Text: H.R.3003 — 112th Congress (2011-2012)All Bill Information (Except Text)

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Introduced in House (09/21/2011)


112th CONGRESS
1st Session
H. R. 3003

To award a Congressional Gold Medal to Dr. Balazs “Ernie” Bodai in recognition of his many outstanding contributions to the Nation, including a tireless commitment to breast cancer research.


IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
September 21, 2011

Ms. Speier (for herself, Mrs. Maloney, Mr. Grijalva, Mr. Payne, Ms. Eshoo, Mr. Baca, Ms. Wilson of Florida, Ms. Brown of Florida, Ms. Jackson Lee of Texas, Ms. Lee of California, Mr. Holt, Mrs. Napolitano, Mr. Hinchey, Mr. Kildee, Mr. Connolly of Virginia, Mr. Stark, Mr. Meeks, Mr. Cardoza, Mr. Pitts, Ms. Woolsey, Mr. Filner, Mrs. Biggert, Mr. Sherman, Ms. Norton, Mr. Yoder, Mrs. Davis of California, Mr. Dold, Mr. Towns, Mr. McGovern, Ms. Moore, Mr. Schock, and Ms. Matsui) introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on Financial Services


A BILL

To award a Congressional Gold Medal to Dr. Balazs “Ernie” Bodai in recognition of his many outstanding contributions to the Nation, including a tireless commitment to breast cancer research.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. Findings.

The Congress finds as follows:

(1) Dr. Balazs “Ernie” Bodai was born in Budapest, Hungary, in 1951.

(2) As a child, Dr. Bodai and his family lived in a bomb shelter for over a year during the Hungarian Revolution of 1956 before managing to escape and immigrate to the United States.

(3) Dr. Bodai received his B.A. and M.S. degrees from the University of California, Los Angeles, and subsequently received his M.D. degree from the University of California, Davis, at the young age of 26.

(4) Dr. Bodai has authored over 250 medical articles and published 5 books, 4 of which focus on cancer.

(5) After working as a breast cancer surgeon for 15 years and caring for more than 1,500 patients, Dr. Bodai became frustrated with the pace of breast cancer research funding.

(6) In 1996, Dr. Bodai launched a campaign to create a postal stamp to benefit breast cancer research.

(7) After several trips to Washington, DC, and countless visits with United States Senators and Members of Congress, the Stamp Out Breast Cancer Act, which allowed a breast cancer stamp to be sold at up to 8 cents above the normal first-class rate, was passed and signed into law in August 1997.

(8) As a direct result of Dr. Bodai’s tireless commitment to breast cancer research, as of 2010, more than 900,000,000 breast cancer stamps have been sold in the United States—providing over $73,000,000 for crucial, life-saving research.

(9) The Breast Cancer Research Stamp recently surpassed the Elvis Presley Stamp to become the all-time best seller for the United States Postal Service.

(10) In an effort to expand breast cancer research internationally, in 2005, Dr. Bodai introduced the first ever “global stamp” to raise awareness and funding to conquer the disease worldwide.

(11) As of 2010, as a direct result of Dr. Bodai’s tireless commitment, over 70 countries have either created their own stamp or are in the process of doing so—making breast cancer research, early detection, and eradication a global health priority.

SEC. 2. Congressional gold medal.

(a) Presentation authorized.—The Speaker of the House of Representatives and the President pro tempore of the Senate shall make appropriate arrangements for the presentation, on behalf of the Congress, of a gold medal of appropriate design, to Dr. Balazs “Ernie” Bodai in recognition of his many outstanding contributions to the Nation, including a tireless commitment to breast cancer research.

(b) Design and striking.—For purposes of the presentation referred to in subsection (a), the Secretary of the Treasury (referred to in this Act as the “Secretary”) shall strike a gold medal with suitable emblems, devices, and inscriptions to be determined by the Secretary.

SEC. 3. Duplicate medals.

The Secretary may strike and sell duplicates in bronze of the gold medal struck pursuant to section 2 under such regulations as the Secretary may prescribe, at a price sufficient to cover the cost thereof, including labor, materials, dies, use of machinery, and overhead expenses, and the cost of the gold medal.

SEC. 4. Status of medals.

(a) National medals.—The medals struck pursuant to this Act are national medals for purposes of chapter 51 of title 31, United States Code.

(b) Numismatic items.—For purposes of sections 5134 and 5136 of title 31, United States Code, all medals struck under this Act shall be considered to be numismatic items.

SEC. 5. Authority to use fund amounts; proceeds of sale.

(a) Authority To use fund amounts.—There is authorized to be charged against the United States Mint Public Enterprise Fund such amounts as may be necessary to pay for the costs of the medals struck pursuant to this Act.

(b) Proceeds of sale.—Amounts received from the sale of duplicate bronze medals authorized under section 3 shall be deposited into the United States Mint Public Enterprise Fund.