Text: H.R.1933 — 113th Congress (2013-2014)All Bill Information (Except Text)

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Introduced in House (05/09/2013)


113th CONGRESS
1st Session
H. R. 1933

To provide assistance and opportunity for the creation and support of sustainable agriculture activities in America’s cities and to improve access to nutrition in America’s cities.


IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
May 9, 2013

Ms. Fudge (for herself, Ms. Eddie Bernice Johnson of Texas, Mr. Thompson of Mississippi, Mr. Rangel, Ms. Kaptur, Ms. Pingree of Maine, Mr. Conyers, and Ms. Chu) introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on Agriculture, and in addition to the Committee on Education and the Workforce, for a period to be subsequently determined by the Speaker, in each case for consideration of such provisions as fall within the jurisdiction of the committee concerned


A BILL

To provide assistance and opportunity for the creation and support of sustainable agriculture activities in America’s cities and to improve access to nutrition in America’s cities.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. Short title; table of contents.

(a) Short title.—This Act may be cited as the “Let’s Grow Act of 2013”.

(b) Table of contents.—The table of contents of this Act is the following:


Sec. 1. Short title; table of contents.

Sec. 101. Healthy corner store initiative.

Sec. 102. Virtual farmers’ markets.

Sec. 103. Local food insecurity assessments: assessing the unique nutritional needs of local communities.

Sec. 104. Hunger-free communities.

Sec. 105. EBT farmers market accessibility program.

Sec. 106. Farm-to-Preschool program.

Sec. 107. Extension of pilot projects to evaluate health and nutrition promotion in the supplemental nutrition assistance program.

Sec. 108. Expanding and improving the affordability and nutritional integrity of the USDA Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program.

Sec. 201. Purpose and definitions.

Sec. 202. Establishment of Healthy Food Financing Initiative and eligible projects.

Sec. 203. Duties of Secretary.

Sec. 204. National fund manager.

Sec. 205. Allocation and use of funds.

Sec. 206. Partnerships.

Sec. 207. Evaluation and monitoring.

Sec. 208. Administrative provisions.

Sec. 209. Authorization of appropriations.

Sec. 301. Community gardening grant program.

Sec. 302. Grants for conversion of abandoned and foreclosed property to urban agricultural uses.

Sec. 303. Expansion of HarvestCorps program.

Sec. 304. Acquisition of publically owned land and conversion to urban farms and community gardens.

Sec. 305. Urban agricultural workforce training pilot program.

Sec. 306. Urban agriculture development grants program.

Sec. 307. Clean and safe drinking water for urban areas and waterways.

Sec. 308. Extension of assistance to socially disadvantaged urban farmers and ranchers.

Sec. 309. Urban entrepreneur and microenterprise assistance program.

Sec. 310. Local farm business and market garden competitive loan program.

Sec. 401. Weekends and holidays without hunger.

Sec. 402. Expansion and modernization of the commodity supplemental food program.

Sec. 403. Expansion and modernization of the emergency food assistance program.

Sec. 404. Food bank equipment and technology program.

Sec. 501. Green and Sustainable Schools, Museums, and Libraries Grant Program.

SEC. 101. Healthy corner store initiative.

(a) In general.—The Secretary of Agriculture shall carry out a program, to be known as the Green and Healthy Corner Store Initiative, of awarding grants to units of general local government, nonprofit organizations, and tribal governments to assist qualified convenience stores to expand and sustain their offering of fruits and vegetables.

(b) Priority.—In awarding grants under this section, the Secretary shall give priority to applicants proposing to provide assistance to qualified convenience stores in low-income communities.

(c) Assistance.—Assistance provided to a qualified convenience store pursuant to this section may include the following:

(1) Seed money for the purchase of fruits and vegetables and for equipment needed to sell fruits and vegetables, such as but not limited to refrigerators.

(2) Seed money for converting to energy-saving equipment, such as but not limited to energy-efficient lighting and refrigerators and a ductless HVAC system, to minimize the additional energy costs associated with the refrigeration needed to stock fruits and vegetables.

(3) Educational tools and information on the importance of fresh fruits and vegetables.

(4) Simple recipes to assist customers in healthy food preparation.

(d) Requirements for convenience stores.—As a condition on receipt of funds under this section, a grantee shall agree to ensure that any qualified convenience store receiving assistance through the grant will—

(1) maintain its expanded offering of fruits and vegetables for a minimum time to be determined by the Secretary;

(2) limit the number of its advertisements for alcoholic beverages and cigarettes and offer at least an equal amount of advertising for fruits and vegetables;

(3) place advertisements for fruits and vegetables prominently in the front of the store;

(4) advertise that the store is participating in the Green and Healthy Corner Store Initiative; and

(5) work to partner with rural and urban farmers markets to obtain fruits and vegetables for sale.

(e) Cooperation among stores To decrease prices.—The Secretary shall encourage grant recipients under this section to encourage qualified convenience stores receiving assistance through the grant to combine efforts with other convenience stores when ordering fruits and vegetables from distributors in an effort to decrease the price of such goods.

(f) Definitions.—In this section:

(1) The term “Bureau-funded school” has the meaning given to such term in section 1141 of the Education Amendments of 1978 (25 U.S.C. 2021).

(2) The terms “elementary school”, “local educational agency”, and “secondary school” have the meanings given to such terms in section 9101 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 7801).

(3) The term “low-income communities” includes—

(A) communities with a high percentage of children eligible for free and reduced priced lunches under the Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act (42 U.S.C. 1751 et seq.); and

(B) any other communities determined by the Secretary to be low-income for purposes of this section.

(4) The term “Secretary” means the Secretary of Agriculture.

(5) The term “qualified convenience store” means a convenience store located within a quarter mile of an elementary school or a secondary school that is a public school or a Bureau-funded school.

SEC. 102. Virtual farmers’ markets.

(a) Establishment of grant program.—From the amounts appropriated to carry out this section, the Secretary of Agriculture shall award grants, on a competitive basis, to eligible entities to enable such entities to carry out a program that provides access to farmers’ markets to communities that are food deserts.

(b) Use of funds.—An eligible entity receiving a grant under this section shall use such funds for the following:

(1) Purchasing virtual farmers market software (including computer kiosks and swipe card stations), or entering into a contract with an eligible organization to develop and maintain the technology necessary, to carry out a virtual farmers market program to enable individuals and organizations in communities that are food deserts to order and purchase fruits and vegetables and other healthy food items using such technology.

(2) Training staff to—

(A) assist individuals and organizations in communities that are food deserts to order and purchase food products under the program described in paragraph (1); and

(B) purchase and order food products under the program for the eligible entity.

(3) Packaging food products purchased under the program in manner that makes transportation of the products possible by foot.

(4) Paying staff to manage the program, and package and assist in the distribution and delivery of food products purchased under the program.

(5) Raising public awareness about the program.

(6) Developing simple food preparation strategies and menus for customers of the program.

(7) Coordinating with the Secretary of Agriculture to develop mechanisms to enable reimbursement under the supplemental nutrition assistance program established under the Food and Nutrition Act of 2008 (7 U.S.C. 2011 et seq.) for purchases made under the program.

(8) Purchasing or rehabilitating buses, including buses that were formerly used as school buses, that may be used to transport to the eligible entity—

(A) the foods ordered and purchased under the program using the technology described in paragraph (1); or

(B) other fruits and vegetables that meet the requirements of subsection (e) in order to provide additional opportunities for individuals and organizations in communities that are food deserts to purchase locally grown fruits and vegetables.

(c) Application.—In order to receive a grant under this section, an eligible entity shall submit an application to the Secretary at such time, in such manner, and containing such information as the Secretary may require.

(d) Grant amount.—A grant awarded under this section may not be greater than $10,000.

(e) Limitations on food purchased.—To the extent practicable, the majority of food purchased under a virtual farmers market program carried out by an eligible entity under this section shall be from farmers located within a 50-mile radius of the site where the food is ordered and delivered under the program, except in the case where the eligible entity demonstrates to the Secretary that no such farmers exist or that the farmers are not able to provide a sufficient variety or amount of food for the purposes of the program.

(f) Report.—Not later than 1 year after the first fiscal year for which funds are appropriated to carry out this section, the Secretary shall report to Congress on the progress made in carrying out programs funded by grants under this section, including—

(1) the number of individuals served by such programs and the barriers and opportunities for additional such programs; and

(2) how such programs have increased access or encouraged permanent farmers markets to be established near communities that are food deserts.

(g) Definitions.—In this section—

(1) BUREAU-FUNDED SCHOOL.—The term “bureau-funded school” has the meaning given such term in section 1146 of the Education Amendments of 1978 (25 U.S.C. 2026).

(2) ELIGIBLE ENTITY.—The term “eligible entity” means an entity that predominantly serves communities that are food deserts, including—

(A) a local educational agency or bureau-funded school;

(B) a nonprofit, community-based organization or entity (including a park and recreation department, recreation center, child care facility, or senior center);

(C) a convenience store; or

(D) other entity that the Secretaries deem to be an eligible entity.

(3) ELIGIBLE ORGANIZATION.—The term “eligible organization” means an organization with expertise in developing and maintaining a virtual farmers market.

(4) LOCAL EDUCATIONAL AGENCY.—The term “local educational agency” has the meaning given such term in section 9101 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 7801).

(5) FOOD DESERT.—The term “food desert” has the meaning given such term in section 7527(a) of the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–234).

(6) SECRETARY.—The term “Secretary” means the Secretary of Agriculture.

