Text: H.R.1318 — 113th Congress (2013-2014)All Information (Except Text)

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Introduced in House (03/21/2013)

 
[Congressional Bills 113th Congress]
[From the U.S. Government Publishing Office]
[H.R. 1318 Introduced in House (IH)]

113th CONGRESS
  1st Session
                                H. R. 1318

   To provide for evidence-based and promising practices related to 
 juvenile delinquency and criminal street gang activity prevention and 
 intervention to help build individual, family, and community strength 
  and resiliency to ensure that youth lead productive, safe, healthy, 
                   gang-free, and law-abiding lives.


_______________________________________________________________________


                    IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

                             March 21, 2013

    Mr. Scott of Virginia (for himself, Mr. Jones, Mr. Conyers, Mr. 
   Thompson of California, Mr. Carney, Mr. Kildee, Mr. Cardenas, Ms. 
   Moore, Mr. Lewis, Mr. Moran, Mr. Danny K. Davis of Illinois, Ms. 
 Clarke, Mr. Connolly, Mr. Rush, Ms. Bass, Mr. Al Green of Texas, Ms. 
Norton, Mr. Larson of Connecticut, Mr. Ellison, Ms. Fudge, Mr. Rangel, 
  Ms. Hahn, Mr. Butterfield, Mr. Payne, Mr. McGovern, Mr. Cohen, Mr. 
 Peters of Michigan, Mr. Nadler, Ms. Wasserman Schultz, Ms. Bonamici, 
Ms. Tsongas, Ms. Wilson of Florida, Ms. Brown of Florida, Mr. Brady of 
 Pennsylvania, Ms. Waters, Mr. Grijalva, Mr. Vargas, Ms. Edwards, Mr. 
Meeks, Mrs. Christensen, Mr. Sires, Mr. Hastings of Florida, Ms. Lee of 
  California, Mr. Kennedy, Mr. Richmond, Mr. Lowenthal, Ms. Chu, Ms. 
 Eddie Bernice Johnson of Texas, Mr. Bishop of Georgia, Mr. Johnson of 
    Georgia, Ms. Bordallo, Ms. DeLauro, Mr. Watt, and Mrs. Beatty) 
 introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on 
                      Education and the Workforce

_______________________________________________________________________

                                 A BILL


 
   To provide for evidence-based and promising practices related to 
 juvenile delinquency and criminal street gang activity prevention and 
 intervention to help build individual, family, and community strength 
  and resiliency to ensure that youth lead productive, safe, healthy, 
                   gang-free, and law-abiding lives.

    Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the 
United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

    This Act may be cited as the ``Youth Prison Reduction through 
Opportunities, Mentoring, Intervention, Support, and Education Act'' or 
the ``Youth PROMISE Act''.

SEC. 2. TABLE OF CONTENTS.

    The table of contents for this Act are as follows:

Sec. 1. Short title.
Sec. 2. Table of contents.
Sec. 3. Definitions.
Sec. 4. Findings.
  TITLE I--FEDERAL COORDINATION OF LOCAL AND TRIBAL JUVENILE JUSTICE 
                        INFORMATION AND EFFORTS

Sec. 101. PROMISE Advisory Panel.
Sec. 102. Geographic assessment of resource allocation.
                        TITLE II--PROMISE GRANTS

Sec. 201. Purposes.
           Subtitle A--PROMISE Assessment and Planning Grants

Sec. 202. PROMISE Assessment and Planning grants authorized.
Sec. 203. PROMISE Coordinating Councils.
Sec. 204. Needs and strengths assessment.
Sec. 205. PROMISE Plan components.
Sec. 206. Authorization of appropriations.
               Subtitle B--PROMISE Implementation Grants

Sec. 211. PROMISE Implementation grants authorized.
Sec. 212. PROMISE Implementation grant application requirements.
Sec. 213. Grant award guidelines.
Sec. 214. Reports.
Sec. 215. Authorization of appropriations.
              Subtitle C--General PROMISE Grant Provisions

Sec. 221. Nonsupplanting clause.
Sec. 222. Grant application review panel.
Sec. 223. Evaluation of PROMISE grant programs.
                  TITLE III--PROMISE RESEARCH CENTERS

Sec. 301. Establishment of the National Research Center for Proven 
                            Juvenile Justice Practices.
Sec. 302. Grants for regional research proven practices partnerships.

SEC. 3. DEFINITIONS.

