Text: H.R.6277 — 111th Congress (2009-2010)All Information (Except Text)

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Introduced in House (09/29/2010)


111th CONGRESS
2d Session
H. R. 6277


To amend the Global Anti-Semitism Review Act of 2004 and the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 to provide for additional reporting and briefing on anti-Semitism around the world and on Department of State actions to monitor and combat anti-Semitism, funding the Office to Monitor and Combat Anti-Semitism, training for Foreign Service Officers and other employees and staff of the Department of State, and for other purposes.


IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

September 29, 2010

Mr. Smith of New Jersey (for himself and Mr. Wolf) introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on Foreign Affairs


A BILL

To amend the Global Anti-Semitism Review Act of 2004 and the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 to provide for additional reporting and briefing on anti-Semitism around the world and on Department of State actions to monitor and combat anti-Semitism, funding the Office to Monitor and Combat Anti-Semitism, training for Foreign Service Officers and other employees and staff of the Department of State, and for other purposes.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. Short title.

This Act may be cited as the “Combating Anti-Semitism Act of 2010”.

SEC. 2. Reports.

Section 4 of the Global Anti-Semitism Review Act of 2004 (Public Law 108–332) is amended to read as follows:

“SEC. 4. Reports and briefs.

“(a) Reports.—Not later than one year after the date of the enactment of this Act and not later than December 31 of each even-numbered year thereafter, the Secretary of State shall submit to Congress a report on acts of anti-Semitism in countries around the world, including a description of—

“(1) acts of anti-Semitic physical violence against, and anti-Semitic harassment of, Jewish people, and acts of anti-Semitic violence against, and anti-Semitic vandalism of, Jewish community institutions, such as schools, synagogues, or cemeteries, that occurred in each country, including a description of emerging issues and key trends;

“(2) anti-Semitic incitement and discourse, including instances of propaganda in government and nongovernment media, and including anti-Semitic incitement and discourse couched as expression against the State of Israel, that occur in each country, including a description of emerging issues and key trends;

“(3) the responses of the government of each country to the acts, incitement, and discourse referred to in paragraphs (1) and (2), including the willingness of leading government officials to publicly condemn such acts, incitement, and discourse;

“(4) the actions taken by the government of each country to enact, enforce, and prosecute laws relating to anti-Semitism, including the provision to law enforcement, prosecutorial, and other bodies of training and resources relating to monitoring and combating anti-Semitism;

“(5) government monitoring, collecting data on, and publicly reporting the acts, incitement, and discourse referred to in paragraphs (1) and (2), and fulfillment or non-fulfillment of governmental obligations or commitments to such monitoring, collecting, and reporting; and

“(6) the promotion by the government of each country of anti-bias and tolerance education directed specifically to countering anti-Semitism, including Holocaust education and commemoration.

“(b) Briefs.—Not later than year after the date of the enactment of this Act and not later than December 31 of each year thereafter, the Ambassador at Large for Monitoring and Combating Anti-Semitism shall brief Congress on United States policies to monitor and combat anti-Semitism in countries around the world, including a description of—

“(1) United States advocacy within intergovernmental organizations of policies to address anti-Semitism in the member states of such organizations, including technical and other assistance, training, and cooperation offered, and United States diplomacy to counter anti-Semitism within intergovernmental organizations and forums that promote anti-Semitism or provide it with a platform;

“(2) United States advocacy in bilateral relations with countries around the world of policies to address anti-Semitism, including technical assistance and other assistance, training, and cooperation offered;

“(3) United States contributions to support specific initiatives to monitor and combat anti-Semitism in countries around the world;

“(4) United States outreach to Jewish communities in countries around the world, including Jewish communities in countries where such communities are endangered, vulnerable to, or subject to anti-Semitic violence, harassment, vandalism, incitement, or discourse;

“(5) United States advocacy to encourage countries around the world to implement commitments to monitor and combat anti-Semitism;

“(6) incorporation by the Department of State of monitoring and combating anti-Semitism into the Department’s public diplomacy program, including the International Visitors Program; and

“(7) Department of State training on issues relating to monitoring and combating anti-Semitism, including training at the Foreign Service Institute, being provided to chiefs of mission, human rights officers, other Foreign Service officers, the staff of the Office to Monitor and Combat Anti-Semitism, the staff of the Office of International Religious Freedom, and other officers and staff of the Department of State and other departments and agencies as needed.”.

SEC. 3. Office to Monitor and Combat Anti-Semitism.

Section 59 of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 2731) is amended—

(1) in subsection (a)(2)—

(A) in subparagraph (A)—

(i) in the heading, by striking “Special Envoy” and inserting “Ambassador at Large”; and

(ii) by striking “Special Envoy” and “ ‘Special Envoy’” and inserting “Ambassador at Large” and “ ‘Ambassador at Large’”, respectively; and

(B) by amending subparagraph (B) to read as follows:

“(B) APPOINTMENT OF AMBASSADOR AT LARGE.—The President shall appoint the Ambassador at Large, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate.”;

(2) in subsection (c), by striking “Special Envoy” each place it appears and inserting “Ambassador at Large”; and

(3) by adding at the end the following new subsection:

“(d) Funding.—The Secretary of State shall provide the Ambassador at Large with funds for the hiring of staff for the Office (which staff shall be distinct from the staff of the Office of International Religious Freedom or any other office or bureau of the Department of State) to assist the Ambassador at Large in carrying out the provisions of this section, including sufficient staff to coordinate and assist in the preparation of reports required under section 4(a) of the Global Anti-Semitism Review Act of 2004 (Public Law 108–332), for the conduct of investigations by the Office, and for any necessary travel.”.

SEC. 4. Training for Foreign Service officers.

Section 708(a) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 4028(a)) is amended—

(1) in the matter preceding paragraph (1)—

(A) by inserting “the Ambassador at Large for Monitoring and Combating Anti-Semitism appointed under section 59 of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956,” before “the Ambassador at Large for International Religious Freedom”;

(B) by striking “January 1, 1999” and inserting “January 1, 2012”; and

(C) by inserting “human rights officers, the staff of the Office to Monitor and Combat Anti-Semitism, other staff of the Office of International Religious Freedom, and other officers and staff of the Department of State and other Federal departments and agencies as needed” after “chiefs of mission,”;

(2) by redesignating paragraphs (1) through (3) as paragraphs (2) through (4), respectively; and

(3) by inserting before paragraph (2), as so redesignated, the following new paragraph:

“(1) instruction on anti-Semitism, including various aspects and manifestations of anti-Semitism, and on legal, law enforcement, and prosecutorial issues relevant to monitoring and combating anti-Semitism;”.