecutor who will participate in any 
                        investigation into an allegation of misconduct 
                        brought against an individual of such Member 
                        State, so that evidence is collected and 
                        preserved in a manner consistent with the 
                        military law of such Member State;
                            (iii) the investigative body should be 
                        regionally based to ensure rapid deployment and 
                        should be equipped with modern forensics 
                        equipment for the purpose of positively 
                        identifying perpetrators and, where necessary, 
                        for determining paternity; and
                            (iv) the investigative body should report 
                        directly to the Associate Director of OIOS for 
                        Peacekeeping Operations, while providing copies 
                        of any reports to the Department of 
                        Peacekeeping Operations, the Head of Mission, 
                        and the Member State concerned.
                    (E) Follow-up.--A dedicated unit, similar to the 
                Personnel Conduct Units, staffed and funded through 
                existing resources, should be established within the 
                headquarters of the United Nations Department of 
                Peacekeeping Operations and tasked with--
                            (i) promulgating measures to prevent 
                        misconduct;
                            (ii) coordinating allegations of 
                        misconduct, and reports received by field 
                        personnel; and
                            (iii) gathering follow-up information on 
                        completed investigations, particularly by 
                        focusing on disciplinary actions against the 
                        individual concerned taken by the United 
                        Nations or by the Member State that is 
                        contributing troops to which such individual 
                        belongs, and sharing such information with the 
                        Security Council, the Head of Mission, and the 
                        community hosting the peacekeeping operation.
                    (F) Financial liability and victims assistance.--
                Although peacekeeping operations should provide 
                immediate medical assistance to victims of sexual abuse 
                or exploitation, the responsibility for providing 
                longer-term treatment, care, or restitution lies solely 
                with the individual found guilty of the misconduct. In 
                particular, the following reforms should be 
                implemented:
                            (i) The United Nations should not assume 
                        responsibility for providing long-term 
                        treatment or compensation by creating a 
                        ``Victims Trust Fund'', or any other such 
                        similar fund, financed through assessed 
                        contributions to United Nations peacekeeping 
                        operations, thereby shielding individuals from 
                        personal liability and reinforcing an 
                        atmosphere of impunity.
                            (ii) If an individual responsible for 
                        misconduct has been repatriated, reassigned, 
                        redeployed, or is otherwise unable to provide 
                        assistance, responsibility for providing 
                        assistance to a victim should be assigned to 
                        the Member State that contributed the troops to 
                        which such individual belonged or to the 
                        manager concerned.
                            (iii) In the case of misconduct by a member 
                        of a military contingent, appropriate funds 
                        shall be withheld from the troop contributing 
                        country concerned.
                            (iv) In the case of misconduct by a 
                        civilian employee or contractor of the United 
                        Nations, appropriate wages shall be garnished 
                        from such individual or fines shall be imposed 
                        against such individual, consistent with 
                        existing United Nations Staff Rules.
                    (G) Managers and commanders.--The manner in which 
                managers and commanders handle cases of misconduct by 
                those serving under them should be included in their 
                individual performance evaluations, so that managers 
                and commanders who take decisive action to deter and 
                address misconduct are rewarded, while those who create 
                a permissive environment or impede investigations are 
                penalized or relieved of duty, as appropriate.
                    (H) Data base.--A centralized data base should be 
                created and maintained within the United Nations 
                Department of Peacekeeping Operations to track cases of 
                misconduct, including the outcome of investigations and 
                subsequent prosecutions, to ensure that personnel who 
                have engaged in misconduct or other criminal 
                activities, regardless of category or rank, are 
                permanently barred from participation in future 
                peacekeeping operations.
                    (I) Welfare.--Peacekeeping operations should assume 
                responsibility for maintaining a minimum standard of 
                welfare for mission personnel to ameliorate conditions 
                of service, while adjustments are made to the 
                discretionary welfare payments currently provided to 
                Member States that contribute troops to offset the cost 
                of operation-provided recreational facilities.
            (3) Peacebuilding commission.--
                    (A) Establishment.--Consistent with the 
                recommendations of the High Level Panel Report, the 
                United Nations should establish a Peacebuilding 
                Commission, supported by a Peacebuilding Support 
                Office, to marshal the efforts of the United Nations, 
                international financial institutions, donors, and non-
                governmental organizations to assist countries in 
                transition from war to peace.
                    (B) Structure and membership.--The Commission 
                should--
                            (i) be a subsidiary body of the United 
                        Nations Security Council, limited in size to 
                        ensure efficiency;
                            (ii) include members of the United Nations 
                        Security Council, major donors, major troop 
                        contributing countries, appropriate United 
                        Nations organizations, the World Bank, and the 
                        International Monetary Fund; and
                            (iii) invite the President of ECOSOC, 
                        regional actors, Member States that contribute 
                        troops, regional development banks, and other 
                        concerned parties that are not already members, 
                        as determined appropriate, to consult or 
                        participate in meetings as observers.
                    (C) Responsibilities.--The Commission should seek 
                to ease the demands currently placed upon the 
                Department of Peacekeeping Operations to undertake 
                tasks that fall beyond the scope of traditional 
                peacekeeping, by--
                            (i) developing and integrating country-
                        specific and system-wide conflict prevention, 
                        post-conflict reconstruction, and long-term 
                        development policies and strategies; and
                            (ii) serving as the key coordinating body 
                        for the design and implementation of military, 
                        humanitarian, and civil administration aspects 
                        of complex missions.
                    (D) Resources.--The establishment of the 
                Peacebuilding Commission and the related Peacebuilding 
                Support Office, should be staffed within existing 
                resources.

SEC. 1253. CERTIFICATION.

    (a) New or Expanded Peacekeeping Operations Contingent Upon 
Presidential Certification of Peacekeeping Operations Reforms.--
            (1) No new or expanded peacekeeping operations.--
                    (A) Certification.--Except as provided in 
                subparagraph (B), until the Secretary of State 
                certifies that the requirements described in paragraph 
                (2) have been satisfied, the President shall direct the 
                United States Permanent Representative to the United 
                Nations to use the voice, vote, and influence of the 
                United States at the United Nations to oppose the 
                creation of new, or expansion of existing, United 
                Nations peacekeeping operations.
                    (B) Exception and notification.--The requirements 
                described under subparagraphs (F) and (G) of paragraph 
                (2) may be waived until January 1, 2007, if the 
                President determines that such is in the national 
                interest of the United States. If the President makes 
                such a determination, the President shall, not later 
                than 15 days before the exercise of such waiver, notify 
                the appropriate congressional committees of such 
                determination and resulting waiver.
            (2) Certification of peacekeeping operations reforms.--The 
        certification referred to in paragraph (1) is a certification 
        made by the Secretary to the appropriate congressional 
        committees that the following reforms, or an equivalent set of 
        reforms, related to peacekeeping operations have been adopted 
        by the United Nations Department of Peacekeeping Operations or 
        the General Assembly, as appropriate:
                    (A) A single, uniform Code of Conduct that has the 
                status of a binding rule and applies equally to all 
                personnel serving in United Nations peacekeeping 
                operations, regardless of category or rank, has been 
                adopted by the General Assembly and mechanisms have 
                been established for training such personnel concerning 
                the requirements of the Code and enforcement of the 
                Code.
                    (B) All personnel, regardless of category or rank, 
                serving in a peacekeeping operation have been trained 
                concerning the requirements of the Code of Conduct and 
                each has been given a personal copy of the Code, 
                translated into the national language of such 
                personnel.
                    (C) All personnel, regardless of category or rank, 
                are required to sign an oath that each has received a 
                copy of the Code of Conduct, that each pledges to abide 
                by the Code, and that each understands the consequences 
                of violating the Code, including the immediate 
                termination of the participation of such personnel in 
                the peacekeeping operation to which such personnel is 
                assigned as a condition of the appointment to such 
                operation.
                    (D) All peacekeeping operations have designed and 
                implemented educational outreach programs to reach 
                local communities where peacekeeping personnel of such 
                operations are based to explain prohibited acts on the 
                part of United Nations peacekeeping personnel and to 
                identify the individual to whom the local population 
                may direct complaints or file allegations of 
                exploitation, abuse, or other acts of misconduct.
                    (E) A centralized data base has been created and is 
                being maintained in the United Nations Department of 
                Peacekeeping Operations that tracks cases of 
                misconduct, including the outcomes of investigations 
                and subsequent prosecutions, to ensure that personnel, 
                regardless of category or rank, who have engaged in 
                misconduct or other criminal activities are permanently 
                barred from participation in future peacekeeping 
                operations.
                    (F) A Model Memorandum of Understanding between the 
                United Nations and each Member State that contributes 
                troops to a peacekeeping operation has been adopted by 
                the United Nations Department of Peacekeeping 
                Operations that specifically obligates each such Member 
                State to--
                            (i) designate a competent legal authority, 
                        preferably a prosecutor with expertise in the 
                        area of sexual exploitation and abuse, to 
                        participate in any investigation into an 
                        allegation of misconduct brought against an 
                        individual of such Member State;
                            (ii) refer to its competent national or 
                        military authority for possible prosecution, if 
                        warranted, any investigation of a violation of 
                        the Code of Conduct or other criminal activity 
                        by an individual of such Member State;
                            (iii) report to the Department of 
                        Peacekeeping Operations on the outcome of any 
                        such investigation;
                            (iv) undertake to conduct on-site court 
                        martial proceedings relating to allegations of 
                        misconduct alleged against an individual of 
                        such Member State; and
                            (v) assume responsibility for the provision 
                        of appropriate assistance to a victim of 
                        misconduct committed by an individual of such 
                        Member State.
                    (G) A professional and independent investigative 
                and audit function has been established within the 
                United Nations Department of Peacekeeping Operations 
                and the OIOS to monitor United Nations peacekeeping 
                operations.

SEC. 1254. RULE OF CONSTRUCTION RELATING TO PROTECTION OF UNITED STATES 
              OFFICIALS AND MEMBERS OF THE ARMED FORCES.

    Nothing in this subtitle shall be construed as superseding the 
Uniform Code of Military Justice or operating to effect the surrender 
of United States officials or members of the Armed Forces to a foreign 
country or international tribunal, including the International Criminal 
Court, for prosecutions arising from peacekeeping operations or other 
similar United Nations-related activity, and nothing in this subtitle 
shall be interpreted in a manner inconsistent with the American 
Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (title II of the 2002 
Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery From and Response 
To Terrorist Attacks on the United States; Public Law 107-206).