    In this Act:
            (1) Administrator.--The term ``Administrator'' means the 
        Administrator of the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency 
        Prevention.
            (2) Community.--The term ``community'' means a unit of 
        local government or an Indian tribe, or part of such a unit or 
        tribe, as determined by such a unit or tribe for the purpose of 
        applying for a grant under this Act.
            (3) Designated geographic area.--The term ``designated 
        geographic area'' means a 5-digit postal ZIP Code assigned to a 
        geographic area by the United States Postal Service.
            (4) Evidence-based.--
                    (A) In general.--The term ``evidence-based'', when 
                used with respect to a practice relating to juvenile 
                delinquency and criminal street gang activity 
                prevention and intervention, means a practice 
                (including a service, program, activity, intervention, 
                technology, or strategy) for which the Administrator 
                has determined--
                            (i) causal evidence documents a 
                        relationship between the practice and its 
                        intended outcome, based on measures of the 
                        direction and size of a change, and the extent 
                        to which a change may be attributed to the 
                        practice; and
                            (ii) the use of scientific methods rules 
                        out, to the extent possible, alternative 
                        explanations for the documented change.
                    (B) Scientific methods.--For the purposes of 
                subparagraph (A), the term ``scientific methods'' 
                means--
                            (i) evaluation by an experimental trial, in 
                        which participants are randomly assigned to 
                        participate in the practice that is subject to 
                        such trial; or
                            (ii) evaluation by a quasi-experimental 
                        trial, in which the outcomes for participants 
                        are compared with outcomes for a control group 
                        that is made up of individuals who are similar 
                        to such participants.
            (5) Intervention.--The term ``intervention'' means the 
        provision of programs and services that are supported by 
        research, are evidence-based or promising practices, and are 
        provided to youth who are involved in, or who are identified by 
        evidence-based risk assessment methods as being at high risk of 
        continued involvement in, juvenile delinquency or criminal 
        street gangs, as a result of indications that demonstrate 
        involvement with problems such as truancy, substance abuse, 
        mental health treatment needs, or siblings who have had 
        involvement with juvenile or criminal justice systems.
            (6) Juvenile delinquency and criminal street gang activity 
        prevention.--The term ``juvenile delinquency and criminal 
        street gang activity prevention'' means the provision of 
        programs and resources to children and families who have not 
        yet had substantial contact with criminal justice or juvenile 
        justice systems, that--
                    (A) are designed to reduce potential juvenile 
                delinquency and criminal street gang activity risks; 
                and
                    (B) are evidence-based or promising educational, 
                health, mental health, school-based, community-based, 
                faith-based, parenting, job training, social 
                opportunities and experiences, or other programs, for 
                youth and their families, that have been demonstrated 
                to be effective in reducing juvenile delinquency and 
                criminal street gang activity risks.
            (7) Promising.--The term ``promising'', when used with 
        respect to a practice relating to juvenile delinquency and 
        criminal street gang activity prevention and intervention, 
        means a practice (including a service, program, activity, 
        intervention, technology, or strategy) that, based on 
        statistical analyses or a theory of change, the Administrator 
        has determined--
                    (A) has outcomes from an evaluation that 
                demonstrate such practice reduces juvenile delinquency 
                and criminal street gang activity; and
                    (B) is part of a study being conducted to determine 
                if such a practice is evidence-based.
            (8) State.--The term ``State'' means each of the several 
        States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto 
        Rico, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, Guam, the Northern 
        Mariana Islands, and any other territories or possessions of 
        the United States.
            (9) Theory of change.--The term ``theory of change'' means 
        a program planning strategy approved by the Administrator that 
        outlines the types of interventions and outcomes essential to 
        achieving a set of program goals.
            (10) Youth.--The term ``youth'' means--
                    (A) an individual who is 18 years of age or 
                younger; or
                    (B) in any State in which the maximum age at which 
                the juvenile justice system of such State has 
                jurisdiction over individuals exceeds 18 years of age, 
                an individual who is such maximum age or younger.

SEC. 4. FINDINGS.

    The Congress finds as follows:
            (1) Youth gang crime has taken a toll on a number of urban 
        communities, and senseless acts of gang-related violence have 
        imposed economic, social, and human costs.
            (2) Drug- and alcohol-dependent youth, and youth dually 
        diagnosed with addiction and mental health disorders, are more 
        likely to become involved with the juvenile justice system than 
        youth without such risk factors, absent appropriate prevention 
        and intervention services.
            (3) Children of color are over-represented relative to the 
        general population at every stage of the juvenile justice 
        system. Black youth are 17 percent of the United States 
        population, but represent 38 percent of youth in secure 
        placement juvenile facilities, and 58 percent of youth 
        incarcerated in adult prisons.
            (4) Research funded by the Department of Justice indicates 
        that gang-membership is short-lived among adolescents. With 
        very few youth remaining gang-involved throughout their 
        adolescent years, ongoing opportunities for intervention exist.
            (5) Criminal justice costs have become burdensome in many 
        States and cities, requiring reductions in vital educational, 
        social, welfare, mental health, and related services.
            (6) Direct expenditures for each of the major criminal 
        justice functions, police, corrections, and judicial services, 
        have increased steadily over the last 25 years. In fiscal year 
        2009, Federal, State, and local governments spent an estimated 
        $258,000,000,000 for police protection, corrections, and 
        judicial and legal services, nearly a 207 percent increase 
        since 1982.
            (7) In 2009, State governments spent $5.7 billion dollars 
        to incarcerate youth. The average annual cost to incarcerate 
        one youth is $88,000.
            (8) Coordinated efforts of stakeholders in the juvenile 
        justice system in a local community, together with other 
        organizations and community members concerned with the safety 
        and welfare of children, have a strong record of demonstrated 
        success in reducing the impact of youth and gang-related crime 
        and violence, as demonstrated in Boston, Massachusetts, 
        Chicago, Illinois, Richmond, Virginia, Los Angeles, California, 
        and other communities.
            (9) Investment in prevention and intervention programs for 
        children and youth, including quality early childhood programs, 
        comprehensive evidence-based school, after school, and summer 
        school programs, mentoring programs, mental health and 
        treatment programs, evidence-based job training programs, and 
        alternative intervention programs, has been shown to lead to 
        decreased youth arrests, decreased delinquency, lower 
        recidivism, and greater financial savings from an educational, 
        economic, social, and criminal justice perspective.
            (10) Quality early childhood education programs have been 
        demonstrated to help children start school ready to learn and 
        to reduce delinquency and criminal street gang activity risks.
            (11) Evidence-based mentoring programs have been shown to 
        prevent youth drug abuse and violence.
            (12) Evidence-based school-based comprehensive 
        instructional programs that pair youth with responsible adult 
        mentors have been shown to have a strong impact upon 
        delinquency prevention.
            (13) After-school programs that connect children to caring 
        adults and that provide constructive activities during the peak 
        hours of juvenile delinquency and criminal street gang 
        activity, between 3 p.m. and 6 p.m., have been shown to reduce 
        delinquency and the attendant costs imposed on the juvenile and 
        criminal justice systems.
            (14) States with higher levels of educational attainment 
        have been shown to have crime rates lower than the national 
        average. Researchers have found that a 5-percent increase in 
        male high school graduation rates would produce an annual 
        savings of almost $5,000,000,000 in crime-related expenses.
            (15) Therapeutic programs that engage and motivate high-
        risk youth and their families to change behaviors that often 
        result in criminal activity have been shown to significantly 
        reduce recidivism among juvenile offenders, and significantly 
        reduce the attendant costs of crime and delinquency imposed 
        upon the juvenile and criminal justice systems.
            (16) Comprehensive programs that target kids who are 
        already serious juvenile offenders by addressing the multiple 
        factors in peer, school, neighborhood, and family environments 
        known to be related to delinquency can reduce recidivism among 
        juvenile offenders and save the public significant economic 
        costs.
            (17) There are many alternatives to incarceration of youth 
        that have been proven to be more effective in reducing crime 
        and violence at the National, State, local, and tribal levels, 
        and the failure to provide for such effective alternatives is a 
        pervasive problem that leads to increased youth, and later 
        adult, crime and violence.
            (18) Savings achieved through early intervention and 
        prevention are significant, especially when noncriminal justice 
        social, educational, mental health, and economic outcomes are 
        considered.
            (19) The prevention of child abuse and neglect can help 
        stop a cycle of violence and save up to $5.00 for every $1.00 
        invested in preventing such abuse and neglect.
            (20) Targeting interventions at special youth risk groups 
        and focusing upon relatively low-cost interventions increases 
        the probability of fiscal benefit.
            (21) Evidence-based intervention treatment facilities have 
        been shown to reduce youth delinquency and to be cost-
        effective.
            (22) States, including Wisconsin, Ohio, New York, Texas, 
        and Pennsylvania, have seen a reduction in juvenile 
        incarceration due to a reallocation of criminal justice funds 
        towards prevention programs.
            (23) The rise in homicides in several cities in recent 
        years followed declines in Federal funding provided for law 
        enforcement, educational, health and mental health, social 
        services, and other support to localities for youth, their 
        families, and other community-oriented programs and approaches.

