Text: H.R.5460 — 111th Congress (2009-2010)All Bill Information (Except Text)

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Introduced in House (05/28/2010)


111th CONGRESS
2d Session
H. R. 5460

To amend the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 and the Higher Education Act of 1965 to require the Secretary of Education to establish grant programs to help pregnant and parenting students stay in school, and for other purposes.


IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
May 28, 2010

Ms. Chu introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on Education and Labor


A BILL

To amend the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 and the Higher Education Act of 1965 to require the Secretary of Education to establish grant programs to help pregnant and parenting students stay in school, and for other purposes.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. Short title.

This Act may be referred to as the “Teen Parent Graduation and College Achievement Act”.

SEC. 2. Findings.

Congress makes the following findings:

(1) Each year, nearly 750,000 American teenagers ages 15 through 19 become pregnant, giving the United States the highest teenage pregnancy rate of all industrialized nations.

(2) Overall, there has been an impressive decline in teen pregnancy and birth rates since the early 1990s. Between 2005 and 2006, however, teen pregnancy rates increased for the first time in 14 years.

(3) Seventy percent of teenagers who become pregnant drop out of high school, and teenage fathers tend to complete, on average, one semester of high school fewer than men who delay fatherhood until they are 21 years or older. Fewer economic opportunities are available to these teenage parents.

(4) Some teenagers drop out of school as a result of subsequent pregnancies. In 2006, subsequent pregnancies accounted for 85,000, or almost 20 percent, of all teenage pregnancies.

(5) Marginalized racial or ethnic minority and immigrant communities generally have less access to the education, support, and services needed for healthy growth and development, and are at high risk for teenage pregnancy.

(6) The high rate of teenage pregnancy in racial or ethnic minority and immigrant communities can lead to a disproportionate dropout rate in those communities. School systems in many such communities lack the funding and expertise to effectively counter high school teenage pregnancy dropout rates.

(7) Fifty-two percent of Latina teens and 50 percent of African-American teen girls will become pregnant at least once before they are 20 years old. Birth rates among Latina and African-American youth ages 15 through 17 are more than twice the birth rates of Caucasian youth in the same age range.

(8) The 2005 Youth Risk Behavior Survey contained the surprising finding that sexually active lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth are three times as likely to face an unwanted pregnancy as their heterosexual peers.

(9) Only 51 percent of all teenage mothers, and 38 percent of teenage mothers who have a child before they turn 18, have a high school diploma, compared to 89 percent of all other women.

(10) Parenthood is a leading cause of school dropout among teenage women. Of all teenage women who have dropped out of high school, 30 percent cited pregnancy or parenthood as a reason they dropped out, including 36 percent of Latina women and 38 percent of African-American women.

(11) Two-thirds of all teenage births occur among teenagers ages 18 and 19. Birth rates among women of those ages have declined less significantly than among teenage women of other ages. These older teenage parents would benefit from the increased availability of services at institutions of higher education, particularly at community colleges.

(12) The responsibilities of pregnancy and parenting can interfere with the attainment of a college degree. Sixty-one percent of women who have children after enrolling in community college do not graduate. Women who do not have children after enrollment graduate at a 65 percent higher rate than women who do.

(13) Comprehensive support through schools, public agencies, and community-based organizations can reduce high school dropout rates and ensure that more pregnant and parenting teenagers complete high school and enroll in institutions of higher education.

(14) More data on the prevalence of pregnant and parenting teenagers is needed so that Federal assistance reaches the communities in which it is most needed.

SEC. 3. Grants for assistance to pregnant and parenting students at elementary and secondary schools.

(a) Establishment of grant program.—Part H of title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 6301 et seq.) is amended—

(1) in section 1803 (20 U.S.C. 6553)—

(A) by striking “this part” and inserting “subparts 1 and 2”;

(B) by inserting “(a)” before the first sentence; and

(C) by adding at the end the following new subsection:

“(b) For the purpose of carrying out subpart 3, there are authorized to be appropriated $75,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2011 through 2015.”;

(2) in section 1822(a) (20 U.S.C. 6561a(a)), by striking “1803” each place it appears and inserting “1803(a)”; and

(3) by adding at the end the following new subpart:

“subpart 3Grants for Assistance to Pregnant and Parenting Students

“SEC. 1840. Grants for assistance to pregnant and parenting students.

“(a) Grant program authorized.—The Secretary shall establish a program to award grants to local educational agencies to help pregnant and parenting students stay in school by expanding their access to services, including—

“(1) tutoring;

“(2) pregnancy-related healthcare;

“(3) child care;

“(4) transportation;

“(5) after-school support;

“(6) academic counseling;

“(7) school social work services; or

“(8) family planning services, including services for subsequent pregnancy prevention.

“(b) Priority.—In awarding grants under subsection (a), the Secretary shall give priority to a local educational agency that, in the determination of the Secretary—

“(1) is eligible for assistance under part A;

“(2) serves a school that will have a significant percentage of pregnant and parenting students in the period for which the grant is awarded; and

“(3) will expand the access of pregnant and parenting students to each service described in subsection (a).

