Text: H.R.2527 — 112th Congress (2011-2012)All Information (Except Text)

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Public Law No: 112-152 (08/03/2012)

 
[112th Congress Public Law 152]
[From the U.S. Government Printing Office]



[[Page 126 STAT. 1155]]

Public Law 112-152
112th Congress

                                 An Act


 
 To require the Secretary of the Treasury to mint coins in recognition 
 and celebration of the National Baseball Hall of Fame. <<NOTE: Aug. 3, 
                         2012 -  [H.R. 2527]>> 

    Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the 
United States of America in Congress assembled, <<NOTE: National 
Baseball Hall of Fame Commemorative Coin Act. 31 USC 5112 note.>> 
SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

    This Act may be cited as the ``National Baseball Hall of Fame 
Commemorative Coin Act''.
SEC. 2. FINDINGS.

    The Congress finds the following:
            (1) On June 12, 1939, the National Baseball Hall of Fame and 
        Museum opened in Cooperstown, New York. Ty Cobb, Walter Johnson, 
        Christy Mathewson, Babe Ruth, and Honus Wagner comprised the 
        inaugural class of inductees. This class set the standard for 
        all future inductees. Since 1939, just one percent of all Major 
        League Baseball players have earned induction into the National 
        Baseball Hall of Fame.
            (2) The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum is 
        dedicated to preserving history, honoring excellence, and 
        connecting generations through the rich history of our national 
        pastime. Baseball has mirrored our Nation's history since the 
        Civil War, and is now an integral part of our Nation's heritage.
            (3) The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum chronicles 
        the history of our national pastime and houses the world's 
        largest collection of baseball artifacts, including more than 
        38,000 three dimensional artifacts, 3,000,000 documents, 500,000 
        photographs, and 12,000 hours of recorded media. This collection 
        ensures that baseball history and its unique connection to 
        American history will be preserved and recounted for future 
        generations.
            (4) Since its opening in 1939, more than 14,000,000 baseball 
        fans have visited the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum 
        to learn about the history of our national pastime and the 
        game's connection to the American experience.
            (5) The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum is an 
        educational institution, reaching 10,000,000 Americans annually. 
        Utilizing video conference technology, students and teachers 
        participate in interactive lessons led by educators from the 
        National Baseball Hall of Fame Museum. These award-winning 
        educational programs draw upon the wonders of baseball to reach 
        students in classrooms nationwide. Each educational program uses 
        baseball as a lens for teaching young Americans important 
        lessons on an array of topics, including

[[Page 126 STAT. 1156]]

        mathematics, geography, civil rights, women's history, 
        economics, industrial technology, arts, and communication.
SEC. 3. COIN SPECIFICATIONS.

    (a) Denominations.--In recognition and celebration of the National 
Baseball Hall of Fame, the Secretary of the Treasury (hereafter in this 
Act referred to as the ``Secretary'') shall mint and issue the following 
coins:
            (1) $5 gold coins.--Not more than 50,000 $5 coins, which 
        shall--
                    (A) weigh 8.359 grams;
                    (B) have diameter of 0.850 inches; and
                    (C) contain 90 percent gold and 10 percent alloy.
            (2) $1 silver coins.--Not more than 400,000 $1 coins, which 
        shall--
                    (A) weigh 26.73 grams;
                    (B) have a diameter of 1.500 inches; and
                    (C) contain 90 percent silver and 10 percent copper.
            (3) Half-dollar clad coins.--Not more than 750,000 half-
        dollar coins which shall--
                    (A) weigh 11.34 grams;
                    (B) have a diameter of 1.205 inches; and
                    (C) be minted to the specifications for half-dollar 
                coins contained in section 5112(b) of title 31, United 
                States Code.

    (b) Legal Tender.--The coins minted under this Act shall be legal 
tender, as provided in section 5103 of title 31, United States Code.
    (c) Numismatic Items.--For purposes of sections 5134 and 5136 of 
title 31, United States Code, all coins minted under this Act shall be 
considered to be numismatic items.
    (d) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that, to the 
extent possible without significantly adding to the purchase price of 
the coins, the $1 coins and $5 coins minted under this Act should be 
produced in a fashion similar to the 2009 International Year of 
Astronomy coins issued by Monnaie de Paris, the French Mint, so that the 
reverse of the coin is convex to more closely resemble a baseball and 
the obverse concave, providing a more dramatic display of the obverse 
design chosen pursuant to section 4(c).
SEC. 4. DESIGN OF COINS.

    (a) In General.--The design for the coins minted under this Act 
shall be--
            (1) selected by the Secretary after consultation with--
                    (A) the National Baseball Hall of Fame;
                    (B) the Commission of Fine Arts; and
            (2) reviewed by the Citizens Commemorative Coin Advisory 
        Committee.

    (b) Designations and Inscriptions.--On each coin minted under this 
Act there shall be--
            (1) a designation of the value of the coin;
            (2) an inscription of the year ``2014''; and
            (3) inscriptions of the words ``Liberty'', ``In God We 
        Trust'', ``United States of America'', and ``E Pluribus Unum''.