  TITLE I--FEDERAL COORDINATION OF LOCAL AND TRIBAL JUVENILE JUSTICE 
                        INFORMATION AND EFFORTS

SEC. 101. PROMISE ADVISORY PANEL.

    (a) Organization of State Advisory Group Member Representatives.--
Section 223(f) of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act 
of 1974 (42 U.S.C. 5633(f)) is amended--
            (1) in paragraph (1), by striking ``an eligible 
        organization composed of member representatives of the State 
        advisory groups appointed under subsection (a)(3)'' and 
        inserting ``a nonpartisan, nonprofit organization that is 
        described in section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 
        1986,''; and
            (2) by amending paragraph (2) to read as follows:
            ``(2) Assistance.--To be eligible to receive such 
        assistance, such organization shall--
                    ``(A) be governed by individuals who--
                            ``(i) have been appointed by a chief 
                        executive of a State to serve as a State 
                        advisory group member under subsection (a)(3); 
                        and
                            ``(ii) are elected to serve as a governing 
                        officer of such organization by a majority of 
                        the Chairs (or Chair-designees) of all such 
                        State advisory groups;
                    ``(B) include member representatives from a 
                majority of such State advisory groups, who shall be 
                representative of regionally and demographically 
                diverse States and jurisdictions;
                    ``(C) annually seek appointments by the chief 
                executive of each State of one State advisory group 
                member and one alternate State advisory group member 
                from each such State to implement the advisory 
                functions specified in clauses (iv) and (v) of 
                subparagraph (D), including serving on the PROMISE 
                Advisory Panel, and make a record of any such 
                appointments available to the public; and
                    ``(D) agree to carry out activities that include--
                            ``(i) conducting an annual conference of 
                        such member representatives for purposes 
                        relating to the activities of such State 
                        advisory groups;
                            ``(ii) disseminating information, data, 
                        standards, advanced techniques, and program 
                        models;
                            ``(iii) reviewing Federal policies 
                        regarding juvenile justice and delinquency 
                        prevention;
                            ``(iv) advising the Administrator with 
                        respect to particular functions or aspects of 
                        the work of the Office, and appointing a 
                        representative, diverse group of members of 
                        such organization under subparagraph (C) to 
                        serve as an advisory panel of State juvenile 
                        justice advisors (referred to as the `PROMISE 
                        Advisory Panel') to carry out the functions 
                        specified in subsection (g); and
                            ``(v) advising the President and Congress 
                        with regard to State perspectives on the 
                        operation of the Office and Federal legislation 
                        pertaining to juvenile justice and delinquency 
                        prevention.''.
    (b) PROMISE Advisory Panel.--Section 223 of the Juvenile Justice 
and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (42 U.S.C. 5633) is further 
amended by adding at the end the following new subsection:
    ``(g) PROMISE Advisory Panel.--
            ``(1) Functions.--The PROMISE Advisory Panel required under 
        subsection (f)(2)(D) shall--
                    ``(A) assess successful evidence-based and 
                promising practices related to juvenile delinquency and 
                criminal street gang activity prevention and 
                intervention carried out by PROMISE Coordinating 
                Councils under such Act;
                    ``(B) provide the Administrator with a list of 
                individuals and organizations with experience in 
                administering or evaluating practices that serve youth 
                involved in, or at risk of involvement in, juvenile 
                delinquency and criminal street gang activity, from 
                which the Administrator shall select individuals who 
                shall--
                            ``(i) provide to the Administrator peer 
                        reviews of applications submitted by units of 
                        local government and Indian tribes pursuant to 
                        title II of such Act, to ensure that such 
                        applications demonstrate a clear plan to--
                                    ``(I) serve youth as part of an 
                                entire family unit; and
                                    ``(II) coordinate the delivery of 
                                service to youth among agencies; and
                            ``(ii) advise the Administrator with 
                        respect to the award and allocation of PROMISE 
                        Planning grants to local and tribal governments 
                        that develop PROMISE Coordinating Councils, and 
                        of PROMISE Implementation grants to such 
                        PROMISE Coordinating Councils, pursuant to 
                        title II of such Act; and
                    ``(C) develop performance standards to be used to 
                evaluate programs and activities carried out with 
                grants under title II of the Youth PROMISE Act, 
                including the evaluation of changes achieved as a 
                result of such programs and activities related to 
                decreases in juvenile delinquency and criminal street 
                gang activity, including--
                            ``(i) prevention of involvement by at-risk 
                        youth in juvenile delinquency or criminal 
                        street gang activity;
                            ``(ii) diversion of youth with a high risk 
                        of continuing involvement in juvenile 
                        delinquency or criminal street gang activity; 
                        and
                            ``(iii) financial savings from deferred or 
                        eliminated costs, or other benefits, as a 
                        result of such programs and activities, and the 
                        reinvestment by the unit or tribe of any such 
                        savings.
            ``(2) Annual report.--Not later than 18 months after the 
        date of the enactment of the Youth PROMISE Act, and annually 
        thereafter, the PROMISE Advisory Panel shall prepare a report 
        containing the findings and determinations under paragraph 
        (1)(A) and shall submit such report to Congress, the President, 
        the Attorney General, and the chief executive and chief law 
        enforcement officer of each State, unit of local government, 
        and Indian tribe.''.
    (c) Authorization of Appropriations.--Section 299(a)(1) of the 
Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (42 U.S.C. 
5671(a)(1)) is amended to read as follows:
            ``(1) There are authorized to be appropriated such sums as 
        may be necessary to carry out this title for each of the fiscal 
        years 2014 through 2016.''.