“(c) Limitation on amount of grant.—The amount of a grant awarded under subsection (a) shall not exceed $500,000.

“(d) Grant conditions.—As a condition of receiving a grant under subsection (a), a local educational agency—

“(1) shall agree to enter into partnerships and share grant funds, when appropriate, with public agencies or with community-based organizations to carry out the purpose for which the grant is awarded; and

“(2) shall not use more than 10 percent of the amount of the grant for administrative costs.

“(e) Use of funds.—Uses of funds from a grant awarded under subsection (a) may include—

“(1) compensating teachers and other employees for performing additional services in carrying out the purpose of the grant; and

“(2) encouraging training practicums for graduate students in social work to carry out the purpose of the grant.

“(f) Application.—To be eligible to receive a grant under subsection (a), a local educational agency shall submit an application to the Secretary at such time, in such manner, and containing such information as the Secretary may require.

“(g) Reporting.—

“(1) SUBMISSION.—The Secretary shall submit to Congress a report on the program established under subsection (a), including the information specified in paragraph (2), on the following dates:

“(A) A date that is not later than September 30, 2013.

“(B) A date that is not later than January 1, 2016.

“(2) CONTENTS.—A report submitted under paragraph (1) shall include the following information, as determined by the Secretary:

“(A) The number and graduation rate of pregnant and parenting students who benefit from the program, and their rate of enrollment in institutions of higher education.

“(B) The effectiveness of the program, in the long term, in reducing costs to the Federal government, including the costs of providing, to individuals affected by the program, benefits under the Medicaid program under title XIX of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 1396 et seq.), the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program established under the Food and Nutrition Act of 2008 (7 U.S.C. 2011 et seq.), and Federal foster care programs, and other income-tested or need-based benefits.”.

(b) Clerical amendment.—The table of contents in section 2 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 6301 note) is amended by inserting after the item relating to section 1830 the following:

“SUBPART 3—GRANTS FOR ASSISTANCE TO PREGNANT AND PARENTING STUDENTS”.

“Sec. 1840. Grants for assistance to pregnant and parenting students.”.

SEC. 4. Grants for assistance to pregnant and parenting students at institutions of higher education.

Part A of title IV of the Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1001 et seq.) is amended by adding at the end the following new subpart:

“subpart 11Grants for Assistance to Pregnant and Parenting Students

“SEC. 420S. Grants for assistance to pregnant and parenting students.

“(a) Grant program authorized.—The Secretary shall establish a program to award grants to institutions of higher education to help pregnant and parenting students stay in school by expanding their access to services, including—

“(1) tutoring;

“(2) pregnancy-related healthcare;

“(3) child care;

“(4) transportation;

“(5) after-school support;

“(6) academic counseling;

“(7) school social work services; or

“(8) family planning services, including services for subsequent pregnancy prevention.

“(b) Priority.—In awarding grants under subsection (a), the Secretary shall give priority to an institution of higher education that, in the determination of the Secretary—

“(1) will have a significant percentage of pregnant and parenting students in the period for which the grant is awarded; and

“(2) will expand the access of pregnant and parenting students to each service described in subsection (a).

“(c) Limitation on amount of grant.—The amount of a grant awarded under subsection (a) shall not exceed $500,000.

“(d) Grant conditions.—As a condition of receiving a grant under subsection (a), an institution of higher education—

“(1) shall agree to enter into partnerships and share grant funds, when appropriate, with public agencies or with community-based organizations to carry out the purpose for which the grant is awarded; and

“(2) may use no more than 10 percent of the amount of the grant for administrative costs.

“(e) Use of funds.—Uses of funds from a grant awarded under subsection (a) may include—

“(1) compensating teachers and other employees for performing additional services in carrying out the purpose of the grant; and

“(2) encouraging training practicums for graduate students in social work to carry out the purpose of the grant.

“(f) Application.—To be eligible to receive a grant under subsection (a), an institution of higher education shall submit an application to the Secretary at such time, in such manner, and containing such information as the Secretary may require.

“(g) Reporting.—

“(1) SUBMISSION.—The Secretary shall submit to Congress a report on the program established under subsection (a), including the information specified in paragraph (2), on the following dates:

“(A) A date that is not later than September 30, 2013.

“(B) A date that is not later than January 1, 2016.

“(2) CONTENTS.—A report submitted under paragraph (1) shall include the following information, as determined by the Secretary:

“(A) The number and graduation rate of pregnant and parenting students who benefit from the program.

“(B) The effectiveness of the program, in the long term, in reducing costs to the Federal government, including the costs of providing, to individuals affected by the program, benefits under the Medicaid program under title XIX of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 1396 et seq.), the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program established under the Food and Nutrition Act of 2008 (7 U.S.C. 2011 et seq.), and Federal foster care programs, and other income-tested or need-based benefits.

“(h) Authorization of appropriations.—There are authorized to be appropriated to carry out this section $75,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2011 through 2015.”.