Text: H.Res.378 — 112th Congress (2011-2012)All Bill Information (Except Text)

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Introduced in House (07/28/2011)


112th CONGRESS
1st Session
H. RES. 378

Expressing the sense of the House of Representatives that strong consideration should be given to the role of science education in the educational accountability system as it works to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.


IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
July 28, 2011

Mrs. Biggert (for herself and Mr. Holt) submitted the following resolution; which was referred to the Committee on Education and the Workforce


RESOLUTION

Expressing the sense of the House of Representatives that strong consideration should be given to the role of science education in the educational accountability system as it works to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.

Whereas science is an essential element of a well-rounded education for United States students;

Whereas student proficiency in science underpins the ability of the United States to remain the economic and technical leader of the global marketplace of the 21st century;

Whereas knowledge of the scientific process and the practice of scientific inquiry empowers individuals to better understand the world around them, have stronger critical thinking skills, and become more informed citizens;

Whereas according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 15 of the 20 fastest growing careers of the next decade require proficiency in science;

Whereas the number of workers in science and engineering occupations grew from about 182,000 in 1950 to 5,500,000 in 2007, representing an average annual growth rate of 6.2 percent, nearly 4 times the 1.6 percent growth rate for the overall adult workforce;

Whereas half of the workers in science and engineering occupations earned $70,600 or more in 2007, more than double the median earnings of the overall United States workforce;

Whereas United States student achievement in the sciences is considerable lower than students in many countries worldwide;

Whereas according to the National Center for Educational Statistics, only 34 percent of fourth-graders, 30 percent of eighth-graders, and 21 percent of twelfth-graders performed at or above the Proficient level in science in 2009;

Whereas results from the 2009 International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) show the scores of United States fourth and eighth graders were higher than in 1995 in mathematics but not in science;

Whereas the accountability system established by the 2002 amendments to the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, has had a significant influence on national, State, and local educational policies; and

Whereas science is already required under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act to be tested once in the elementary and middle school grades, but these tests are not included in measures of school accountability: Now, therefore, be it

Resolved, That it is the sense of the House of Representatives that strong consideration should be given to the role of science education in the educational accountability system as it works to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.