  Subtitle E--Department of State and Government Accountability Office

SEC. 1261. POSITIONS FOR UNITED STATES CITIZENS AT INTERNATIONAL 
              ORGANIZATIONS.

    The Secretary of State shall make every effort to recruit United 
States citizens for positions within international organizations.

SEC. 1262. BUDGET JUSTIFICATION FOR REGULAR ASSESSED BUDGET OF THE 
              UNITED NATIONS.

    (a) Detailed Itemization.--The annual congressional budget 
justification shall include a detailed itemized request in support of 
the assessed contribution of the United States to the regular assessed 
budget of the United Nations.
    (b) Contents of Detailed Itemization.--The detailed itemization 
required under subsection (a) shall--
            (1) contain information relating to the amounts requested 
        in support of each of the various sections and titles of the 
        regular assessed budget of the United Nations; and
            (2) compare the amounts requested for the current year with 
        the actual or estimated amounts contributed by the United 
        States in previous fiscal years for the same sections and 
        titles.
    (c) Adjustments and Notification.--If the United Nations proposes 
an adjustment to its regular assessed budget, the Secretary of State 
shall, at the time such adjustment is presented to the Advisory 
Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions (ACABQ), notify and 
consult with the appropriate congressional committees.

SEC. 1263. REVIEW AND REPORT.

    Not later than six months after the date of the enactment of this 
Act, the Secretary of State shall conduct a review of programs of the 
United Nations that are funded through assessed contributions and 
submit to the appropriate congressional committees a report 
containing--
            (1) the findings of such review; and
            (2) recommendations relating to--
                    (A) the continuation of such programs; and
                    (B) which of such programs should be voluntarily 
                funded, other than those specified in subparagraphs (A) 
                through (R) of subsection (c)(2) of section 11 of the 
                United Nations Participation Act of 1945, as amended by 
                section 1111(c) of this title.

SEC. 1264. GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE.

    (a) Report on United Nations Reforms.--Not later than 12 months 
after the date of the enactment of this Act and again 12 months 
thereafter, the Comptroller General of the United States of the 
Government Accountability Office shall submit to the appropriate 
congressional committees a report on the status of the 1997, 2002, and 
2005 management reforms initiated by the Secretary General and on the 
reforms mandated by this title.
    (b) Report on Department of State Certifications.--Not later than 
six months after each certification submitted by the Secretary of State 
to the appropriate congressional committees under this title and 
subsection (d)(3) of section 11 of the United Nations Participation Act 
of 1945 (as amended by section 1111(c) of this title), the Comptroller 
General shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees a 
report on each such certification. The Secretary shall provide the 
Comptroller General with any information required by the Comptroller 
General to submit any such report.
    (c) United Nations Construction and Contracting.--Not later than 
six months after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Comptroller 
General shall submit to the Committee on International Relations of the 
House of Representatives, the Committee on Foreign Relations of the 
Senate, the Committee on Appropriations of the House of 
Representatives, and the Committee on Appropriations of the Senate a 
report describing the costs associated with the contracting for and 
construction of the Geneva, Switzerland, buildings of the World 
Meteorological Organization (WMO) and the World Intellectual Property 
Organization (WIPO). The report shall include analyses of the 
procurement procedures for each such building and shall specifically 
address issues of any corrupt contracting practices that are 
discovered, such as rigged bids and kickbacks, as well as other 
improprieties. The report shall also include an identification of other 
credible allegations of corrupt contracting at United Nations 
construction projects that involve major construction on a scale 
comparable to the WMO and WIPO construction projects, and a description 
of the results of an investigation into each such credible allegation.

      Subtitle F--Certifications and Withholding of Contributions

SEC. 1271. CERTIFICATIONS AND WITHHOLDING OF CONTRIBUTIONS.

    (a) Certifications.--
            (1) In general.--Except as provided in paragraph (3), the 
        certifications required under subsection (d)(3) of section 11 
        of the United Nations Participation Act of 1945 (as amended by 
        section 1111(c) of this title) and section 1113, sections 
        1114(a) through 1114(e), section 1114(g), section 1123, section 
        1124, sections 1131(c) and 1131(e), section 1132, and section 
        1133 of this title are certifications submitted to the 
        appropriate congressional committees by the Secretary of State 
        that the requirements of each such section have been satisfied 
        with respect to reform of the United Nations.
            (2) Alternate certification mechanism.--
                    (A) In general.--Except as provided in paragraph 
                (3), in the event that the Secretary is unable to 
                submit a certification in accordance with paragraph 
                (1), the Secretary may submit to the appropriate 
                congressional committees, in accordance with 
                subparagraph (B), an alternate certification that 
                certifies that the requirements of the section to which 
                the original certification applies have been 
                implemented through reforms that are substantially 
                similar to the requirements of such section or 
                accomplish the same purposes as the requirements of 
                such section.
                    (B) Equivalency.--Reforms are substantially similar 
                or accomplish the same purposes if--
                            (i) such reforms are formally adopted in 
                        written form by the entity or committee of the 
                        United Nations or of its specialized agency 
                        that has authority to enact or implement such 
                        reforms or are issued by the Secretariat or the 
                        appropriate entity or committee in written 
                        form; and
                            (ii) such reforms are not identical to the 
                        reforms required by a particular certification 
                        but in the determination of the Secretary will 
                        have the same, or nearly the same effect, as 
                        such reforms.
                    (C) Written justification and consultation.--
                            (i) Written justification.--Not later than 
                        30 days before submitting an alternate 
                        certification in accordance with subparagraph 
                        (A), the Secretary shall submit to the 
                        appropriate congressional committees a written 
                        justification explaining in detail the basis 
                        for such alternate certification.
                            (ii) Consultation.--After the Secretary has 
                        submitted the written justification under 
                        clause (i), but no later than 15 days before 
                        the Secretary exercises the alternate 
                        certification mechanism described under 
                        subparagraph (A), the Secretary shall consult 
                        with the appropriate congressional committees 
                        regarding such exercise.
            (3) Limited exception for substantial compliance.--
                    (A) Substantial compliance.--Subject to 
                subparagraph (B), if at least 32 of the 46 reforms 
                represented by the 14 certifications specified under 
                paragraph (1) have been implemented, all such reforms 
                (including the unimplemented reforms) so represented 
                shall be deemed to have been implemented for the year 
                in which the Secretary submits such certifications.
                    (B) Mandatory implementation of certain reforms.--
                            (i) In general.--The provisions of 
                        subparagraph (A) shall not apply unless the 
                        reforms under the following sections have been 
                        implemented for the year to which subparagraph 
                        (A) applies:
                                    (I) Subsection (d)(3) of section 11 
                                of the United Nations Participation Act 
                                of 1945 (as amended by section 1111(c) 
                                of this title).
                                    (II) Section 1113(b)(1)(A).
                                    (III) Section 1113(b)(2)(D).
                                    (IV) Section 1114(a)(1).
                                    (V) Section 1114(a)(6).
                                    (VI) Section 1114(b)(1).
                                    (VII) Section 1114(b)(2).
                                    (VIII) Section 1114(c)(1).
                                    (IX) Section 1131(b)(1).
                                    (X) Section 1131(b)(2).
                                    (XI) Section 1131(b)(3).
                                    (XII) Section 1131(b)(5).
                                    (XIII) Section 1131(b)(6).
                                    (XIV) Section 1132(a)(1).
                                    (XV) Section 1132(a)(2).
                            (ii) Full compliance in succeeding year.--
                        If the unimplemented reforms under subparagraph 
                        (A) are not implemented in the year succeeding 
                        the year to which subparagraph (A) applies, the 
                        provisions of subsection (b) shall apply for 
                        such succeeding year.
    (b) Withholding of United States Contributions to Regular Assessed 
Budget of the United Nations.--
            (1) In general.--Except as provided in paragraph (4) and in 
        accordance with paragraph (2), until such time as all 
        certifications (or alternate certifications) are submitted in 
        accordance with subsection (a), the United States shall 
        appropriate, but withhold from expenditure, 50 percent of the 
        contributions of the United States to the regular assessed 
        budget of the United Nations for a biennial period.
            (2) Available until expended.--The contributions 
        appropriated but withheld from expenditure under paragraph (1) 
        are authorized to remain available until expended.
            (3) Application with respect to section 11(b) of the united 
        nation participation act of 1945.--Until such time as all 
        certifications (or alternate certifications) are submitted in 
        accordance with subsection (a), subsection (b) of section 11 of 
        the United Nations Participation Act of 1945 (as amended by 
        section 1111(c) of this title) shall be administered as though 
        such section reads as follows: ``The Secretary may not make a 
        contribution to a regularly assessed biennial budget of the 
        United Nations in an amount greater than 11 percent of the 
        amount calculable under subsection (c).''.
            (4) Section 11(d)(3) of united nations participation act of 
        1945.--
                    (A) Special rule.--A certification under subsection 
                (d)(3) of section 11 of the United Nations 
                Participation Act of 1945 (as amended by section 
                1111(c) of this title) (relating to the 2008-2009 
                biennial period and subsequent biennial periods) shall 
                not be required until such time as the United Nations 
                makes its formal budget presentation for the 2008-2009 
                biennial period.
                    (B) Application.--If the Secretary does not submit 
                a certification under such section, the 50 percent 
                withholding described under paragraph (1) shall apply.
    (c) Release of Funds.--At such time as all certifications (or 
alternate certifications) are submitted in accordance with subsection 
(a), the United States shall transfer to the United Nations amounts 
appropriated but withheld from expenditure under subsection (b).
    (d) Annual Reviews.--
            (1) In general.--The Secretary shall conduct annual 
        reviews, beginning one year after the date on which the 
        Secretary submits the final certification (or alternate 
        certification) in accordance with subsection (a), to determine 
        if the United Nations continues to remain in compliance with 
        all such certifications (or alternate certifications). Not 
        later than 30 days after the completion of each such review, 
        the Secretary shall submit to the appropriate congressional 
        committees a report containing the findings of each such 
        review.
            (2) Action.--If during the course of any such review the 
        Secretary determines that the United Nations has failed to 
        remain in compliance with a certification (or an alternate 
        certification) that was submitted in accordance with subsection 
        (a), the 50 percent withholding described under subsection (b) 
        shall re-apply with respect to United States contributions each 
        fiscal year to the regular assessed budget of the United 
        Nations beginning with the fiscal year immediately following 
        such review and subsequent fiscal years until such time as all 
        certifications (or alternate certifications) under subsection 
        (a) have been submitted.
    (e) Effective Date.--The certifications (or alternate 
certifications) specified under subsection (a) shall be required with 
respect to United States contributions towards payment of regular 
assessed dues of the United Nations for 2007 and subsequent years.

