Text: S.Con.Res.18 — 109th Congress (2005-2006)All Information (Except Text)

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Engrossed in Senate (03/17/2005)

 
[Congressional Bills 109th Congress]
[From the U.S. Government Publishing Office]
[S. Con. Res. 18 Engrossed in Senate (ES)]

  1st Session
S. CON. RES. 18

_______________________________________________________________________

                         CONCURRENT RESOLUTION

    Resolved by the Senate (the House of Representatives concurring),

SECTION 1. CONCURRENT RESOLUTION ON THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2006.

    (a) Declaration.--Congress declares that this resolution is the 
concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2006 including the 
appropriate budgetary levels for fiscal years 2005 and 2007 through 
2010 as authorized by section 301 of the Congressional Budget Act of 
1974 (2 U.S.C. 632).
    (b) Table of Contents.--The table of contents for this concurrent 
resolution is as follows:

Sec. 1. Concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2006.
                      TITLE I--LEVELS AND AMOUNTS

Sec. 101. Recommended levels and amounts.
Sec. 102. Social Security.
Sec. 103. Major functional categories.
                        TITLE II--RECONCILIATION

Sec. 201. Reconciliation in the Senate.
                        TITLE III--RESERVE FUNDS

Sec. 301. Reserve fund for health information technology and pay-for-
                            performance.
Sec. 302. Reserve fund for Asbestos Injury Trust Fund.
Sec. 303. Reserve fund for the uninsured.
Sec. 304. Reserve fund for Land and Water Conservation Fund.
Sec. 305. Reserve fund for the Federal Pell Grant Program.
Sec. 306. Reserve fund for Higher Education.
Sec. 307. Reserve fund for energy legislation.
Sec. 308. Reserve fund for the safe importation of prescription drugs.
Sec. 309. Adjustment for surface transportation.
Sec. 310. Reserve fund for the bipartisan medicaid commission.
Sec. 311. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for patriotic employers of 
                            national guardsmen and reservists.
Sec. 312. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for the Family Opportunity Act.
Sec. 313. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for the restoration of SCHIP 
                            funds.
Sec. 314. Reserve for funding of Hope credit.
Sec. 315. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for influenza vaccine shortage 
                            prevention.
Sec. 316. Reserve fund for extension of treatment of combat pay for 
                            earned income and child tax credits.
                      TITLE IV--BUDGET ENFORCEMENT

Sec. 401. Restrictions on advance appropriations.
Sec. 402. Emergency legislation.
Sec. 403. Supermajority enforcement.
Sec. 404. Discretionary spending limits in the Senate.
Sec. 405. Application and effect of changes in allocations and 
                            aggregates.
Sec. 406. Adjustments to reflect changes in concepts and definitions.
Sec. 407. Limitation on long-term spending proposals.
Sec. 408. Exercise of rulemaking powers.
                      TITLE V--SENSE OF THE SENATE

Sec. 501. Sense of the Senate regarding unauthorized appropriations.
Sec. 502. Sense of the Senate regarding a commission to review the 
                            performance of programs.
Sec. 503. Sense of the Senate regarding Tricare.
Sec. 504. Sense of the Senate regarding restraining Medicaid growth.
Sec. 505. Sense of the Senate regarding tribal colleges and 
                            universities.
Sec. 506. Sense of the Senate regarding support for the President's 
                            request to concentrate Federal funds for 
                            State and local homeland security 
                            assistance programs on the highest threats, 
                            vulnerabilities, and needs.
Sec. 507. Sense of the Senate rejecting proposed elimination of per 
                            diem reimbursement to State nursing homes 
                            in the President's budget.
Sec. 508. Sense of the Senate regarding Impact Aid.
Sec. 509. Sense of the Senate regarding mandatory agricultural 
                            programs.
Sec. 510. Sense of the Senate regarding social security restructuring.
Sec. 511. Sense of the Senate that failing to address social security 
                            will result in massive debt, deep benefit 
                            cuts and tax increases.
Sec. 512. Sense of the Senate regarding the State Criminal Alien 
                            Assistance Program.
Sec. 513. Sense of the Senate regarding funding for subsonic and 
                            hypersonic aeronautics research by the 
                            National Aeronautics and Space 
                            Administration.
Sec. 514. Sense of the Senate concerning children with HIV/AIDS.
Sec. 515. Sense of the Senate regarding the acquisition of the next 
                            generation destroyer (DDX).
Sec. 516. Sense of the Senate on reducing the tax on social security 
                            benefits.
Sec. 517. Sense of the Senate on the crime victims fund.
Sec. 518. Sense of the Senate supporting funding for HIDTAS.
Sec. 519. Sense of the Senate regarding the need for a comprehensive, 
                            coordinated, and integrated national ocean 
                            policy.
Sec. 520. United States response to global HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and 
                            malaria.
Sec. 521. Offset for increases in funding for the Cops Methamphetamine 
                            Enforcement and Clean Up Program.
Sec. 522. Sense of the Senate regarding foreign-owned debt.
Sec. 523. Sense of the Senate regarding tax relief to encourage 
                            charitable giving.
Sec. 524. Sense of the Senate regarding water infrastructure.
Sec. 525. Sense of the Senate regarding funding of administrative costs 
                            of Social Security Administration.
Sec. 526. Sense of the Senate concerning comparative effectiveness 
                            studies.
Sec. 527. Sense of the Senate regarding the Advanced Technology 
                            Program.
Sec. 528. Sense of the Senate with respect to pension reform.

                      TITLE I--LEVELS AND AMOUNTS

SEC. 101. RECOMMENDED LEVELS AND AMOUNTS.

    The following budgetary levels are appropriate for the fiscal years 
2005 through 2010:
    (1) Federal revenues.--For purposes of the enforcement of this 
resolution--
            (A) The recommended levels of Federal revenues are as 
        follows:
                    Fiscal year 2005: $1,483,908,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2006: $1,588,646,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2007: $1,705,690,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2008: $1,811,285,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2009: $1,917,240,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2010: $2,034,260,000,000.
            (B) The amounts by which the aggregate levels of Federal 
        revenues should be changed are as follows:
                    Fiscal year 2005: -$116,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2006: -$19,016,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2007: -$13,581,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2008: -$24,900,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2009: -$38,975,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2010: -$32,108,000,000.
    (2) New budget authority.--For purposes of the enforcement of this 
resolution, the appropriate levels of total new budget authority are as 
follows:
                    Fiscal year 2005: $2,074,959,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2006: $2,141,801,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2007: $2,210,608,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2008: $2,329,249,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2009: $2,453,065,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2010: $2,551,318,000,000.
    (3) Budget outlays.--For purposes of the enforcement of this 
resolution, the appropriate levels of total budget outlays are as 
follows:
                    Fiscal year 2005: $2,055,994,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2006: $2,145,684,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2007: $2,229,291,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2008: $2,315,553,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2009: $2,418,787,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2010: $2,526,493,000,000.
    (4) Deficits.--For purposes of the enforcement of this resolution, 
the amounts of the deficits are as follows:
                    Fiscal year 2005: -$572,086,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2006: -$557,038,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2007: -$523,601,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2008: -$504,268,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2009: -$501,547,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2010: -$492,233,000,000.
    (5) Debt subject to limit.--The appropriate levels of the public 
debt are as follows:
                    Fiscal year 2005: $7,961,738,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2006: $8,637,186,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2007: $9,288,652,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2008: $9,931,410,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2009: $10,574,984,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2010: $11,210,426,000,000.
    (6) Debt held by the public.--The appropriate levels of the debt 
held by the public are as follows:
                    Fiscal year 2005: $4,688,918,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2006: $5,067,403,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2007: $5,395,305,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2008: $5,686,105,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2009: $5,955,749,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2010: $6,199,346,000,000.

SEC. 102. SOCIAL SECURITY.

    (a) Social Security Revenues.--For purposes of Senate enforcement 
under sections 302 and 311 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the 
amounts of revenues of the Federal Old-Age and Survivors Insurance 
Trust Fund and the Federal Disability Insurance Trust Fund are as 
follows:
                    Fiscal year 2005: $573,475,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2006: $604,777,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2007: $637,792,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2008: $671,688,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2009: $705,849,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2010: $740,343,000,000.
    (b) Social Security Outlays.--For purposes of Senate enforcement 
under sections 302 and 311 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the 
amounts of outlays of the Federal Old-Age and Survivors Insurance Trust 
Fund and the Federal Disability Insurance Trust Fund are as follows:
                    Fiscal year 2005: $398,088,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2006: $415,993,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2007: $429,254,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2008: $443,235,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2009: $460,443,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2010: $479,412,000,000.
    (c) Social Security Administrative Expenses.--In the Senate, the 
amounts of new budget authority and budget outlays of the Federal Old-
Age and Survivors Insurance Trust Fund and the Federal Disability 
Insurance Trust Fund for administrative expenses are as follows:
            Fiscal year 2005:
                    (A) New budget authority, $4,426,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $4,405,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2006:
                    (A) New budget authority, $4,576,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $4,587,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2007:
                    (A) New budget authority, $4,710,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $4,785,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2008:
                    (A) New budget authority, $4,853,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $4,849,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2009:
                    (A) New budget authority, $5,001,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $4,974,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2010:
                    (A) New budget authority, $5,152,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $5,124,000,000.

SEC. 103. MAJOR FUNCTIONAL CATEGORIES.

