Text: H.R.586 — 111th Congress (2009-2010)All Information (Except Text)

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Public Law No: 111-19 (05/12/2009)

 
[111th Congress Public Law 19]
[From the U.S. Government Printing Office]



[[Page 1611]]

                CIVIL RIGHTS HISTORY PROJECT ACT OF 2009

[[Page 123 STAT. 1612]]

Public Law 111-19
111th Congress

                                 An Act


 
To direct the Librarian of Congress and the Secretary of the Smithsonian 
Institution to carry out a joint project at the Library of Congress and 
 the National Museum of African American History and Culture to collect 
  video and audio recordings of personal histories and testimonials of 
individuals who participated in the Civil Rights movement, and for other 
             purposes. <<NOTE: May 12, 2009 -  [H.R. 586]>> 

    Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the 
United States of America in Congress assembled, <<NOTE: Civil Rights 
History Project Act of 2009.>> 
SECTION 1. <<NOTE: 20 USC 80s note.>> SHORT TITLE.

    This Act may be cited as the ``Civil Rights History Project Act of 
2009''.
SEC. 2. <<NOTE: 20 USC 80s.>>  FINDINGS; PURPOSE.

    (a) Findings.--Congress finds as follows:
            (1) A fundamental principle of American democracy is that 
        individuals should stand up for their rights and beliefs and 
        fight for justice.
            (2) The actions of those who participated in the Civil 
        Rights movement from the 1950s through the 1960s are a shining 
        example of this principle in action, demonstrated in events as 
        varied as the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the sit-ins, the Freedom 
        Rides, the March on Washington, the drive for voting rights in 
        Mississippi, and the March to Selma.
            (3) While the Civil Rights movement had many visible 
        leaders, including Thurgood Marshall, Dr. Martin Luther King, 
        Jr., and Rosa Parks, there were many others whose impact and 
        experience were just as important to the cause but who are not 
        as well known.
            (4) The participants in the Civil Rights movement possess an 
        invaluable resource in their first-hand memories of the 
        movement, and the recording of the retelling of their stories 
        and memories will provide a rich, detailed history of our Nation 
        during an important and tumultuous period.
            (5) It is in the Nation's interest to undertake a project to 
        collect oral histories of individuals from the Civil Rights 
        movement so future generations will be able to learn of their 
        struggle and sacrifice through primary-source, eyewitness 
        material. A coordinated Federal project would also focus 
        attention on the efforts undertaken by various public and 
        private entities to collect and interpret articles in all 
        formats relating to the Civil Rights movement, and serve as a 
        model for future projects undertaken in museums, libraries, and 
        universities throughout the Nation.

[[Page 123 STAT. 1613]]

            (6) The Library of Congress and the Smithsonian Institution 
        are appropriate repositories to collect, preserve, and make 
        available to the public a collection of these oral histories. 
        The Library and Smithsonian have expertise in the management of 
        documentation projects, and experience in the development of 
        cultural and educational programs for the public.

    (b) Purpose.--It is the purpose of this Act to create a new 
federally sponsored, authorized, and funded project that will coordinate 
at a national level the collection of video and audio recordings of 
personal histories and testimonials of individuals who participated in 
the American Civil Rights movement that will build upon and complement 
previous and ongoing documentary work on this subject, and to assist and 
encourage local efforts to preserve the memories of such individuals so 
that Americans of all current and future generations may hear from them 
directly and better appreciate the sacrifices they made.
SEC. 3. <<NOTE: 20 USC 80s-1.>> ESTABLISHMENT OF JOINT PROJECT AT 
                    LIBRARY OF CONGRESS AND NATIONAL MUSEUM OF 
                    AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY AND CULTURE TO 
                    COLLECT VIDEO AND AUDIO RECORDINGS OF 
                    HISTORIES OF PARTICIPANTS IN AMERICAN CIVIL 
                    RIGHTS MOVEMENT.