             TITLE XIII--OPENING DOORS FOR FOREIGN STUDENTS

SEC. 1301. SHORT TITLE.

    This title may be cited as the ``Opening Doors for Foreign Students 
Act of 2005''.

SEC. 1302. FINDINGS.

    Congress finds the following:
            (1) Opening doors to well-intentioned foreign students and 
        exchange visitors has wide-ranging benefits to the United 
        States.
            (2) Upon their return to their countries of origin, foreign 
        students and exchange visitors disseminate the core values of 
        the United States as they relate their positive experiences 
        with the democratic form of governance, the dynamic 
        multicultural society, and the entrepreneurial spirit of the 
        United States.
            (3) The United States earns approximately $13,000,000,000 a 
        year in tuition and living expenses paid by foreign students, 
        making higher education the United States' fifth largest 
        service export.
            (4) Since the terrorist attacks on America on September 11, 
        2001, the United States institutions of higher education and 
        nongovernmental exchange sponsors have faced great challenges 
        in retaining their competitive position in the market for 
        foreign students.
                    (A) During the 2002-2003 academic year, the first 
                year after the 9/11 attacks, the growth of overall 
                international student enrollment in the United States 
                slowed to 0.6 percent after having increased by 6.4 
                percent in the two previous academic years. During the 
                2003-2004 academic year, according to the Institute of 
                International Education, the number of international 
                students studying in the United States declined 2.4 
                percent to 572,509. This was the first overall decline 
                in international students studying in the United States 
                since the 1971-72 school year.
                    (B) Community Colleges have been particularly hard-
                hit by overall declines in enrollments of foreign 
                students. During the 2003-2004 academic year, the 
                number of foreign students enrolled a public two-year 
                schools fell by 10 percent, according to the Institute 
                of International Education.
            (5) Some foreign students have expressed anxiety and alarm 
        about the new visa processes. A survey conducted in 2004 at the 
        University of California of 1,700 foreign students found that 
        60 percent reported that they had to endure ``unreasonable 
        delays'' to obtain student visas.
            (6) Competitors in the marketplace for higher education, 
        including Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Germany and the 
        United Kingdom, are aggressively recruiting students to take 
        advantage of changed perceptions of the United States.
            (7) If the United States is to regain its competitive 
        advantage in attracting foreign students and exchange visitors, 
        it will be essential for the Department of State to work to 
        ensure that new visa procedures are administered in the most 
        efficient and user-friendly possible manner. Furthermore the 
        Department must continue to engage in public outreach designed 
        to dispel negative perceptions about study in the United 
        States.

SEC. 1303. DEVELOPMENT OF A COMPREHENSIVE STRATEGY TO ATTRACT FOREIGN 
              STUDENTS TO STUDY IN THE UNITED STATES.

    (a) Development of Strategy.--Not later than one year after the 
date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State, in 
consultation with the Secretary of Homeland Security, the Secretary of 
Education, and the Secretary of Commerce, shall develop a comprehensive 
strategy to counter widespread perceptions among foreign students that 
the United States no longer welcomes them to study in the United States 
or to participate in exchange programs, and to increase applications by 
foreign students to come to the United States for study and exchange. 
Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, 
the Secretary shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees 
a written account of this strategy.
    (b) Consultations With Stakeholders.--Beginning not later than 180 
days after date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State 
shall undertake annual consultations with individuals and organizations 
involved in international education, including consultations with 
nongovernmental institutions concerned with the recruitment of foreign 
students to the United States; officials from United States educational 
institutions concerned with the recruitment of foreign students, 
foreign student representatives, nongovernmental organizations 
designated by the Department of State as sponsors in the Exchange 
Visitor Program, and other concerned parties for the purpose of 
discussing and seeking input on the development of the comprehensive 
strategy described in subsection (a).

SEC. 1304. IDENTIFICATION OF PRIORITY MISSIONS AND MISSIONS EMPLOYING 
              BEST PRACTICES FOR ATTRACTING STUDENT VISA APPLICANTS.

    (a) Review of Student Visa Applications.--The Secretary of State 
shall review the application and issuance rates for F-1 and J-1 
nonimmigrant visas (issued under subparagraphs (F) and (J) of section 
101(a)(15) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 
1101(a)(15)) at every diplomatic or consular mission of the United 
States providing consular services. Such review shall encompass the 
five-year period immediately preceding the date of the enactment of 
this Act and shall be used to identify missions that have experienced 
significant declines in such visa applications, the issuance of such 
visas, or both, and shall also identify diplomatic or consular missions 
that have experienced recovery in the rate of such applications or such 
issuances after experiencing significant declines in such applications, 
such issuances, or both.
    (b) Obtaining Information on Best Practices for Gaining 
Increases.--Upon identifying diplomatic or consular missions that have 
experienced recoveries in the rates of such visa applications, 
issuances, or both, the Secretary shall direct the chiefs of mission of 
such missions to submit to the Secretary a report concerning consular, 
public diplomacy, public outreach, or other practices that may have 
contributed to such recoveries.
    (c) Corrective Measures.--Upon identifying diplomatic or consular 
missions in key foreign policy countries that have suffered significant 
declines in the rates of such applications, issuances, or both without 
experiencing recovery in either or both of such rates in accordance 
with the review required under subsection (a), the Secretary shall 
direct the chiefs of mission of such missions to develop a plan 
appropriate to each such mission to attract additional F-1 and J-1 visa 
applicants and to address any inefficiencies in processing visa 
applications specific to each such mission.
    (d) Report.--
            (1) In general.--Not later than 180 days after the date of 
        the enactment of this Act, and one year thereafter, the 
        Secretary shall submit to the appropriate congressional 
        committees a report concerning trends in the application and 
        issuance rates for F-1 and J-1 visas at all diplomatic and 
        consular missions of the United States providing consular 
        services.
            (2) Report elements.--
                    (A) Statistical information.--The first report 
                submitted pursuant to this section shall contain data 
                from the five-year period immediately preceding the 
                date of the enactment of this Act. The second report 
                shall contain updated data covering the calendar year 
                preceding the issuance of the report and comparisons 
                with previous data.
                    (B) Best practices.--Each report shall contain a 
                ``Best Practices'' section identifying diplomatic or 
                consular missions that have experienced a recovery in 
                the rates of such applications, such issuances, or both 
                after experiencing declines in the rates for such 
                applications, such issuances, or both. For each 
                diplomatic or consular mission so identified, the 
                report shall include post activities that may have 
                contributed to such recovery.
                    (C) Priority posts.--Each report shall also contain 
                a section entitled ``Priority Posts'' that identifies 
                critical diplomatic and consular missions from key 
                foreign policy countries that have experienced declines 
                in the rates of such applications, such issuances, or 
                both without experiencing a significant recovery in any 
                of such rates. For each diplomatic or consular mission 
                so identified, the report shall contain an action plan 
                that describes new initiatives, such as consular 
                services, public diplomacy, and public outreach, that 
                are designed to improve the rates of such applications 
                and such issuances.

SEC. 1305. ENHANCED TRAINING IN PROCESSING AND FACILITATING STUDENT 
              VISAS.

    (a) Training Programs.--Chapter 7 of the Foreign Service Act of 
1980 (22 U.S.C. 3901 et seq.) (relating to career development, 
training, and orientation) is amended by adding at the end the 
following new section:

``SEC. 708. TRAINING IN PROCESSING AND FACILITATING VISA APPLICATIONS 
              FOR STUDENTS AND EXCHANGE VISITORS FOR STUDY IN THE 
              UNITED STATES.

    ``The Secretary shall establish a training program for members of 
the Service who have responsibilities related to the issuance of visas 
to prepare such members for the unique challenges that visa applicants 
face in completing the F-1 and J-1 nonimmigrant visa application 
process and to provide such members with proven tools, including in the 
area of consular services, public diplomacy, outreach to non-
governmental institutions and educational institutions, and public 
outreach to combat perceptions that the United States is no longer a 
welcoming place for foreign citizens to study or to participate in 
exchange programs.''.

SEC. 1306. ENHANCED DIPLOMATIC EFFORTS TO NEGOTIATE FAVORABLE 
              RECIPROCAL AGREEMENTS WITH FOREIGN GOVERNMENTS CONCERNING 
              STUDENT VISA TERM LIMITS.

    The Secretary of State should undertake a sustained diplomatic 
dialogue with key foreign governments, including the Government of the 
People's Republic of China and the Government of the Russian 
Federation, aimed at renegotiating the terms of existing reciprocal 
agreements to provide for extended validity of student and exchange 
visas in order to reduce the need for frequent renewals of F-1 and J-1 
nonimmigrant visas by foreign students.

                  TITLE XIV--MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS

                     Subtitle A--General Provisions

SEC. 1401. STATEMENT OF POLICY RELATING TO DEMOCRACY IN IRAN.

    (a) Findings.--Congress finds the following:
            (1) Iran is neither free nor democratic. Men and women are 
        not treated equally in Iran, women are legally deprived of 
        internationally recognized human rights, and religious freedom 
        is not respected under the laws of Iran. Undemocratic 
        institutions, such as the Guardians Council, thwart the 
        decisions of elected leaders.
            (2) The April 2005 report of the Department of State states 
        that Iran remained the most active state sponsor of terrorism 
        in 2004.
            (3) That report also states that Iran continues to provide 
        funding, safe-haven, training, and weapons to known terrorist 
        groups, including Hizballah, Hamas, the Palestine Islamic 
        Jihad, al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigade, and the Popular Front for the 
        Liberation of Palestine, and has harbored senior members of al-
        Qaeda.
    (b) Policy.--It is the policy of the United States that--
            (1) currently, there is not a free and fully democratic 
        government in Iran;
            (2) the United States supports transparent, full democracy 
        in Iran;
            (3) the United States supports the rights of the Iranian 
        people to choose their system of government; and
            (4) the United States condemns the brutal treatment, 
        imprisonment, and torture of Iranian civilians who express 
        political dissent.