    Congress determines and declares that the appropriate levels of new 
budget authority and budget outlays for fiscal years 2005 through 2010 
for each major functional category are:
    (1) National Defense (050):
            Fiscal year 2005:
                    (A) New budget authority, $498,761,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $496,928,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2006:
                    (A) New budget authority, $491,562,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $496,117,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2007:
                    (A) New budget authority, $465,260,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $479,984,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2008:
                    (A) New budget authority, $483,730,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $479,730,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2009:
                    (A) New budget authority, $503,763,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $489,146,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2010:
                    (A) New budget authority, $513,904,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $505,872,000,000.
    (2) International Affairs (150):
            Fiscal year 2005:
                    (A) New budget authority, $34,707,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $32,425,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2006:
                    (A) New budget authority, $32,884,600,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $35,388,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2007:
                    (A) New budget authority, $36,580,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $34,555,600,000.
            Fiscal year 2008:
                    (A) New budget authority, $37,131,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $33,972,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2009:
                    (A) New budget authority, $37,171,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $33,847,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2010:
                    (A) New budget authority, $36,862,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $33,436,000,000.
    (3) General Science, Space, and Technology (250):
            Fiscal year 2005:
                    (A) New budget authority, $24,413,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $23,594,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2006:
                    (A) New budget authority, $24,735,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $23,894,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2007:
                    (A) New budget authority, $25,294,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $24,672,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2008:
                    (A) New budget authority, $25,796,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $25,095,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2009:
                    (A) New budget authority, $26,102,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $25,472,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2010:
                    (A) New budget authority, $26,413,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $25,808,000,000.
    (4) Energy (270):
            Fiscal year 2005:
                    (A) New budget authority, $2,564,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $794,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2006:
                    (A) New budget authority, $3,247,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $2,127,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2007:
                    (A) New budget authority, $2,859,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $1,698,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2008:
                    (A) New budget authority, $2,923,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $1,035,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2009:
                    (A) New budget authority, $2,534,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $1,132,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2010:
                    (A) New budget authority, $2,232,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $1,022,000,000.
    (5) Natural Resources and Environment (300):
            Fiscal year 2005:
                    (A) New budget authority, $32,527,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $31,168,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2006:
                    (A) New budget authority, $30,005,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $31,973,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2007:
                    (A) New budget authority, $30,373,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $31,556,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2008:
                    (A) New budget authority, $30,446,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $31,846,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2009:
                    (A) New budget authority, $31,115,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $32,051,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2010:
                    (A) New budget authority, $30,609,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $31,604,000,000.
    (6) Agriculture (350):
            Fiscal year 2005:
                    (A) New budget authority, $30,151,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $28,550,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2006:
                    (A) New budget authority, $29,087,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $28,143,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2007:
                    (A) New budget authority, $26,245,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $25,057,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2008:
                    (A) New budget authority, $24,492,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $23,434,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2009:
                    (A) New budget authority, $24,845,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $23,950,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2010:
                    (A) New budget authority, $24,584,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $23,854,000,000.
    (7) Commerce and Housing Credit (370):
            Fiscal year 2005:
                    (A) New budget authority, $16,804,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $11,302,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2006:
                    (A) New budget authority, $10,363,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $5,117,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2007:
                    (A) New budget authority, $9,866,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $4,764,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2008:
                    (A) New budget authority, $9,815,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $4,067,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2009:
                    (A) New budget authority, $10,413,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $4,122,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2010:
                    (A) New budget authority, $14,270,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $6,399,000,000.
    (8) Transportation (400):
            Fiscal year 2005:
                    (A) New budget authority, $72,506,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $67,663,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2006:
                    (A) New budget authority, $69,683,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $69,789,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2007:
                    (A) New budget authority, $71,030,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $71,013,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2008:
                    (A) New budget authority, $74,489,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $72,755,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2009:
                    (A) New budget authority, $81,524,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $75,693,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2010:
                    (A) New budget authority, $82,867,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $79,335,000,000.
    (9) Community and Regional Development (450):
            Fiscal year 2005:
                    (A) New budget authority, $23,007,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $20,756,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2006:
                    (A) New budget authority, $15,208,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $18,425,080,000.
            Fiscal year 2007:
                    (A) New budget authority, $13,118,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $17,416,280,000.
            Fiscal year 2008:
                    (A) New budget authority, $13,272,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $15,545,680,000.
            Fiscal year 2009:
                    (A) New budget authority, $13,410,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $13,815,560,000.
            Fiscal year 2010:
                    (A) New budget authority, $13,430,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $13,197,700,000.
    (10) Education, Training, Employment, and Social Services (500):
            Fiscal year 2005:
                    (A) New budget authority, $94,026,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $92,805,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2006:
                    (A) New budget authority, $98,387,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $88,496,020,000.
            Fiscal year 2007:
                    (A) New budget authority, $89,909,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $94,077,410,000.
            Fiscal year 2008:
                    (A) New budget authority, $90,600,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $89,917,380,000.
            Fiscal year 2009:
                    (A) New budget authority, $90,762,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $89,173,190,000.
            Fiscal year 2010:
                    (A) New budget authority, $90,369,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $88,679,000,000.
    (11) Health (550):
            Fiscal year 2005:
                    (A) New budget authority, $257,498,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $252,799,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2006:
                    (A) New budget authority, $263,962,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $264,301,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2007:
                    (A) New budget authority, $275,711,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $275,158,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2008:
                    (A) New budget authority, $295,315,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $293,927,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2009:
                    (A) New budget authority, $317,433,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $313,894,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2010:
                    (A) New budget authority, $336,858,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $335,893,000,000.
    (12) Medicare (570):
            Fiscal year 2005:
                    (A) New budget authority, $292,587,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $293,587,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2006:
                    (A) New budget authority, $331,240,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $331,003,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2007:
                    (A) New budget authority, $371,899,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $372,186,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2008:
                    (A) New budget authority, $395,362,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $395,408,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2009:
                    (A) New budget authority, $420,284,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $419,877,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2010:
                    (A) New budget authority, $448,161,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $448,492,000,000.
    (13) Income Security (600):
            Fiscal year 2005:
                    (A) New budget authority, $339,651,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $347,850,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2006:
                    (A) New budget authority, $347,395,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $353,429,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2007:
                    (A) New budget authority, $352,633,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $358,674,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2008:
                    (A) New budget authority, $365,775,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $370,107,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2009:
                    (A) New budget authority, $374,946,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $377,951,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2010:
                    (A) New budget authority, $384,137,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $386,269,000,000.
    (14) Social Security (650):
            Fiscal year 2005:
                    (A) New budget authority, $15,849,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $15,849,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2006:
                    (A) New budget authority, $15,991,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $15,991,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2007:
                    (A) New budget authority, $17,804,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $17,804,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2008:
                    (A) New budget authority, $19,868,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $19,868,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2009:
                    (A) New budget authority, $21,843,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $21,843,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2010:
                    (A) New budget authority, $24,129,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $24,129,000,000.
    (15) Veterans Benefits and Services (700):
            Fiscal year 2005:
                    (A) New budget authority, $69,448,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $68,873,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2006:
                    (A) New budget authority, $68,994,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $68,365,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2007:
                    (A) New budget authority, $66,181,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $65,931,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2008:
                    (A) New budget authority, $69,458,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $69,257,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2009:
                    (A) New budget authority, $69,971,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $69,680,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2010:
                    (A) New budget authority, $70,069,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $69,794,000,000.
    (16) Administration of Justice (750):
            Fiscal year 2005:
                    (A) New budget authority, $39,819,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $39,502,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2006:
                    (A) New budget authority, $42,024,400,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $42,889,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2007:
                    (A) New budget authority, $41,751,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $42,952,400,000.
            Fiscal year 2008:
                    (A) New budget authority, $42,607,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $43,287,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2009:
                    (A) New budget authority, $43,178,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $43,428,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2010:
                    (A) New budget authority, $43,436,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $43,448,000,000.
    (17) General Government (800):
            Fiscal year 2005:
                    (A) New budget authority, $16,765,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $17,673,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2006:
                    (A) New budget authority, $18,074,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $18,381,500,000.
            Fiscal year 2007:
                    (A) New budget authority, $18,074,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $18,048,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2008:
                    (A) New budget authority, $19,753,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $19,693,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2009:
                    (A) New budget authority, $17,772,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $17,545,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2010:
                    (A) New budget authority, $18,092,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $17,894,000,000.
    (18) Net Interest (900):
            Fiscal year 2005:
                    (A) New budget authority, $267,980,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $267,980,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2006:
                    (A) New budget authority, $310,451,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $310,451,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2007:
                    (A) New budget authority, $359,866,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $359,866,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2008:
                    (A) New budget authority, $398,279,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $398,279,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2009:
                    (A) New budget authority, $428,689,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $428,689,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2010:
                    (A) New budget authority, $457,125,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $457,125,000,000.
    (19) Allowances (920):
            Fiscal year 2005:
                    (A) New budget authority, $0.
                    (B) Outlays, $0.
            Fiscal year 2006:
                    (A) New budget authority, -$6,130,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$3,233,100,000.
            Fiscal year 2007:
                    (A) New budget authority, -$32,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$1,183,690,000.
            Fiscal year 2008:
                    (A) New budget authority, -$32,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$1,028,060,000.
            Fiscal year 2009:
                    (A) New budget authority, -$32,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$488,750,000.
            Fiscal year 2010:
                    (A) New budget authority, -$32,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$185,700,000.
    (20) Undistributed Offsetting Receipts (950):
            Fiscal year 2005:
                    (A) New budget authority, -$54,104,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$54,104,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2006:
                    (A) New budget authority, -$55,362,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$55,362,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2007:
                    (A) New budget authority, -$63,813,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$64,938,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2008:
                    (A) New budget authority, -$69,830,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$70,642,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2009:
                    (A) New budget authority, -$62,658,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$62,033,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2010:
                    (A) New budget authority, -$66,197,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$65,572,000,000.

                        TITLE II--RECONCILIATION

SEC. 201. RECONCILIATION IN THE SENATE.

    (a) Spending Reconciliation Instructions.--In the Senate, by June 
6, 2005, the committees named in this section shall submit their 
recommendations to the Committee on the Budget of the Senate. After 
receiving those recommendations, the Committee on the Budget shall 
report to the Senate a reconciliation bill carrying out all such 
recommendations without any substantive revision.
            (1) Committee on agriculture, nutrition, and forestry.--The 
        Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry shall 
        report changes in laws within its jurisdiction sufficient to 
        reduce outlays by $171,000,000 in fiscal year 2006, and 
        $2,814,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2006 through 
        2010.
            (2) Committee on banking, housing, and urban affairs.--The 
        Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs shall 
        report changes in laws within its jurisdiction sufficient to 
        reduce outlays by $30,000,000 in fiscal year 2006, and 
        $270,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2006 through 2010.
            (3) Committee on commerce, science, and transportation.--
        The Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation 
        shall report changes in laws within its jurisdiction sufficient 
        to reduce outlays by $8,000,000 in fiscal year 2006, and 
        $2,576,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2006 through 
        2010.
            (4) Committee on energy and natural resources.--The Senate 
        Committee on Energy and Natural Resources shall report changes 
        in laws within its jurisdiction sufficient to reduce outlays by 
        $33,000,000 in fiscal year 2006, and $2,658,000,000 for the 
        period of fiscal years 2006 through 2010.
            (5) Committee on environment and public works.--The Senate 
        Committee on Environment and Public Works shall report changes 
        in laws within its jurisdiction sufficient to reduce outlays by 
        $14,000,000 in fiscal year 2006, and $112,000,000 for the 
        period of fiscal years 2006 through 2010.
            (6) Committee on health, education, labor, and pensions.--
        The Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions 
        shall report changes in laws within its jurisdiction sufficient 
        to reduce outlays by $2,204,000,000 in fiscal years 2005 and 
        2006, and $8,576,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2005 
        through 2010.
    (b) Revenue Reconciliation Instructions.--The Senate Committee on 
Finance shall report to the Senate a reconciliation bill not later than 
September 7, 2005 that consists of changes in laws within its 
jurisdiction sufficient to reduce the total level of revenues by not 
more than: $19,016,000,000 for fiscal year 2006, and $128,580,000,000 
for the period of fiscal years 2006 through 2010.
    (c) Increase in Statutory Debt Limit.--The Committee on Finance 
shall report to the Senate a reconciliation bill not later than 
September 16, 2005, that consists solely of changes in laws within its 
jurisdiction to increase the statutory debt limit by $446,464,000,000.

                        TITLE III--RESERVE FUNDS

SEC. 301. RESERVE FUND FOR HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND PAY-FOR-
              PERFORMANCE.

    In the Senate, if the Committee on Finance or the Committee on 
Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions reports a bill or joint 
resolution, if an amendment is offered thereto, or if a conference 
report is submitted thereon, that--
            (1) provides incentives or other support for adoption of 
        modern information technology to improve quality in health 
        care; and
            (2) provides for performance-based payments that are based 
        on accepted clinical performance measures that improve the 
        quality in healthcare,
provided that the committee is within its allocation as provided under 
section 302(a) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the chairman of 
the Committee on the Budget may revise allocations of new budget 
authority and outlays, the revenue aggregates, and other appropriate 
measures to reflect such legislation provided that such legislation 
would not increase the deficit for the period of fiscal years 2006 
through 2010.

SEC. 302. RESERVE FUND FOR ASBESTOS INJURY TRUST FUND.

    In the Senate, if the Committee on the Judiciary reports 
legislation, if an amendment is offered thereto, or if a conference 
report is submitted thereon, that--
            (1) compensates injured victims of asbestos-related 
        disease;
            (2) does not compensate uninjured claimants or those 
        suffering from a disease not shown to be asbestos-related 
        disease;
            (3) requires strict medical criteria; and
            (4) is reasonably expected to remain funded from non-
        Federal sources for the 50-year life of the fund,
provided that the committee is within its allocation as provided under 
section 302(a) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the chairman of 
the Budget Committee may make the appropriate adjustments in 
allocations and aggregates to the extent that such legislation would 
not increase the deficit for the period of fiscal years 2006 through 
2056.

SEC. 303. RESERVE FUND FOR THE UNINSURED.