(7) SWIPE CARD STATIONS.—The term “swipe card stations” shall include support for the use of electronic benefit transfer cards.

(8) VIRTUAL FARMERS MARKET.—The term “virtual farmers market” means an online grocery store that enables individuals to purchase foods from local farms and distributors.

SEC. 103. Local food insecurity assessments: assessing the unique nutritional needs of local communities.

(a) In general.—The Secretary of Health and Human Services shall establish a 3-year pilot program to award grants to local and tribal governments, on a competitive basis, to allow such local and tribal governments, in partnership with the local community organizations under subsection (e), to—

(1) conduct a food security assessment; and

(2) make an inventory of the system in order to identify the strengths and gaps in such system.

(b) Data points for Assessment.—For purposes of conducting an Assessment and making an inventory under a grant under subsection (a), with respect to the community served by a local or tribal government, such government shall examine the following food security and food system issues in the community:

(1) The prevalence of childhood obesity.

(2) The availability of safe routes to school for children.

(3) The quality of food served in school and child care settings.

(4) The availability of supermarkets.

(5) The cost and availability of fresh fruits and vegetables.

(6) The concentration of convenience stores, and other food vendors that sell a disproportionate amount of foods that are not fresh fruits and vegetables.

(7) The availability of products.

(8) The concentration of fast food restaurants.

(9) The availability of green space or recreation areas, and the extent to which such space or areas encourage physical activity by adults and children.

(10) Any other issues determined to be relevant by the local or tribal government.

(11) Any other issues determined to be relevant by the Secretary of Health and Human Services.

(c) Number of sites.—The Secretary of Health and Human Services, in awarding grants under subsection (a), shall award grants to no more than—

(1) 20 local governments; and

(2) 5 tribal governments.

(d) Priority.—In awarding grants under subsection (a), the Secretary of Health and Human Services shall give priority to those local and tribal governments that serve communities with the highest concentrations of poverty.

(e) Requirement of partnerships.—In order to qualify for a grant under subsection (a), a local or tribal government shall demonstrate, to the satisfaction of the Secretary of Health and Human Services, that the local or tribal government has entered into a partnership (for the purpose of conducting an assessment and making an inventory under subsection (a)) with at least one of the following local community organizations:

(1) A nonprofit community-based organization or entity.

(2) A developer or urban planning institution.

(3) An accredited college or university.

SEC. 104. Hunger-free communities.

Section 4405 of the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (7 U.S.C. 7517) is amended—

(1) in subsection (a)—

(A) by striking paragraph (1) and inserting the following:

“(1) ELIGIBLE ENTITY.—

“(A) COLLABORATIVE GRANTS.—In subsection (b), the term ‘eligible entity’ means a public food program service provider or nonprofit organization, including an emergency feeding organization, that has collaborated or will collaborate with 1 or more local partner organizations to achieve at least 1 hunger-free communities goal.

“(B) INCENTIVE GRANTS.—In subsection (c), the term ‘eligible entity’ means a nonprofit organization (including an emergency feeding organization), an agricultural cooperative, producer network or association, community health organization, public benefit corporation, economic development corporation, farmers’ market, community-supported agriculture program, buying club, supplemental nutrition assistance program retail food store, a State, local, or tribal agency, and any other entity the Secretary designates.”; and

(B) by adding at the end the following:

“(4) SUPPLEMENTAL NUTRITION ASSISTANCE PROGRAM.—The term ‘supplemental nutrition assistance program’ means the supplemental nutrition assistance program established under the Food and Nutrition Act of 2008 (7 U.S.C. 2011 et seq.).

“(5) UNDERSERVED COMMUNITY.—The term ‘underserved community’ has the meaning given the term in section 25 of the Food and Nutrition Act of 2008 (7 U.S.C. 2034).”;

(2) in subsection (b)(1)(A), by striking “not more than 50 percent of any funds made available under subsection (e)” and inserting “funds made available under subsection (d)(1)”; and

(3) by striking subsections (c), (d), and (e) and inserting the following:

“(c) Hunger-Free communities incentive grants.—

“(1) AUTHORIZATION.—

“(A) IN GENERAL.—In each of the years specified in subsection (d), the Secretary shall make grants to eligible entities in accordance with paragraph (2).

“(B) FEDERAL SHARE.—The Federal share of the cost of carrying out an activity under this subsection shall not exceed 50 percent of the total cost of the activity.

“(C) NON-FEDERAL SHARE.—

“(i) IN GENERAL.—The non-Federal share of the cost of an activity under this subsection may be provided—

“(I) in cash or in-kind contributions as determined by the Secretary, including facilities, equipment, or services; and

“(II) by a State or local government or a private source.

“(ii) LIMITATION.—In the case of a for-profit entity, the non-Federal share described in clause (i) shall not include services of an employee, including salaries paid or expenses covered by the employer.

“(2) CRITERIA.—

“(A) IN GENERAL.—For purposes of this subsection, an eligible entity is a governmental agency or nonprofit organization that—

“(i) meets the application criteria set forth by the Secretary; and

“(ii) proposes a project that, at a minimum—

“(I) has the support of the State agency;

“(II) would increase the purchase of fruits and vegetables by low-income consumers participating in the supplemental nutrition assistance program by providing incentives at the point of purchase;

“(III) agrees to participate in the evaluation described in paragraph (4);

“(IV) ensures that the same terms and conditions apply to purchases made by individuals with benefits issued under this Act and incentives provided for in this subsection as apply to purchases made by individuals who are not members of households receiving benefits, such as provided for in section 278.2(b) of title 7, Code of Federal Regulations (or a successor regulation); and

“(V) includes effective and efficient technologies for benefit redemption systems that may be replicated in other for States and communities.

“(B) PRIORITY.—In awarding grants under this section, the Secretary shall give priority to projects that—

“(i) maximize the share of funds used for direct incentives to participants;

“(ii) use direct-to-consumer sales marketing;

“(iii) demonstrate a track record of designing and implementing successful nutrition incentive programs that connect low-income consumers and agricultural producers;

“(iv) provide locally or regionally produced fruits and vegetables;

“(v) are located in underserved communities; or

“(vi) address other criteria as established by the Secretary.

“(3) APPLICABILITY.—

“(A) IN GENERAL.—The value of any benefit provided to a participant in any activity funded under this subsection shall not be considered income or resources for any purpose under any Federal, State, or local law.

“(B) PROHIBITION ON COLLECTION OF SALES TAXES.—Each State shall ensure that no State or local tax is collected on a purchase of food under this subsection.

“(C) NO LIMITATION ON BENEFITS.—A grant made available under this subsection shall not be used to carry out any project that limits the use of benefits under the Food and Nutrition Act of 2008 (7 U.S.C. 2011 et seq.) or any other Federal nutrition law.

“(D) HOUSEHOLD ALLOTMENT.—Assistance provided under this subsection to households receiving benefits under the supplemental nutrition assistance program shall not—

“(i) be considered part of the supplemental nutrition assistance program benefits of the household; or

“(ii) be used in the collection or disposition of claims under section 13 of the Food and Nutrition Act of 2008 (7 U.S.C. 2022).

“(4) EVALUATION.—

“(A) INDEPENDENT EVALUATION.—The Secretary shall provide for an independent evaluation of projects selected under this subsection that measures the impact of each project on—

“(i) improving the nutrition and health status of participating households receiving incentives under this subsection; and

“(ii) increasing fruit and vegetable purchases in participating households.

“(B) REQUIREMENT.—The independent evaluation under subparagraph (A) shall use rigorous methodologies capable of producing scientifically valid information regarding the effectiveness of a project.

“(C) COSTS.—The Secretary may use funds not to exceed 10 percent of the funding provided to carry out this section to pay costs associated with administering, monitoring, and evaluating each project.

“(d) Funding.—

“(1) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.—There is authorized to be appropriated to carry out subsection (b) $5,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2014 through 2018.

“(2) MANDATORY FUNDING.—Of the funds of the Commodity Credit Corporation, the Secretary shall use to carry out subsection (c)—

“(A) $15,000,000 for fiscal year 2014;

“(B) $20,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2015 through 2017; and

“(C) $25,000,000 for fiscal year 2018.”.

SEC. 105. EBT farmers market accessibility program.

(a) Authority for program.—The Secretary of Agriculture shall develop and carry out a program to make grants to entities that operate farmers markets in urban areas for the purchase of equipment and to finance the installation of equipment necessary to operate EBT systems at farmers markets.

(b) Authorization of appropriations.—There is authorized to be appropriated to carry out this section $10,000,000 for each of the fiscal years in the 8-year period beginning on the October 1 of the first fiscal year that begins after the date of the enactment of this Act.

SEC. 106. Farm-to-Preschool program.

(a) Authority for program.—The Secretary of Agriculture shall develop and carry out a grant program to make grants to community-based and nonprofit organizations to develop a Farm-to-Preschool program that fosters the connection between preschools, Head Start programs, childcare or daycare centers, kindergarten readiness programs in K–12 school districts, and in-home care facilities, with small- or medium-sized agricultural producers, for the purposes of—

(1) developing an industry-leading preschool nutrition education and meal program designed to help prevent the onset of childhood obesity and develop foundational healthy eating and lifestyle habits,

(2) creating nutritious and healthy made-from-scratch meals and menus using recipes that include mostly locally grown and produced organic foods,

(3) developing recipes and menus that will serve as a tool for parent awareness, access to healthy food, food preparation, and eating, and engagement in nutrition education,

(4) developing experiential educational curricula centered around farms, farmers’ markets, and school gardens for parents and children,

(5) replicating “Farm-to-Preschool” parent awareness and engagement in nutrition education, healthy eating and food preparation nationally,

(6) supporting local and regional agriculture communities, and

(7) promoting the institutionalization of preschool wellness policies.