SEC. 102. GEOGRAPHIC ASSESSMENT OF RESOURCE ALLOCATION.

    (a) Grant for Collection of Data To Determine Need.--Subject to the 
availability of appropriations, the Administrator shall award a grant, 
on a competitive basis, to an organization to--
            (1) collect and analyze data related to the existing 
        juvenile delinquency and criminal street gang activity 
        prevention and intervention needs and resources in each 
        designated geographic area;
            (2) use the data collected and analyzed under paragraph (1) 
        to compile a list of designated geographic areas that have the 
        most need of resources, based on such data, to carry out 
        juvenile delinquency and criminal street gang activity 
        prevention and intervention;
            (3) use the data collected and analyzed under paragraph (1) 
        to rank the areas listed under paragraph (2) in descending 
        order by the amount of need for resources to carry out juvenile 
        delinquency and criminal street gang activity prevention and 
        intervention, ranking the area with the greatest need for such 
        resources highest; and
            (4) periodically update the list and rankings under 
        paragraph (3) as the Administrator determines to be 
        appropriate.
    (b) Data Sources.--In compiling such list and determining such 
rankings, the organization shall collect and analyze data relating to 
juvenile delinquency and criminal street gang activity prevention and 
intervention--
            (1) using the geographic information system and Web-based 
        mapping application known as the Socioeconomic Mapping and 
        Resource Topography (SMART) system;
            (2) from the Department of Health and Human Services, the 
        Department of Labor, the Department of Housing and Urban 
        Development, and the Department of Education; and
            (3) from the annual KIDS Count Data Book and other data 
        made available by the KIDS Count initiative of the Annie E. 
        Casey Foundation.
    (c) Use of Data by the Administrator.--The list and rankings 
required by this section shall be provided to the Administrator to be 
used to provide funds under this Act in the most strategic and 
effective manner to ensure that resources and services are provided to 
youth in the communities with the greatest need for such resources and 
services.
    (d) Limitation on Use of Collected Data.--The information collected 
and analyzed under this section may not be used for any purpose other 
than to carry out the purposes of this Act. Such information may not be 
used for any purpose related to the investigation or prosecution of any 
person, or for profiling of individuals based on race, ethnicity, 
socio-economic status, or any other characteristic.
    (e) Authorization and Limitation of Appropriations.--Of the amount 
appropriated for fiscal year 2014 to carry out this section and 
subtitle A of title II of this Act (as authorized under section 205), 
not more than one percent of such amount, or $1,000,000, whichever is 
less, shall be available to carry out this section.

                        TITLE II--PROMISE GRANTS

SEC. 201. PURPOSES.

    The purposes of the grant programs established under this title are 
to--
            (1) enable local and tribal communities to assess the unmet 
        needs of youth who are involved in, or are at risk of 
        involvement in, juvenile delinquency or criminal street gangs;
            (2) develop plans appropriate for a community to address 
        those unmet needs with juvenile delinquency and gang prevention 
        and intervention practices; and
            (3) implement and evaluate such plans in a manner 
        consistent with this Act.

