Text: H.Res.278 — 111th Congress (2009-2010)All Information (Except Text)

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Introduced in House (03/24/2009)


111th CONGRESS
1st Session
H. RES. 278


Recognizing the paramount need to address the threat of international terrorism and protect the international security of the United States by reducing the number of and accessibility to nuclear weapons and preventing their proliferation, and directing a portion of the resulting savings towards child survival, hunger, and universal education, and calling on the President to take action to achieve these goals.


IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

March 24, 2009

Mr. McGovern (for himself and Mr. Daniel E. Lungren of California) submitted the following resolution; which was referred to the Committee on Foreign Affairs


RESOLUTION

Recognizing the paramount need to address the threat of international terrorism and protect the international security of the United States by reducing the number of and accessibility to nuclear weapons and preventing their proliferation, and directing a portion of the resulting savings towards child survival, hunger, and universal education, and calling on the President to take action to achieve these goals.

    Whereas the United States and the Russian Federation have in the past entered into arms control treaties providing for reductions of several thousand nuclear delivery systems, including the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty of 1991 (START I), the Intermediate Range Nuclear Forces Treaty of 1987 (INF), and the Treaty of Moscow of 2002;

    Whereas both countries still will retain several thousand nuclear weapons, their delivery systems, and supporting infrastructure at an annual cost of many billions of dollars;

    Whereas the United States and the Russian Federation now face different threats to their security since the end of the Cold War, notably that of international terrorism;

    Whereas international terrorism, particularly the danger posed by a terrorist entity acquiring a nuclear explosive device, requires that the countries redouble efforts to prevent the proliferation of such devices and the technology to produce them;

    Whereas since 1992, the Cooperative Threat Reduction (CTR) program of assistance to the Russian Federation and certain other states of the former Soviet Union, initiated under the leadership of Senators Sam Nunn and Richard Lugar, has proven an effective and necessary tool to combat the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction at a cost far below that of maintaining such weapons;

    Whereas additional reductions in nuclear armaments of both the United States and the Russian Federation, together with other nuclear powers, will—

    (1) meet the objective of the eventual elimination of nuclear weapons as prescribed in article VI of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons and the vision of a nuclear-weapon-free world of Presidents Reagan and Gorbachev at the Reykjavik Summit of 1986;

    (2) reduce the number of nuclear weapons subject to diversion or theft by terrorist groups; and

    (3) eventually make available additional funds in the range of tens of billions of dollars to further enhance international security by reducing world poverty, thereby addressing one of the factors contributing to international terrorism;

    Whereas the United States and the Russian Federation, committed by international agreement as well as joint commitments by their respective Presidents, will reduce nuclear armaments in coming years and will encourage other countries to do likewise;

    Whereas the Task Force on Department of Energy Nonproliferation Programs with Russia, commonly known as the Baker-Cutler Task Force, recommended in its final report of January 10, 2001, significant increases in the amounts of funding devoted to securing nuclear arsenals and other weapons of mass destruction;

    Whereas the savings generated in the long term by significant reduction of nuclear armaments will be appreciable, with estimates as high as $13,000,000,000 annually, even in the face of the real costs of eliminating a large portion of the nuclear arsenals of both the Russian Federation and the United States;

    Whereas on March 22, 2002, President George W. Bush stated that “We fight against poverty because hope is an answer to terror. We fight against poverty because opportunity is a fundamental right to human dignity. We fight against poverty because faith requires it and conscience demands it. We fight against poverty with a growing conviction that major progress is within our reach.”;

    Whereas the 2002 National Security Strategy of the United States of America noted that “a world where some live in comfort and plenty, while half of the human race lives on less than $2 per day, is neither just nor stable. Including all of the world’s poor in an expanding circle of development—and opportunity—is a moral imperative and one of the top priorities of U.S. international policy”;

    Whereas the final report of the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States (more commonly known as the 9/11 Commission Report), issued on July 22, 2004, recommended that a comprehensive U.S. strategy to counter terrorism should include policies that encourage development, more open societies, and opportunities that improve the lives of families and enhance prospects for their children’s futures;

    Whereas President Barack Obama has called for substantial verifiable reductions in the nuclear arsenals of the United States and the Russian Federation;