(b) Availability and use of grants.—The Secretary shall make grants under subsection (a)—

(1) to be used—

(A) to support the initial costs of implementing a new, or expanding an existing, Farm-to-Preschool program,

(B) in an amount not to exceed $250,000 to support the training and access to resources and information necessary to conduct a successful Farm-to-Preschool program, or

(C) in an amount not to exceed $50,000 to support the cost of conducting research, identifying resources, and developing partnerships to design a successful and sustainable Farm-to-Preschool program,

(2) to eligible entities that agree to provide, in cash or in kind, not less that 20 percent of the cost of the use for which the respective grants are made, and

(3) to achieve to the maximum extent practicable geographical diversity and grantee participation in urban, rural and tribal communities.

(c) Report.—Not later than 1 year after the first fiscal year for which funds are appropriated to carry out this section, the Secretary of Agriculture shall report to Congress on the progress made in carrying out programs funded by grants under this section, including preschool nutrition education curricula centered around farms, farmers’ markets, and school gardens, and the institutionalization of preschool wellness policies.

(d) Authorization of appropriations.—There is authorized to be appropriated for fiscal years 2014 through 2018 in the aggregate $10,000,000 to carry out this section.

SEC. 107. Extension of pilot projects to evaluate health and nutrition promotion in the supplemental nutrition assistance program.

Section 17(k)(5)(A) of the Food and Nutrition Act of 2008 (7 U.S.C. 2036(k)(5)(A)) is amended by striking “2012” and inserting “2018”.

SEC. 108. Expanding and improving the affordability and nutritional integrity of the USDA Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program.

Subsection (b) of section 19 of the Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act (42 U.S.C. 1769a(b)) is amended to read as follows:

“(b) Program.—A school participating in the program—

“(1) shall make free fruits and vegetables available to students throughout the school day (or at such other times as are considered appropriate by the Secretary) in 1 or more areas designated by the school; and

“(2) may make free fruits and vegetables in any other form (such as fresh, frozen, dried, pureed, or canned) available to students throughout the school day (or at such other times as are considered appropriate by the Secretary) in 1 or more areas designated by the school only if such fruits and vegetables meet any additional nutrition specifications, as established by the Secretary.”.

SEC. 201. Purpose and definitions.

(a) Purpose.—The purpose of the Healthy Food Financing Initiative is to improve access to healthy foods in underserved areas, to create and preserve quality jobs, and to revitalize low-income communities by providing loans and grants to retailers of fresh and healthy food to overcome the higher costs and initial barriers to entry in underserved urban, suburban, and rural areas.

(b) Definitions.—In this title:

(1) COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FINANCIAL INSTITUTION.—The term “community development financial institution” has the meaning given the term in section 103 of the Community Development Banking and Financial Institutions Act of 1994 (12 U.S.C. 4702).

(2) EXPAND OR PRESERVE THE AVAILABILITY OF FRESH FRUITS AND VEGETABLES IN UNDERSERVED AREAS.—The term “expand or preserve the availability of fresh fruits and vegetables in underserved areas” means—

(A) in the case of a project not involving a regional food hub, a project that—

(i) carries a variety of fresh produce, as defined by the national fund manager to reflect differences in project size and type;

(ii) sells food for home preparation and consumption; and

(iii) at a minimum—

(I) offers for sale at least 3 different varieties of food in each of the 4 staple food groups (bread and grains, dairy, fruits and vegetables, and meat, poultry, and fish), with perishable food in at least 2 categories, on a daily basis; or

(II) has at least 50 percent of the total sales of the store (including food and nonfood items or services) from the sale of eligible staple food; and

(B) in the case of a regional food hub, a project that—

(i) supplies a variety of fresh produce to a healthy food retailer located in an underserved, low- and moderate-income area; and

(ii) participates in the supplemental nutrition assistance program established under the Food and Nutrition Act of 2008 (7 U.S.C. 2011 et seq.).

(3) FARMERS’ MARKET.—The term “farmers’ market” means a common facility or area in which several agricultural producers gather on a regular and recurring basis to sell a variety of fresh fruits and vegetables and other locally grown agricultural products directly to consumers.

(4) FOOD ACCESS ORGANIZATION.—The term “food access organization” means a nonprofit organization with expertise in improving access to healthy food in underserved communities.

(5) HEALTHY FOOD RETAILER.—The term “healthy food retailer” means a commercial, cooperative, and nonprofit seller of fresh or healthy food, including a grocery store, mobile healthy food retailer, farmers’ market, cooperative, corner store, bodega, or other store that sells other food and non-food options along with a full range of fresh or healthy foods.

(6) INITIATIVE.—The term “Initiative” means the Healthy Food Financing Initiative.

(7) LOCAL FUNDS.—The term “local funds” means the allocation of national funds and any other forms of financial assistance (including grants, loans, and equity investments) that are raised by partnerships to carry out the purposes of the Initiative.

(8) NATIONAL FUNDS.—The term “national funds” means amounts appropriated to carry out the Initiative and any other forms of financial assistance (including grants, loans, and equity investments) that are raised by the national fund manager to carry out the Initiative.

(9) NATIONAL FUND MANAGER.—The term “national fund manager” means a community development financial institution in existence as of the date of enactment of this Act and certified by the Community Development Financial Institutions Fund of the Department of the Treasury that is designated by the Secretary to manage the Initiative for purposes of—

(A) raising private capital;

(B) providing financial and technical assistance to partnerships; and

(C) funding eligible projects directly at the request of partnerships to attract retailers of healthy food to underserved urban, suburban, and rural areas in accordance with this title.

(10) PARTNERSHIP.—

(A) IN GENERAL.—The term “partnership” means a regional, State, or local public and private partnership that is organized to improve access to healthy foods by providing financial and technical assistance to eligible projects.

(B) INCLUSIONS.—The term includes—

(i) an unit of State, local, or tribal government or a quasi-public State or local government agency;

(ii) a food access or community health organization committed to improving access to healthy foods;

(iii) a community development financial institution or other organization that is capable of administering a loan and grant program in accordance with this title; and

(iv) other organizations interested in improving access to healthy foods in underserved areas.

(11) PERISHABLE FOOD.—

(A) IN GENERAL.—The term “perishable food” means food that is fresh, refrigerated, or frozen.

(B) EXCLUSION.—The term “perishable food” does not include packaged or canned goods.

(12) REGIONAL FOOD HUB.—The term “regional food hub” means a business or organization that actively manages the aggregation, distribution, and marketing of source-identified food products primarily from local and regional producers to strengthen the ability of the producers to satisfy wholesale, retail, and institutional demand.

(13) SECRETARY.—The term “Secretary” means the Secretary of Agriculture.

(14) SERVE.—The term “serve” means, with respect to a regional food hub, that the regional food hub, in connection with an eligible project, supplies fresh produce or other healthy foods—

(A) to a healthy food retailer that participates in the supplemental nutrition assistance program established under the Food and Nutrition Act of 2008 (7 U.S.C. 2011 et seq.);

(B) to a healthy food retailer located in a low- or moderate-income area; and

(C) to institutions such as hospitals, schools, or food banks that largely serve a low- and moderate-income area.

(15) STAPLE FOOD.—

(A) IN GENERAL.—The term “staple food” means food that is a basic dietary item, including bread, flour, fruits, vegetables, and meat.

(B) EXCLUSIONS.—The term “staple food” does not include snack or accessory food (such as chips, soda, coffee, condiments, and spices) or ready-to-eat, prepared food.

(16) VARIETY.—The term “variety” means an assortment of different types of food items.

SEC. 202. Establishment of Healthy Food Financing Initiative and eligible projects.

(a) Establishment.—There is established in the Department of Agriculture a Healthy Food Financing Initiative.

(b) Management.—Not later than 1 year after the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall select and enter into a grant agreement with a national fund manager that will be responsible for the management of the Initiative.

(c) Eligible projects.—

(1) ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA.—Subject to the requirements of this section, the national fund manager shall establish the eligibility criteria for projects to be assisted by the Initiative.

(2) REQUIRED PROJECT ELEMENTS.—To be eligible to receive assistance through the Initiative, a project shall—

(A) include a supermarket, grocery store, regional food hub, farmers’ market, or other healthy food retailer;

(B) consist of a for-profit business enterprise, a member- or worker-owned cooperative, or a nonprofit organization;

(C) meet the eligibility criteria established under this section;

(D) continue to be a viable business enterprise with a financial viability plan;

(E) require an investment of public funding to move forward and be competitive;

(F) operate on a self-service basis;

(G) expand or preserve the availability of fresh fruits and vegetables in underserved areas and other healthy, fresh, high quality unprepared and unprocessed foods in such areas; and

(H)(i) in the case of a regional food hub, serve retailers that accept benefits under the supplemental nutrition assistance program established under the Food and Nutrition Act of 2008 (7 U.S.C. 2011 et seq.); or

(ii) in the case of a retailer that is not a regional food hub, agree to accept such benefits.

