Text: H.Con.Res.175 — 111th Congress (2009-2010)All Bill Information (Except Text)

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Introduced in House (07/31/2009)


111th CONGRESS
1st Session
H. CON. RES. 175

Expressing the sense of the Congress that a postage stamp should be issued to commemorate the War of 1812 and that the Citizens’ Stamp Advisory Committee should recommend to the Postmaster General that such a stamp be issued.


IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
July 31, 2009

Mr. Dingell (for himself, Mr. Buyer, Ms. Norton, Ms. Kilpatrick of Michigan, Mr. Stupak, Mr. Kildee, Mr. Ehlers, Mr. Peters, Mr. Camp, Mr. Hoekstra, Mrs. Miller of Michigan, and Mr. Rogers of Michigan) submitted the following concurrent resolution; which was referred to the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform


CONCURRENT RESOLUTION

Expressing the sense of the Congress that a postage stamp should be issued to commemorate the War of 1812 and that the Citizens’ Stamp Advisory Committee should recommend to the Postmaster General that such a stamp be issued.

Whereas the War of 1812, often referred to as “America’s Second War of Independence”, was a significant effort for the United States in securing territorial boundaries and limiting violence on the frontier, clarifying the border between the United States and Canada, ensuring safety for American mariners from attack in passage to Europe and other shores around the world, and securing a lasting and definitive independence from Great Britain;

Whereas the continental United States was invaded and partly occupied, and public buildings in the Nation’s capital were burned, by a foreign power;

Whereas the major areas of military operations took place along the Canadian-American border in the North, the Atlantic Seaboard in the East, and the Gulf Coast in the South;

Whereas the infant United States Navy won small but important victories with ships like the USS Constitution, or “Old Ironsides”, against the dominant world naval power of the time, and American squadrons on Lake Erie and Lake Champlain defeated British squadrons;

Whereas the War of 1812 was a proving ground for future leaders of the United States, including Andrew Jackson, William Henry Harrison, James Monroe, Winfield Scott, Zachary Taylor, John Quincy Adams, Jacob Brown, and others;

Whereas the War of 1812 produced heroes and heroines that entered into American legend, such as Dolley Madison, Jean Lafitte, Davy Crockett, and others, including many whose names have been lost to history or are buried in War Department records;

Whereas Native American resistance to encroachment on their lands was ennobled and personified by The Great Shawnee Chief Tecumseh and others;

Whereas desperate battles and circumstances produced a number of inspirational and patriotic sayings, including “Don’t give up the ship”, “Remember the Raisin”, and “We have met the enemy and they are ours”;

Whereas the bombardment of Fort McHenry inspired Francis Scott Key to pen the words of what was to become the National Anthem;

Whereas the War of 1812 left the people of the United States with a new respect and reverence for their national flag;

Whereas the iconic figure Uncle Sam made his first appearance in the War of 1812;

Whereas on December 24, 1814, the Peace Treaty to end the War of 1812 was officially signed in Ghent, Belgium;

Whereas the Treaty of Ghent declared the release of all prisoners of war and returned land seized by both sides;

Whereas the Treaty of Ghent also formally restored diplomatic relations between the United States and Great Britain, resulting in a lasting peace that has endured to this day;

Whereas the War of 1812 was significant in the formation of Canada and the Canadian identity;

Whereas 2012 marks the bicentennial of the War of 1812; and

Whereas the War of 1812 was an important benchmark, not only in forging the identity of this Nation, but also in the emergence of the United States as a great power: Now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate concurring), That it is the sense of the Congress that—

(1) the United States Postal Service should issue a postage stamp commemorating the War of 1812; and

(2) the Citizens’ Stamp Advisory Committee should recommend to the Postmaster General that such a stamp be issued.