Text: H.R.595 — 112th Congress (2011-2012)All Bill Information (Except Text)

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Introduced in House (02/09/2011)


112th CONGRESS
1st Session
H. R. 595

To amend title 36, United States Code, to designate the musical piece commonly known as “Taps” as the National Song of Remembrance, and for other purposes.


IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
February 9, 2011

Mr. Reed (for himself, Ms. Hayworth, Mr. Owens, and Ms. Richardson) introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary, and in addition to the Committee on Veterans’ Affairs, for a period to be subsequently determined by the Speaker, in each case for consideration of such provisions as fall within the jurisdiction of the committee concerned


A BILL

To amend title 36, United States Code, to designate the musical piece commonly known as “Taps” as the National Song of Remembrance, and for other purposes.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. Findings.

Congress finds the following:

(1) The bugle call commonly known as “Taps” is known throughout the United States as part of the military honors accorded at funerals, memorial services, and wreath ceremonies held for members of the uniformed services and veterans.

(2) In July 1862, following the Seven Days Battles, Union General Daniel Butterfield and bugler Oliver Willcox Norton created “Taps” at Berkley Plantation, Virginia, as a way to signal the end of daily military activities.

(3) “Taps” is now codified by the uniformed services as the last call of the day and is sounded at the completion of a military funeral.

(4) “Taps” has become the signature, solemn musical farewell for members of the uniformed services and veterans who have faithfully served the United States during times of war and peace.

(5) Over its almost 150 years of use, “Taps” has been woven into the historical fabric of the United States.

(6) When sounded, “Taps” summons emotions of loss, pride, honor, and respect and encourages Americans to remember patriots who served the United States with honor and valor.

(7) The 150th anniversary of the writing of “Taps” will be observed with events culminating in June 2012 with a rededication of the Taps Monument at Berkley Plantation, Virginia.

SEC. 2. Sense of Congress.

It is the sense of Congress that at a military funeral, memorial service, or wreath laying, “Taps” should be sounded by a live solo bugler or trumpeter when such arrangements are possible.

SEC. 3. Designation of “Taps” as National Song of Remembrance.

(a) Designation.—Chapter 3 of title 36, United States Code, is amended by adding at the end the following new section:

§ 306. National Song of Remembrance

“(a) Designation.—The bugle call commonly known as ‘Taps’, consisting of 24 notes sounded on a bugle or trumpet performed by a solo bugler or trumpeter without accompaniment or embellishment, is the National Song of Remembrance.

“(b) Conduct during sounding.—

“(1) IN GENERAL.—During a performance of ‘Taps’ at a military funeral, memorial service, or wreath laying—

“(A) all present, except persons in uniform, should stand at attention with the right hand over the heart;

“(B) men not in uniform should remove their headdress with their right hand and hold the headdress at the left shoulder, the hand being over the heart; and

“(C) persons in uniform should stand at attention and give the military salute at the first note of ‘Taps’ and maintain that position until the last note.

“(2) EXCEPTION.—Paragraph (1) shall not apply when ‘Taps’ is sounded as the final bugle call of the day at a military base.

“(c) Definition of military base.—In this section, the term ‘military base’ means a base, camp, post, station, yard, center, homeport facility for any ship, or other activity under the jurisdiction of the Department of Defense, including any leased facility, which is located within any of the several States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, American Samoa, the Virgin Islands, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, or Guam.”.

(b) Conforming and clerical amendments.—

(1) CHAPTER HEADING.—The heading of chapter 3 of title 36, United States Code, is amended to read as follows:

“CHAPTER 3NATIONAL ANTHEM, MOTTO, AND OTHER NATIONAL DESIGNATIONS”.

(2) TABLE OF CHAPTERS.—The item relating to chapter 3 in the table of chapters for such title is amended to read as follows:

“3. National Anthem, Motto, and Other National Designations
301”.

(3) TABLE OF SECTIONS.—The table of sections at the beginning of such chapter is amended by adding at the end the following new item:


“306. National Song of Remembrance.”.