    In the Senate, if the Committee on Finance or the Committee on 
Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions of the Senate reports a bill or 
joint resolution, if an amendment is offered thereto, or if a 
conference report is submitted thereon, that--
            (1) addresses health care costs, coverage, or care for the 
        uninsured;
            (2)(A) provides safety net access to integrated and other 
        health care services; or
            (B) increases the number of people with health insurance, 
        provided that such increase is not obtained primarily as a 
        result of increasing premiums for the currently insured; and
            (3) increases access to coverage through mechanisms that 
        decrease the growth of health care costs, and may include tax- 
        and market-based measures (such as tax credits, deductibility, 
        regulatory reforms, consumer-directed initiatives, and other 
        measures targeted to key segments of the uninsured, such as 
        individuals without employer-sponsored coverage and college 
        students and recent graduates),
provided that the committee is within its allocation as provided under 
section 302(a) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the chairman of 
the Committee on the Budget may revise allocations of new budget 
authority and outlays, the revenue aggregates, and other appropriate 
aggregates to reflect such legislation, to the extent that such 
legislation would not increase the deficit for fiscal year 2006 and for 
the period of fiscal years 2006 through 2010.

SEC. 304. RESERVE FUND FOR LAND AND WATER CONSERVATION FUND.

    (a) In the Senate.--If--
            (1) the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources reports a 
        bill or joint resolution, or an amendment is offered thereto, 
        or a conference report is submitted thereon, that permits 
        exploration and production of oil in the 1002 Area of the 
        Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, and such measure is enacted; 
        and
            (2) the reconciliation instruction set out in section 
        201(a)(4) is met,
provided that the committee is within its allocation as provided under 
section 302(a) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the chairman of 
the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may make the adjustments 
described in subsection (b).
    (b) Adjustment for the Land and Water Conservation Fund Programs 
and Additional Land Conservation Programs.--If the Committee on 
Appropriations of the Senate reports a bill or joint resolution, or if 
an amendment is offered thereto or a conference report is submitted 
thereon that provides funding for the programs described in this 
subsection at least at the previous year's levels, adjusted for 
inflation, and makes available a portion of the receipts resulting from 
enactment of the legislation described in subsection (a) for the Land 
and Water Conservation Fund, Federal Land Acquisition and Stateside 
Grant Programs, and for the Coastal and Estuarine Land Protection 
Program, and for the Forest Legacy Program, the chairman of the 
Committee on the Budget may revise committee allocations for that 
committee and other appropriate budgetary aggregates and allocations of 
new budget authority and outlays by the amount provided by that measure 
for that purpose, but the adjustment may not exceed $350,000,000 in new 
budget authority in each of fiscal years 2008 through 2010.

SEC. 305. RESERVE FUND FOR THE FEDERAL PELL GRANT PROGRAM.

    In the Senate, if the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and 
Pensions reports a bill or joint resolution, or an amendment is offered 
thereto or a conference report is submitted thereon, that provides a 
provision that eliminates the accumulated shortfall of budget authority 
resulting from insufficient appropriations of discretionary new budget 
authority previously enacted for the Federal Pell Grant Program for 
awards made through the award year 2005-2006, provided that the 
committee is within its allocation as provided under section 302(a) of 
the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the chairman of the Committee on 
the Budget may revise the committee allocation and other appropriate 
budgetary aggregates by the amount provided by that measure for that 
purpose, but not to exceed $4,300,000,000 in new budget authority for 
the fiscal year 2006.

SEC. 306. RESERVE FUND FOR HIGHER EDUCATION.

    In the Senate, if the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and 
Pensions reports a bill or joint resolution, or an amendment is offered 
thereto or a conference report is submitted thereon, that reauthorizes 
the Higher Education Act of 1965, provided that the committee is within 
its allocation as provided under section 302(a) of the Congressional 
Budget Act of 1974, the chairman of the Committee on the Budget may 
revise committee allocations for that committee and other appropriate 
budgetary aggregates and allocations of new budget authority and 
outlays by the amount provided by that measure for that purpose, but 
not to exceed $748,000,000 in new budget authority and $684,000,000 in 
outlays for fiscal year 2006, and $5,603,000,000 in new budget 
authority and $5,099,000,000 in outlays for the period of fiscal years 
2006 through 2010.

SEC. 307. RESERVE FUND FOR ENERGY LEGISLATION.

    In the Senate, if a bill or joint resolution, or an amendment is 
offered thereto or a conference report is submitted thereon, within the 
jurisdiction of the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, that--
            (1) provides for a national energy policy; and
            (2) in conjunction with revenue legislation that does not 
        reduce net revenues by more than $803,000,000 in 2006 and 
        $4,557,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2006 through 
        2010,
provided that the committee is within its allocation as provided under 
section 302(a) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the chairman of 
the Committee on the Budget may revise committee allocations for that 
committee and other appropriate budgetary aggregates and allocations of 
new budget authority and outlays by the amount provided by that measure 
for that purpose, but not to exceed $100,000,000 in new budget 
authority for fiscal year 2006 and the outlays flowing from that budget 
authority and $2,000,000,000 in new budget authority for the period of 
fiscal years 2006 through 2010 and the outlays flowing from that budget 
authority.

SEC. 308. RESERVE FUND FOR THE SAFE IMPORTATION OF PRESCRIPTION DRUGS.

    In the Senate, if the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and 
Pensions reports a bill or joint resolution or an amendment is offered 
thereto or a conference report is submitted thereon, that permits the 
safe importation of prescription drugs approved by the Food and Drug 
Administration from specified countries with strong safety laws, and 
provided that the committee is within its allocation as provided under 
section 302(a) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the chairman of 
the Committee on the Budget may revise allocations of new budget 
authority and outlays, revenue aggregates, and other appropriate 
measures to reflect such legislation if any such measure would not 
increase the deficit for fiscal year 2006 and for the period of fiscal 
years 2006 through 2010.

SEC. 309. ADJUSTMENT FOR SURFACE TRANSPORTATION.

    (a) In General.--In the Senate, if the Committee on Environment and 
Public Works, the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs, or 
the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation reports a bill 
or joint resolution, or an amendment is offered thereto or a conference 
report is submitted thereon that provides new budget authority for the 
budget accounts or portions thereof, for programs, projects, and 
activities for highways, highway safety, and transit, in excess of--
            (1) for fiscal year 2005, $42,606,000,000; or
            (2) for fiscal year 2006, $43,131,000,000; or
            (3) for fiscal years 2005 through 2009, $231,088,000,000;
the chairman of the Committee on the Budget may make the appropriate 
adjustments in allocations and aggregates and increase the allocation 
of new budget authority to such committees for fiscal year 2005 and 
2006 and for the period of fiscal years 2005 through 2009 to the extent 
such adjustment is offset by an increase in receipts to the highway 
trust fund that are appropriated to such fund for the applicable fiscal 
year caused by such legislation. In the Senate, any increase in 
receipts shall be reported by the Committee on Finance.
    (b) Adjustment for Outlays.--In the Senate, for fiscal year 2006, 
and, as necessary, in subsequent fiscal years, if a bill or joint 
resolution is reported, or if an amendment is offered thereto or a 
conference report is submitted thereon that changes obligation 
limitations such that the total limitations are in excess of 
$42,686,000,000 for fiscal year 2006, for programs, projects, and 
activities for highways, highway safety, and transit, and if 
legislation has been enacted that satisfies the conditions set forth in 
subsection (a) for such fiscal year, the chairman of the Committee on 
the Budget may increase the allocation of outlays and appropriate 
aggregates for such fiscal year, and, as necessary, in subsequent 
fiscal years, for the committees reporting such measures, by the amount 
of outlays that corresponds to such excess obligation limitations, but 
not to exceed the amount of such excess that was offset in 2006 
pursuant to subsection (a). After the adjustment has been made, the 
Senate Committee on Appropriations shall report new section 302(b) 
allocations consistent with this section.

SEC. 310. RESERVE FUND FOR THE BIPARTISAN MEDICAID COMMISSION.

    In the Senate, the Chairman of the Committee on the Budget shall 
revise the aggregates, functional totals, allocations, levels in 
section 404 of this resolution, and other appropriate levels and limits 
for fiscal year 2006 and for the period of fiscal years 2006 through 
2010 by up to $1,500,000 in new budget authority for 2006 and the 
amounts of outlays flowing therefrom for an appropriations bill, 
amendment, or conference report that provides funding for legislation 
reported by the Senate Finance Committee authorizing and creating a 23 
member, bipartisan Commission that is charged with reviewing and making 
recommendations within one year with respect to the long-term goals, 
populations served, financial sustainability, interaction with Medicare 
and safety-net providers, quality of care provided, and such other 
matters relating to the effective operation of the Medicaid program as 
the Commission deems appropriate.

SEC. 311. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR PATRIOTIC EMPLOYERS OF 
              NATIONAL GUARDSMEN AND RESERVISTS.

    In the Senate, if a bill or joint resolution, or if an amendment is 
offered thereto, or if a conference report is submitted thereon, that 
provides a 50 percent tax credit to employers for compensation paid to 
employees who are on active duty status as members of the Guard or 
Reserve in order to make up the difference between the employee's 
civilian pay and military pay and/or for compensation paid to a worker 
hired to replace an active duty Guard or Reserve employee, the chairman 
of the Committee on the Budget shall adjust the revenue aggregates and 
other appropriate aggregates, levels, and limits in this resolution to 
reflect such legislation, to the extent that such legislation would not 
increase the deficit for fiscal year 2006 and for the period of fiscal 
years 2006 through 2010.

SEC. 312. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR THE FAMILY OPPORTUNITY ACT.

    In the Senate, if the Committee on Finance reports a bill or joint 
resolution or an amendment is offered thereto or a conference report is 
submitted thereon, that provides families of disabled children with the 
opportunity to purchase coverage under the medicaid coverage for such 
children (the Family Opportunity Act), and provided that the committee 
is within its allocation as provided under section 302(a) of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the chairman of the Committee on the 
Budget may revise allocations of new budget authority and outlays, 
revenue aggregates, and other appropriate measures to reflect such 
legislation if any such measure would not increase the deficit for 
fiscal year 2006 and for the period of fiscal years 2006 through 2010.

SEC. 313. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR THE RESTORATION OF SCHIP 
              FUNDS.

    In the Senate, if the Committee on Finance reports a bill or joint 
resolution or an amendment is offered thereto or a conference report is 
submitted thereon, that provides for the restoration of unexpended 
funds under the State Children's Health Insurance Program that reverted 
to the Treasury on October 1, 2004, and that may provide for the 
redistribution of such funds for outreach and enrollment as well as for 
coverage initiatives, the chairman of the Committee on the Budget may 
revise allocations of new budget authority and outlays, revenue 
aggregates, and other appropriate measures to reflect such legislation, 
if such legislation would not increase the deficit for fiscal year 2006 
and for the period of fiscal years 2006 through 2010.

SEC. 314. RESERVE FOR FUNDING OF HOPE CREDIT.

    If the Committee on Finance of the Senate reports a bill or joint 
resolution, or an amendment thereto is offered or a conference report 
thereon is submitted, that increases the Hope credit to $4,000, and 
makes the credit available for 4 years, the chairman of the Committee 
on the Budget may revise committee allocations for the Committee on 
Finance and other appropriate budgetary aggregates and allocations of 
new budget authority and outlays by the amount provided by that measure 
for that purpose, if that measure includes offsets including 
legislation closing corporate tax loopholes and would not increase the 
deficit for fiscal year 2006 and for the period of fiscal years 2006 
though 2010.

SEC. 315. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR INFLUENZA VACCINE SHORTAGE 
              PREVENTION.

