Text: H.Res.90 — 112th Congress (2011-2012)All Bill Information (Except Text)

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Introduced in House (02/11/2011)


112th CONGRESS
1st Session
H. RES. 90

Recognizing the 75th birthday of the Honorable Barbara Charline Jordan, American politician, leader of the Civil Rights movement, first African-American elected to the Texas Senate, first Southern Black woman ever elected to the United States House of Representatives, inspirational figure in the Progressive movement, and recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom Award.


IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
February 11, 2011

Ms. Jackson Lee of Texas (for herself, Mr. Hall, Mr. Cleaver, Mr. Sam Johnson of Texas, Mr. Rangel, Ms. Eddie Bernice Johnson of Texas, Ms. Brown of Florida, Ms. Wilson of Florida, Mr. Thompson of Mississippi, Ms. Fudge, Ms. Richardson, Mr. Jackson of Illinois, Ms. Moore, Mr. Carson of Indiana, Ms. Woolsey, Mr. Ellison, Mr. Waxman, Mr. Weiner, Mr. Serrano, Mr. Dingell, Mr. Doggett, and Mr. Butterfield) submitted the following resolution; which was referred to the Committee on House Administration


RESOLUTION

Recognizing the 75th birthday of the Honorable Barbara Charline Jordan, American politician, leader of the Civil Rights movement, first African-American elected to the Texas Senate, first Southern Black woman ever elected to the United States House of Representatives, inspirational figure in the Progressive movement, and recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom Award.

Whereas Barbara Charline Jordan was born on February 21, 1936, in Houston, Texas;

Whereas Barbara Charline Jordan was a United States politician elected as the first African-American to the Texas Senate after reconstruction and the first Southern African-American woman ever elected to the United States House of Representatives, representing the 18th District of Texas;

Whereas in 1972, Barbara Charline Jordan served with distinction on the Committee on the Judiciary of the House of Representatives;

Whereas Barbara Charline Jordan was and still remains an inspirational figure in United States politics through her powerful public speaking and her triumphant refusal to be defined by disability;

Whereas Barbara Charline Jordan became the voice of inspiration during a time of a national challenge and called for integrity from United States leadership, stating before the Committee on the Judiciary of the House of Representatives that “common sense would be revolted if we engaged upon this process for petty reasons. Pettiness cannot be allowed to stand in the face of such overwhelming problems. So today we are not petty. We are trying to be big, because the task we have before us is a big one.”;

Whereas in 1975, a leading national magazine surveyed 700 political opinion leaders who ranked Barbara Charline Jordan at the top of a list of women they would like to see become President of the United States;

Whereas in 1976, Barbara Charline Jordan was mentioned as a possible running mate to Jimmy Carter, and that same year became the first African-American woman to deliver the keynote address at the Democratic National Convention;

Whereas despite not being a candidate, Barbara Charline Jordan received one delegate vote for President at the convention;

Whereas in the summer of 1976, Barbara Charline Jordan’s speech in New York was ranked fifth in the “Top 100 American Speeches of the 20th Century” list and is considered by many historians to be the best convention keynote speech in modern history;

Whereas in 1979, Barbara Charline Jordan left Congress to join the faculty of the Lyndon Baines Johnson School of Public Policy at the University of Texas, where she held the endowed Lyndon B. Johnson Centennial Chair in National Policy;

Whereas in 1993, Barbara Charline Jordan received the Elizabeth Blackwell Award from Hobart and William Smith Colleges;

Whereas in 1994, Barbara Charline Jordan was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President William Jefferson Clinton for being “the most outspoken moral voice of the American political system”, adding to her other prestigious honors, namely, the Texas and National Women’s Halls of Fame and the United States Military Academy’s Sylvanus Thayer Award;

Whereas today, the main terminal at Austin-Bergstrom International Airport is named after her, as are an elementary school in Odessa, Texas, a middle school in Cibolo, Texas, Barbara Jordan High School in Houston, Texas, a YMCA in Martinsville, Indiana, and a United States Postal Service facility in Houston, Texas; and

Whereas Barbara Charline Jordan’s papers are held at the Barbara Jordan Archives at Texas Southern University, and her speeches are collected in a 2007 publication from the University of Texas Press entitled, “Barbara Jordan: Speaking the Truth with Eloquent Thunder”: Now, therefore, be it

Resolved, That the House of Representatives celebrates and honors the continuing legacy of the late Honorable Barbara Charline Jordan, on the occasion of the 75th anniversary of her birth, to allow the memory of her resounding voice to continue to speak the truth with eloquent thunder.