(d) Income criteria.—Each eligible project shall be located in or, in the case of a project involving a regional food hub, shall serve—

(1) a low- or moderate-income census tract, as determined by the Bureau of the Census of the Department of Commerce;

(2) a population census tract that is treated as a low-income community under section 45D(e) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986; or

(3) an area that significantly serves an adjacent area that meets the criteria described in paragraph (1) or (2), as approved by the national fund manager.

(e) Underserved criteria.—

(1) IN GENERAL.—Each eligible project shall be located in, or in the case of a project involving a regional food hub, shall serve, an underserved area, as determined by the partnerships according to criteria established by the national fund manager.

(2) FACTORS.—In determining whether an area is an underserved area, the following factors shall be taken into consideration:

(A) Population density.

(B) Below average supermarket density or sales.

(C) Car ownership.

(D) Geographical or physical barriers, such as highways, mountains, major parks, bodies of water, or areas with large amounts of vacant lots or foreclosed properties.

(3) LOCATIONS.—On an annual basis, the national fund manager shall collect data and publish maps that show the location of underserved areas.

(f) Priority projects.—

(1) IN GENERAL.—Priority shall be given to projects that—

(A) are located in severely distressed low-income communities, as defined by the Community Development Financial Institutions Fund of the Department of the Treasury; and

(B) include 1 or more of the following characteristics:

(i) The project will create or retain quality jobs in the community, as determined in accordance with paragraph (2).

(ii) The project has community support in terms of store quality, affordability, site location, and coordination with local community plans or other programs promoting community and economic development.

(iii) The project supports regional food systems and locally grown foods, to the extent available.

(iv) In major metropolitan areas, the project is associated with a transit-oriented development project.

(v) In areas with public transit, the project is accessible by public transit.

(vi) The project involves the reuse of a building that is listed in or eligible for the National Register of Historic Places.

(vii) The project involves a brownfield or grayfield (as those terms are used in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (42 U.S.C. 9601 et seq.)).

(viii) The estimated energy consumption of the project, calculated using building energy software approved by the Department of Energy, will qualify the project for designation under the Energy Star program established by section 324A of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (42 U.S.C. 6294a).

(ix) The project involves women- and minority-owned businesses.

(2) QUALITY JOBS.—For purposes of paragraph (1)(B)(i), a quality job is a job that—

(A) provides wages that are comparable to or better than similar positions in existing businesses of similar size in similar local economies;

(B) offers benefits that are comparable to or better than what is offered for similar positions in existing local businesses of similar size in similar local economies; and

(C) is targeted for residents of neighborhoods with a high proportion of persons of low income (as that term is defined in section 102(a) of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974 (42 U.S.C. 5302(a))) through local targeted hiring programs.

SEC. 203. Duties of Secretary.

(a) In general.—The Secretary shall—

(1) designate a national fund manager to manage national funds;

(2) oversee the Initiative nationally;

(3) work closely with the national fund manager—

(A) to ensure that funds are used appropriately and in the most effective manner practicable; and

(B) to develop the program strategy into a detailed work plan, program, and operating budget;

(4) review and approve the operating budget for the national fund manager to ensure that the administrative costs are—

(A) reasonable (not more than 5 percent of the total budget);

(B) connected to the costs of operations; and

(C) reflect efficient operations by the national fund manager; and

(5) make available to the public an annual report, using data obtained from the Department of Agriculture, the Department of Health and Human Services, and the community development financial institutions, that describes the impacts of the Initiative, including tracking health and economic development indicators at the local, State, and national levels to determine the impacts of individual projects and the collective impact in local areas and statewide of funded projects and the Initiative overall.

(b) Performance targets.—

(1) IN GENERAL.—The Secretary shall conduct financial audits of, and establish performance targets for, the national fund manager, which shall include, at a minimum, the requirements described in this subsection.

(2) GEOGRAPHIC SPREAD.—Partnerships funded by the Initiative shall be geographically diverse and representative of the underserved areas across the United States.

(3) FOCUS ON LOW-INCOME COMMUNITIES.—A substantial portion of the projects funded by partnerships shall serve very low- and low-income communities, as defined by the Bureau of the Census of the Department of Commerce.

(4) FINANCIAL EFFECTIVENESS OF THE NATIONAL FUND MANAGER.—The national fund manager and any local financial institution involved in a partnership shall demonstrate on-going capacity and timeliness in raising private capital and disbursing funds as required under the Initiative.

(5) TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE EFFECTIVENESS OF THE NATIONAL FUND MANAGER.—The provision of technical assistance by the national fund manager shall be evaluated based on—

(A) the responsiveness of the national fund manager to requests for assistance; and

(B) the ability of the national fund manager to craft programs that develop needed new capacities in partnerships.

(6) IMPACT.—Performance targets shall address the allocation of funds by the national fund manager to partnerships and the tracking and reporting of the impacts of the funds in improving access to fresh, healthy foods and in achieving other related impacts.

(c) Disbursement of funds.—The Secretary shall assist in the administration of the Initiative by approving the disbursement of funds to the national fund manager in a manner that facilitates the implementation of the overall Initiative.

SEC. 204. National fund manager.

(a) Selection of National fund manager.—The Secretary shall select the national fund manager through a competitive process from among community development financial institutions that have a proven and recent track record of success and effectiveness in—

(1) attracting private capital;

(2) developing and managing programs that provide grants and loans to support supermarkets and other healthy food retailers in low- and moderate-income areas, including the development of grocery stores, farmers markets, and other healthy food retailer models;

(3) making and servicing loans that are similar to loans proposed in the Initiative or having a record of otherwise successfully investing in the development of healthy food retailers;

(4) effectively managing multiple contracts and subcontractors;

(5) effectively managing large capital pools, of at least $100,000,000; and

(6) providing or contracting for the provision of technical assistance.

(b) Responsibilities of the national fund manager.—The designated national fund manager shall—

(1) raise other forms of financial assistance to match or leverage the national funds;

(2) use administrative funds to develop appropriate training programs and offer technical assistance services to—

(A) partnerships;

(B) State, local, and tribal governments;

(C) the food retail industry; and

(D) food access and health advocacy organizations to augment local capacities;

(3) develop financial products such as loans, grants, and credit enhancement tools that can be used by partnerships to incentivize and support the development and retention of supermarkets and other healthy food retailers in underserved areas;

(4) award Initiative funds to eligible partnerships through an annual competitive process in accordance with section 205(d);

(5) contract with a national food access organization to assist in the review of applications from partnerships and to provide technical assistance to local food access organizations in the proposed partnerships;

(6) award and disburse funds to partnerships or eligible local projects in a timely manner;

(7) create and meet performance benchmarks and reporting guidelines, as approved by the Secretary, including for—

(A) the amount of capital raised and leveraged from financial institutions, partnerships, and other resources;

(B) the geographic diversity of partnerships; and

(C) the proportion of projects funded by the partnership that are in severely distressed low-income communities;

(8) develop program guidelines and operating procedures for the Initiative, including—

(A) maximum grant and loan amounts for projects;

(B) eligible uses of funds;

(C) prudent underwriting criteria;

(D) performance targets;

(E) reporting guidelines;

(F) limits on administrative costs; and

(G) implementation milestones;

(9) monitor the performance of partnerships; and

(10) collect data, compile information, and conduct such research studies as the national fund manager determines to be relevant to the successful implementation of the Initiative, including—

(A) to assess national and local market conditions;

(B) to determine barriers to market entry; and

(C) to identify opportunities for the development or retention of supermarkets and other healthy food retailers in underserved communities.

(c) Work plan.—

(1) IN GENERAL.—Not later than 45 days after the date of receipt of an award, the national fund manager shall develop, with guidance from and in consultation with the Secretary, and submit to the Secretary, a detailed work plan.

(2) APPROVAL REQUIRED.—The Secretary shall review and approve the work plan, program budget, and administrative costs under subsection (e)(4)(C) prior to entering into an agreement with the national fund manager to administer the Initiative.

SEC. 205. Allocation and use of funds.

(a) Allocation.—The national fund manager shall—

(1) allocate at least 70 percent of all funds appropriated for the Initiative for a fiscal year to partnerships that are selected based on the criteria described in subsection (d);

(2) use not more than 25 percent of all funds appropriated for the Initiative for a fiscal year to establish regional food hubs; and

(3) retain the remainder of the funds appropriated for the Initiative for a fiscal year to undertake financing activities described in subsection (c), including a reasonable amount for administrative costs (not to exceed 5 percent) approved by the Secretary.

(b) Use of the national funds by partnership programs.—

(1) IN GENERAL.—As a condition on the receipt of funds, each partnership shall use—

(A) the national funds received from the national fund manager under subsection (a)(1) to create 1 or more revolving loan programs or other revolving pools of capital or other products to facilitate financing of local projects as determined by the agreement between the partnership and the national fund manager; and

(B) any remaining funds for grants, or, as approved, for innovative financing mechanisms.

(2) LIMITATIONS.—

(A) IN GENERAL.—Use of funds for administrative costs and other purposes shall be—

(i) limited in accordance with the terms of the agreement negotiated between the national fund manager and partnerships;

(ii) based on whether administrative costs are reasonable, connected to the costs of operation, and reflect efficient operations by the partnership; and

(iii) determined using criteria including geographic coverage, program duration, and total funding amount.

(B) GOAL.—The goal of this paragraph is to limit administrative costs to the maximum extent practicable, but in no case may the amount used for administrative costs exceed 10 percent of the Federal funds allocated.