    Whereas addressing the needs of the very poor in the world, particularly children, reduces a source of international tension and local despair that contribute to terrorist initiatives;

    Whereas despite significant progress worldwide in reducing child mortality rates over time, the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) estimates that 9,200,000 children under the age of 5 die every year, mostly from preventable and treatable causes;

    Whereas investing in the health and nutrition of children and their mothers is a sound economic decision and one of the surest ways for a country to set its course toward a better future;

    Whereas international health experts estimate that an additional $5,000,000,000 each year in global assistance for proven child survival interventions could save the lives of 6,000,000 young children each year;

    Whereas in sub-Saharan Africa, UNICEF and other organizations estimate that scaling up a minimum package of existing interventions delivered through effective, community-based health services could cut the region’s child mortality rate by 30 percent, and the maternal mortality rate by 15 percent, at an estimated annual cost of $1,000 for each life saved;

    Whereas the United States supports child survival programs to meet the needs of children in poor countries through its contributions to international organizations and support for bilateral and multilateral programs;

    Whereas according to the United Nations World Food Programme, more than 300,000,000 children suffer from chronic hunger, and an estimated 121,000,000 of these children, two-thirds of whom are girls, do not attend school;

    Whereas providing nutritious meals in schools has proven to be one of the most effective strategies to increase school attendance and enrollment, particularly among girls, decrease the incidence of hunger and malnutrition in school-age children, and help create literate, self-sustaining, and healthy societies;

    Whereas the United States supports programs to address chronic hunger and malnutrition and promote universal education among adolescent and school-age children;

    Whereas the World Food Programme and the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations estimate that an additional $5,000,000,000 annually in global assistance for school feeding and other food supports could eliminate hunger and malnutrition among the world’s school-age children;

    Whereas Americans consistently rank child survival and ending hunger in poor countries as a top priority of United States foreign assistance; and

    Whereas President Barack Obama has committed the United States to new leadership in the international campaign to reduce by half global hunger and poverty by 2015: Now, therefore, be it

Resolved,

SECTION 1. Short title.

This resolution may be cited as the “Global Security Priorities Resolution”.

SEC. 2. Sense of the House.

It is the sense of the House of Representatives that—

(1) the President should continue both negotiations with other countries and unilateral initiatives to achieve further reductions in nuclear arms to minimum levels;

(2) the President should agree to the verifiable reduction of deployed nuclear weapons of both the United States and the Russian Federation to equal levels of 1,000, and a total nuclear inventory of not more than 3,000, by the year 2015;

(3) the Cooperative Threat Reduction (Nunn-Lugar) Program should be enhanced and extended to third countries who request it as a truly cooperative, equally funded program between the United States and the Russian Federation to assist in the reduction and elimination of nuclear weapons throughout the world and to establish an environment of assurance that nuclear explosive material will not and cannot be diverted into the hands of terrorists; and

(4) the funds saved through nuclear arms reductions should be used for cooperative threat reduction and to alleviate those problems in the world affecting children and families that can contribute to the support for international terrorism, including—

(A) as a first priority, allocating funds annually to extend the Cooperative Threat Reduction Program (Nunn-Lugar) at a rate of at least an additional $1,000,000,000 per year, and increased as warranted, to dismantle remaining weapons, establish verifiable safeguards, and improve accounting and physical security;

(B) increasing United States contributions to such programs as the Global Partnership Against the Spread of Weapons and Materials of Mass Destruction and the Global Threat Reduction Initiative by an additional $2,500,000,000 annually over a period of 5 years, if and when it can be demonstrated that these programs can usefully absorb these funds;

(C) in addition to funds already available for such purposes, providing an additional $5,000,000,000 over a period of 5 years to enhance child survival in the world’s most needy countries, by scaling up implementation of integrated packages of high-impact and low-cost health and nutrition interventions at the community level; and

(D) in addition to funds already available for such purposes, providing an additional $1,500,000,000 annually over a period of 5 years for programs under title II of the Agricultural Trade Development and Assistance Act of 1954 (Public Law 480 (Food for Peace)) and the George McGovern-Robert Dole International Food for Education and Child Nutrition Program, specifically for programs targeted at reducing the incidence of child hunger and increasing child nutrition and educational opportunities.


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