SEC. 1402. IRANIAN NUCLEAR ACTIVITIES.

    (a) Findings.--Congress finds the following:
            (1) Iran remains the world's leading sponsors of 
        international terrorism and is on the Department of State's 
        list of countries that provide support for acts of 
        international terrorism.
            (2) Iran has repeatedly called for the destruction of 
        Israel, and Iran supports organizations, such as Hizballah, 
        Hamas, and the Palestine Islamic Jihad, that deny Israel's 
        right to exist and are responsible for terrorist attacks 
        against Israel.
            (3) The Ministry of Defense of the Government of Iran 
        confirmed in July 2003 that it had successfully conducted the 
        final test of the Shahab-3 missile, giving Iran an operational 
        intermediate-range ballistic missile capable of striking both 
        Israel and United States troops throughout the Middle East and 
        Afghanistan.
            (4) Inspections by the International Atomic Energy Agency 
        (IAEA) in Iran have revealed significant undeclared activities, 
        including plutonium reprocessing efforts.
            (5) Plutonium reprocessing is a necessary step in a nuclear 
        weapons program that uses plutonium created in a reactor.
            (6) Iran continues to assert its right to pursue nuclear 
        power and related technology, continues constructing a heavy 
        water reactor that is ideal for making plutonium for weapons, 
        and has not fully cooperated with the ongoing investigation by 
        the IAEA of its nuclear activities.
            (7) The United States has publicly opposed the completion 
        of reactors at the Bushehr nuclear power plant because the 
        transfer of civilian nuclear technology and training could help 
        to advance Iran's nuclear weapons program.
            (8) Russia, in spite of strong international concern that 
        Iran intended to use civilian nuclear energy plants to develop 
        nuclear weapons, provided Iran with support to complete the 
        Bushehr nuclear facility.
            (9) Russia intends to begin supplying the Bushehr nuclear 
        facility with fuel in June 2005, and the Bushehr nuclear plant 
        is expected to begin operation at the beginning of 2006.
            (10) The Iranian parliament has ratified a bill supporting 
        the construction of 20 new nuclear power plants.
    (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that--
            (1) Russia's provision of assistance to Iran on the Bushehr 
        nuclear reactor is inconsistent with the nonproliferation goals 
        of the United States;
            (2) Iran's stated plans to construct 20 new nuclear 
        facilities and its development of nuclear technologies, coupled 
        with acknowledged and unacknowledged ties to terrorist groups, 
        constitute a threat to global peace and security; and
            (3) the national security interests of the United States 
        will best be served if the United States develops and 
        implements a long-term strategy to halt all foreign nuclear 
        cooperation with Iran.
    (c) Statement of Congress.--Congress calls upon the leaders of the 
governments of the G-8 to--
            (1) insist that the Government of Russia terminate all 
        assistance, including fuel shipments, to the Bushehr nuclear 
        facility in Iran; and
            (2) condition Russia's continued membership in the G-8 on 
        Russia's termination of all assistance, including fuel 
        shipments, to the Bushehr facility and to any other nuclear 
        plants in Iran.

SEC. 1403. LOCATION OF INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTIONS IN AFRICA.

    (a) Statement of Congress.--Congress declares that, for the purpose 
of maintaining regional balances with respect to the location of 
international organizations and institutions in Africa, such 
organizations or institutions, such as the African Development Bank, 
that move their headquarters offices from their original locations for 
reasons of security should return once those security issues have been 
resolved or should relocate to another country in the region in which 
the organization or institution was originally headquartered.
    (b) Consultations Regarding Return.--The Secretary of State is 
authorized to begin consultations with appropriate parties to determine 
the feasibility of returning such organizations and institutions to the 
regions in which they were originally headquartered.

SEC. 1404. BENJAMIN GILMAN INTERNATIONAL SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM.

    Section 305 of the International Academic Opportunity Act of 2000, 
(title III of the Microenterprise for Self-Reliance and International 
Anti-Corruption Act of 2000) (Public Law 106-309; 22 U.S.C. 2462 note) 
is amended by striking ``$1,500,000'' and inserting ``$4,000,000''.

SEC. 1405. PROHIBITION ON COMMEMORATIONS RELATING TO LEADERS OF 
              IMPERIAL JAPAN.

    The Department of State, both in Washington and at United States 
diplomatic missions and facilities in foreign countries, shall not 
engage in any activity, including the celebration of the recently 
enacted Showa holiday, which may, in any manner, serve to commemorate 
or be construed as serving to commemorate leaders of Imperial Japan who 
were connected to the attack on the United States Fleet at Pearl 
Harbor, Oahu, Hawaii, on December 7, 1941.

SEC. 1406. UNITED STATES POLICY REGARDING WORLD BANK GROUP LOANS TO 
              IRAN.

    (a) United States Policy.--The Secretary of State, in consultation 
with the Secretary of the Treasury, shall work to secure the support of 
the governments of countries represented on the decisionmaking boards 
and councils of the international financial institutions of the World 
Bank Group to oppose any further activity in Iran by the international 
financial institutions of the World Bank Group until Iran abandons its 
program to develop nuclear weapons.
    (b) Notification.--Not later than 30 days after the Secretary 
initiates efforts to carry out subsection (a), the Secretary shall 
notify the appropriate congressional committees of such efforts.
    (c) World Bank Group Defined.--As used in this section, the term 
``World Bank Group'' means the International Bank for Reconstruction 
and Development, the International Development Association, the 
International Financial Corporation, and the Multilateral Investment 
Guaranty Agency.

SEC. 1407. STATEMENT OF POLICY REGARDING SUPPORT FOR SECI REGIONAL 
              CENTER FOR COMBATING TRANS-BORDER CRIME.

    (a) Findings.--Congress finds the following:
            (1) The Southeast European Cooperative Initiative (SECI) 
        Regional Center for Combating Trans-Border Crime, located in 
        Bucharest, Romania, is composed of police and customs officers 
        from each of the 12 member states of SECI: Albania, Bosnia and 
        Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Greece, Hungary, Macedonia, 
        Moldova, Romania, Slovenia, Serbia and Montenegro and Turkey.
            (2) The SECI Regional Center supports joint trans-border 
        crime fighting efforts through the establishment of task 
        forces, including task forces relating to trafficking in human 
        beings, anti-drugs, financial and computer crimes, stolen 
        vehicles, anti-smuggling and anti-fraud, and terrorism.
    (b) Statement of Policy.--It is the policy of the United States to 
continue to support the activities of the SECI Regional Center for 
Combating Trans-border Crime.

SEC. 1408. STATEMENT OF POLICY URGING TURKEY TO RESPECT THE RIGHTS AND 
              RELIGIOUS FREEDOMS OF THE ECUMENICAL PATRIARCH.

    (a) Findings.--Congress finds the following:
            (1) Turkey is scheduled to begin accession negotiations 
        with the European Union on October 3, 2005.
            (2) In 1993 the European Union defined the membership 
        criteria for accession to the European Union at the Copenhagen 
        European Council, obligating candidate countries to have 
        achieved certain levels of reform, including stability of 
        institutions guaranteeing democracy, the rule of law, and human 
        rights, and respect for and protection of minorities.
            (3) The Government of Turkey refuses to recognize the 
        Ecumenical Patriarch's international status.
            (4) The Government of Turkey has limited to Turkish 
        nationals the candidates available to the Holy Synod for 
        selection as the Ecumenical Patriarch and has refused to reopen 
        the Theological School at Halki, thus impeding training for the 
        clergy.
    (b) Statement of Policy.--Congress--
            (1) calls on Turkey to continue to demonstrate its 
        willingness to adopt and uphold European standards for the 
        protection of human rights;
            (2) based on the ideals associated with the European Union 
        and its member states, calls on Turkey to eliminate all forms 
        of discrimination, particularly those based on race or 
        religion, and immediately--
                    (A) grant the Ecumenical Patriarch appropriate 
                international recognition and ecclesiastic succession;
                    (B) grant the Ecumenical Patriarchate the right to 
                train clergy of all nationalities, not just Turkish 
                nationals; and
                    (C) respect property rights and human rights of the 
                Ecumenical Patriarchate; and
            (3) calls on Turkey to pledge to uphold and safeguard 
        religious and human rights without compromise.

SEC. 1409. STATEMENT OF POLICY REGARDING THE MURDER OF UNITED STATES 
              CITIZEN JOHN M. ALVIS.

    (a) Findings.--Congress finds the following:
            (1) On November 30, 2000, United States citizen John M. 
        Alvis was brutally murdered in Baku, Azerbaijan.
            (2) John M. Alvis was serving his final two weeks of a two 
        year full-time commitment to the International Republican 
        Institute, a United States nongovernmental organization 
        carrying out assistance projects for the Government of the 
        United States to help promote democracy and strengthen the rule 
        of law in Azerbaijan.
            (3) The United States is committed to ensuring that the 
        truth of the murder of John M. Alvis is determined and the 
        individual or individuals who are responsible for this heinous 
        act are brought to justice.
    (b) Statement of Policy.--Congress--
            (1) appreciates the efforts of the Government of Azerbaijan 
        to find the individual or individuals who are responsible for 
        the murder of United States citizen John M. Alvis and urges the 
        Government of Azerbaijan to continue to make these efforts a 
        high priority; and
            (2) urges the Secretary of State to continue to raise the 
        issue of the murder of United States citizen John M. Alvis with 
        the Government of Azerbaijan and to make this issue a priority 
        in relations between the Government of the United States and 
        the Government of Azerbaijan.

SEC. 1410. STATEMENT OF CONGRESS AND POLICY WITH RESPECT TO THE 
              DISENFRANCHISEMENT OF WOMEN.

    (a) Findings.--Congress finds the following:
            (1) Following the May 16, 2005, decision of the Kuwaiti 
        parliament to enfranchise its female citizens, Saudi Arabia is 
        now the only country in world that restricts the franchise and 
        the right to hold elected office to men only.
            (2) Only men were allowed to vote and run for office in 
        Saudi Arabia's municipal elections held earlier this year, the 
        first elections of any kind that Saudi Arabia has held since 
        1963.
    (b) Statements of Congress.--Congress--
            (1) strongly condemns the disenfranchisement of women, 
        including restrictions that prevent women from holding office; 
        and
            (2) calls on the Government of Saudi Arabia to, at the 
        earliest possible time, promulgate a law that grants women the 
        right to vote and to run for office in all future Saudi 
        elections, whether local, provincial, or national.
    (c) Policy.--The President is encouraged to take such action as the 
President considers appropriate, including a downgrading of diplomatic 
relations, to encourage countries that disenfranchise only women to 
grant women the rights to vote and hold office.