    (a) Establishment of Project.--
            (1) In general.--Within the limits of available funds, the 
        Librarian of Congress (hereafter referred to as the 
        ``Librarian'') and the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution 
        (hereafter referred to as the ``Secretary)'', acting jointly, 
        shall establish an oral history project--
                    (A) to survey, during the initial phase of the 
                project, collections of audio and video recordings of 
                the reminiscences of participants in the Civil Rights 
                movement that are housed in archives, libraries, 
                museums, and other educational institutions, as well as 
                ongoing documentary work, in order to augment and 
                complement these endeavors and avoid duplication of 
                effort;
                    (B) to solicit, reproduce, and collect--
                          (i) video and audio recordings of personal 
                      histories and testimonials of individuals who 
                      participated in the Civil Rights movement, and
                          (ii) visual and written materials (such as 
                      letters, diaries, photographs, and ephemera) 
                      relevant to the personal histories of individuals;
                    (C) to create a collection of the recordings and 
                other materials obtained, and to catalog and index the 
                collection in a manner the Librarian and the Secretary 
                consider appropriate; and
                    (D) to make the collection available for public use 
                through the Library of Congress and the National Museum 
                of African American History and Culture, as well as 
                through such other methods as the Librarian and the 
                Secretary consider appropriate.
            (2) Role of director of museum.--The Secretary shall carry 
        out the Secretary's duties under this Act through the Director 
        of the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

    (b) Use of and Consultation With Other Entities.--The Librarian and 
the Secretary may carry out the activities described

[[Page 123 STAT. 1614]]

in subsection (a)(1) through agreements and partnerships entered into 
with other government and private entities, and may otherwise consult 
with interested persons (within the limits of available resources) and 
develop appropriate guidelines and arrangements for soliciting, 
acquiring, and making available recordings under the project under this 
Act.
    (c) Services of Experts and Consultants; Acceptance of Volunteer 
Services; Advance Payments.--In carrying out activities described in 
subsection (a)(1), the Librarian and the Secretary may--
            (1) procure temporary and intermittent services under 
        section 3109 of title 5, United States Code;
            (2) accept and utilize the services of volunteers and other 
        uncompensated personnel and reimburse them for travel expenses, 
        including per diem, as authorized under section 5703 of title 5, 
        United States Code; and
            (3) make advances of money and payments in advance in 
        accordance with section 3324 of title 31, United States Code.

    (d) Timing.--As soon as practicable after the enactment of this Act, 
the Librarian and the Secretary shall begin collecting video and audio 
recordings and other materials under subsection (a)(1), and shall 
attempt to collect the first such recordings from the oldest individuals 
involved.
    (e) Definition.--In this Act, the term ``Civil Rights movement'' 
means the movement to secure racial equality in the United States for 
African Americans that, focusing on the period 1954 through 1968, 
challenged the practice of racial segregation in the Nation and achieved 
equal rights legislation for all American citizens.
SEC. 4. <<NOTE: 20 USC 80s-2.>> PRIVATE SUPPORT FOR CIVIL RIGHTS 
                    HISTORY PROJECT.

    (a) Encouraging Solicitation and Acceptance of Donations.--The 
Librarian of Congress and the Secretary are encouraged to solicit and 
accept donations of funds and in-kind contributions to support 
activities under section 3.
    (b) Dedication of Funds Provided to Library of Congress.--
Notwithstanding any other provision of law--
            (1) any funds donated to the Librarian of Congress to 
        support the activities of the Librarian under section 3 shall be 
        deposited entirely into an account established for such purpose;
            (2) the funds contained in such account shall be used solely 
        to support such activities; and
            (3) the Librarian of Congress may not deposit into such 
        account any funds donated to the Librarian which are not donated 
        for the exclusive purpose of supporting such activities.

[[Page 123 STAT. 1615]]

SEC. 5. <<NOTE: 20 USC 80s-3.>> AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

    There are authorized to be appropriated to carry out this Act--
            (1) $500,000 for fiscal year 2010; and
            (2) such sums as may be necessary for each of the fiscal 
        years 2011 through 2014.

    Approved May 12, 2009.

LEGISLATIVE HISTORY--H.R. 586:
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CONGRESSIONAL RECORD, Vol. 155 (2009):
            Apr. 22, considered and passed House.
            Apr. 24, considered and passed Senate.

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