           Subtitle A--PROMISE Assessment and Planning Grants

SEC. 202. PROMISE ASSESSMENT AND PLANNING GRANTS AUTHORIZED.

    (a) Grants Authorized.--The Administrator is authorized to award 
grants to units of local government and Indian tribes to assist PROMISE 
Coordinating Councils with planning and assessing evidence-based and 
promising practices relating to juvenile delinquency and criminal 
street gang activity prevention and intervention, especially for youth 
who are involved in, or who are at risk of involvement in, juvenile 
delinquency and criminal street gang activity. Such PROMISE 
Coordinating Councils shall--
            (1) conduct an objective needs and strengths assessment in 
        accordance with section 203; and
            (2) develop a PROMISE Plan in accordance with section 204, 
        based on the assessment conducted in accordance with section 
        203.
    (b) Grant Duration, Amount, and Allocation.--
            (1) Duration.--A grant awarded under this section shall be 
        for a period not to exceed one year.
            (2) Maximum grant amount.--A grant awarded under this 
        section shall not exceed $300,000.
    (c) Allocation.--
            (1) Minimum allocation.--Subject to the availability of 
        appropriations, the Administrator shall ensure that the total 
        funds allocated under this section to units of local 
        governments and Indian tribes in a State shall not be less than 
        $1,000,000.
            (2) Ratable reduction.--If the amount made available for 
        grants under this section for any fiscal year is less than the 
        amount required to provide the minimum allocation of funds 
        under paragraph (1) to units of local government and Indian 
        tribes in each State, then the amount of such minimum 
        allocation shall be ratably reduced.

SEC. 203. PROMISE COORDINATING COUNCILS.

    To be eligible to receive a grant under this subtitle, a unit of 
local government or an Indian tribe shall establish a PROMISE 
Coordinating Council for each community of such unit or tribe, 
respectively, for which such unit or tribe is applying for a grant 
under this subtitle. Each such community shall include one or more 
designated geographic areas identified on the list required under 
section 102(a)(2). The members of such a PROMISE Coordinating Council 
shall be representatives of public and private sector entities and 
individuals that--
            (1) shall include, to the extent possible, at least one 
        representative from each of the following:
                    (A) the local chief executive's office;
                    (B) a local educational agency;
                    (C) a local health agency or provider;
                    (D) a local mental health agency or provider, 
                unless the representative under subparagraph (C) also 
                meets the requirements of this subparagraph;
                    (E) a local public housing agency;
                    (F) a local law enforcement agency;
                    (G) a local child welfare agency;
                    (H) a local juvenile court;
                    (I) a local juvenile prosecutor's office;
                    (J) a private juvenile residential care entity;
                    (K) a local juvenile public defender's office;
                    (L) a State juvenile correctional entity;
                    (M) a local business community representative; and
                    (N) a local faith-based community representative;
            (2) shall include two representatives from each of the 
        following:
                    (A) parents who have minor children, and who have 
                an interest in the local juvenile or criminal justice 
                systems;
                    (B) youth between the ages of 15 and 24 who reside 
                in the jurisdiction of the unit or tribe; and
                    (C) members from nonprofit community-based 
                organizations that provide effective delinquency 
                prevention and intervention to youth in the 
                jurisdiction of the unit or tribe; and
            (3) may include other members, as the unit or tribe 
        determines to be appropriate.

SEC. 204. NEEDS AND STRENGTHS ASSESSMENT.

    (a) Assessment.--Each PROMISE Coordinating Council receiving funds 
from a unit of local government or Indian tribe under this subtitle 
shall conduct an objective strengths and needs assessment of the 
resources of the community for which such PROMISE Coordinating Council 
was established, to identify the unmet needs of youth in the community 
with respect to evidence-based and promising practices related to 
juvenile delinquency and criminal street gang activity prevention and 
intervention. The PROMISE Coordinating Council shall consult with a 
research partner receiving a grant under section 302 for assistance 
with such assessment. Such assessment shall include, with respect to 
the community for which such PROMISE Coordinating Council was 
established--
            (1) the number of youth who are at-risk of involvement in 
        juvenile delinquency or street gang activity;
            (2) the number of youth who are involved in juvenile 
        delinquency or criminal street gang activity, including the 
        number of such youth who are at high risk of continued 
        involvement;
            (3) youth unemployment rates during the summer;
            (4) the number of individuals on public financial 
        assistance (including a breakdown of the numbers of men, women, 
        and children on such assistance);
            (5) the estimated number of youth who are chronically 
        truant;
            (6) the number of youth who have dropped out of school in 
        the previous year;
            (7) for the year before such assessment, the estimated 
        total amount expended (by the community and other entities) for 
        the incarceration of offenders who were convicted or 
        adjudicated delinquent for an offense that was committed in 
        such community, including amounts expended for the 
        incarceration of offenders in prisons, jails, and juvenile 
        facilities that are located in the United States but are not 
        located in such community;
            (8) a comparison of the amount under paragraph (7) with an 
        estimation of the amount that would be expended for the 
        incarceration of offenders described in such paragraph if the 
        number of offenders described in such paragraph was equal to 
        the national average incarceration rate per 100,000 population; 
        and
            (9) a description of evidence-based and promising practices 
        related to juvenile delinquency and criminal street gang 
        activity prevention available for youth in the community, 
        including school-based programs, after school programs 
        (particularly programs that have activities available for youth 
        between 3 p.m. and 6 p.m. in the afternoon), weekend activities 
        and programs, youth mentoring programs, faith and community-
        based programs, summer activities, and summer jobs, if any; and
            (10) a description of evidence-based and promising 
        intervention practices available for youth in the community.
    (b) Limitation on Use of Assessment Information.--Information 
gathered pursuant to this section may be used for the sole purpose of 
developing a PROMISE Plan in accordance with this subtitle.