SEC. 1411. ACQUISITION OF MARITIME REFUELING SUPPORT VESSEL FOR UNITED 
              STATES DRUG INTERDICTION EFFORTS IN THE EASTERN PACIFIC 
              MARITIME TRANSIT ZONE.

    (a) Findings.--Congress finds the following:
            (1) The Department of Defense and Department of Homeland 
        Security report that narcotics smuggling organizations continue 
        to avoid United States drug interdiction efforts by transiting 
        deep into the Eastern Pacific, well beyond the capabilities of 
        United States ships.
            (2) Drug trafficking organizations have already adapted to 
        these long transit routes by employing logistical support 
        vessels (LSVs) to refuel drug laden boats on the high seas.
            (3) United States drug interdiction forces currently do not 
        have this at-sea refueling capability.
            (4) On June 29, 2005, the Subcommittee on Criminal Justice, 
        Drug Policy and Human Resources of the Committee on Government 
        Reform of the House of Representatives held a hearing entitled 
        ``Interrupting Narco-Terrorist Threats on the High Seas: Do We 
        Have Enough Wind in Our Sails?''.
            (5) During the hearing, the acting United States 
        Interdiction Coordinator (USIC), Ralph Utley, spoke of the 
        substantial benefits to be gained if a maritime ``oiler'' ship 
        were employed to support interdiction activities in the Eastern 
        Pacific maritime transit zone.
            (6) The Subcommittee was very interested to see that all 
        witnesses representing the Department of Defense, the Office of 
        National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP), the United States Coast 
        Guard, Customs and Border Protection, and the Drug Enforcement 
        Administration testified that they believe the employment of a 
        maritime oiler vessel would be an immediate improvement to 
        United States interdiction operations in the transit zone.
            (7) On any given day, United States and Allied forces seize 
        an average of 100 kilograms of cocaine per ship when patrolling 
        in the Eastern Pacific maritime transit zone.
            (8) Each year, the United States Coast Guard estimates it 
        loses 100 ``ship-days'' due to lengthy refueling trips to 
        Central and South American countries. The United States Navy 
        also faces similar refueling challenges.
    (b) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated $25,000,000 for fiscal year 2006 and $25,000,000 for 
fiscal year 2007 for the Bureau for International Narcotics and Law 
Enforcement Affairs (INL) of the Department of State to purchase or 
lease a maritime refueling support vessel that is capable of refueling 
United States and allied warships and vessels employed in support of 
United States drug interdiction duties in the Eastern Pacific maritime 
transit zone.

SEC. 1412. STATEMENT OF POLICY RELATING TO INTERNATIONAL TAXATION.

    (a) Policy.--It is the policy of the United States to use the 
voice, vote, and influence of the United States to vigorously oppose 
any international or global tax that is or may be considered or 
promoted by the United Nations, its specialized or affiliated agencies, 
its Member States, or United Nations-recognized nongovernmental 
organizations.
    (b) Efforts.--United States representatives at the United Nations 
shall--
            (1) use the voice, vote, and influence of the United States 
        to vigorously oppose any effort by the United Nations or any of 
        its specialized or affiliated agencies to fund, approve, 
        advocate, or promote any proposal concerning the imposition of 
        a tax or fee on any United States person in order to raise 
        revenue for the United Nations or any such agency; and
            (2) declare that a United States person shall not be 
        subject to any international tax and shall not be required to 
        pay such tax if such tax is levied against such person.
    (c) Exception.--The policy described in subsection (a) shall not 
apply to fees for publications or other kinds of fees that are not 
tantamount to a tax on a United States person.
    (d) Person Defined.--For purposes of this section, the term 
``person'' has the meaning given such term in section 7701(a)(1) of the 
Internal Revenue Code of 1986 (26 U.S.C. 7701(a)(1)).

SEC. 1413. DECLARATION OF HEADS OF STATE OF THE SHANGHAI COOPERATION 
              ORGANIZATION.

    (a) Findings.--Congress finds the following:
            (1) The Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) is made up 
        of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, the People's Republic of China, 
        Russia, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan.
            (2) al Qaeda and Taliban fighters remain active in 
        Afghanistan and antiterrorist operations led by the 
        international coalition are still ongoing.
            (3) The Heads of State of the SCO declared that they 
        supported the Global War on Terrorism and would strengthen 
        their efforts to combat and prevent terrorism.
            (4) The Heads of State of the SCO called for the relevant 
        State parties of the anti-terrorist coalition to set a deadline 
        for the temporary use of the infrastructure facilities of the 
        SCO Member States and for their military presence in these 
        countries.
    (b) Statement of Congress.--Congress--
            (1) commends the Heads of State of the SCO for their 
        declaration of support of the Global War on Terrorism and for 
        strengthening their efforts to combat and prevent terrorism;
            (2) commends the support of the anti-terrorist efforts of 
        the international coalition in Afghanistan;
            (3) expresses its concern about language in the declaration 
        of the Heads of State of the SCO calling for the relevant State 
        parties of the anti-terrorist coalition to set a deadline for 
        the temporary use of the infrastructure facilities of the SCO 
        Member States and for their military presence in these 
        countries; and
            (4) calls on the President, the Secretary of State, and the 
        Secretary of Defense to open a dialogue with the appropriate 
        Member States in the SCO concerning the importance of the use 
        of bases in the SCO Member States and report to Congress on the 
        outcome of such dialogue.

SEC. 1414. PREVENTION OF SMUGGLING OF METHAMPHETAMINE INTO THE UNITED 
              STATES FROM MEXICO.

    (a) In General.--The Secretary of State, acting through the 
Assistant Secretary of the Bureau for International Narcotics and Law 
Enforcement Affairs, shall take such actions as are necessary to 
prevent the smuggling of methamphetamine into the United States from 
Mexico.
    (b) Specific Actions.--In carrying out subsection (a), the 
Secretary shall--
            (1) improve bilateral efforts at the United States-Mexico 
        border to prevent the smuggling of methamphetamine into the 
        United States from Mexico;
            (2) seek to work with Mexican law enforcement authorities 
        to improve the ability of such authorities to combat the 
        production and trafficking of methamphetamine, including by 
        providing equipment and technical assistance, as appropriate; 
        and
            (3) encourage the Government of Mexico to take immediate 
        action to reduce the diversion of pseudoephedrine by drug 
        trafficking organizations for the production and trafficking of 
        methamphetamine.
    (c) Report.--Not later than one year after the date of the 
enactment of this Act, and annually thereafter, the Secretary shall 
submit to the appropriate congressional committees a report on the 
implementation of this section for the prior year.
    (d) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated to the Secretary to carry out this section not less than 
$4,000,000 for each of the fiscal years 2006 and 2007.

SEC. 1415. STATEMENT OF POLICY REGARDING THE ATTACKS ON UNITED STATES 
              CITIZENS BY PALESTINIAN TERRORISTS.