    If the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions of the 
Senate reports a bill or joint resolution, or an amendment thereto is 
offered or a conference report thereon is submitted, that increases the 
participation of manufacturers in the production of influenza vaccine, 
increases research and innovation in new technologies for the 
development of influenza vaccine, and enhances the ability of the 
United States to track and respond to domestic influenza outbreaks as 
well as pandemic containment efforts, the chairman of the Committee on 
the Budget shall revise committee allocations for the Committee on 
Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions and other appropriate budgetary 
aggregates and allocations of new budget authority and outlays by the 
amount provided by that measure for that purpose, regardless of whether 
the committee is within its 302(a) allocations, and such legislation 
shall be exempt from sections 302, 303, 311, and 425 of the 
Congressional Budget Act, and from section 505 of the concurrent 
resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2004 (H. Con. Res. 95), if 
that measure would not increase the deficit for fiscal year 2006 and 
for the period of fiscal years 2006 through 2010.

SEC. 316. RESERVE FUND FOR EXTENSION OF TREATMENT OF COMBAT PAY FOR 
              EARNED INCOME AND CHILD TAX CREDITS.

    If the Committee on Finance reports a bill or joint resolution, or 
an amendment thereto is offered or a conference report thereon is 
submitted, that makes permanent the taxpayer election to treat combat 
pay otherwise excluded from gross income under section 112 of the 
Internal Revenue Code as earned income for purposes of the earned 
income credit and makes permanent the treatment of such combat pay as 
earned income for purposes of the child tax credit, provided that the 
Committee is within its allocation as provided under section 302(a) of 
the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the Chairman of the Committee on 
the Budget may revise the allocations of budget authority and outlays, 
the revenue aggregates, and other appropriate measures, provided that 
such legislation would not increase the deficit for the period of 
fiscal year 2006 or the total of fiscal years 2006 though 2010.

                      TITLE IV--BUDGET ENFORCEMENT

SEC. 401. RESTRICTIONS ON ADVANCE APPROPRIATIONS.

    (a) In General.--Except as provided in subsection (b), it shall not 
be in order in the Senate to consider any bill, joint resolution, 
motion, amendment, or conference report that would provide an advance 
appropriation.
    (b) Exceptions.--An advance appropriation may be provided for the 
fiscal years 2007 and 2008 for programs, projects, activities, or 
accounts identified in the joint explanatory statement of managers 
accompanying this resolution under the heading ``Accounts Identified 
for Advance Appropriations'' in an aggregate amount not to exceed 
$23,393,000,000 in new budget authority in each year.
    (c) Disposition.--
            (1) In general.--In the Senate, subsection (a) may be 
        waived or suspended only by an affirmative vote of three-fifths 
        of the Members, duly chosen and sworn. An affirmative vote of 
        three-fifths of the Members of the Senate, duly chosen and 
        sworn, shall be required to sustain an appeal of the ruling of 
        the Chair on a point of order raised under subsection (a).
            (2) Procedure.--A point of order under subsection (a) may 
        be raised by a Senator as provided in section 313(e) of the 
        Congressional Budget Act of 1974.
            (3) Disposition.--If a point of order is sustained under 
        subsection (a) against a conference report in the Senate, the 
        report shall be disposed of as provided in section 313(d) of 
        the Congressional Budget Act of 1974.
    (d) Definition.--In this section, the term ``advance 
appropriation'' means any discretionary new budget authority in a bill 
or joint resolution making general appropriations or continuing 
appropriations for fiscal year 2006 that first becomes available for 
any fiscal year after 2006, or making general appropriations or 
continuing appropriations for fiscal year 2007 that first becomes 
available for any fiscal year after 2007.

SEC. 402. EMERGENCY LEGISLATION.

    (a) Purpose.--It is the purpose of this section, in the absence of 
an extension of the discretionary spending limits and paygo 
requirements under the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control 
Act of 1985, to enable Congress to designate provisions of legislation 
as an emergency in order to exempt such measures from enforcement of 
this resolution with respect to the new budget authority, outlays, and 
receipts resulting from such provisions.
    (b) In the Senate.--
            (1) Authority to designate.--With respect to a provision of 
        direct spending or receipts legislation or appropriations for 
        discretionary accounts that the Congress designates as an 
        emergency requirement in such measure, the amounts of new 
        budget authority, outlays, and receipts in all fiscal years 
        resulting from that provision shall be treated as an emergency 
        requirement for the purpose of this section.
            (2) Exemption of emergency provisions.--Any new budget 
        authority, outlays, and receipts resulting from any provision 
        designated as an emergency requirement, pursuant to this 
        section, in any bill, joint resolution, amendment, or 
        conference report shall not count for purposes of sections 302, 
        303, 311, and 401 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 and 
        section 404 of this resolution (relating to discretionary 
        spending limits in the Senate) and section 505 of the 
        Concurrent Resolution on the Budget for Fiscal Year 2004 H. 
        Con. Res. 95 (relating to the paygo requirement in the Senate).
            (3) Designations.--
                    (A) Guidance.--If a provision of legislation is 
                designated as an emergency requirement under this 
                section, the committee report and any statement of 
                managers accompanying that legislation shall include an 
                explanation of the manner in which the provision meets 
                the criteria in subparagraph (B).
                    (B) Criteria.--
                            (i) In general.--Any such provision is an 
                        emergency requirement if the situation 
                        addressed by such provision is--
                                    (I) necessary, essential, or vital 
                                (not merely useful or beneficial);
                                    (II) sudden, quickly coming into 
                                being, and not building up over time;
                                    (III) an urgent, pressing, and 
                                compelling need requiring immediate 
                                action;
                                    (IV) subject to clause (ii), 
                                unforeseen, unpredictable, and 
                                unanticipated; and
                                    (V) not permanent, temporary in 
                                nature.
                            (ii) Unforeseen.--An emergency that is part 
                        of an aggregate level of anticipated 
                        emergencies, particularly when normally 
                        estimated in advance, is not unforeseen.
            (4) Definitions.--In this subsection, the terms ``direct 
        spending'', ``receipts'', and ``appropriations for 
        discretionary accounts'' means any provision of a bill, joint 
        resolution, amendment, motion, or conference report that 
        affects direct spending, receipts, or appropriations as those 
        terms have been defined and interpreted for purposes of the 
        Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.
            (5) Point of order.--When the Senate is considering a bill, 
        resolution, amendment, motion, or conference report, if a point 
        of order is made by a Senator against an emergency designation 
        in that measure, that provision making such a designation shall 
        be stricken from the measure and may not be offered as an 
        amendment from the floor.
            (6) Waiver and appeal.--Paragraph (5) may be waived or 
        suspended in the Senate only by an affirmative vote of three-
        fifths of the Members, duly chosen and sworn. Appeals in the 
        Senate from the decisions of the Chair relating to any 
        provision of this subsection shall be limited to 1 hour, to be 
        equally divided between, and controlled by, the appellant and 
        the manager of the bill or joint resolution, as the case may 
        be. An affirmative vote of three-fifths of the Members of the 
        Senate, duly chosen and sworn, shall be required to sustain an 
        appeal of the ruling of the Chair on a point of order raised 
        under this section.
            (7) Definition of an emergency designation.--For purposes 
        of paragraph (5), a provision shall be considered an emergency 
        designation if it designates any item as an emergency 
        requirement pursuant to this section.
            (8) Form of the point of order.--A point of order under 
        paragraph (5) may be raised by a Senator as provided in section 
        313(e) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974.
            (9) Conference reports.--If a point of order is sustained 
        under paragraph (5) against a conference report, the report 
        shall be disposed of as provided in section 313(d) of the 
        Congressional Budget Act of 1974.
            (10) Exception for defense spending.--Paragraph (5) shall 
        not apply against an emergency designation for a provision 
        making discretionary appropriations under the defense function 
        (050).
    (c) Exemption of Overseas Contingent Operations.--
            (1) In general.--In the Senate, if a bill, joint 
        resolution, amendment, or a conference report makes 
        supplemental appropriations for fiscal year 2006 for overseas 
        contingency operations related to the global war on terrorism, 
        then the new budget authority, new entitlement authority, and 
        outlays resulting from the provisions of such measure that are 
        designated pursuant to this section as making appropriations 
        for such contingency operations--
                    (A) shall not count for purposes of sections 302, 
                303, and 401 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974; 
                and
                    (B) shall not count for the purpose of section 404 
                of this resolution (relating to discretionary spending 
                limits in the Senate) and section 505 of the Concurrent 
                Resolution on the Budget for Fiscal Year 2004 H. Con. 
                Res. 95 (relating to the pay-go requirement).
            (2) Limitation.--The amounts that are not counted for 
        purposes of this section shall not exceed $50,000,000,000 in 
        new budget authority and outlays associated with the budget 
        authority.

SEC. 403. SUPERMAJORITY ENFORCEMENT.

    (a) Extension.--Notwithstanding any provision of the Congressional 
Budget Act of 1974, subsections (c)(2) and (d)(3) of section 904 of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 shall remain in effect for purposes of 
Senate enforcement through September 30, 2010.
    (b) Unfunded Mandates.--
            (1) In general.--Section 425(a)(1) and (2) of the 
        Congressional Budget Act of 1974 shall be subject to the waiver 
        and appeal requirements of subsections (c)(2) and (d)(3) of 
        section 904 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974.
            (2) Effective date.--This subsection shall remain in effect 
        for purposes of Senate enforcement through September 30, 2010.

SEC. 404. DISCRETIONARY SPENDING LIMITS IN THE SENATE.

    (a) Discretionary Spending Limits.--In the Senate and as used in 
this section, the term ``discretionary spending limit'' means--
            (1) for fiscal year 2006, $848,063,000,000 in new budget 
        authority and $916,405,000,000 in outlays for the discretionary 
        category;
            (2) for fiscal year 2007, $868,473,000,000 in new budget 
        authority for the discretionary category; and
            (3) for fiscal year 2008, $891,445,000,000 in new budget 
        authority for the discretionary category;
as adjusted in conformance with the adjustment procedures in subsection 
(d).
    (b) Adjustments to Discretionary Spending Limits.--
            (1) Continuing disability reviews.--If a bill or joint 
        resolution is reported making appropriations for fiscal year 
        2006 that appropriates $412,000,000 for continuing disability 
        reviews for the Social Security Administration, and provides an 
        additional appropriation of $189,000,000 for continuing 
        disability reviews for the Social Security Administration, then 
        the allocation to the Senate Committee on Appropriations shall 
        be increased by $189,000,000 in budget authority and outlays 
        flowing from the budget authority for fiscal year 2006.
            (2) Internal revenue service tax enforcement.--If a bill or 
        joint resolution is reported making appropriations for fiscal 
        year 2006 that appropriates $6,447,000,000 for enhanced tax 
        enforcement to address the ``Federal tax gap'' for the Internal 
        Revenue Service, and provides an additional appropriation of 
        $446,000,000 for enhanced tax enforcement to address the 
        ``Federal tax gap'' for the Internal Revenue Service, then the 
        allocation to the Senate Committee on Appropriations shall be 
        increased by $446,000,000 in budget authority and outlays 
        flowing from the budget authority for fiscal year 2006.
            (3) Health care fraud and abuse control program.--If a bill 
        or joint resolution is reported making appropriations for 
        fiscal year 2006 that appropriates $80,000,000 to the health 
        care fraud and abuse control program at the Department of 
        Health and Human Services, then the allocation to the Senate 
        Committee on Appropriations shall be increased by $80,000,000 
        in budget authority and outlays flowing from the budget 
        authority for fiscal year 2006.
            (4) Unemployment insurance improper payments.--If a bill or 
        joint resolution is reported making appropriations for fiscal 
        year 2006 that appropriates $10,000,000 for unemployment 
        insurance improper payments reviews for the Department of 
        Labor, and provides an additional appropriation of $40,000,000 
        for unemployment insurance improper payments reviews for the 
        Department of Labor, then the allocation to the Senate 
        Committee on Appropriations shall be increased by $40,000,000 
        in budget authority and outlays flowing from the budget 
        authority for fiscal year 2006.
    (c) Discretionary Spending Point of Order in the Senate.--
            (1) In general.--Except as otherwise provided in this 
        subsection, it shall not be in order in the Senate to consider 
        any bill or joint resolution (or amendment, motion, or 
        conference report on that bill or joint resolution) that would 
        cause the discretionary spending limits in this section to be 
        exceeded.
            (2) Waiver.--This subsection may be waived or suspended in 
        the Senate only by the affirmative vote of three-fifths of the 
        Members, duly chosen and sworn.
            (3) Appeals.--Appeals in the Senate from the decisions of 
        the Chair relating to any provision of this subsection shall be 
        limited to 1 hour, to be equally divided between, and 
        controlled by, the appellant and the manager of the bill or 
        joint resolution, as the case may be. An affirmative vote of 
        three-fifths of the Members of the Senate, duly chosen and 
        sworn, shall be required to sustain an appeal of the ruling of 
        the Chair on a point of order raised under this subsection.
    (d) Procedure for Adjustments.--
            (1) In general.--
                    (A) Chairman.--After the reporting of a bill or 
                joint resolution, or the offering of an amendment 
                thereto or the submission of a conference report 
                thereon, the chairman of the Committee on the Budget 
                may make the adjustments set forth in subparagraph (B) 
                for the amount of new budget authority in that measure 
                (if that measure meets the requirements set forth in 
                paragraph (2)) and the outlays flowing from that budget 
                authority.
                    (B) Matters to be adjusted.--The adjustments 
                referred to in subparagraph (A) are to be made to--
                            (i) the discretionary spending limits, if 
                        any, set forth in the appropriate concurrent 
                        resolution on the budget;
                            (ii) the allocations made pursuant to the 
                        appropriate concurrent resolution on the budget 
                        pursuant to section 302(a) of the Congressional 
                        Budget Act of 1974; and
                            (iii) the budgetary aggregates as set forth 
                        in the appropriate concurrent resolution on the 
                        budget.
            (2) Amounts of adjustments.--The adjustment referred to in 
        paragraph (1) shall be an amount provided for the fiscal year 
        2006 pursuant to subsection (b).
            (3) Reporting revised suballocations.--Following any 
        adjustment made under paragraph (1), the Committee on 
        Appropriations of the Senate shall report appropriately revised 
        suballocations under section 302(b) of the Congressional Budget 
        Act of 1974 to carry out this subsection.