SEC. 205. PROMISE PLAN COMPONENTS.

    (a) In General.--Each PROMISE Coordinating Council receiving funds 
from a unit of local government or Indian tribe under this subtitle 
shall develop a PROMISE Plan to provide for the coordination of, and, 
as appropriate, to support the delivery of, evidence-based and 
promising practices related to juvenile delinquency and criminal street 
gang activity prevention and intervention to youth and families who 
reside in the community for which such PROMISE Coordinating Council was 
established. Such a PROMISE Plan shall--
            (1) include the strategy by which the PROMISE Coordinating 
        Council plans to prioritize and allocate resources and services 
        toward the unmet needs of youth in the community, consistent 
        with the needs and available resources of communities with the 
        greatest need for assistance, as determined pursuant to section 
        102;
            (2) include a combination of evidence-based and promising 
        prevention and intervention practices that are responsive to 
        the needs of the community; and
            (3) ensure that cultural and linguistic needs of the 
        community are met.
    (b) Mandatory Components.--Each PROMISE Plan shall--
            (1) include a plan to connect youth identified in 
        paragraphs (1) and (2) of section 204(a) to evidence-based and 
        promising practices related to juvenile delinquency and 
        criminal street gang activity prevention and intervention;
            (2) identify the amount or percentage of local funds that 
        are available to the PROMISE Coordinating Council to carry out 
        the PROMISE Plan;
            (3) provide strategies to improve indigent defense delivery 
        systems, with particular attention given to groups of children 
        who are disproportionately represented in the State delinquency 
        system and Federal criminal justice system, as compared to the 
        representation of such groups in the general population of the 
        State;
            (4) provide for training (which complies with the American 
        Bar Association Juvenile Justice Standards for the 
        representation and care of youth in the juvenile justice 
        system) of prosecutors, defenders, probation officers, judges 
        and other court personnel related to issues concerning the 
        developmental needs, challenges, and potential of youth in the 
        juvenile justice system, (including training related to 
        adolescent development and mental health issues, and the 
        expected impact of evidence-based practices and cost reduction 
        strategies);
            (5) ensure that the number of youth involved in the 
        juvenile delinquency and criminal justice systems does not 
        increase as a result of the activities undertaken with the 
        funds provided under this subtitle;
            (6) describe the coordinated strategy that will be used by 
        the PROMISE Coordinating Council to provide at-risk youth with 
        evidence-based and promising practices related to juvenile 
        delinquency and criminal street gang activity prevention and 
        intervention;
            (7) propose the performance evaluation process to be used 
        to carry out section 211(d), which shall include performance 
        measures to assess efforts to address the unmet needs of youth 
        in the community with evidence-based and promising practices 
        related to juvenile delinquency and criminal street gang 
        activity prevention and intervention; and
            (8) identify the research partner the PROMISE Coordinating 
        Council will use to obtain information on evidence-based and 
        promising practices related to juvenile delinquency and 
        criminal street gang activity prevention and intervention, and 
        for the evaluation under section 211(d) of the results of the 
        activities carried out with funds under this subtitle.
    (c) Voluntary Components.--In addition to the components under 
subsection (b), a PROMISE Plan may include evidence-based or promising 
practices related to juvenile delinquency and criminal street gang 
activity prevention and intervention in the following categories:
            (1) Early childhood development services (such as pre-natal 
        and neo-natal health services), early childhood prevention, 
        voluntary home visiting programs, nurse-family partnership 
        programs, parenting and healthy relationship skills training, 
        child abuse prevention programs, Early Head Start, and Head 
        Start.
            (2) Child protection and safety services (such as foster 
        care and adoption assistance programs), family stabilization 
        programs, child welfare services, and family violence 
        intervention programs.
            (3) Youth and adolescent development services, including 
        job training and apprenticeship programs, job placement and 
        retention training, education and after school programs (such 
        as school programs with shared governance by students, 
        teachers, and parents, and activities for youth between the 
        hours of 3 p.m. and 6 p.m. in the afternoon), mentoring 
        programs, conflict resolution skills training, sports, arts, 
        life skills, employment and recreation programs, summer jobs, 
        and summer recreation programs, and alternative school 
        resources for youth who have dropped out of school or 
        demonstrate chronic truancy.
            (4) Health and mental health services, including cognitive 
        behavioral therapy, play therapy, and peer mentoring and 
        counseling.
            (5) Substance abuse counseling and treatment services, 
        including harm-reduction strategies.
            (6) Emergency, transitional, and permanent housing 
        assistance (such as safe shelter and housing for runaway and 
        homeless youth).
            (7) Targeted gang prevention, intervention, and exit 
        services such as tattoo removal, successful models of anti-gang 
        crime outreach programs (such as ``street worker'' programs), 
        and other criminal street gang truce or peacemaking activities.
            (8) Training and education programs for pregnant teens and 
        teen parents.
            (9) Alternatives to detention and confinement programs 
        (such as mandated participation in community service, 
        restitution, counseling, and intensive individual and family 
        therapeutic approaches).
            (10) Pre-release, post-release, and reentry services to 
        assist detained and incarcerated youth with transitioning back 
        into and reentering the community.