    (a) Findings.--Congress finds the following:
            (1) Since the late Yasser Arafat renounced violence in the 
        Oslo Peace Accords on September 13, 1993, at least 53 United 
        States citizens, including one unborn child, have been murdered 
        by Palestinian terrorists.
            (2) On December 1, 1993, in a drive-by shooting north of 
        Jerusalem, Hamas killed United States citizen Yitzhak 
        Weinstock, 19, whose family came from Los Angeles.
            (3) On October 9, 1994, Hamas kidnapped and murdered United 
        States citizen Nachshon Wachsman, 19, whose family came from 
        New York City.
            (4) On April 9, 1995, an Islamic Jihad bomb attack on a bus 
        near Kfar Darom killed United States citizen Alisa Flatow, 20, 
        from West Orange, New Jersey.
            (5) On August 21, 1995, in a Hamas bus bombing in 
        Jerusalem, United States citizen Joan Davenny, from New Haven, 
        Connecticut, was killed.
            (6) On September 9, 1995, Mara Frey of Chicago was stabbed 
        in Ma``ale Michmash resulting in her unborn child''s death.
            (7) On February 25, 1996, three United States citizens, 
        Sara Duker of Teaneck, New Jersey, Matthew Eisenfeld of West 
        Hartford, Connecticut, and Ira Weinstein of New York City, were 
        killed in a Hamas bus bombing in Jerusalem.
            (8) On May 13, 1996, United States citizen David Boim, 17, 
        of New York City, was killed in a drive-by shooting near Beit 
        El, north of Jerusalem.
            (9) On June 9, 1996, United States citizen Yaron Ungar was 
        killed in a drive-by shooting near Beit Shemesh.
            (10) On July 30, 1997, United States citizen Leah Stern of 
        Passaic, New Jersey, was killed in a Hamas bombing in 
        Jerusalem's Mahane Yehuda market.
            (11) On September 4, 1997, a Hamas bombing on Ben-Yehuda 
        Street, Jerusalem, killed Yael Botwin, 14, of Los Angeles.
            (12) On April 19, 1998, an attack near the Israeli town of 
        Maon killed United States citizen Dov Dribben, 28.
            (13) On October 8, 2000, Rabbi Hillel Lieberman, 36, of New 
        York City, was stabbed and killed near Nablus.
            (14) On October 30, 2000, United States citizen Esh-Kodesh 
        Gilmore, 25, was shot in Jerusalem.
            (15) On December 31, 2000, Rabbi Binyamin Kahane, 34, and 
        his wife, Talia Hertzlich Kahane, both formerly of New York 
        City, were killed in a drive-by shooting near Ofra.
            (16) On May 9, 2001, Jacob ``Koby'' Mandell, 13, of Silver 
        Spring, Maryland, was killed in an attack near Tekoah.
            (17) On May 29, 2001, Sarah Blaustein, 53, of Lawrence, New 
        York, was killed in a drive-by shooting near Efrat.
            (18) On August 9, 2001, two United States citizens, Judith 
        L. Greenbaum, 31, and Malka Roth, 15, were killed in the 
        Jerusalem Sbarro pizzeria bombing.
            (19) On November 4, 2001, Shoshana Ben-Yishai, 16, of New 
        York City, was shot and killed during an attack on a Jerusalem 
        bus.
            (20) On January 15, 2002, Avraham Boaz, 72, of New York 
        City, was killed in a shooting near Bethlehem.
            (21) On January 18, 2002, United States citizen Aaron Elis, 
        32, was killed in a shooting in Hadera.
            (22) On February 8, 2002, United States citizen Moranne 
        Amit, 25, was killed in a stabbing in Abu Tor Peace Forest, 
        Jerusalem.
            (23) On February 15, 2002, United States citizen Lee 
        Akunis, was shot and killed near Ramallah.
            (24) On February 16, 2002, Keren Shatsky, 14, of New York 
        City and Maine, and Rachel Thaler, 16, of Baltimore, Maryland, 
        were killed in a bombing in Karnei Shomron.
            (25) On March 24, 2002, Esther Kleinman, 23, formerly of 
        Chicago, was shot and killed near Ofra.
            (26) On March 27, 2002, United States citizen Hannah Rogen, 
        90, was killed in a bombing at a hotel Passover seder in 
        Netanya.
            (27) On June 18, 2002, Moshe Gottlieb, 70, of Los Angeles, 
        was killed in a bus bombing in Jerusalem.
            (28) On June 19, 2002, United States citizen Gila Sara 
        Kessler, 19, was killed in a bombing at a Jerusalem bus stop.
            (29) On July 31, 2002, five United States citizens were 
        killed in a bombing of a Hebrew University cafeteria: Marla 
        Bennett, 24, of San Diego, Benjamin Blutstein, 25, of 
        Susquehanna Township, Pennsylvania, Janis Ruth Coulter, 36, of 
        Massachusetts, David Gritz, 24, of Peru, Massachusetts (and of 
        dual French-United States citizenship), and Dina Carter, 37, of 
        North Carolina.
            (30) On March 5, 2003, Abigail Leitel, 14, who was born in 
        Lebanon, New Hampshire, died in a bus bombing in Haifa.
            (31) On March 7, 2003, a shooting occurred in the home of 
        United States citizens Rabbi Eli Horowitz, 52, who grew up in 
        Chicago, and Dina Horowitz, 50, who grew up in Florida, and 
        both were killed.
            (32) On June 11, 2003, Alan Beer, 47, who grew up in 
        Cleveland, was killed in a bus bombing in Jerusalem.
            (33) On June 20, 2003, a shooting attack on a car driving 
        through the West Bank killed United States citizen Tzvi 
        Goldstein, 47, who grew up in the State of New York.
            (34) On August 19, 2003, Mordechai Reinitz, 49, Yitzhak 
        Reinitz, 9, Tehilla Nathanson, 3, of Monsey, New York, Goldie 
        Taubenfeld, 43, of New Square, New York, and Shmuel Taubenfeld, 
        3 months, of New Square, New York, were killed in a homicide 
        bombing on a bus in Jerusalem.
            (35) On September 9, 2003, a homicide bomber killed United 
        States citizens David Applebaum, 51, originally of Cleveland, 
        and Nava Applebaum, 20, originally of Cleveland, in a cafe in 
        Jerusalem.
            (36) On October 15, 2003, United States citizens John 
        Branchizio, 36, of San Antonio, Texas, John Martin Linde, Jr., 
        30, of Washington, Missouri, and Mark T. Parson, 31, of the 
        State of New York were killed in a car bombing in Gaza.
            (37) On September 24, 2004, a mortar strike on a housing 
        community killed Tiferet Tratner, 24, a dual United States-
        Israeli citizen.
            (38) At least another 83 United States citizens have been 
        injured in Palestinian terrorist attacks.
            (39) Palestinian terrorism continues to happen as 
        demonstrated by the bombing in Tel Aviv on February 25, 2005, 
        despite the recent elections and a new sense of optimism in the 
        region.
            (40) The United States is willing to continue to work with 
        Palestinian leaders under the condition that the newly elected 
        Palestinian leadership reject and take verifiable steps to 
        prevent terrorism.
    (b) Statement of Policy.--Congress--
            (1) condemns the attacks on United States citizens by 
        Palestinian terrorists and demands that the Palestinian 
        Authority work with Israel to protect all innocent individuals, 
        regardless of citizenship, from terrorist atrocities; and
            (2) offers its condolences to the families and loved ones 
        of United States citizens who were killed by Palestinian 
        terrorist attacks.

SEC. 1416. STATEMENT OF POLICY REGARDING TRANSFER OF CHARLES TAYLOR FOR 
              TRIAL FOR WAR CRIMES.

    It shall be the policy of the United States Government to seek the 
expeditious transfer of Charles Ghankay Taylor, former President of the 
Republic of Liberia, to the jurisdiction of the Special Court for 
Sierra Leone to undergo a fair and open trial for war crimes, crimes 
against humanity, and other serious violations of international 
humanitarian law.

SEC. 1417. UNITED STATES COMMITMENT TO IRAQ.

    (a) Findings.--Congress finds the following:
            (1) The men and women of the United States Armed Forces 
        fighting in Iraq are serving with bravery, distinction, and 
        high morale.
            (2) The men and women of the United States Armed Forces 
        fighting in Iraq need and deserve the full support of the 
        American people.
            (3) The men and women of the United States Armed Forces 
        fighting in Iraq are part of a large, multinational coalition, 
        and are serving side-by-side with Iraqi national forces who 
        have been trained by that coalition.
            (4) Coalition and Iraqi forces, Iraqi civilians, foreign 
        diplomats, and individuals from around the world who have come 
        to the aid of the Iraqi people are under attack from terrorists 
        who deliberately attack children, worshippers, and law 
        enforcement figures, attack civilians at random, sabotage 
        essential services, and otherwise attempt to terrorize the 
        Iraqi people, the American people, and the citizens of other 
        coalition countries.
            (5) The terrorists will be emboldened to ``wait out'' the 
        United States if a target date for withdrawal is established 
        and announced, especially if the terrorists perceive such 
        withdrawal date has been established and announced as a result 
        of their terrorist campaign against the coalition and the Iraqi 
        people.
    (b) Sense of Congress.-- It is the sense of Congress that--
            (1) given the nature of the adversary the United States and 
        its coalition partners face in Iraq and the difficult 
        conditions under which the United States Armed Forces, 
        coalition forces, and Iraqi forces find themselves, calls for 
        an early withdrawal of United States and coalition forces are 
        counterproductive to security aims of the United States and the 
        hopes of the Iraqi people; and
            (2) such calls for an early withdrawal embolden the 
        terrorists and undermine the morale of the United States Armed 
        Forces, coalition forces, and Iraqi forces, and put their 
        security at risk.
    (c) Policy.--It shall be the policy of the United States--
            (1) to pursue a transfer of responsibility for Iraqi 
        security to Iraqi forces; and
            (2) not to withdraw prematurely the United States Armed 
        Forces from Iraq, but to do so only when it is clear that 
        United States national security and foreign policy goals 
        relating to a free and stable Iraq have been or are about to be 
        achieved.

                Subtitle B--Sense of Congress Provisions

SEC. 1421. KOREAN FULBRIGHT PROGRAMS.

    It is the sense of Congress that Fulbright program activities for 
the Republic of Korea (commonly referred to as ``South Korea'') 
should--
            (1) include participation by students from throughout South 
        Korea, including proportional representation from areas outside 
        of Seoul;
            (2) attempt to include Korean students from a broad range 
        of educational institutions, including schools other than elite 
        universities;
            (3) broaden the Korean student emphasis beyond degree-
        seeking graduate students to include opportunities for one-year 
        nondegree study at United States colleges and universities by 
        pre-doctoral Korean students; and
            (4) include a significant number of Korean students 
        planning to work or practice in areas other than advanced 
        research and university teaching, such as in government 
        service, media, law, and business.

SEC. 1422. UNITED STATES RELATIONS WITH TAIWAN.

    It is the sense of Congress that--
            (1) it is in the national interests of the United States to 
        communicate directly with democratically elected and appointed 
        officials of Taiwan, including the President of Taiwan, the 
        Vice-President of Taiwan, the Foreign Minister of Taiwan, and 
        the Defense Minister of Taiwan;
            (2) the Department of State should, in accordance with 
        Public Law 103-416, admit such high level officials of Taiwan 
        to the United States to discuss issues of mutual concern with 
        United States officials; and
            (3) the Department of State should, in cooperation with the 
        Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Taiwan, facilitate high level 
        meetings between such high level officials of Taiwan and their 
        counterparts in the United States.

SEC. 1423. NUCLEAR PROLIFERATION AND A. Q. KHAN.

    (a) Findings.--Congress finds the following:
            (1) Dr. Abdul Qadeer Khan, former director of the A.Q. Khan 
        Research Laboratory in Pakistan and Special Adviser to the 
        Prime Minister on the Strategic Programme, had the status of a 
        federal minister and established and operated an illegal 
        international network which sold nuclear weapons and related 
        technologies to a variety of countries.
            (2) China provided Dr. Khan with nuclear weapons designs, 
        and the illegal international nuclear proliferation network 
        established by Dr. Khan may have provided other countries with 
        these designs.
            (3) The illegal international nuclear proliferation network 
        established by Dr. Khan assisted Iran with its nuclear program 
        by supplying Iran with uranium-enrichment technology, including 
        centrifuge equipment and designs.
            (4) The illegal international nuclear proliferation network 
        established by Dr. Khan assisted North Korea with its nuclear 
        weapons program by providing centrifuge technology, including 
        designs and complete centrifuges.
            (5) The illegal international nuclear proliferation network 
        established by Dr. Khan assisted Libya with its nuclear program 
        by providing blueprints of centrifuge parts and thousands of 
        assembled centrifuge parts.
            (6) There is concern that the illegal international nuclear 
        proliferation network created by Dr. Khan may be still in 
        existence and its work still on-going.
            (7) Defense cooperation and technology transfer between 
        China and Pakistan have been recently strengthened, including 
        the codevelopment and manufacturing of a minimum of 400 J-17 
        ``Thunder'' fighter aircraft, with a minimum of 250 going to 
        China. This and other Chinese-Pakistani technology sharing 
        provides an expanded basis for further Pakistani proliferation 
        of advanced military technology.
            (8) The illegal international nuclear proliferation network 
        established by Dr. Khan is a threat to United States national 
        security.
    (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that the United 
States--
            (1) should continue efforts to--
                    (A) dismantle the illegal international nuclear 
                proliferation network created by Dr. Abdul Qadeer Khan; 
                and
                    (B) counter, through diplomacy and negotiation, the 
                proliferation of weapons of mass destruction from 
                Pakistan to other countries;
            (2) should request and Pakistan should grant access to 
        interview Dr. Khan and his top associates to determine in 
        greater detail what technology his network provided or received 
        from Iran, North Korea, Libya, and China; and
            (3) should take the steps necessary to ensure that Pakistan 
        has verifiably halted any cooperation with any country in the 
        development of nuclear or missile technology, material, or 
        equipment, or any other technology, material, or equipment that 
        is useful for the development of weapons of mass destruction, 
        including exports of such technology, material, or equipment.