(c) Use of the national funds by the national fund manager.—The national fund manager shall use national funds described in subsection (a)(2) to undertake financing and other activities to enhance and maximize the effectiveness of the Initiative, as determined by the agreement with the Secretary, including—

(1) attracting other forms of financial assistance to match or leverage the national funds;

(2) awarding national funds to partnerships in accordance with subsection (d);

(3) creating and managing pools of grant or loan capital that blend or leverage national funds with other forms of financial assistance, including capital in the form of tax credits under section 45D of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, for the benefit of partnerships;

(4) creating and managing pools of grant or loan capital that blend or leverage the national funds with other forms of financial assistance, including capital in the form of tax credits under section 45D of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, to finance eligible local projects identified by partnerships or the national fund manager that have special or unique characteristics;

(5) providing loans or grants directly to eligible local projects as matching funds if requested by a partnership;

(6) providing credit enhancement or other financial products and instruments for the benefit of partnerships or eligible local projects;

(7) providing technical assistance; and

(8) funding reasonable administrative costs approved by the Secretary.

(d) Criteria for awarding national funds to partnerships.—

(1) IN GENERAL.—The national fund manager shall award national funds to partnerships through a competitive process on an annual basis.

(2) FIRST ROUND PRIORITY.—In the first round of funding, the national fund manager shall give priority to existing partnerships that have demonstrable capacity to implement fresh food financing programs in underserved areas quickly.

(3) ADDITIONAL ROUNDS.—Additional rounds shall be designed to promote geographic diversity.

(4) CRITERIA.—In awarding national funds to partnerships, the national fund manager shall consider—

(A) the amount of funds and other resources pledged by a partnership to match or leverage national funds;

(B) the degree of State, local, or tribal government support of the partnership as evidenced by matching grant and loan funds or other types of support, such as allocation of tax-exempt bonds, loan guarantees, and coordination of resources from other State or local economic development programs;

(C) the capacity of the partnership to successfully develop and manage loan and grant programs;

(D) the lack of supermarkets and other healthy food retailers in low- and moderate-income areas that would be served by the partnership;

(E) the experience of the food access or community health organization of the partnership in outreach about access to healthy foods and local healthy food access issues;

(F) the degree of community engagement and support in the development and retention of supermarkets and other healthy food retailers; and

(G) the contribution of the program of the partnership to the overall geographic diversity of the Initiative.

(e) Administrative costs.—

(1) IN GENERAL.—Not later than 45 days after the date of receipt of an award, the national fund manager shall submit to the Secretary for approval a 3-year program and operating budget and detailed work plan that shall include—

(A) costs for research and evaluation, technical assistance, and training; and

(B) program and operating costs.

(2) EARNED REVENUES.—Earned revenues from loan fees and interest may be expended on program and operating costs in accordance with the budget approved by the Secretary.

(3) BASIS OF REVIEW.—The Secretary shall base the review under subparagraph (A) on—

(A) the likelihood of the plan and expenditures to further the purposes of this section; and

(B) whether the administrative costs are reasonable, connected to the costs of operation, and reflect efficient operations by the national fund manager.

SEC. 206. Partnerships.

(a) In general.—Each partnership that receives assistance through the Initiative shall provide financial and technical assistance to eligible healthy food retailer projects in underserved areas within the defined communities of the partnership.

(b) Administration.—Each partnership shall designate a community development financial institution or other organization that is capable of administering a loan and grant program—

(1) to execute grant agreements with the national fund manager; and

(2) to serve as the manager of local funds.

(c) Responsibilities of partnerships.—A partnership shall—

(1) raise other forms of financial assistance to match the national funds received by the partnership;

(2) provide marketing and outreach to communities, the supermarket industry, other healthy food retailers, State and local government officials, and civic and public interest organizations—

(A) to solicit applications from underserved areas from across the State or locality to be served by the partnership; and

(B) to inform the communities and other persons about the availability of grants, loans, training, and technical assistance;

(3) review and underwrite projects to determine whether—

(A) a proposed project meets the criteria for eligible projects under section __02; and

(B) a proposed project meets the criteria for priority projects under subsection (g) of such section;

(4) provide technical assistance services to operators and developers of healthy food retailers;

(5) track and report outcomes, including—

(A) the number of jobs created or retained;

(B) the quantity of healthy food retailer space created or retained and the quantity of regional food hub capacity developed; and

(C) such other health and economic indicators as are required by the national fund manager;

(6) monitor and audit funded projects to ensure compliance with the Initiative, the national fund manager, and partnership program requirements for a period of at least 3 years;

(7) submit an annual report to the national fund manager that describes—

(A) the activities of the partnership;

(B) the expenditure of local funds; and

(C) success in meeting performance targets and satisfying such other terms and conditions as are specified in the agreement between the partnership and the national fund manager; and

(8) coordinate with the national fund manager for the smooth operation of the Initiative.

(d) Administrative costs.—

(1) IN GENERAL.—As a condition on the receipt of assistance under this section, each partnership shall submit to the national fund manager for approval a 3-year budget and plan for all program and operating costs, including—

(A) costs for research and evaluation, technical assistance, and training; and

(B) administrative and operating costs.

(2) EARNED REVENUES.—Earned revenues from loan fees and interest may be expended on program and operating costs in accordance with the budget approved by the national fund manager.

(3) BASIS OF REVIEW.—The national fund manager shall base the review of the budget and plan under paragraph (1) on the likelihood of the budget and plan to further the purposes of the Initiative.

SEC. 207. Evaluation and monitoring.

(a) In general.—Program evaluation and financial audits shall occur at all levels of the Initiative to ensure that—

(1) national and local funds are used properly; and

(2) the objectives of the Initiative are met.

(b) Program evaluation and financial audits.—

(1) IN GENERAL.—The Secretary shall—

(A) conduct periodic program evaluations and financial audits of the national fund manager, partnerships, and projects funded by the Initiative; and

(B) share with the national fund manager the results of the evaluations and audits.

(2) FUNDED PROJECTS.—The Secretary or the national fund manager shall evaluate partnerships to assess the health and economic impacts of projects funded by the Initiative.

(3) OTHER IMPACTS.—

(A) SECRETARY OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES.—The Secretary of Health and Human Services shall conduct research studies and evaluate the health impacts of the Initiative.

(B) COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS.—Representatives of the community development financial institutions shall conduct research studies and evaluate the economic impacts of the Initiative.

(4) PARTNERSHIPS.—

(A) IN GENERAL.—Each partnership shall—

(i) conduct periodic administrative and financial audits of projects funded by the Initiative; and

(ii) share with the national fund manager the results of the audits.

(B) FAILURE OF PARTNERSHIP.—In a case in which a partnership fails, the national fund manager shall take over the portfolio of the failed partnership.

SEC. 208. Administrative provisions.

Not later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall promulgate such regulations as may be necessary to carry out the Initiative, including regulations—

(1) for the conduct of a performance evaluation at the end of the initial 5-year period;

(2) to terminate the contract for cause; and

(3) to extend the contract for an additional 5-year period.

SEC. 209. Authorization of appropriations.

There is authorized to be appropriated to the Secretary to carry out the Initiative $500,000,000. Amounts appropriated pursuant to this authorization of appropriation shall remain available until expended.

SEC. 301. Community gardening grant program.

(a) Program established.—From the amounts appropriated to carry out this section, the Secretary of Agriculture shall award grants to eligible entities to expand, establish, or maintain urban and Native American community gardens.

(b) Application.—In order to receive a grant under this section, an eligible entity shall submit to the Secretary an application at such time, in such manner, and containing such information as the Secretary may require, including—

(1) an assurance that priority for hiring for jobs created by the expansion, establishment, or maintenance of an urban community garden funded with a grant received under this section will be given to individuals who reside in the community where the garden is located; and

(2) a demonstration that the eligible entity is committed to providing non-Federal financial or in-kind support (such as, but not limited to, providing a water supply) for the community garden for which the entity receives funds under this section.

(c) Definitions.—In this section:

(1) ELIGIBLE ENTITY.—The term “eligible entity” means—

(A) a for profit or nonprofit organization; or

(B) a unit of general local government, or tribal government, located on tribal land or in a low-income community.

(2) LOW-INCOME COMMUNITY.—The term “low-income community” has the meaning given such term by the Secretary of Agriculture.

(3) UNIT OF GENERAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT.—The term “unit of general local government” means any city, county, town, township, parish, village, or other general purpose political subdivision of a State.

(4) STATE.—The term “State” includes, in addition to the several States of the United States, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the District of Columbia, the Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands.

SEC. 302. Grants for conversion of abandoned and foreclosed property to urban agricultural uses.

(a) Grants authorized.—The Secretary of Agriculture may make grants on a competitive basis to assist an eligible entity described in subsection (b)—

(1) to acquire, by purchase or lease, abandoned or foreclosed real property in an urban area where there is limited or no agricultural production; and

(2) to convert the property to an agricultural use authorized by subsection (c).

(b) Eligible entities described.—Grants may be made under this section to a community organization, municipality, institution of higher education, local school district, nonprofit organization, or for-profit entity.

(c) Authorized agricultural uses.—Real property acquired using grant funds may be used for any of the following purposes:

(1) Projects to encourage the production of local foods in an urban area.

(2) Projects to strengthen local food distribution systems in an urban area.

(3) Projects to create sustainable food systems in an urban area.

(4) Projects to create or expand the opportunities to consume fresh fruits and vegetables in an urban area.

(5) Projects to promote agricultural processing in an urban area.

(6) Projects to encourage recipients of Federal and State domestic food assistance programs to purchase locally grown or produced foods.