SEC. 206. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

    Subject to the limitation under section 102(e), there are 
authorized to be appropriated for fiscal year 2014, such sums as may be 
necessary to carry out this subtitle and section 102.

               Subtitle B--PROMISE Implementation Grants

SEC. 211. PROMISE IMPLEMENTATION GRANTS AUTHORIZED.

    (a) PROMISE Implementation Grants Authorized.--The Administrator of 
the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention is authorized 
to award grants to units of local government and Indian tribes to 
assist PROMISE Coordinating Councils with implementing PROMISE Plans 
developed pursuant to subtitle A.
    (b) Grant Duration and Amount.--
            (1) Duration.--A grant awarded under this subtitle shall be 
        for a three-year period.
            (2) Maximum grant amount.--A grant awarded under this 
        subtitle shall not be for more than $10,000,000 per year for 
        each year of the grant period.
    (c) Non-Federal Funds Required.--For each fiscal year during the 
three-year grant period for a grant under this subtitle, each unit of 
local government or Indian tribe receiving such a grant for a PROMISE 
Coordinating Council shall provide, from non-Federal funds, in cash or 
in-kind, 25 percent of the costs of the activities carried out with 
such grant.
    (d) Evaluation.--Of any funds provided to a unit of local 
government or an Indian tribe for a grant under this subtitle, not more 
than $100,000 shall be used to provide a contract to a competitively 
selected organization to assess the progress of the unit or tribe in 
addressing the unmet needs of youth in the community, in accordance 
with the performance measures under section 204(b)(7).

SEC. 212. PROMISE IMPLEMENTATION GRANT APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS.

    (a) Application Required.--To be eligible to receive a PROMISE 
Implementation grant under this subtitle, a unit of local government or 
Indian tribe that received a PROMISE Assessment and Planning grant 
under subtitle A shall submit an application to the Administrator of 
the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention not later 
than one year after the date such unit of local government or Indian 
tribe was awarded such grant under subtitle A, in such manner, and 
accompanied by such information, as the Administrator, after 
consultation with the organization under section 223(f)(1) of the 
Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (42 U.S.C. 
5633(f)(1)), may require.
    (b) Contents of Application.--Each application submitted under 
subsection (a) shall--
            (1) identify potential savings from criminal justice costs, 
        public assistance costs, and other costs avoided by utilizing 
        evidence-based and promising practices related to juvenile 
        delinquency and criminal street gang activity prevention and 
        intervention;
            (2) document--
                    (A) investment in evidence-based and promising 
                practices related to juvenile delinquency and criminal 
                street gang activity prevention and intervention to be 
                provided by the unit of local government or Indian 
                tribe;
                    (B) the activities to be undertaken with the grants 
                funds;
                    (C) any expected efficiencies in the juvenile 
                justice or other local systems to be attained as a 
                result of implementation of the programs funded by the 
                grant; and
                    (D) outcomes from such activities, in terms of the 
                expected numbers related to reduced criminal activity;
            (3) describe how savings sustained from investment in 
        prevention and intervention practices will be reinvested in the 
        continuing implementation of the PROMISE Plan; and
            (4) provide an assurance that the local fiscal contribution 
        with respect to evidence-based and promising practices related 
        to juvenile delinquency and criminal street gang activity 
        prevention and intervention in the community for which the 
        PROMISE Coordinating Council was established for each year of 
        the grant period will not be less than the local fiscal 
        contribution with respect to such practices in the community 
        for the year preceding the first year of the grant period.

SEC. 213. GRANT AWARD GUIDELINES.

    (a) Selection and Distribution.--Grants awarded under this subtitle 
shall be awarded on a competitive basis. The Administrator shall--
            (1) take such steps as may be necessary to ensure that 
        grants are awarded to units of local governments and Indian 
        tribes in areas with the highest concentrations of youth who 
        are--
                    (A) at-risk of involvement in juvenile delinquency 
                or criminal street gang activity; and
                    (B) involved in juvenile delinquency or street gang 
                activity and who are at high-risk of continued 
                involvement; and
            (2) give consideration to the need for grants to be awarded 
        to units of local governments and Indian tribes in each region 
        of the United States, and among urban, suburban, and rural 
        areas.
    (b) Extension of Grant Award.--The Administrator may extend the 
grant period under section 211(b)(1) for a PROMISE Implementation grant 
to a unit of local government or an Indian tribe, in accordance with 
regulations issued by the Administrator.
    (c) Renewal of Grant Award.--Subject to the availability of 
appropriations, the Administrator may renew a PROMISE Implementation 
grant to a unit of local government or an Indian tribe to provide such 
unit or tribe with additional funds to continue implementation of a 
PROMISE Plan. Such a renewal--
            (1) shall be initiated by an application for renewal from a 
        unit of local government or an Indian tribe;
            (2) shall be carried out in accordance with regulations 
        issued by the Administrator; and
            (3) shall not be granted unless the Administrator 
        determines such a renewal to be appropriate based on the 
        results of the evaluation conducted under section 223(a) with 
        respect to the community of such unit or tribe for which a 
        PROMISE Coordinating Council was established, and for which 
        such unit or tribe is applying for renewal.

SEC. 214. REPORTS.

    Not later than one year after the end of the grant period for which 
a unit of local government or an Indian tribe receives a PROMISE 
Implementation grant, and annually thereafter for as long as such unit 
or tribe continues to receive Federal funding for a PROMISE 
Coordinating Council, such unit or tribe shall report to the 
Administrator regarding the use of Federal funds to implement the 
PROMISE Plan developed under subtitle A.