SEC. 1424. PALESTINIAN TEXTBOOKS.

    (a) Findings.--Congress finds the following:
            (1) Since 1993, the United States has provided more than 
        $1,400,000,000 to assist the Palestinian people, including to 
        assist with the process of strengthening the Palestinian 
        education system.
            (2) Since 1950, the United States has provided more than 
        $3,200,000,000 in assistance to United Nations Relief and Works 
        Agency (UNRWA), which operates schools in camps housing 
        Palestinians.
            (3) The Palestinian Authority has undertaken a reform of 
        its textbooks, a process which will be completed in 2006.
            (4) These new textbooks, while an improvement over past 
        texts, fail in many respects to foster attitudes amongst the 
        Palestinian people conducive to peace with Israel, including 
        references to the infamous Protocols of the Elders of Zion, 
        failure to acknowledge the State of Israel, and failure to 
        discuss Jews in sections dealing with religious tolerance.
    (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that the 
Secretary of State should express in the strongest possible terms 
United States opposition to the inclusion in Palestinian textbooks of 
materials which foster anti-Semitism and rejection of peace with 
Israel, and to express the unwillingness of the United States to 
continue to support educational programs of the Palestinian Authority, 
whether directly or indirectly, should the Palestinian Authority 
continue to include material which does not foster tolerance and peace.

SEC. 1425. INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION AFFIRMING THE HUMAN RIGHTS AND 
              DIGNITY OF PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES.

    (a) Findings.--Congress finds the following:
            (1) There are more than 600,000,000 people who have a 
        disability and more than two-thirds of all persons with 
        disabilities live in developing countries.
            (2) Only two percent of children with disabilities in 
        developing countries receive any education or rehabilitation.
            (3) A substantial shift has occurred globally from an 
        approach of charity toward persons with disabilities to the 
        recognition of the inherent universal human rights of persons 
        with disabilities.
            (4) A clearly defined international standard addressing the 
        rights of persons with disabilities would assist developing 
        countries in the creation and implementation of national laws 
        protecting those rights.
            (5) To better protect and promote the rights of persons 
        with disabilities and to establish international norms, the 
        United Nations General Assembly adopted Resolution 56/168 
        (December 19, 2001) which established an ad hoc committee to 
        consider proposals for a comprehensive and integral 
        international convention that affirms the human rights and 
        dignity of persons with disabilities.
            (6) With the strong commitment and leadership of the United 
        States and the vast domestic experience of the United States in 
        the advancement of disability rights, the world community can 
        benefit from United States participation in the drafting of an 
        international convention that affirms the human rights and 
        dignity of persons with disabilities.
    (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that--
            (1) the United States should play a leading role in the 
        drafting of an international convention that affirms the human 
        rights and dignity of persons with disabilities and which is 
        consistent with the Constitution of the United States, the 
        Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, and other rights 
        enjoyed by United States citizens with disabilities;
            (2) for this purpose, the President should authorize the 
        Secretary of State to send to the Sixth Session of the United 
        Nations Ad Hoc Committee on a Comprehensive and Integral 
        International Convention on the Protection and Promotion of the 
        Rights and Dignity of Persons with Disabilities to be held in 
        August 2005 and to subsequent sessions of the Ad Hoc Committee 
        a United States delegation which includes individuals with 
        disabilities who are recognized leaders in the United States 
        disability rights movement; and
            (3) the United States delegation referred to in paragraph 
        (2) should seek the input and advice of the Department of 
        State's Advisory Committee on Persons with Disabilities with 
        respect to matters considered at the Sixth Session of the 
        United Nations Ad Hoc Committee and subsequent sessions.

SEC. 1426. FULBRIGHT SCHOLARSHIPS FOR EAST ASIA AND THE PACIFIC.

    (a) Findings.--Congress finds the following:
            (1) From 1949-2003, the Department of State awarded 13,176 
        Fulbright Scholarships to students from East Asia and the 
        Pacific, but only 31 went to Pacific Island students.
            (2) In 2003-2004, the Department of State awarded 315 
        scholarships to students from East Asia and the Pacific, but 
        none were awarded to Pacific Island students.
    (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that the 
Department of State should conduct a review and submit to the 
appropriate congressional committees a report regarding the 
marginalization of Pacific Islands students in the awarding of 
Fulbright Scholarships.

SEC. 1427. BAKU-TBILISI-CEYHAN ENERGY PIPELINE.

    (a) Findings.--Congress finds the following:
            (1) It has been the long-standing policy of the United 
        States to support the independence, security, and economic 
        development of the newly independent states of the Caspian Sea 
        region.
            (2) The growth and stability of the newly independent 
        states of the Caspian Sea region will be greatly enhanced by 
        the development of their extensive oil and natural gas 
        resources and the export of these resources unhindered along an 
        east-west energy transportation corridor.
            (3) The establishment of an east-west energy transportation 
        corridor would enhance the energy security of the United 
        States, Turkey, and other United States allies by ensuring an 
        unhindered flow of energy from the Caspian Sea region to world 
        markets.
            (4) The centerpiece of the proposed east-west energy 
        transportation corridor is the Baku-Tbilisi-Ceyhan (BTC) 
        pipeline, which was first endorsed by the relevant regional 
        governments in 1998 and which will carry one million barrels of 
        Caspian Sea oil per day from Baku, Azerbaijan, to Ceyhan, 
        Turkey, via a route that passes through Tbilisi, Georgia.
            (5) The BTC pipeline was inaugurated on May 25, 2005, and 
        Caspian Sea oil exports from the port of Ceyhan, Turkey, will 
        begin later this year.
            (6) The BTC pipeline project has received strong bipartisan 
        support during the administrations of both Presidents Bill 
        Clinton and George W. Bush.
    (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that--
            (1) the governments and peoples of Turkey and the newly 
        independent states of the Caspian Sea region should be 
        congratulated for the successful completion of the Baku-
        Tbilisi-Ceyhan pipeline;
            (2) the policy of the United States to support the 
        independence, security, and economic development of the newly 
        independent states of the Caspian Sea region should be 
        reaffirmed; and
            (3) projects should be encouraged that would further 
        develop the east-west energy transportation corridor between 
        the newly independent states of the Caspian Sea region and 
        Europe and that advance the strategic goals of the United 
        States, especially the promotion of appropriate multiple routes 
        for the transportation to world markets of oil and gas from the 
        Caspian Sea region.

SEC. 1428. LEGISLATION REQUIRING THE FAIR, COMPREHENSIVE, AND 
              NONDISCRIMINATORY RESTITUTION OF PRIVATE PROPERTY 
              CONFISCATED IN POLAND.

    (a) Findings.--Congress find the following:
            (1) The protection of and respect for property rights is a 
        basic tenet for all democratic governments that operate 
        according to the rule of law.
            (2) Private properties were seized and confiscated by the 
        Nazis in occupied Poland or by the Communist Polish government 
        after World War II.
            (3) Some post-Communist countries in Europe have taken 
        steps toward compensating individuals whose property was seized 
        and confiscated by the Nazis during World War II and by 
        Communist governments after World War II.
            (4) Poland has continuously failed to enact legislation 
        that requires realistically achievable restitution or 
        compensation for those individuals who had their private 
        property seized and confiscated.
            (5) Although President Aleksander Kwasniewski of Poland 
        later exercised his veto power, in March 2001 the Polish 
        Parliament passed a bill that would have provided compensation 
        for seized and confiscated property, but only to individuals 
        who were registered as Polish citizens as of December 31, 1999, 
        thereby excluding all those individuals who emigrated from 
        Poland during and after World War II.
            (6) President Kwasniewski met in 2002 with congressional 
        leaders of the United States Helsinki Commission and stated 
        that he intended to draft a new law requiring the restitution 
        of previously seized and confiscated private property that 
        would not discriminate based on the residency or citizenship of 
        an individual, and which would be ready to take effect by the 
        beginning of 2003.
    (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that--
            (1) Poland should develop a final and complete settlement 
        for those individuals who had their private property seized and 
        confiscated by the Nazis during World War II or by the 
        Communist Polish government after the war;
            (2) restitution should be made in a timely manner if they 
        are to be of any benefit to the many Holocaust survivors who 
        are in their eighties or older; and
            (3) the President and the Secretary of State should engage, 
        as appropriate--
                    (A) in an open dialogue with the Government of 
                Poland supporting the adoption of legislation requiring 
                the fair, comprehensive, and nondiscriminatory 
                restitution of or compensation for private property 
                that was seized and confiscated; and
                    (B) in follow-up discussions with the Government of 
                Poland regarding the status and implementation of such 
                legislation.

SEC. 1429. CHILD LABOR PRACTICES IN THE COCOA SECTORS OF COTE D'IVOIRE 
              AND GHANA.

