Text: H.R.6199 — 111th Congress (2009-2010)All Bill Information (Except Text)

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Introduced in House (09/23/2010)


111th CONGRESS
2d Session
H. R. 6199

To direct the Secretary of the Interior to conduct a special resources study regarding the suitability and feasibility of designating the John Hope Franklin Reconciliation Park and other sites in Tulsa, Oklahoma, relating to the 1921 Tulsa race riot as a unit of the National Park System, and for other purposes.


IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
September 23, 2010

Mr. Sullivan (for himself, Ms. Fallin, Mr. Cole, Mr. Lucas, and Mr. Boren) introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on Natural Resources


A BILL

To direct the Secretary of the Interior to conduct a special resources study regarding the suitability and feasibility of designating the John Hope Franklin Reconciliation Park and other sites in Tulsa, Oklahoma, relating to the 1921 Tulsa race riot as a unit of the National Park System, and for other purposes.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. Findings.

Congress finds the following:

(1) Prior to May 31, 1921, the community of Greenwood, located in Tulsa, Oklahoma, was a thriving African-American business community and home to nearly 11,000 citizens.

(2) The southern end of Greenwood Avenue formed the backbone of the Greenwood commercial district. This mile-long stretch of several blocks was characterized by one-, two-, and three-story red brick buildings housing dozens of African-American-owned and operated businesses, organizations, institutions, newspapers, churches, and a hospital.

(3) Greenwood was the location of the 1921 Tulsa race riot, recognized as one of the most violent race riots following World War I in terms of bloodshed and property loss. On May 31, 1921, to June 1, 1921, mobs invaded Greenwood, the city’s segregated African-American community, during an 18-hour period.

(4) During the riot, between 35 and 40 square blocks of Greenwood’s residential area and virtually all of the commercial district were destroyed.

(5) Approximately 700 persons were injured and many people lost their lives. The American Red Cross reported that 1,256 houses were burned, leaving 9,000 homeless. The Tulsa Real Estate Exchange estimated nearly $1,500,000 worth of damages, one-third of that in the business district, and claimed personal property losses at $750,000.

(6) The 1921 Tulsa race riot illustrates the key characteristics of race riots during the 1886 to early 1920’s era and ranks as one of the most devastating incidents of racial violence in United States history.

(7) As the last major race riot of the era, the Tulsa race riot represented the closing chapter to the racial violence that swept across the United States during the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

(8) Since 1921, the people of Tulsa of all races have worked closely to bridge the racial divides and to learn from the many lessons of the 1921 Tulsa race riot.

SEC. 2. Study.

(a) In general.—The Secretary of the Interior shall conduct a special resource study of the sites in Tulsa, Oklahoma, relating to the 1921 Tulsa race riot, including the John Hope Franklin Reconciliation Park, to determine the suitability and feasibility of including the sites as a unit of the National Park System.

(b) Requirements.—The study conducted under subsection (a) shall include the analysis and recommendations of the Secretary on the alternatives for management, administration, and protection of the sites relating to the riot.

(c) Consultation.—In conducting the study under subsection (a), the Secretary shall consult with—

(1) appropriate Federal agencies and State and local government entities; and

(2) interested groups and organizations.

(d) Applicable law.—The study required under subsection (a) shall be conducted in accordance with Public Law 91–383 (16 U.S.C. 1a-1 et seq.).

SEC. 3. Report.

Not later than 3 fiscal years after the date on which funds are first made available for this Act, the Secretary shall submit to the Committee on Natural Resources of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources of the Senate a report on the findings, conclusions, and recommendations of the study required under section 2.