(7) Projects to promote education and training related to best practices for agricultural production in an urban area.

(8) Projects to promote education initiatives that promote the nutritional benefits of consuming locally produced foods.

(9) Other projects to promote economic development through agricultural production in an urban area.

(d) Grant limitation.—The amount of a grant made under this section shall not exceed $500,000.

(e) Authorization of appropriations.—There are authorized to be appropriated to the Secretary such amounts as may be necessary to carry out this section.

SEC. 303. Expansion of HarvestCorps program.

(a) Authority To fund HarvestCorps grants.—The Secretary of Agriculture may enter into an agreement with the Director of the Corporation for National and Community Service, under which the Secretary will provide funds to the Corporation for National and Community Service to make up to 10 annual grants under section 121 of the National and Community Service Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12571) to support the creation of the HarvestCorps program—

(1) to alleviate poverty and meet the food needs of low-income people by increasing their access to supportive programs, such as the Summer Food Service Program, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, tax credits, and other programs, that increase the revenue and economic health of the low-income communities; and

(2) to engage community resources and promote partnerships that address local food access issues.

(b) Grant process; elimination of cost-Sharing requirements.—

(1) COMPETITIVE PROCESS.—Grants funded by the Secretary under subsection (a) shall be awarded by the Corporation on a competitive basis. The Corporation shall extend a preference to eligible entities (as described in section 121(a) of the National and Community Service Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12571(a))) operating in the 10 States with the highest food insecurity rates, as measured by the Department of Agriculture.

(2) GRANT AMOUNT; DURATION.—A grant funded by the Secretary under subsection (a) may not exceed $1,000,000 per year. The grant recipient may not receive a grant under this section for more than three years.

(3) MATCHING FUNDS.—The matching funds requirement of section 121(e) of the National and Community Service Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12571(e)) shall not apply to grants funded by the Secretary under subsection (a).

(c) Statewide use of grant.—The recipient of a grant funded by the Secretary under subsection (a) shall agree to provide services on a statewide basis.

(d) Sharing information.—The Secretary and the Corporation may provide for the sharing of information concerning HarvestCorps projects through publications, conferences, and other appropriate forums, including sharing information with researchers, practitioners, and other interested parties.

(e) Authorization of appropriations.—There is authorized to be appropriated to the Secretary of Agriculture $10,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2014, 2015, and 2016 to carry out this section.

SEC. 304. Acquisition of publically owned land and conversion to urban farms and community gardens.

(a) Definitions.—In this section:

(1) FOOD DESERT.—The term “food desert” has the meaning given the term “underserved community” in section 25(a)(3) of the Food and Nutrition Act of 2008 (7 U.S.C. 2034(a)(3)).

(2) COMMUNITY LAND TRUST.—The term “community land trust” means a community housing development organization, as such term is defined in section 104(6) of the Cranston-Gonzalez National Affordable Housing Act (42 U.S.C. 12704(6)), except that the requirements under subparagraphs (C) and (D) of such section shall not apply for purposes of this section.

(b) Grants authorized.—The Secretary of Agriculture shall make competitive grants to nonprofit organizations, including community land trusts, to assist the organizations—

(1) to purchase publically owned land in a food desert; and

(2) to convert the land for use as an urban farm or community garden for the production of affordable, nutritious foods.

(c) Matching funds requirement.—As a condition of receiving a grant under this section, the nonprofit organization shall provide an amount of funds equal to not less than the amount of the grant.

(d) Authorization of appropriations.—There is authorized to be appropriated to the Secretary of Agriculture such amounts as may be necessary to carry out this section.

SEC. 305. Urban agricultural workforce training pilot program.

(a) Authority.—The Secretary of Agriculture, in consultation with the Secretary of Labor, shall award not more than 25 grants to eligible entities to develop and implement urban agricultural workforce training programs.

(b) Grants.—

(1) APPLICATION.—An eligible entity seeking a grant under this section shall submit to the Secretary of Agriculture an application containing—

(A) a description of the urban agricultural workforce training program such entity intends to develop and implement using grant funds; and

(B) such other information as the Secretary may require.

(2) EQUAL AMOUNTS.—The Secretary of Agriculture shall award grants under this section in equal amounts.

(c) Term of grants; condition.—

(1) TERM.—The term of a grant awarded under this section shall be two years.

(2) CONDITION.—

(A) TWO-YEAR AVAILABILITY OF GRANT FUNDS.—Each recipient of a grant under this section shall return to the Secretary of Agriculture any unused portion of such grant at the end of the two-year period beginning on the date the grant was awarded, together with any earnings on such unused portion.

(B) AMOUNTS RETURNED.—The Secretary of Agriculture shall return to the general fund of the Treasury of the United States any amounts returned pursuant to subparagraph (A).

(d) Use of grants.—

(1) IN GENERAL.—An eligible entity that receives a grant under this section may only use grant funds for the following purposes:

(A) To develop and implement an urban agricultural workforce training program in accordance with paragraph (2).

(B) To provide funding to trainees to defray the start-up costs for new urban agricultural businesses of such trainees.

(2) URBAN AGRICULTURAL ACTIVITIES.—An urban agricultural workforce training program developed and implemented by an eligible entity receiving a grant under this section shall provide training for individuals to carry out any of the following urban agricultural activities:

(A) Designing, constructing, and maintaining biocellar structures.

(B) Community gardening.

(C) Urban farming.

(D) Viticulture.

(E) Agricultural education.

(F) Rehabilitating land for agricultural use.

(G) Developing farmers’ markets.

(H) Transporting fresh, local food.

(I) Developing mobile pantries for fresh produce.

(3) LIMITATION.—Not less than 30 percent of the amount received through a grant awarded under this section shall be used to provide the funding described in paragraph (1)(B).

(e) Definitions.—In this section:

(1) ELIGIBLE ENTITY.—The term “eligible entity” means—

(A) a unit of general local government located in an urban area (as defined by the Bureau of the Census);

(B) a tribal government;

(C) an accredited college or university; or

(D) a nonprofit organization.

(2) STATE.—The term “State” includes, in addition to the several States of the United States, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the District of Columbia, the Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands.

(3) UNIT OF GENERAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT.—The term “unit of general local government” means any city, county, town, township, parish, village, or other general purpose political subdivision of a State.

(f) Authorization of appropriations.—There are authorized to be appropriated to carry out this section $5,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2014 through 2018.

SEC. 306. Urban agriculture development grants program.

(a) In general.—The Secretary of Agriculture may make grants to persons to cover the cost of establishing or operating a farm, garden, or aquacultural or other facility, in an urban area, for the production of an agricultural or aquacultural product or the raising of livestock for sale exclusively in the urban area.

(b) Limitations on use of grant.—A person to whom a grant is made under subsection (a) shall not use the grant for any expense other than for community educational programming, transportation, equipment, utilities, construction, rehabilitation of property, feed, or operating expenses (excluding salaries).

(c) Limitations on authorization of appropriations.—For grants under subsection (a), there are authorized to be appropriated to the Secretary of Agriculture not more than $8,000,000,000 for each fiscal year.

SEC. 307. Clean and safe drinking water for urban areas and waterways.

Section 1234(c)(3)(B) of the Food Security Act of 1985 (16 U.S.C. 3834(c)(3)(B)) is amended by inserting “, or the extent to which water quality in a metropolitan statistical area (as defined by the Director of the Office of Management and Budget) downstream from the land that is the subject of the contract offer may be improved” before the period at the end.

SEC. 308. Extension of assistance to socially disadvantaged urban farmers and ranchers.

(a) Eligible land.—Section 1240A(1)(B)(vi) of the Food Security Act of 1985 (16 U.S.C. 3839aa–1(1)(B)(vi)) is amended by inserting “urban agricultural land,” before “and agricultural land”.

(b) Increased payments for certain producers.—Section 1240B(d)(4)(A) of the Food Security Act of 1985 (16 U.S.C. 3839aa–2(d)(4)(A)) is amended by inserting “, including a socially disadvantaged farmer engaged in farming in an urban area of 50,000 or more people,” before “or a beginning farmer or rancher,”.

(c) Assistance to certain farmers or ranchers for conservation access.—Section 1241(g)(1)(B) of the Food Security Act of 1985 (16 U.S.C. 3841(g)(1)(B)) is amended by inserting “, including socially disadvantaged farmers engaged in farming in an urban area of 50,000 or more people” before the period at the end.

SEC. 309. Urban entrepreneur and microenterprise assistance program.

Subtitle D of the Consolidated Farm and Rural Development Act is amended by inserting after section 365 (7 U.S.C. 2008) the following:

“SEC. 366. Urban entrepreneur and microenterprise assistance program.

“(a) Definitions.—In this section:

“(1) ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED MICROENTREPRENEUR.—The term ‘economically disadvantaged microentrepreneur’ means an owner, majority owner, or developer of a microenterprise that has the ability to compete in the private sector but has been impaired because of diminished capital and credit opportunities, as compared to other microentrepreneurs in the industry.

“(2) INDIAN TRIBE.—The term ‘Indian tribe’ has the meaning given the term in section 4 of the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act (25 U.S.C. 450b).

“(3) INTERMEDIARY.—The term ‘intermediary’ means a private, nonprofit entity that provides assistance—

“(A) to a microenterprise development organization; or

“(B) for a microenterprise development program.