SEC. 405. APPLICATION AND EFFECT OF CHANGES IN ALLOCATIONS AND 
              AGGREGATES.

    (a) Application.--Any adjustments of allocations and aggregates 
made pursuant to this resolution shall--
            (1) apply while that measure is under consideration;
            (2) take effect upon the enactment of that measure; and
            (3) be published in the Congressional Record as soon as 
        practicable.
    (b) Effect of Changed Allocations and Aggregates.--Revised 
allocations and aggregates resulting from these adjustments shall be 
considered for the purposes of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 as 
allocations and aggregates contained in this resolution.
    (c) Budget Committee Determinations.--For purposes of this 
resolution--
            (1) the levels of new budget authority, outlays, direct 
        spending, new entitlement authority, revenues, deficits, and 
        surpluses for a fiscal year or period of fiscal years shall be 
        determined on the basis of estimates made by the appropriate 
        Committee on the Budget; and
            (2) such chairman may make any other necessary adjustments 
        to such levels to carry out this resolution.

SEC. 406. ADJUSTMENTS TO REFLECT CHANGES IN CONCEPTS AND DEFINITIONS.

    (a) In General.--In the Senate, upon the enactment of a bill or 
joint resolution providing for a change in concepts or definitions, the 
appropriate chairman of the Committee on the Budget shall make 
adjustments to the levels and allocations in this resolution in 
accordance with section 251(b) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
Deficit Control Act of 1985 (as in effect prior to September 30, 2002).
    (b) Pell Grants.--
            (1) Budget authority.--In the Senate, if appropriations of 
        discretionary new budget authority enacted for the Federal Pell 
        Grant Program are insufficient to cover the full cost of Pell 
        Grants in the upcoming award year, adjusted for any cumulative 
        funding surplus or shortfall from prior years, the budget 
        authority counted against the bill for the Pell Grant Program 
        shall be equal to the adjusted full cost.
            (2) Application.--This subsection shall apply only to new 
        Pell Grant awards approved in legislation for award year 2006-
        2007 and subsequent award years and shall not apply to the 
        cumulative shortfall through award year 2005-2006.
            (3) Estimates.--The estimate of the budget authority 
        associated with the full cost of Pell Grants shall be based on 
        the maximum award and any changes in eligibility requirements, 
        using current economic and technical assumptions and as 
        determined pursuant to scorekeeping guidelines, if any.

SEC. 407. LIMITATION ON LONG-TERM SPENDING PROPOSALS.

    (a) Congressional Budget Office Analysis of Proposals.--The 
Congressional Budget Office shall, to the extent practicable, prepare 
an estimate of the costs in each of the four 10-year periods beginning 
in fiscal year 2015 through fiscal year 2055, for each bill or 
resolution of a public character, except measures within the 
jurisdiction of the Committee on Appropriations, causing a net increase 
in direct spending in excess of $5,000,000,000 in any of the four 10-
year periods, and shall submit to the committee the estimate of the 
costs of the legislation.
    (b) In the Senate.--It shall not be in order to consider any bill, 
joint resolution, amendment, motion, or conference report that would 
cause a net increase in direct spending in excess of $5,000,000,000 in 
any of the four 10-year periods beginning in 2015 through 2055, as 
measured against current law out-year estimates prepared by the 
Congressional Budget Office.
    (c) Waiver.--This section may be waived or suspended only by the 
affirmative vote of three-fifths of the Members, duly chosen and sworn.
    (d) Appeals.--An affirmative vote of three-fifths of the Members, 
duly chosen and sworn, shall be required to sustain an appeal of the 
ruling of the Chair on a point of order raised under this section.
    (e) Determinations of Budget Levels.--For purposes of this section, 
the levels of net direct spending shall be determined on the basis of 
estimates provided by the Committee on the Budget of the Senate.
    (f) Sunset.--This section shall expire on September 30, 2010.

SEC. 408. EXERCISE OF RULEMAKING POWERS.

    Congress adopts the provisions of this title--
            (1) as an exercise of the rulemaking power of the Senate 
        and the House, respectively, and as such they shall be 
        considered as part of the rules of each House, or of that House 
        to which they specifically apply, and such rules shall 
        supersede other rules only to the extent that they are 
        inconsistent therewith; and
            (2) with full recognition of the constitutional right of 
        either House to change those rules (so far as they relate to 
        that house) at any time, in the same manner, and to the same 
        extent as in the case of any other rule of that House.

                      TITLE V--SENSE OF THE SENATE

SEC. 501. SENSE OF THE SENATE REGARDING UNAUTHORIZED APPROPRIATIONS.

    It is the sense of the Senate that Congress should--
            (1) preclude consideration of any bill, joint resolution, 
        motion, amendment, or conference report that would provide an 
        appropriation, in whole or in part, for programs not 
        specifically authorized by law or Treaty stipulation, or the 
        amount of which exceeds the amount specifically authorized by 
        law or Treaty stipulation, or that would provide a limited tax 
        benefit as defined by the Line Item Veto Act of 1996 (Public 
        Law 104-130), and
            (2) determine a method for effectively containing the 
        extraordinary growth in unauthorized earmarks.

SEC. 502. SENSE OF THE SENATE REGARDING A COMMISSION TO REVIEW THE 
              PERFORMANCE OF PROGRAMS.

    It is the sense of the Senate that a commission should be 
established to review Federal agencies, and programs within such 
agencies, with the express purpose of providing Congress with 
recommendations, and legislation to implement those recommendations, to 
realign or eliminate Government agencies and programs that are 
wasteful, duplicative, inefficient, outdated, irrelevant, or have 
failed to accomplish their intended purpose.

SEC. 503. SENSE OF THE SENATE REGARDING TRICARE.

    It is the sense of the Senate that Congress should provide 
sufficient funding to the Department of Defense to offer members of the 
Reserve Component continuous access to TRICARE, for a premium, 
regardless of their activation status.

SEC. 504. SENSE OF THE SENATE REGARDING RESTRAINING MEDICAID GROWTH.

    (a) Findings.--The Senate makes the following findings:
            (1) The Medicaid program provides essential health care and 
        long-term care services to more than 50,000,000 low-income 
        children, pregnant women, parents, individuals with 
        disabilities, and senior citizens. It is a Federal guarantee 
        that ensures the most vulnerable will have access to needed 
        medical services.
            (2) Medicaid provides critical access to long-term care and 
        other services for the elderly and individuals living with 
        disabilities, and is the single largest provider of long-term 
        care services. Medicaid also pays for personal care and other 
        supportive services that are typically not provided by private 
        health insurance or Medicare, but are necessary to enable 
        individuals with spinal cord injuries, developmental 
        disabilities, neurological degenerative diseases, serious and 
        persistent mental illnesses, HIV/AIDS, and other chronic 
        conditions to remain in the community, to work, and to maintain 
        independence.
            (3) Medicaid supplements the Medicare program for more than 
        6,000,000 low-income elderly or disabled Medicare 
        beneficiaries, assisting them with their Medicare premiums and 
        co-insurance, wrap-around benefits, and the costs of nursing 
        home care that Medicare does not cover. The Medicaid program 
        spent nearly $40,000,000,000 on uncovered Medicare services in 
        2002.
            (4) Medicaid provides health insurance for more than \1/4\ 
        of America's children and is the largest purchaser of maternity 
        care, paying for more than \1/3\ of all the births in the 
        United States each year. Medicaid also provides critical access 
        to care for children with disabilities, covering more than 70 
        percent of poor children with disabilities.
            (5) More than 16,000,000 women depend on Medicaid for their 
        health care. Women comprise the majority of seniors (71 
        percent) on Medicaid. Half of nonelderly women with permanent 
        mental or physical disabilities have health coverage through 
        Medicaid. Medicaid provides treatment for low-income women 
        diagnosed with breast or cervical cancer in every State.
            (6) Medicaid is the Nation's largest source of payment for 
        mental health services, HIV/AIDS care, and care for children 
        with special needs. Much of this care is either not covered by 
        private insurance or limited in scope or duration. Medicaid is 
        also a critical source of funding for health care for children 
        in foster care and for health services in schools.
            (7) Medicaid funds help ensure access to care for all 
        Americans. Medicaid is the single largest source of revenue for 
        the Nation's safety net hospitals, health centers, and nursing 
        homes, and is critical to the ability of these providers to 
        adequately serve all Americans.
            (8) Medicaid serves a major role in ensuring that the 
        number of Americans without health insurance, approximately 
        45,000,000 in 2003, is not substantially higher. The system of 
        Federal matching for State Medicaid expenditures ensures that 
        Federal funds will grow as State spending increases in response 
        to unmet needs, enabling Medicaid to help buffer the drop in 
        private coverage during recessions. More than 4,800,000 
        Americans lost employer-sponsored coverage between 2000 and 
        2003, during which time Medicaid enrolled an additional 
        8,400,000 Americans.
    (b) Sense of the Senate.--It is the sense of the Senate that the 
Finance Committee shall not report a reconciliation bill that achieves 
spending reductions that would--
            (1) undermine the role the Medicaid program plays as a 
        critical component of the health care system of the United 
        States;
            (2) cap Federal Medicaid spending, or otherwise shift 
        Medicaid cost burdens to State or local governments and their 
        taxpayers and health providers, forcing a reduction in access 
        to essential health services for low-income elderly 
        individuals, individuals with disabilities, and children and 
        families; or
            (3) undermine the Federal guarantee of health insurance 
        coverage Medicaid provides, which would threaten not only the 
        health care safety net of the United States, but the entire 
        health care system.

