Text: H.Res.532 — 112th Congress (2011-2012)All Information (Except Text)

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Introduced in House (02/01/2012)


112th CONGRESS
2d Session
H. RES. 532

Expressing the sense of the House of Representatives that the President of the United States should appoint a special counsel to investigate Operation Fast and Furious and the Attorney General’s knowledge and management of Operation Fast and Furious.


IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
February 1, 2012

Mr. Quayle (for himself, Mr. Westmoreland, Mr. Cole, Mrs. Blackburn, Mr. Canseco, Mr. Boustany, Mrs. Adams, Mr. Grimm, Mr. Brooks, Mr. Farenthold, Mr. Fincher, Mr. Stutzman, Mr. Ribble, Mr. Wilson of South Carolina, Mr. Roe of Tennessee, Mr. Olson, Mr. Marchant, Mr. Gohmert, Mr. Pompeo, and Mr. Yoder) submitted the following resolution; which was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary


RESOLUTION

Expressing the sense of the House of Representatives that the President of the United States should appoint a special counsel to investigate Operation Fast and Furious and the Attorney General’s knowledge and management of Operation Fast and Furious.

Whereas, in November of 2009, Operation Fast and Furious was initiated under Project Gunrunner;

Whereas, under Operation Fast and Furious, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (ATF) sanctioned the sale of hundreds of assault weapons to straw purchasers who transported the weapons across the United States border and into the hands of Mexican criminals;

Whereas, on December 14, 2010, 2 guns used in Operation Fast and Furious were found at the scene of the murder of a Border Patrol agent;

Whereas, on May 3, 2011, the Attorney General testified before the House Judiciary Committee and, when asked when he first knew about operation Fast and Furious, he stated, “I’m not sure of the exact date, but I probably heard about Fast and Furious for the first time over the last few weeks.”;

Whereas, beginning in July 2010, weekly memos addressed to the Attorney General included briefings about Operation Fast and Furious;

Whereas, on November 8, 2011, the Attorney General testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee and stated, “I first learned about the tactics and the phrase Operation Fast and Furious at the beginning of this year, I think, when it became a matter of, I guess, public controversy. In my testimony before the House committee I did say ‘a few weeks’ I probably could have said a couple of months …”;

Whereas, on December 8, 2011, the Attorney General testified before the House Judiciary Committee and stated, “he has no intention in resigning” and that no one should resign on the basis of the information that he has;

Whereas, on January 27, 2012, the Department of Justice released documents regarding Operation Fast and Furious, which included e-mails exchanged on December 14, 2010, between the Attorney General’s deputy chief of staff and the United States Attorney for the district of Arizona, stating that the Attorney General had been alerted of the shooting and death of a Border Patrol agent: Now, therefore, be it

Resolved, That it is the sense of the House of Representatives that the President of the United States should appoint a special counsel to investigate Operation Fast and Furious and the Attorney General’s knowledge and management of Operation Fast and Furious.