    It is the sense of Congress that--
            (1) the Government of the Republic of Cote d'Ivoire and the 
        Government of the Republic of Ghana should be commended for the 
        tangible steps they have taken to address the situation of 
        child labor in the cocoa sector;
            (2) the Government of Cote d'Ivoire and the Government of 
        Ghana should consider child labor and forced labor issues top 
        priorities;
            (3) the chocolate industry signatories to the September 19, 
        2001, voluntary Protocol for the Growing and Processing of 
        Cocoa Beans and their Derivative Products in a Manner that 
        Complies with ILO Convention 182 Concerning the Prohibition and 
        Immediate Action for the Elimination of the Worst Forms of 
        Child Labor should meet the sixth and final pillar of the 
        Protocol, to ``develop and implement credible, mutually-
        acceptable, voluntary, industry-wide standards of public 
        certification, consistent with applicable federal law, that 
        cocoa beans and their derivative products have been grown and/
        or processed without any of the worst forms of child labor'' by 
        July 1, 2005;
            (4) the chocolate industry, nongovernmental organizations, 
        and the Government of Cote d'Ivoire and the Government of Ghana 
        should continue their efforts in full force beyond July 1, 
        2005, to develop and implement a system to monitor child labor 
        in the cocoa industry of Cote d'Ivoire and Ghana;
            (5) the Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons 
        of the Department of State should include information on the 
        association between trafficking in persons and the cocoa 
        industries of Cote d'Ivoire, Ghana, and other cocoa producing 
        regions in the annual trafficking in persons report to 
        Congress; and
            (6) the Department of State should assist the Government of 
        Cote d'Ivoire and the Government of Ghana in preventing the 
        trafficking of persons into the cocoa fields and other 
        industries in West Africa.

SEC. 1430. CONTRIBUTIONS OF IRAQI KURDS.

    (a) Findings.--Congress finds the following:
            (1) Iraqi Kurdish forces played a unique and significant 
        role in the fight to liberate Iraq for all Iraqis in 2003.
            (2) Since Iraq's liberation, Iraqi Kurdish leaders have 
        played prominent and constructive roles in the drafting and 
        passage of the Transitional Administrative Law and, more 
        generally, in seeking to achieve a free, stable, and democratic 
        Iraq.
    (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that--
            (1) Iraqi Kurds should be commended for their many 
        contributions and sacrifices made in the cause of creating a 
        free, stable, and democratic Iraq; and
            (2) the Iraqi Transitional Government and the Kurdistan 
        Regional Government are expected to adhere to the highest 
        standards of democratic governance, including through 
        enforcement of full equality and rights for all religious and 
        ethnic minorities, such as Assyrians and Turcomans.

SEC. 1431. PROLIFERATION SECURITY INITIATIVE.

    It is the sense of Congress that--
            (1) the Secretary of State should strive to expand and 
        strengthen the Proliferation Security Initiative announced on 
        May 31, 2003, by President George W. Bush, placing particular 
        emphasis on including countries outside of the North Atlantic 
        Treaty Organization (NATO); and
            (2) the United States should seek an international 
        instrument, in the form of a United Nations Security Council 
        resolution, multilateral treaty, or other agreement, to enhance 
        international cooperation with the Proliferation Security 
        Initiative regarding the interdiction, seizure, and impoundment 
        in international waters and airspace of illicit shipments of 
        weapons of mass destruction and their delivery systems and of 
        related materials, equipment, and technology.

SEC. 1432. SECURITY OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS AND MATERIALS.

    It is the sense of Congress that the President should seek to 
devise and implement standards to improve the security of nuclear 
weapons and materials by--
            (1) establishing with other willing nations a set of 
        guidelines containing performance-based standards for the 
        security of nuclear weapons and materials;
            (2) negotiating with those nations agreements to adopt 
        guidelines containing performance-based standards and implement 
        appropriate verification measures to assure ongoing compliance;
            (3) coordinating with those nations and the International 
        Atomic Energy Agency to strongly encourage other nations to 
        adopt and verifiably implement the standards; and
            (4) encouraging all nations to work with the International 
        Atomic Energy Agency to complete the negotiation, adoption, and 
        implementation of its proposed series of documents related to 
        the security of nuclear materials.

SEC. 1433. INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL COURT AND GENOCIDE IN DARFUR, SUDAN.

    Based upon the adoption of resolutions on July 22, 2004, by both 
the House of Representatives and the Senate and the declaration on 
September 9, 2004, by former Secretary of State Colin Powell that the 
atrocities unfolding in Darfur, Sudan, are genocide, it is the sense of 
Congress that, notwithstanding the American Servicemembers' Protection 
Act of 2002 (title II of the 2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for 
Further Recovery From and Response To Terrorist Attacks on the United 
States; Public Law 107-206), the United States should render assistance 
to the efforts of the International Criminal Court to bring to justice 
persons accused of genocide, war crimes, or crimes against humanity in 
Darfur, Sudan, provided that legally binding assurances have been 
received from the United Nations Security Council or the International 
Criminal Court that no current or former United States Government 
official, employee (including any contractor), member of the United 
States Armed Forces, or United States national will be subject to 
prosecution by the International Criminal Court in connection with 
those efforts.

SEC. 1434. ACTION AGAINST AL-MANAR TELEVISION.

    (a) Findings.--Congress finds that--
            (1) in 1996, the Secretary of State designated Hizballah as 
        a foreign terrorist organization (FTO) under section 219 of the 
        Immigration and Nationality Act;
            (2) al-Manar television is owned and controlled by 
        Hizballah and acts on behalf of Hizballah, as openly 
        acknowledged by Hizballah leader Hasan Nasrallah;
            (3) al-Manar's programming, in accordance with Hizballah's 
        policy, openly promotes hatred of and graphically glorifies and 
        incites violence, including suicide bombings, against 
        Americans, Israelis, and Jews;
            (4) in December 2004, the Secretary of State placed al-
        Manar on its Terrorist Exclusion List, immediately after which 
        the sole satellite company that broadcast al-Manar in North 
        America pulled al-Manar off the air;
            (5) in recent months, several European Union (EU) countries 
        and EU-based satellite companies have taken actions that 
        severely limit al-Manar's broadcasting reach in Europe; and
            (6) al-Manar continues to broadcast to all of the Arab 
        world, much of non-Arab Asia, most of Central and South 
        America, and parts of Europe, with the cooperation of companies 
        headquartered in Europe and the Arab world.
    (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that--
            (1) all countries that host satellite companies that 
        broadcast al-Manar, on whose territory al-Manar may be viewed 
        over media subject to government regulation, or where 
        advertising or other financial support for al-Manar originates, 
        should take action, by the strongest and most comprehensive 
        appropriate means available, to suppress al-Manar's terroristic 
        programming; and
            (2) the Arab States Broadcasting Union, which is part of 
        the Arab League, should revoke al-Manar's membership status 
        because of al-Manar's promotion of hatred and incitement to 
        violence, including suicide bombings, directed toward 
        Americans, Israelis, and Jews.

SEC. 1435. STABILITY AND SECURITY IN IRAQ.

    It is the sense of Congress that the President should transmit to 
the appropriate congressional committees as soon as possible after the 
date of the enactment of this Act the plan to provide for a stable and 
secure government of Iraq and an Iraqi military and police force that 
will allow the United States military presence in Iraq to be 
diminished.

SEC. 1436. PROPERTY EXPROPRIATED BY THE GOVERNMENT OF ETHIOPIA.

    It is the sense of the Congress that the Government of Ethiopia 
should account for, compensate for, or return to United States 
citizens, and entities not less than 50 percent beneficially owned by 
United States citizens, property of such citizens and entities that has 
been nationalized, expropriated, or otherwise seized by the Government 
of Ethiopia before the date of the enactment of this Act in 
contravention of international law.

SEC. 1437. UNITED STATES-CHINA RELATIONS.

    It is the sense of Congress that--
            (1) the comments by Chinese General Zhu Chenghu advocating 
        the use of nuclear weapons against the United States are both 
        damaging to United States-China relations and a violation of 
        China's commitment to resolve its differences with Taiwan 
        peacefully; and
            (2) the Government of China should renounce the use of 
        force against Taiwan, disavow General Zhu's statements, and 
        relieve General Zhu from his command.

SEC. 1438. CAPTURE, DETENTION, AND INTERROGATION OF TERRORISTS AT 
              GUANTANAMO BAY, CUBA.

    (a) Findings.--Congress finds the following:
            (1) Usama bin Laden declared war on the United States in 
        1996.
            (2) International terrorists, including al Qaida and its 
        affiliated terrorists, have repeatedly attacked the United 
        States and its coalition partners throughout the world and have 
        killed and wounded thousands of innocent United States citizens 
        and citizens from these coalition partners.
            (3) The United States is exercising its rights to self-
        defense and to protect United States citizens both at home and 
        abroad by waging war alongside its coalition partners against 
        al Qaida and affiliated terrorists.
            (4) International terrorists continue to pose an 
        extraordinary threat to the national security and foreign 
        policy of the United States and its coalition partners.
            (5) International terrorists continue to commit and plan 
        terrorist attacks around the world against the United States 
        and its coalition partners.
            (6) In order to protect the United States and its citizens, 
        the United States must identify terrorists and those 
        individuals who support them, disrupt their activities, and 
        eliminate their ability to conduct or support attacks against 
        the United States, its citizens, and its coalition partners.
            (7) Identifying, disrupting, and eliminating terrorist 
        threats against the United States requires effective gathering, 
        dissemination, and analysis of timely intelligence.
            (8) The collection of information from detainees at 
        Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, by the United States has improved the 
        security of the United States and its coalition partners and is 
        essential in fighting the Global War on Terrorism.
            (9) The loss of interrogation-derived information would 
        have a disastrous effect on the United States' intelligence 
        collection and counterterrorism efforts and would constitute a 
        damaging reversal in the Global War on Terrorism.
    (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that--
            (1) the capture, detention, and interrogation of 
        international terrorists are essential to the successful 
        prosecution of the Global War on Terrorism and to the defense 
        of the United States, its citizens, and its coalition partners 
        from future terrorist attacks;
            (2) the detention and lawful, humane interrogation by the 
        United States of detainees at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, is 
        essential to the defense of the United States and its coalition 
        partners and to the successful prosecution of the Global War on 
        Terrorism;
            (3) the detention facilities and interrogations at 
        Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, plays an essential role in the security 
        of the United States and should not be closed or ended while 
        the United States is waging the Global War of Terrorism.

            Passed the House of Representatives July 20, 2005.

            Attest:

                                                 JEFF TRANDAHL,

                                                                 Clerk.

                            By Gerasimos C. Vans,

                                                          Deputy Clerk.
                                                       Calendar No. 172

109th CONGRESS

  1st Session

                               H. R. 2601

_______________________________________________________________________

                                 AN ACT

  To authorize appropriations for the Department of State for fiscal 
              years 2006 and 2007, and for other purposes.

_______________________________________________________________________

                             July 22, 2005

            Received; read twice and placed on the calendar