SEC. 505. SENSE OF THE SENATE REGARDING TRIBAL COLLEGES AND 
              UNIVERSITIES.

    (a) Findings.--The Senate finds the following:
            (1) American Indians from over 250 federally recognized 
        tribes nationwide attend tribal college and universities, a 
        majority of whom are first-generation college students.
            (2) Tribal colleges and universities are located in some of 
        the most isolated and impoverished areas in the Nation and are 
        the Nation's most poorly funded institutions of higher 
        education. While the Tribally Controlled College or University 
        Assistance Act, or ``Tribal College Act'' provides funding 
        based solely on Indian students, the colleges have open 
        enrollment policies providing access to postsecondary education 
        opportunities to all interested students, about 20 percent of 
        whom are non-Indian. With rare exception, tribal colleges and 
        universities do not receive operating funds from their 
        respective States for these non-Indian State resident students. 
        Yet, if these same students attended any other public 
        institutions in their States, the State would provide basic 
        operating funds to the institution.
    (b) Sense of the Senate.--It is the sense of the Senate that--
            (1) this resolution recognizes the funding challenges faced 
        by tribal colleges, and universities and assumes that equitable 
        consideration will be provided to them through funding of the 
        Tribally Controlled College or University Assistance Act, the 
        Equity in Educational Land Grant Status Act, title III of the 
        Higher Education Act of 1965, and the National Science 
        Foundation, Department of Defense, and Housing and Urban 
        Development Tribal College and University Programs; and
            (2) such equitable consideration reflects Congress intent 
        to continue to work toward statutory Federal funding 
        authorization goals for tribal colleges and universities.

SEC. 506. SENSE OF THE SENATE REGARDING SUPPORT FOR THE PRESIDENT'S 
              REQUEST TO CONCENTRATE FEDERAL FUNDS FOR STATE AND LOCAL 
              HOMELAND SECURITY ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS ON THE HIGHEST 
              THREATS, VULNERABILITIES, AND NEEDS.

    It is the sense of the Senate that Congress supports the 
President's request to ``Concentrat[e] Federal funds for State and 
local homeland security assistance programs on the highest threats, 
vulnerabilities, and needs. In dealing with homeland security 
assistance grants that relate to port security, Congress should (1) 
allocate port security grants under a separate, dedicated program 
intended specifically for port security enhancements, rather than as 
part of a combined program for many different infrastructure programs 
that could lead to reduced funding for port security, (2) devise a 
method to enable the Secretary of Homeland Security to both distribute 
port security grants to the Nation's port facilities more quickly and 
efficiently and give ports the financial resources needed to comply 
with congressional mandates, and (3) allocate sufficient funding for 
port security to enable port authorities to comply with mandated 
security improvements taking into consideration national, economic, and 
strategic defense concerns, ensure the protection of our Nation's 
maritime transportation, commerce system, and cruise passengers, strive 
to achieve funds consistent with the needs estimated by the United 
States Coast Guard, and recognize the unique threats for which port 
authorities must prepare.''.

SEC. 507. SENSE OF THE SENATE REJECTING PROPOSED ELIMINATION OF PER 
              DIEM REIMBURSEMENT TO STATE NURSING HOMES IN THE 
              PRESIDENT'S BUDGET.

    It is the sense of the Senate that Congress should reject the 
President's proposal to eliminate per diem payments to State Veterans 
Homes for the vast majority of patients that reside in these homes.

SEC. 508. SENSE OF THE SENATE REGARDING IMPACT AID.

    It is the sense of the Senate that funding for Impact Aid (Title 
VIII of Public Law 107-110) should be sufficient to insure that all 
federally connected school districts are provided a payment under 
sections 8002 and 8003 of that Act that will allow them to address the 
increase in program costs in recent years, as this is critical for 
school districts addressing the emotional and family needs of children 
of military families who have a parent or parents engaged in conflict 
in Iraq or Afghanistan.

SEC. 509. SENSE OF THE SENATE REGARDING MANDATORY AGRICULTURAL 
              PROGRAMS.

    (a) Findings.--The Senate finds the following:
            (1) The mandatory farm programs administered by United 
        States Department of Agriculture under the Food Security and 
        Rural Development Act of 2002 provide an economic safety net, 
        ensure the availability of Federal crop insurance, fund 
        conservation priorities, and enhance agriculture export market 
        opportunities for United States farmers and ranchers.
            (2) The actual budget outlays for farm bill programs for 
        fiscal years 2002-2004 have been about $16,700,000,000 less 
        than projected by the Congressional Budget Office in August 
        2002, shortly after the farm bill was passed.
            (3) Over 72 percent of farm program payments are currently 
        received by only 10 percent of our Nation's program crop 
        producers.
            (4) Any agricultural policy modifications should address 
        the disproportionate share of farm program payments received by 
        the largest farming operations.
            (5) If commodity prices decline, as projected by the 
        Congressional Budget Office over the next several years, 
        agricultural programs will be even more important to the 
        economic future of small- and medium-sized family farms.
    (b) Sense of the Senate.--It is the sense of the Senate that any 
reconciled mandatory agriculture savings required under this resolution 
should be primarily achieved through modifications to the payment 
limitation provisions of the Food Security and Rural Investment Act of 
2002.

SEC. 510. SENSE OF THE SENATE REGARDING SOCIAL SECURITY RESTRUCTURING.

    (a) Findings.--The Senate finds that--
            (1) Social Security is the foundation of retirement income 
        for most Americans;
            (2) preserving and strengthening the long term viability of 
        Social Security is a vital national priority and is essential 
        for the retirement security of today's working Americans, 
        current and future retirees, and their families;
            (3) Social Security faces significant fiscal and 
        demographic pressures;
            (4) the nonpartisan Office of the Chief Actuary at the 
        Social Security Administration reports that--
                    (A) the number of workers paying taxes to support 
                each Social Security beneficiary has dropped from 16.5 
                in 1950 to 3.3 in 2002;
                    (B) within a generation there will be only 2 
                workers to support each retiree, which will 
                substantially increase the financial burden on American 
                workers;
                    (C) without structural reform, the Social Security 
                system, beginning in 2018, will pay out more in 
                benefits than it will collect in taxes;
                    (D) without structural reform, the Social Security 
                trust fund will be exhausted in 2042, and Social 
                Security tax revenue in 2042 will only cover 73 percent 
                of promised benefits, and will decrease to 68 percent 
                by 2078;
                    (E) without structural reform, future Congresses 
                may have to raise payroll taxes 50 percent over the 
                next 75 years to pay full benefits on time, resulting 
                in payroll tax rates of as much as 16.9 percent by 2042 
                and 18.3 percent by 2078;
                    (F) without structural reform, Social Security's 
                total cash shortfall over the next 75 years is 
                estimated to be $3,700,000,000,000 measured in present 
                value terms; and
                    (G) absent structural reforms, spending on Social 
                Security will increase from 4.3 percent of gross 
                domestic product in 2004 to 6.6 percent in 2078; and
            (5) the Congressional Budget Office, the Government 
        Accountability Office, the Congressional Research Service, the 
        Chairman of the Federal Reserve Board, and the President's 
        Commission to Strengthen Social Security have all warned that 
        failure to enact fiscally responsible Social Security reform 
        quickly will result in 1 or more of the following:
                    (A) Higher tax rates.
                    (B) Lower Social Security benefit levels.
                    (C) Increased Federal debt or less spending on 
                other federal programs.
    (b) Sense of the Senate.--It is the sense of the Senate that--
            (1) the President, the Congress, and the American people 
        including seniors, workers, women, minorities, and disabled 
        persons should work together at the earliest opportunity to 
        enact legislation to achieve a solvent and permanently 
        sustainable Social Security system;
            (2) Social Security reform--
                    (A) must protect current and near retirees from any 
                changes to Social Security benefits;
                    (B) must reduce the pressure on future taxpayers 
                and on other budgetary priorities;
                    (C) must provide benefit levels that adequately 
                reflect individual contributions to the Social Security 
                system; and
                    (D) must preserve and strengthen the safety net for 
                vulnerable populations including the disabled and 
                survivors; and
            (3) the Senate should honor section 13301 of the Budget 
        Enforcement Act of 1990.

SEC. 511. SENSE OF THE SENATE THAT FAILING TO ADDRESS SOCIAL SECURITY 
              WILL RESULT IN MASSIVE DEBT, DEEP BENEFIT CUTS AND TAX 
              INCREASES.

    It is the sense of the Senate that Congress should reject any 
Social Security plan that requires deep benefit cuts or a massive 
increase in debt, and a failure to act would result in massive debt, 
deep benefit cuts and tax increases.

SEC. 512. SENSE OF THE SENATE REGARDING THE STATE CRIMINAL ALIEN 
              ASSISTANCE PROGRAM.

    (a) Findings.--The Senate finds the following:
            (1) Control of illegal immigration is a Federal 
        responsibility.
            (2) The State Criminal Alien Assistance Program (referred 
        to in this section as ``SCAAP'') provides critical funding to 
        States and localities for reimbursement of costs incurred as a 
        result of housing undocumented criminal aliens.
            (3) Congress appropriated $250,000,000 for SCAAP to 
        reimburse State and local governments for these costs in fiscal 
        year 2003.
            (4) Congress appropriated $300,000,000 for SCAAP to 
        reimburse State and local governments for these costs in fiscal 
        year 2004.
            (5) Congress appropriated $305,000,000 for SCAAP to 
        reimburse State and local governments for these costs in fiscal 
        year 2005.
    (b) Sense of the Senate.--It is the sense of the Senate that the 
levels in this concurrent resolution assume that--
            (1) Congress will appropriate $750,000,000 for SCAAP for 
        fiscal year 2006; and
            (2) Congress will enact long-term reauthorization of SCAAP 
        to reimburse State and local governments for the financial 
        burdens undocumented criminal aliens place on their local 
        criminal justice systems.

SEC. 513. SENSE OF THE SENATE REGARDING FUNDING FOR SUBSONIC AND 
              HYPERSONIC AERONAUTICS RESEARCH BY THE NATIONAL 
              AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION.

    (a) Findings.--The Senate makes the following findings:
            (1) The economic and military security of the United States 
        depends on the continued development of improved aeronautics 
        technologies.
            (2) Research and development on many emerging aeronautics 
        technologies is often too expensive or removed in terms of time 
        from commercial application to garner the necessary level of 
        support from the private sector.
            (3) The advances made possible by Government-funded 
        research in emerging aeronautics technologies have enabled a 
        longstanding positive balance of trade and air superiority on 
        the battlefield for the United States in recent decades.
            (4) The aeronautics industry has grown increasingly mature 
        in recent years, with growth dependent on the availability of 
        the research workforce and facilities provided by the National 
        Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).
            (5) Recent NASA studies have demonstrated the 
        competitiveness, and scientific merit, and necessity of nearly 
        all existing aeronautics wind tunnel and propulsion testing 
        facilities.
            (6) A minimum level of investment by NASA is necessary to 
        maintain these facilities in operational condition and to 
        prevent their financial collapse.
    (b) Sense of the Senate.--It is the sense of the Senate that--
            (1) the level of funding provided for the Aeronautics 
        Mission Directorate within the National Aeronautics and Space 
        Administration should be increased by $1,582,700,000 between 
        fiscal year 2006 and fiscal year 2010; and
            (2) the increases provided should be applied to the Vehicle 
        Systems portion of the Aeronautics Mission Directorate budget 
        for use in subsonic and hypersonic aeronautical research.

SEC. 514. SENSE OF THE SENATE CONCERNING CHILDREN WITH HIV/AIDS.

