Text: H.R.4067 — 110th Congress (2007-2008)All Information (Except Text)

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Introduced in House (11/01/2007)


110th CONGRESS
1st Session
H. R. 4067


To provide grants to colleges to improve remedial education (including English language instruction), to customize remediation to student career goals, and to help students move rapidly from remediation into for-credit occupation program courses and through program completion.


IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

November 1, 2007

Ms. Woolsey (for herself, Mr. Altmire, Mr. Loebsack, and Mr. Hare) introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on Education and Labor


A BILL

To provide grants to colleges to improve remedial education (including English language instruction), to customize remediation to student career goals, and to help students move rapidly from remediation into for-credit occupation program courses and through program completion.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. Short title.

This Act may be cited as the “Bridges from Jobs to Careers Act”.

SEC. 2. Grants to create bridges from jobs to careers.

(a) Authorization of program.—From amounts appropriated under subsection (k), the Secretary shall award grants, on a competitive basis, to institutions of higher education for the purposes of improving remedial education, including English language instruction, to customize remediation to student career goals, and to help students move rapidly from remediation into for-credit occupational program courses and through program completion. The grants shall focus in particular on creating bridges to for-credit occupational certificate programs that are articulated to degree programs.

(b) Application.—An eligible institution seeking a grant under this section shall submit an application to the Secretary at such time, in such manner, and containing such information as the Secretary may require.

(c) Priorities.—The Secretary shall give priority to applications that—

(1) are from institutions of higher education in which not less than 50 percent of the institution’s entering first-year students are enrolled in developmental courses to bring reading, writing, or mathematics skills up to college-level; and

(2) propose to replicate practices that have proven effective with adults and to applications that propose to collaborate with adult education providers.

(d) Peer review.—The Secretary shall convene a peer review process to review applications for grants under this section and to make recommendations to the Secretary regarding the selection of grantees.

(e) Mandatory activity.—An eligible institution that receives a grant under this section shall use the grant funds to create workforce bridge programs that customize developmental education curricula, including English language instruction, to the content of the for-credit occupational certificate or degree programs, or clusters of programs, in which developmental education students seek to enroll. Such bridge programs may include those that integrate the curricula and the instruction of both remediation and college-level coursework or dual enroll students in remediation and college-level coursework.

(f) Permissible activities.—An eligible institution that receives a grant under this section, in addition to creating workforce bridge programs, may use the grant funds to carry out the following:

(1) Design and implement innovative ways to improve retention in and completion of developmental education courses, including but not limited to enrolling students in cohorts, accelerating course content, integrating remediation and college-level curricula and instruction, dual enrolling students in remediation and college-level courses, tutoring, providing counseling and other supportive services, and giving small, material incentives for attendance and performance.

(2) In consultation with faculty in the appropriate departments, redesignating class schedules to meet the needs of working adults, such as by creating evening, weekend, modular, compressed, distance learning formats or other alternative schedules.

(3) Improving the quality of teaching in remedial courses through professional development, reclassification of such teaching positions, or other means the eligible institution determines appropriate.

(4) Any other activities the eligible institution and the Secretary determine will promote retention of and completion by students attending institutions of higher education.

(5) Fully advise students on the range of options and programs available, which may include: diploma; certification; 2-year degree; associate’s degree; transfer degree to upper division; and career options.

(g) Grant period.—Grants made under this section shall be for a period of not less than 36 months and not more than 60 months.

(h) Technical assistance.—The Secretary shall provide technical assistance to grantees under this section throughout the grant period.

(i) Evaluation.—The Secretary shall conduct an evaluation of program impacts under the demonstration program, and shall disseminate to the public the findings from the evaluation and information on best practices. The Secretary is encouraged to partner with other providers of funds, such as private foundations, to allow for use of a random assignment evaluation in at least one of the demonstration sites.

(j) Authorization of appropriations.—There are authorized to be appropriated to carry out this section $35,000,000 for fiscal year 2009 and each of the 4 succeeding fiscal years, of which an aggregate of not more than 5 percent may be used to carry out subsections (i) and (j).

(k) Definition of institution.—In this section, the term “institution of higher education” means an institution of higher education as defined in section 101(a).