    (c) Selection and Approval Process for Obverse Design.--
            (1) In general.--The Secretary shall hold a competition to 
        determine the design of the common obverse of the coins

[[Page 126 STAT. 1157]]

        minted under this Act, with such design being emblematic of the 
        game of baseball.
            (2) Selection and approval.--Proposals for the design of 
        coins minted under this Act may be submitted in accordance with 
        the design selection and approval process developed by the 
        Secretary in the sole discretion of the Secretary. The Secretary 
        shall encourage 3-dimensional models to be submitted as part of 
        the design proposals.
            (3) Proposals.--As part of the competition described in this 
        subsection, the Secretary may accept proposals from artists, 
        engravers of the United States Mint, and members of the general 
        public.
            (4) Compensation.--The Secretary shall determine 
        compensation for the winning design under this subsection, which 
        shall be not less than $5,000. The Secretary shall take into 
        account this compensation amount when determining the sale price 
        described in section 6(a).

    (d) Reverse Design.--The design on the common reverse of the coins 
minted under this Act shall depict a baseball similar to those used by 
Major League Baseball.
SEC. 5. ISSUANCE OF COINS.

    (a) Quality of Coins.--Coins minted under this Act shall be issued 
in uncirculated and proof qualities.
    (b) Period for Issuance.--The Secretary may issue coins minted under 
this Act only during the 1-year period beginning on January 1, 2014.
SEC. 6. SALE OF COINS.

    (a) Sale Price.--The coins issued under this Act shall be sold by 
the Secretary at a price equal to the sum of--
            (1) the face value of the coins;
            (2) the surcharge provided in section 7(a) with respect to 
        such coins; and
            (3) the cost of designing and issuing the coins (including 
        labor, materials, dies, use of machinery, winning design 
        compensation, overhead expenses, marketing, and shipping).

    (b) Bulk Sales.--The Secretary shall make bulk sales of the coins 
issued under this Act at a reasonable discount.
    (c) Prepaid Orders.--
            (1) In general.--The Secretary shall accept prepaid orders 
        for the coins minted under this Act before the issuance of such 
        coins.
            (2) Discount.--Sale prices with respect to prepaid orders 
        under paragraph (1) shall be at a reasonable discount.
SEC. 7. SURCHARGES.

    (a) In General.--All sales of coins minted under this Act shall 
include a surcharge as follows:
            (1) A surcharge of $35 per coin for the $5 coin.
            (2) A surcharge of $10 per coin for the $1 coin.
            (3) A surcharge of $5 per coin for the half-dollar coin.

    (b) Distribution.--Subject to section 5134(f) of title 31, United 
States Code, all surcharges received by the Secretary from the sale of 
coins issued under this Act shall be promptly paid by the Secretary to 
the National Baseball Hall of Fame to help finance its operations.

[[Page 126 STAT. 1158]]

    (c) Audits.--The National Baseball Hall of Fame shall be subject to 
the audit requirements of section 5134(f)(2) of title 31, United States 
Code, with regard to the amounts received under subsection (b).
    (d) Limitation.--Notwithstanding subsection (a), no surcharge may be 
included with respect to the issuance under this Act of any coin during 
a calendar year if, as of the time of such issuance, the issuance of 
such coin would result in the number of commemorative coin programs 
issued during such year to exceed the annual commemorative coin program 
issuance limitation under section 5112(m)(1) of title 31, United States 
Code (as in effect on the date of the enactment of this Act). The 
Secretary of the Treasury may issue guidance to carry out this 
subsection.
SEC. 8. FINANCIAL ASSURANCES.

    The Secretary shall take such actions as may be necessary to ensure 
that--
            (1) minting and issuing coins under this Act will not result 
        in any net cost to the United States Government; and
            (2) no funds, including applicable surcharges, are disbursed 
        to any recipient designated in section 7 until the total cost of 
        designing and issuing all of the coins authorized by this Act 
        (including labor, materials, dies, use of machinery, winning 
        design compensation, overhead expenses, marketing, and shipping) 
        is recovered by the United States Treasury, consistent with 
        sections 5112(m) and 5134(f) of title 31, United States Code.
SEC. 9. BUDGET COMPLIANCE.

    The budgetary effects of this Act, for the purpose of complying with 
the Statutory Pay-As-You-Go Act of 2010, shall be determined by 
reference to the latest statement titled ``Budgetary Effects of PAYGO 
Legislation'' for this Act, submitted for printing in the Congressional 
Record by the Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the House of 
Representatives, provided that such statement has been submitted prior 
to the vote on passage.

    Approved August 3, 2012.

LEGISLATIVE HISTORY--H.R. 2527:
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CONGRESSIONAL RECORD:
                                                        Vol. 157 (2011):
                                    Oct. 25, 26, considered and passed 
                                        House.
                                                        Vol. 158 (2012):
                                    July 12, considered and passed 
                                        Senate, amended.
                                    July 19, House concurred in Senate 
                                        amendment.

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