    (a) Findings.--The Senate makes the following findings:
            (1) Approximately 2,200,000 children under the age of 15 
        are infected with the HIV virus, and 1,900 children worldwide 
        are infected with HIV each day.
            (2) In 2004, it was estimated that of the 4,900,000 people 
        newly infected with HIV, 640,000 were children. The vast 
        majority of them were infected through mother-to-child 
        transmission, which includes transmission at any point during 
        pregnancy, labor, delivery, or breastfeeding.
            (3) Effective implementation of prevention of mother-to-
        child transmission of HIV and care and treatment services in 
        the United States has resulted in the near elimination (less 
        than 2 percent transmission) of mother-to-child transmission of 
        HIV/AIDS. By contrast, in resource-poor settings less than 10 
        percent of pregnant women living with HIV have access to 
        services to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV.
            (4) Currently, more than 4,000,000 children worldwide are 
        estimated to have died from AIDS.
            (5) In 2004, approximately 510,000 children died of AIDS, 
        resulting in almost 1,400 AIDS deaths in children per day.
            (6) According to the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/
        AIDS, if current trends continue by 2010, 3,500,000 of the 
        45,000,000 people infected worldwide will be children under the 
        age of 15.
            (7) At least a quarter of newborns infected with HIV die 
        before the age of one, up to 60 percent die before reaching 
        their second birthday, and overall, most die before they are 5 
        years of age.
            (8) HIV threatens to reverse the child survival and 
        developmental gains of past decades.
            (9) Research and practice have shown conclusively that 
        timely initiation of antiretroviral therapy to infants or young 
        children with HIV/AIDS can preserve or restore their immune 
        functions, promote normal growth and development, and prolong 
        life.
            (10) There is clear evidence in resource-rich countries 
        that antiretroviral treatment in children is very effective. 
        For example, many children who were infected through mother-to-
        child transmission in the United States are living with HIV as 
        young adults.
            (11) Few programs specifically target the treatment of 
        children with HIV/AIDS in resource-poor countries due to 
        significant challenges in diagnosing and treating infants and 
        young children with HIV. Such challenges include difficulty in 
        diagnosing HIV in infants less than 18 months of age, lack of 
        appropriate and affordable pediatric HIV/AIDS medicines, and 
        lack of trained health care providers.
            (12) Children are not small adults and treating them as 
        such can seriously jeopardize their health.
            (13) Children should not be forgotten in the fight against 
        the global HIV/AIDS pandemic.
    (b) Sense of the Senate.--It is the sense of the Senate that this 
resolution assumes that--
            (1)(A) assistance should be provided to support the 
        expansion of programs to prevent mother-to-child transmission 
        of HIV as an integral component of a comprehensive approach to 
        fighting HIV/AIDS;
            (B) to facilitate the expansion described in subparagraph 
        (A)--
                    (i) more resources are needed for infrastructure 
                improvements and education and training of health care 
                workers; and
                    (ii) better linkages between mother-to-child 
                transmission and broader care and treatment programs 
                should be created for women, children, and families who 
                are in need of access to expanded services;
            (2) assistance should be provided to support the care and 
        treatment of children with HIV/AIDS, including the development 
        and purchase of high-quality, Food and Drug Administration-
        approved pediatric formulations of antiretroviral drugs and 
        other HIV/AIDS medicines, including fixed-dose combinations, 
        pediatric-specific training to doctors and other health-care 
        personnel, and the purchase of pediatric-appropriate 
        technologies;
            (3) antiretroviral drugs intended for pediatric use should 
        include age-appropriate dosing information;
            (4) health care sites in resource-poor countries need 
        better diagnostic capacity and appropriate supplies to provide 
        care and treatment services for children, and additional 
        training is required to ensure that health care providers can 
        administer specialized care services for children; and
            (5) pediatric care and treatment should be integrated into 
        the existing health care framework so children and families can 
        be treated simultaneously.

SEC. 515. SENSE OF THE SENATE REGARDING THE ACQUISITION OF THE NEXT 
              GENERATION DESTROYER (DDX).

    (a) Findings.--The Senate makes the following findings:
            (1) The Quadrennial Defense Review to be conducted in 2005 
        has not been completed.
            (2) The national security of the United States is best 
        served by a competitive industrial base consisting of at least 
        two shipyards capable of constructing major surface combatants.
    (b) Sense of the Senate.--It is the sense of the Senate that--
            (1) it is ill-advised for the Department of Defense to 
        pursue a winner-take-all strategy for the acquisition of 
        destroyers under the next generation destroyer (DDX) program; 
        and
            (2) the amounts identified in this resolution assume that 
        the Department of Defense will not acquire any destroyer under 
        the next generation destroyer program through a winner-take-all 
        strategy.
    (c) Winner-Take-All Strategy Defined.--In this section, the term 
``winner-take-all strategy'', with respect to the acquisition of 
destroyers under the next generation destroyer program, means the 
acquisition (including design and construction) of such destroyers 
through a single shipyard.

SEC. 516. SENSE OF THE SENATE ON REDUCING THE TAX ON SOCIAL SECURITY 
              BENEFITS.

    It is the sense of the Senate that the tax cuts assumed in this 
resolution include repeal of the 1993 law that subjects 85 percent of 
certain Social Security benefits to the income tax, provided that the 
revenue loss to the Medicare Hospital Insurance Trust Fund is fully 
replaced so that seniors' access to health care is not adversely 
affected. If the inclusion of these proposals would otherwise cause the 
cost of the tax cuts to exceed the level authorized in the resolution, 
any excess should be fully offset by closing corporate tax loopholes.

SEC. 517. SENSE OF THE SENATE ON THE CRIME VICTIMS FUND.

    (a) Findings.--The Senate finds the following:
            (1) The Victims of Crime Act of 1984 (``VOCA'') was enacted 
        to provide Federal financial support for services to victims of 
        all types of crime, primarily through grants to state crime 
        victim compensation and victim assistance programs.
            (2) VOCA created the Crime Victims Fund (``the Fund'') as a 
        separate account into which are deposited monies collected from 
        persons convicted of Federal criminal offenses, including 
        criminal fines, forfeitures and special assessments. There are 
        no general taxpayer generated revenues deposited into the Fund.
            (3) Each fiscal year, the Fund is used to support--
                    (A) Children's Justice Act grants to States to 
                improve the investigation and prosecution of child 
                abuse cases;
                    (B) victim witness coordinators in United States 
                Attorney's Offices;
                    (C) victim assistance specialists in Federal Bureau 
                of Investigation field offices;
                    (D) discretionary grants by the Office for Victims 
                of Crime to provide training and technical assistance 
                and services to victims of Federal crimes;
                    (E) formula grants to States to supplement State 
                crime victim compensation programs, which reimburse 
                more than 150,000 violent crime victims annually for 
                out-of-pocket expenses, including medical expenses, 
                mental health counseling, lost wages, loss of support 
                and funeral costs;
                    (F) formula grants to States for financial 
                assistance to upwards of 4,400 programs providing 
                direct victim assistance services to nearly 4,000,000 
                victims of all types of crimes annually, with priority 
                for programs serving victims of domestic violence, 
                sexual assault and child abuse, and previously 
                underserved victims of violent crime; and
                    (G) the Antiterrorism Emergency Reserve, to assist 
                victims of domestic and international terrorism.
            (4) Just 4 months ago, a strong bipartisan, bicameral 
        majority in Congress affirmed its support for the Crime Victims 
        Fund and increased its commitment to crime victims in the 
        Justice for All Act of 2004 (Public Law 108-405), which 
        establishes Federal crime victims rights and authorized 2 new 
        VOCA-funded victim programs.
            (5) Before fiscal year 2000, all amounts deposited into the 
        Crime Victims Fund in each fiscal year were made available for 
        authorized programs in the subsequent fiscal year.
            (6) Beginning in fiscal year 2000, Congress responded to 
        large fluctuations of deposits into the Fund by delaying 
        obligations from the Fund above certain amounts, as follows:
                    (A) For fiscal year 2000, $500,000,000.
                    (B) For fiscal year 2001, $537,500,000.
                    (C) For fiscal year 2002, $550,000,000.
                    (D) For fiscal year 2003, $600,000,000.
                    (E) For fiscal year 2004, $625,000,000.
                    (F) For fiscal year 2005, $625,000,000.
            (7) In the conference report on an omnibus spending bill 
        for fiscal year 2000 (Public Law 106-113), Congress explained 
        that the reason for delaying annual Fund obligations was ``to 
        protect against wide fluctuations in receipts into the Fund, 
        and to ensure that a stable level of funding will remain 
        available for these programs in future years''.
            (8) VOCA mandates that ``. . . all sums deposited in the 
        Fund in any fiscal year that are not made available for 
        obligation by Congress in the subsequent fiscal year shall 
        remain in the Fund for obligation in future fiscal years, 
        without fiscal year limitation''.
            (9) For fiscal year 2006, the President is recommending 
        ``rescission'' of $1,267,000,000 from amounts in the Fund.
            (10) The rescission proposed by the President would result 
        in no funds being available to support crime victim services at 
        the start of fiscal year 2007. Further, such rescission would 
        make the Fund vulnerable to fluctuations in receipts into the 
        Fund, and would not ensure that a stable level of funding will 
        remain available for vital programs in future years.
            (11) Retention of all amounts deposited into the Fund for 
        the immediate and future use of crime victim services as 
        authorized by VOCA is supported by many major national victim 
        service organizations, including--
                    (A) Justice Solutions, NPO;
                    (B) National Organization for Victim Assistance;
                    (C) National Alliance to End Sexual Violence;
                    (D) National Children's Alliance;
                    (E) National Association of VOCA Assistance 
                Administrators;
                    (F) National Association of Crime Victim 
                Compensation Boards;
                    (G) Mothers Against Drunk Driving;
                    (H) National Center for Victims of Crime;
                    (I) National Organization for Parents of Murdered 
                Children;
                    (J) National Coalition Against Domestic Violence;
                    (K) Pennsylvania Coalition Against Rape; and
                    (L) National Network to End Domestic Violence.
    (b) Sense of the Senate.--It is the sense of the Senate that the 
funding levels in this resolution assume that all amounts that have 
been and will be deposited into the Crime Victims Fund, including 
amounts deposited in fiscal year 2006 and thereafter, shall remain in 
the Fund for use as authorized under the Victims of Crime Act of 1984.

SEC. 518. SENSE OF THE SENATE SUPPORTING FUNDING FOR HIDTAS.

    (a) Findings.--The Senate finds the following:
            (1) The High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) 
        program encompasses 28 strategic regions, 355 task forces, 53 
        intelligence centers, 4,428 Federal personnel, and 8,459 State 
        and local personnel.
            (2) The purposes of the HIDTA program are to reduce drug 
        trafficking and drug production in designated areas in the 
        United States by--
                    (A) facilitating cooperation among Federal, State, 
                and local law enforcement agencies to share information 
                and implement coordinated enforcement activities;
                    (B) enhancing intelligence sharing among Federal, 
                State, and local law enforcement agencies;
                    (C) providing reliable intelligence to law 
                enforcement agencies needed to design effective 
                enforcement strategies and operations; and
                    (D) supporting coordinated law enforcement 
                strategies which maximize use of available resources to 
                reduce the supply of drugs in HIDTA designated areas.
            (3) In 2004, HIDTA efforts resulted in disrupting or 
        dismantling over 509 international, 711 multi-State, and 1,110 
        local drug trafficking organizations.
            (4) In 2004, HIDTA instructors trained 21,893 students in 
        cutting-edge practices to limit drug trafficking and 
        manufacturing within their areas.
            (5) The HIDTAs are the only drug enforcement coalitions 
        that include equal partnership between Federal, State, and 
        local law enforcement leaders executing a regional approach to 
        achieving regional goals while pursuing a national mission.
            (6) The proposed budget of $100,000,000 for the HIDTA 
        program is inadequate to effectively maintain all of the 
        operations currently being supported.
            (7) The proposed budget of $100,000,000 for the HIDTA 
        program would undermine the viability of this program and the 
        efforts of law enforcement around the country to combat illegal 
        drugs, particularly methamphetamine.
    (b) Sense of the Senate.--It is the sense of the Senate that--
            (1) the spending level of budget function 750 
        (Administration of Justice) is assumed to include $227,000,000 
        for the High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas; and
            (2) unless new legislation is enacted, it is assumed that 
        the HIDTA program will remain with the Office of National Drug 
        Control Policy, where Congress last authorized it to reside.