“(4) LOW-INCOME INDIVIDUAL.—The term low-income individual means an individual with an income (adjusted for family size) of not more than the greatest of—

“(A) 80 percent of median income of an area;

“(B) 80 percent of the statewide non-metropolitan area median income; or

“(C) 80 percent of the national median income.

“(5) MICROCREDIT.—The term ‘microcredit’ means a business loan or loan guarantee of not more than $50,000 that is provided to an urban entrepreneur.

“(6) MICROENTERPRISE.—The term ‘microenterprise’ means—

“(A) a sole proprietorship; or

“(B) a business entity with not more than 10 full-time-equivalent employees.

“(7) MICROENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT ORGANIZATION.—

“(A) IN GENERAL.—The term ‘microenterprise development organization’ means a private, nonprofit entity that—

“(i) provides training and technical assistance to urban entrepreneurs; and

“(ii) facilitates access to capital or another service described in subsection (b) for urban entrepreneurs.

“(B) INCLUSIONS.—The term ‘microenterprise development organization’ includes an organization described in subparagraph (A) with a demonstrated record of delivering services to economically disadvantaged microentrepreneurs, or an effective plan to develop a program to deliver microenterprise services to urban entrepreneurs effectively, as determined by the Secretary.

“(8) MICROENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM.—The term ‘microenterprise development organization’ means a program administered by an organization serving an urban area.

“(9) MICROENTREPRENEUR.—The term ‘microentrepreneur’ means the owner, operator, or developer of a microenterprise.

“(10) PROGRAM.—The term ‘program’ means the urban entrepreneur and microenterprise program established under subsection (b)(1).

“(11) QUALIFIED ORGANIZATION.—The term ‘qualified organization’ means—

“(A) a microenterprise development organization or microenterprise development program that has a demonstrated record of delivering microenterprise services to urban entrepreneurs, or an effective plan to develop a program to deliver microenterprise services to urban entrepreneurs effectively, as determined by the Secretary;

“(B) an intermediary that has a demonstrated record of delivery assistance to microenterprise development organizations or microenterprise development programs;

“(C) a microenterprise development organization or microenterprise development program that serves urban entrepreneurs;

“(D) an Indian tribe, the tribal government of which certifies to the Secretary that no microenterprise development organization or microenterprise development program exists under the jurisdiction of the Indian tribe;

“(E) a group of 2 or more organizations or Indian tribes described in any of subparagraphs (A) through (D) that agree to act jointly as a qualified organization under this section; or

“(F) for purposes of subsection (b), a public college or university.

“(12) URBAN AREA.—The term ‘urban area’ means any community that is urban in character and has—

“(A) a population of more than 25,000 individuals; or

“(B) an average population density of at least 1,000 individuals per square mile.

“(13) URBAN CAPACITY BUILDING SERVICE.—The term ‘urban capacity building service’ means a service provided to an organization that—

“(A) is, or is in the process of becoming, a microenterprise development organization or microenterprise development program; and

“(B) serves urban areas for the purpose of enhancing the ability of the organization to provide training, technical assistance, and other related services to urban entrepreneurs.

“(14) URBAN ENTREPRENEUR.—The term ‘urban entrepreneur’ means a microentrepreneur, or prospective microentrepreneur—

“(A) the principal place of business of which is in a urban area; and

“(B) that is unable to obtain sufficient training, technical assistance, or microcredit elsewhere, as determined by the Secretary.

“(15) SECRETARY.—The term ‘Secretary’ means the Secretary of Agriculture, acting through the Rural Business-Cooperative Service.

“(16) TRIBAL GOVERNMENT.—The term ‘tribal government’ means the governing body of an Indian tribe.

“(b) Urban Entrepreneurship and Microenterprise Program.—

“(1) ESTABLISHMENT.—The Secretary shall establish an urban entrepreneurship and microenterprise program.

“(2) PURPOSE.—The purpose of the program shall be to provide low-income individuals and moderate-income individuals with—

“(A) the skills necessary to establish new small businesses in urban areas; and

“(B) continuing technical and financial assistance as individuals and business starting or operating small businesses.

“(3) GRANTS.—

“(A) IN GENERAL.—The Secretary may make a grant under the program to a qualified organization—

“(i) to provide training, operational support, or an urban capacity building service to a qualified organization to assist the qualified organization in developing microenterprise training, technical assistance, market development assistance, and other related services, primarily for business with 5 or fewer full-time-equivalent employees;

“(ii) to assist in researching and developing the best practices in delivering training, technical assistance, and microcredit to urban entrepreneurs; and

“(iii) to carry out such other projects and activities as the Secretary determines to be consistent with the purposes of this section.

“(B) SUBGRANTS.—Subject to such regulations as the Secretary may promulgate, a qualified organization that receives a grant under this paragraph may use the grant to provide assistance to other qualified organizations, such as small or emerging qualified organizations.

“(C) DIVERSITY.—In making grants under this paragraph, the Secretary shall ensure, to the maximum extent practicable, that grant recipients include qualified organizations—

“(i) of varying sizes; and

“(ii) that serve racially- and ethnically-diverse populations.

“(D) COST SHARING.—

“(i) FEDERAL SHARE.—The Federal share of the cost of a project carried out using funds from a grant made under this paragraph shall be 75 percent.

“(ii) FORM OF NON-FEDERAL SHARE.—The non-Federal share of the cost of a project described in clause (i) may be provided—

“(I) in cash (including through fees, grants (including community development block grants), and gifts); or

“(II) in kind.

“(4) URBAN MICROLOAN PROGRAM.—

“(A) ESTABLISHMENT.—In carrying out the program, the Secretary may carry out an urban microloan program.

“(B) PURPOSE.—The purpose of the urban microloan program shall be to provide technical and financial assistance to sole proprietorships and small businesses located in urban areas with a particular focus on those businesses with 5 or fewer full-time equivalent employees.

“(C) AUTHORITY OF SECRETARY.—In carrying out the urban microloan program, the Secretary may—

“(i) make direct loans to qualified organizations for the purpose of making short-term, fixed interest rate microloans to startup, newly established, and growing urban microbusiness concerns; and

“(ii) in conjunction with those loans, provide grants in accordance with subparagraph (E) to those qualified organizations for the purpose of providing intensive marketing, management, and technical assistance to small business concerns that are borrowers under this paragraph.

“(D) LOAN DURATION; INTEREST RATES; CONDITIONS.—

“(i) LOAN DURATION.—A loan made by the Secretary under this paragraph shall be for a term of 20 years.

“(ii) APPLICABLE INTEREST RATES.—A loan made by the Secretary under this paragraph to a qualified organization shall bear an annual interest rate of at least 1 percent.

“(iii) DEFERRAL OF INTEREST AND PRINCIPAL.—The Secretary may permit the deferral of payments, for principal and interest, on a loan made under this paragraph for a period of not more than 2 years, beginning on the date on which the loan was made.

“(E) GRANT AMOUNTS.—

“(i) IN GENERAL.—Except as otherwise provided in this section, each qualified organization that receives a loan under this paragraph shall be eligible to receive a grant to provide marketing, management, and technical assistance to small business concerns that are borrowers or potential borrowers under this subsection.

“(ii) MAXIMUM AMOUNT OF GRANT FOR MICROENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT ORGANIZATIONS.—Each microenterprise development organization that receives a loan under this paragraph shall receive an annual grant in an amount equal to not more than 25 percent of the total outstanding balance of loans made to the microenterprise development organization under this paragraph, as of the date of provision of the grant.

“(iii) MATCHING REQUIREMENT.—

“(I) IN GENERAL.—As a condition of any grant made to a qualified organization under this subparagraph, the Secretary shall require the qualified organization to match not less than 15 percent of the total amount of the grant.

“(II) SOURCES.—In addition to cash from non-Federal sources, a matching share provided by the qualified organization may include indirect costs or in-kind contributions funded under non-Federal programs.

“(c) Administrative expenses.—Not more than 10 percent of assistance received by a qualified organization for a fiscal year under this section may be used to pay administrative expenses.

“(d) Funding.—

“(1) IN GENERAL.—Not later than 30 days after the date of enactment of this section, and on October 1, 2013, and each October 1 thereafter through October 1, 2017, out of any funds in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, the Secretary of the Treasury shall transfer to the Secretary to carry out this section $50,000,000, to remain available until expended.

“(2) ALLOCATION OF FUNDS.—Of the amount made available by paragraph (1) for each fiscal year—

“(A) not less than $30,000,000 shall be available for use in carrying out subsection (b)(3); and

“(B) not less than $20,000,000 shall be available for use in carrying out subsection (b)(4), of which not more than $7,000,000 shall be used to support direct loans.

“(C) RECEIPT AND ACCEPTANCE.—The Secretary shall be entitled to receive, shall accept, and shall use to carry out this section the funds transferred under paragraph (1), without further appropriation.”.

SEC. 310. Local farm business and market garden competitive loan program.

(a) Definitions.—In this section:

(1) AGRICULTURAL COMMODITY.—The term “agricultural commodity” has the meaning given the term in section 102 of the Agricultural Trade Act of 1978 (7 U.S.C. 5602).

(2) ELIGIBLE LENDING ENTITY.—The term “eligible lending entity” means a government agency, nonprofit organization, or any other entity that the Secretary designates to finance and facilitate the development of a local farm business project or market garden project.

(3) ELIGIBLE PRODUCER.—The term “eligible producer” means an individual or group of individuals who carry out a local farm business project or market garden project.

(4) FOOD DESERT.—The term “food desert” has the meaning given the term in section 7527(a) of the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–246; 122 Stat. 2039).