SEC. 215. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

    There are authorized to be appropriated to carry out this subtitle 
such sums as may be necessary for each of the fiscal years 2014 through 
2016.

              Subtitle C--General PROMISE Grant Provisions

SEC. 221. NONSUPPLANTING CLAUSE.

    A unit of local government or Indian tribe receiving a grant under 
this title shall use such grant only to supplement, and not supplant, 
the amount of funds that, in the absence of such grant, would be 
available to address the needs of youth in the community with respect 
to evidence-based and promising practices related to juvenile 
delinquency and criminal street gang activity prevention and 
intervention.

SEC. 222. GRANT APPLICATION REVIEW PANEL.

    The Administrator of the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency 
Prevention, in conjunction with the PROMISE Advisory Panel, shall 
establish and utilize a transparent, reliable, and valid system for 
evaluating applications for PROMISE Assessment and Planning grants and 
for PROMISE Implementation grants, and shall determine which applicants 
meet the criteria for funding, based primarily on a determination of 
greatest need (in accordance with section 102), with due consideration 
to other enumerated factors and the indicated ability of the applicant 
to successfully implement the program described in the application.

SEC. 223. EVALUATION OF PROMISE GRANT PROGRAMS.

    (a) Evaluation Required.--Subject to the availability of 
appropriations under this title, the Administrator shall, in 
consultation with the organization provided assistance under section 
223(f)(1) of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 
1974 (42 U.S.C. 5633(f)(1)), provide for an evaluation of the programs 
and activities carried out with grants under this title. In carrying 
out this section, the Administrator shall--
            (1) award grants to institutions of higher education 
        (including institutions that are eligible to receive funds 
        under part F of title III of the Higher Education Act of 1965 
        (20 U.S.C. 1067q et seq.), to facilitate the evaluation process 
        and measurement of achieved outcomes;
            (2) identify evidence-based and promising practices used by 
        PROMISE Coordinating Councils under PROMISE Implementation 
        grants that have proven to be effective in preventing 
        involvement in, or diverting further involvement in, juvenile 
        delinquency or criminal street gang activity; and
            (3) ensure--
                    (A) that such evaluation is based on the 
                performance standards that are developed by the PROMISE 
                Advisory Panel in accordance with section 223(g) of the 
                Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 
                (as added by section 101(b) of this Act);
                    (B) the development of longitudinal and clinical 
                trial evaluation and performance measurements with 
                regard to the evidence-based and promising practices 
                funded under this title; and
                    (C) the dissemination of the practices identified 
                in paragraph (2) to the National Research Center for 
                Proven Juvenile Justice Practices (established under 
                section 301), units of local government, and Indian 
                tribes to promote the use of such practices by such 
                units and tribes to prevent involvement in, or to 
                divert further involvement in, juvenile delinquency or 
                criminal street gang activity.
    (b) Results to the National Research Center for Proven Juvenile 
Justice Practices.--The Administrator shall provide the results of the 
evaluation under subsection (a) to the National Research Center for 
Proven Juvenile Justice Practices established under section 301.

                  TITLE III--PROMISE RESEARCH CENTERS

SEC. 301. ESTABLISHMENT OF THE NATIONAL RESEARCH CENTER FOR PROVEN 
              JUVENILE JUSTICE PRACTICES.

    (a) Center Established.--Subject to the availability of 
appropriations, the Administrator shall award a grant to a nonprofit 
organization with a national reputation for expertise in operating or 
evaluating effective, evidence-based practices related to juvenile 
delinquency and criminal street gang activity prevention or 
intervention to develop a National Research Center for Proven Juvenile 
Justice Practices. Such Center shall--
            (1) collaborate with institutions of higher education as 
        regional partners to create a best practices juvenile justice 
        information-sharing network to support the programs and 
        activities carried out with grants under title II of this Act;
            (2) collect, and disseminate to PROMISE Coordinating 
        Councils, research and other information about evidence-based 
        and promising practices related to juvenile delinquency and 
        criminal street gang activity prevention and intervention to 
        inform the efforts of PROMISE Coordinating Councils and 
        regional research partners and to support the programs and 
        activities carried out with grants under title II of this Act;
            (3) increase the public's knowledge and understanding of 
        effective juvenile justice practices to prevent crime and 
        delinquency and reduce recidivism; and
            (4) develop, manage, and regularly update a site to 
        disseminate proven practices for successful juvenile 
        delinquency prevention and intervention.
    (b) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated such sums as may be necessary to carry out this section 
for each of the fiscal years 2014 through 2016.

SEC. 302. GRANTS FOR REGIONAL RESEARCH PROVEN PRACTICES PARTNERSHIPS.

    (a) Grant Program Authorized.--The Administrator shall, subject to 
the availability of appropriations, establish a grant program to award 
grants to institutions of higher education to serve as regional 
research partners with PROMISE Coordinating Councils that are located 
in the same geographic region as an institution, in collaboration with 
the National Research Center for Proven Juvenile Justice Practices 
authorized under section 301. Regional research partners shall provide 
research support to such PROMISE Coordinating Councils, including--
            (1) assistance with preparing PROMISE grant applications 
        under title II, including collection of baseline data for such 
        applications;
            (2) assistance with the needs and strengths assessments 
        conducted under section 203; and
            (3) provision of support services to PROMISE grant 
        recipients for data collection and analysis to assess progress 
        under the PROMISE grant.
    (b) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated such sums as may be necessary to carry out this section 
for each of the fiscal years 2014 through 2016.
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