SEC. 519. SENSE OF THE SENATE REGARDING THE NEED FOR A COMPREHENSIVE, 
              COORDINATED, AND INTEGRATED NATIONAL OCEAN POLICY.

    (a) Findings.--The Senate makes the following findings:
            (1) The United States Commission on Ocean Policy and the 
        Pew Ocean Commission have each completed and published 
        independent findings on the state of the United States oceans, 
        coasts, and Great Lakes.
            (2) The findings made by the Commissions include the 
        following:
                    (A) The United States oceans, coasts, and Great 
                Lakes are a vital component of the economy of the 
                United States.
                    (B) The resources and ecosystems associated with 
                the United States oceans, coasts, and Great Lakes are 
                in trouble.
    (b) Sense of the Senate.--It is the sense of the Senate that the 
President and the Congress should--
            (1) expeditiously consider the recommendations of the 
        United States Commission on Ocean Policy during the 109th 
        Congress; and
            (2) enact a comprehensive, coordinated, and integrated 
        national ocean policy that will ensure the long-term economic 
        and ecological health of the United States oceans, coasts, and 
        Great Lakes.

SEC. 520. UNITED STATES RESPONSE TO GLOBAL HIV/AIDS, TUBERCULOSIS, AND 
              MALARIA.

    (a) Findings.--Congress makes the following findings:
            (1) The HIV/AIDS pandemic has reached staggering 
        proportions. At the end of 2004, an estimated 40,000,000 people 
        were infected with HIV or living with AIDS. HIV/AIDS is 
        estimated to kill 3,000,000 men, women and children each year. 
        Each year, there are estimated to be 5,000,000 new HIV 
        infections.
            (2) The United States was the first, and remains the 
        largest, contributor to the Global Fund.
            (3) The Presidential Administration of George W. Bush 
        (referred to in this section as the ``Administration'') has 
        supported language in the Global HIV/AIDS authorization bill 
        that links United States contributions to the Global Fund to 
        the contributions of other donors, permitting the United States 
        to provide 33 percent of all donations, which would match 
        contributions on a one-to-two basis.
            (4) Congress has provided one-third of all donations to the 
        Global Fund every year of the Fund's existence.
            (5) For fiscal year 2006, the Global Fund estimates it will 
        renew $2,400,000,000 worth of effective programs that are 
        already operating on the ground, and the Administration and 
        Fund Board have said that renewals of existing grants should 
        receive priority funding.
            (6) The Global Fund is an important component of United 
        States efforts to combat AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria, and 
        supports approximately 300 projects in 130 countries.
            (7) For fiscal year 2006, the President has requested 
        $300,000,000 for the United States contribution to the Global 
        Fund.
            (8) Through a mid-year review process, Congress and the 
        Administration will assess contributions to date and 
        anticipated contributions to the Global Fund, and ensure that 
        United States contributions, at year-end, are at the 
        appropriate one-to-two ratio.
            (9) Congress and the Administration will monitor 
        contributions to the Global Fund to ensure that United States 
        contributions do not exceed one-third of the Global Fund's 
        revenues.
            (10) In order to cover one-third of renewals during fiscal 
        year 2006, and to maintain the one-to-two funding match, the 
        United States will need to contribute an additional 
        $500,000,000 above the President's request for the Global Fund 
        for fiscal year 2006 to keep good programs funded at a level of 
        $800,000,000.
    (b) Sense of the Senate.--It is the sense of the Senate that the 
assumptions underlying this budget resolution assume that none of the 
offsets needed to provide $800,000,000 for the Global Fund will come 
from international humanitarian assistance programs.

SEC. 521. OFFSET FOR INCREASES IN FUNDING FOR THE COPS METHAMPHETAMINE 
              ENFORCEMENT AND CLEAN-UP PROGRAM.

    It is the sense of the Senate that this resolution assumes that any 
increases in funding for the COPS Methamphetamine Enforcement Clean-Up 
Program should be offset by increased revenues to be derived from 
closing corporate tax loopholes.

SEC. 522. SENSE OF THE SENATE REGARDING FOREIGN-OWNED DEBT.

    It is the sense of the Senate that the Secretary of the Treasury 
and the Comptroller General should each conduct a study to examine the 
economic impact of United States publicly-held debt that is held by 
foreign governments, institutions, and individuals. The study should 
provide an analysis of the following:
            (1) The amount of foreign-owned debt dating back to 1980, 
        broken down by foreign governments, foreign institutions, and 
        foreign private investors, and expressed in nominal terms and 
        as a percentage of the total amount of publicly-held debt in 
        each year.
            (2) The economic impact that the increased foreign 
        ownership of United States publicly-held debt has had on the 
        ability of the United States to maintain a stable dollar 
        policy.
            (3) The impact that foreign ownership of United States 
        publicly-held debt has had, or could have, on United States 
        trade policy.

SEC. 523. SENSE OF THE SENATE REGARDING TAX RELIEF TO ENCOURAGE 
              CHARITABLE GIVING.

    (a) Findings.--The Senate finds that--
            (1) the CARE Act, which represents a part of the 
        President's faith-based initiative, will spur charitable giving 
        and assist faith-based and community organizations that serve 
        the needy;
            (2) more than 1,600 small and large organizations from 
        around the Nation have endorsed the CARE Act, and in the 108th 
        Congress the CARE Act had bipartisan support and was sponsored 
        by 23 Senators;
            (3) although the CARE Act passed the Senate on April 9, 
        2003, by a vote of 95 to 5, and the House of Representatives 
        passed companion legislation on September 17, 2003, by a vote 
        of 408 to 13, a conference committee on the CARE Act was never 
        formed and a final version was not passed in the 108th 
        Congress; and
            (4) charities around the Nation continue to struggle, and 
        the passage of the incentives for charitable giving contained 
        in the CARE Act would provide significant dollars in private 
        and public sector assistance to those in need.
    (b) Sense of the Senate.--It is the sense of the Senate that a 
relevant portion of amounts in this budget resolution providing for tax 
relief should be used--
            (1) to provide the 86,000,000 Americans who do not itemize 
        deductions an opportunity to deduct charitable contributions;
            (2) to provide incentives for individuals to give tax free 
        contributions from individual retirement accounts for 
        charitable purposes;
            (3) to provide incentives for an estimated $2,000,000,000 
        in food donations from farmers, restaurants, and corporations 
        to help the needy, an equivalent of 878,000,000 meals for 
        hungry Americans over 10 years;
            (4) to provide at least 300,000 low-income, working 
        Americans the opportunity to build assets through individual 
        development accounts or IDAs, which can be used to purchase a 
        home, expand educational opportunity, or to start a small 
        business; and
            (5) to provide incentives for corporate charitable 
        contributions.

SEC. 524. SENSE OF SENATE REGARDING WATER INFRASTRUCTURE.

    (a) Findings.--The Senate finds that--
            (1) payments to States from the Federal Water Pollution 
        Control State Revolving Fund under title VI of the Federal 
        Water Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C. 1381 et seq.) are 
        essential to protect public health, fisheries, wildlife, and 
        watersheds, and to ensure opportunities for public recreation 
        and economic development;
            (2) despite important progress in protecting and enhancing 
        water quality since the enactment of the Federal Water 
        Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C. 1251 et seq.) in 1972, serious 
        water pollution problems persist throughout the United States;
            (3) the report of the Environmental Protection Agency dated 
        September 30, 2002, and relating to clean water and drinking 
        water infrastructure gap analysis found that there will be a 
        $535,000,000,000 gap between current spending and projected 
        needs for water and wastewater infrastructure over the next 20 
        years if additional investments are not made;
            (4) in November 2002, the Congressional Budget Office 
        estimated the annual investment in clean water infrastructure 
        needs to be at least $13,000,000,000 for capital construction 
        and $20,300,000,000 for operation and maintenance; and
            (5) the Federal Government is a vital partner with State 
        and local governments and must continue to share in the burden 
        of maintaining and improving the water infrastructure of the 
        United States.
    (b) Sense of the Senate.--It is the sense of the Senate that 
payments to States from the Federal Water Pollution Control State 
Revolving Fund under title VI of the Federal Water Pollution Control 
Act (33 U.S.C. 1381 et seq.) should be increased to $1,350,000,000 for 
fiscal year 2006 to assist States and local communities in meeting 
water quality standards and restoring the health and safety of the 
water of the United States.

SEC. 525. SENSE OF THE SENATE REGARDING FUNDING OF ADMINISTRATIVE COSTS 
              OF SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION.

    It is the sense of the Senate that Congress should approve the full 
amount of the President's request for the administrative costs of the 
Social Security Administration for fiscal year 2006, including funds 
for the implementation of the low-income prescription drug subsidy 
under part D of title XVIII of the Social Security Act (as added by the 
Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 
2003).

SEC. 526. SENSE OF THE SENATE CONCERNING COMPARATIVE EFFECTIVENESS 
              STUDIES.

    It is the Sense of the Senate that--
            (1) the overall discretionary levels set in this resolution 
        assume $75,000,000 in new budget authority in fiscal year 2006 
        and new outlays that flow from this budget authority in fiscal 
        year 2006 and subsequent years, to fund research and ongoing 
        systematic reviews, consistent with efforts currently 
        undertaken by the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality 
        designed to improve scientific evidence related to the 
        comparative effectiveness and safety of prescription drugs and 
        other treatments and to disseminate the findings from such 
        research to health care practitioners, consumers, and health 
        care purchasers; and
            (2) knowledge gaps identified through such efforts be 
        addressed in accordance with the authorizing legislation and 
        with oversight from the committees of subject matter 
        jurisdiction.

SEC. 527. SENSE OF THE SENATE REGARDING THE ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY 
              PROGRAM.

    It is the sense of the Senate that the Senate Committee on 
Appropriations should make every effort to provide funding for the 
Advanced Technology Program in fiscal year 2006.

SEC. 528. SENSE OF THE SENATE WITH RESPECT TO PENSION REFORM.

    (a) Findings.--The Senate finds the following:
            (1) The rules for calculating the funded status of pension 
        plans and for determining calculations, premiums, and other 
        issues should ensure strong funding of such plans in both good 
        and bad economic times.
            (2) The expiration of the interest rate provisions of the 
        Pension Funding Equity Act of 2004 at the end of 2005 and the 
        need to address the deficit at the Pension Benefit Guaranty 
        Corporation (referred to in this section as the ``PBGC'') 
        demand enactment of pension legislation this year.
            (3) Thirty-four million active and retired workers are 
        relying on their defined benefit plans to provide retirement 
        security, and a failure by Congress to reform the defined 
        benefit system will place at risk the pensions of millions of 
        Americans.
            (4) Stabilization of the defined benefit pension system and 
        the PBGC may require significant and structural changes in the 
        Employee Retirement and Income Security Act of 1974 and the 
        Internal Revenue Code of 1986, which must be undertaken in a 
        single comprehensive set of reforms.
    (b) Sense of the Senate.--It is the sense of the Senate that the 
Senate conferees shall insist, on the Senate position expressed in this 
resolution with respect to PBGC premiums.

            Passed the Senate March 17, 2005.

            Attest:

                                                             Secretary.
109th CONGRESS

  1st Session

                            S. CON. RES. 18

_______________________________________________________________________

                         CONCURRENT RESOLUTION

Setting forth the congressional budget for the United States Government 
for fiscal year 2006 and including the appropriate budgetary levels for 
                fiscal years 2005 and 2007 through 2010.