(5) LOCAL FARM BUSINESS PROJECT.—The term “local farm business project” means a project on a farm or ranch that—

(A) is for the production of an agricultural commodity for local markets in the local service area; and

(B) is located on 1 or more property lots, the cumulative acreage of which shall be more than 1 acre.

(6) LOCAL SERVICE AREA.—The term “local service area” means an area consisting of a certain mile radius (as determined by the Secretary) from the physical location of production by an eligible local farm business or market garden project.

(7) MARKET GARDEN PROJECT.—The term “market garden project” means a project that—

(A) is for the production of an agricultural commodity for local markets in the local service area; and

(B) is located on 1 or more property lots (regardless of the population density of the area in which the property lots are located), the cumulative acreage of which shall be more than ¼ acre.

(8) REVOLVING LOAN FUND.—The term “revolving loan fund” means a revolving loan fund established by an eligible lending entity as described in subsection (c).

(9) SECRETARY.—The term “Secretary” means the Secretary of Agriculture.

(10) SOCIALLY DISADVANTAGED FARMER OR RANCHER.—The term “socially disadvantaged farmer or rancher” has the meaning given the term in section 355(e) of the Consolidated Farm and Rural Development Act (7 U.S.C. 2003(e)).

(11) SPECIALTY CROP.—The term “specialty crop” has the meaning given the term in section 3 of the Specialty Crops Competitiveness Act of 2004 (7 U.S.C. 1621 note; Public Law 108–465).

(12) SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE.—The term “sustainable agriculture” has the meaning given the term in section 1404 of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act of 1977 (7 U.S.C. 3103).

(b) Competitive loan program for eligible lending entities.—

(1) IN GENERAL.—To support new entrepreneurship and job creation, the Secretary shall establish a local farm business and market garden competitive loan program under which the Secretary shall make available to eligible lending entities loans to develop revolving loan funds to assist—

(A) eligible producers in establishing local farm business projects or market garden projects that will locally produce fresh foods; and

(B) local farm business projects and market garden projects to create local employment opportunities by—

(i) increasing farm and garden income by connecting producers and consumers;

(ii) creating more reliable local food systems;

(iii) diversifying food production;

(iv) increasing consumer access to fresh, local healthful foods produced by local farms, ranches, and market gardens in urban, suburban, or rural areas;

(v) supporting nutrition education that incorporates participation of school children in farm- and garden-based agricultural education activities; and

(vi) preserving farmland.

(2) ELIGIBILITY.—To be eligible to receive a loan under the program established under paragraph (1), an eligible lending entity shall submit to the Secretary an application at such time, in such form, and containing such information as the Secretary may require.

(3) SELECTION CRITERIA.—

(A) APPROVAL.—Not later than 1 year after the date of enactment of this section and in accordance with this paragraph, the Secretary shall, on a competitive basis, begin assessing and approving such applications received under paragraph (2) as the Secretary considers appropriate.

(B) CRITERIA.—In considering a loan application received under paragraph (2), the Secretary shall—

(i) evaluate the extent to which the application demonstrates the ability of the eligible lending entity—

(I) to manage, market, and administer a revolving loan fund;

(II) to assist local eligible producers to successfully meet local service area opportunities;

(III) to work with partners to provide technical support to eligible local farm business projects and market garden projects;

(IV) to recruit, educate, and assist local producers to advance local farming and ranching opportunities that meet local service area needs; and

(V) subject to paragraph (5), to provide matching funds in the form of cash or in-kind services to properly implement and manage the revolving loan fund;

(ii) assess—

(I) the number and type of local farm business projects and market garden projects to be affected by local farm business project loan funding;

(II) the number of new jobs and eligible local farm business projects and market garden projects to be created by the revolving loan fund;

(III) the ability of an eligible local farm business project or market garden project—

(aa) to preserve farmland through economically and environmentally sustainable agriculture practices (as determined by the Secretary); and

(bb) to serve schools and institutions with a high proportion of students who are eligible for free or reduced price lunches under the Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act (42 U.S.C. 1751 et seq.);

(IV) the degree to which an eligible local farm business project or market garden project—

(aa) incorporates experiential nutrition education;

(bb) demonstrates the potential positive economic impact for the local economy;

(cc) demonstrates environmentally sustainable agriculture practices; and

(dd) demonstrates a collaboration between schools or educational institutions, nongovernmental organizations, producer groups, and other community and business partners; and

(V) the market opportunity for eligible local farm business projects or market garden projects to sell products in the local community; and

(iii) consider any other factors that the Secretary determines to be appropriate.

(C) REGIONAL BALANCE.—To the maximum extent practicable, in awarding loans under this section, the Secretary shall ensure that loan recipients—

(i) are geographically diverse;

(ii) serve clients targeted by the loan program, including socially disadvantaged farmers or ranchers;

(iii) serve clients located in areas with a variety of population densities, including rural, suburban, urban, and tribal areas; and

(iv) identify and serve food deserts within the local service area.

(D) PRIORITY.—

(i) IN GENERAL.—In considering loan applications received under paragraph (2), the Secretary shall give priority to applications that demonstrate the ability and willingness of the eligible lending entity—

(I) to serve clients targeted by the program, including, as appropriate, socially disadvantaged farmers or ranchers;

(II) to assist with the financial management aspects of specialty crop farming and other types of local agricultural projects; and

(III) to address the nutritional needs of an underserved area, as determined in accordance with clause (ii).

(ii) UNDERSERVED AREAS.—In determining whether an area is an underserved area, the Secretary shall consider—

(I) population density;

(II) below-average supermarket density or sales;

(III) the rate of ownership of motor vehicles; and

(IV) geographical or physical barriers, such as highways, mountains, major parks, or bodies of water.

(4) LOAN TERMS FOR ELIGIBLE LENDING ENTITIES.—

(A) IN GENERAL.—For each fiscal year for which the Secretary makes a loan to an eligible lending entity under this subsection, the loan shall—

(i) be in an amount that is not less than $200,000 and not more than $1,000,000; and

(ii) be used by the eligible lending entity to establish a revolving loan fund to provide loans for local farm business projects or market garden projects.

(B) TERM.—The term of a loan under this subsection shall not exceed 20 years from the date on which the loan is finalized.

(C) LOAN FINANCING TERMS.—In making loans to eligible lending entities under this subsection, the Secretary shall—

(i) set the rate of interest at not more than 2 percent per year; and

(ii) ensure that no payments are due on the loan during the first 2 years of the loan.

(5) MATCHING FUNDS.—The Secretary may not require an eligible lending entity that receives a loan under this subsection to provide, from non-Federal sources, in cash or in-kind, the cost of carrying out activities under the loan.

(6) ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES.—

(A) IN GENERAL.—Each eligible lending entity that receives a loan under this subsection shall be eligible additionally to receive a one-time grant for purposes described in subparagraph (B) in an amount that is not more than the lesser of—

(i) 10 percent of the total amount of the loan received by the eligible lending entity; or

(ii) $50,000.

(B) USE OF GRANT FUNDS.—Grant funds received under subparagraph (A) may be used by the eligible lending entity only to pay management and technical support costs associated with the loan.

(C) INTEREST RATE.—If an eligible lending entity receives a grant under subparagraph (A), the eligible lending entity may not set the interest rate of loans made by the eligible lending entity to local farm business projects or market garden projects at more than 3 percent per year.

(7) PROGRESS REPORTS.—

(A) IN GENERAL.—Not later than 90 days after the last day of each fiscal year, each eligible lending entity that has a loan under this subsection shall submit to the Secretary a report that includes—

(i) an evaluation of the progress of the revolving loan fund carried out by the eligible lending entity;

(ii) a description of the revolving loan fund, including information on all loans made to local farm business projects or market garden projects;

(iii) a status update for the local farm business projects and market garden projects funded by the revolving loan fund that describes—

(I) the amount of food produced;

(II) the amount of revenue generated; and

(III) the number of new and retained jobs; and

(iv) such other information as the Secretary may require.

(B) REPORTS BY THE SECRETARY.—Not later than 3 years after the date of enactment of this section, the Secretary shall submit to the Committee on Agriculture of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry of the Senate a report that describes the results and findings of the loan program carried out under this subsection.

(8) ANNUAL REVIEW.—The Secretary shall conduct an annual review of the financial records of each eligible lending entity that receives funding under this subsection—

(A) to assess the financial soundness of the eligible lending entity; and

(B) to determine the effective use of loan and grant funds made available to the eligible lending entity under this subsection.

(c) Revolving loan fund.—

(1) ESTABLISHMENT AND PURPOSE.—Each eligible lending entity that receives a loan under subsection (b) shall use the funds to establish a revolving loan fund to provide loans to eligible producers in the local service area.

(2) ELIGIBLE ACTIVITIES.—Loans made by an eligible lending entity under this subsection shall be used by the eligible producer to carry out eligible activities in the local service area, including—

(A) to carry out production projects for value-added food products;

(B) to provide working capital for general operational costs of the local farm business project or market garden project;

(C) to purchase project-related equipment;

(D) to purchase seeds, plants, and fruit or nut trees;

(E) to purchase livestock, poultry, and breeding stock;

(F) to construct and maintain irrigation systems;

(G) to construct buildings (including barns, sheds, greenhouses, and dry and cold storage sheds) necessary to support production;

(H) to lease, lease to purchase, or directly purchase farmland or make a down payment on an accepted purchase offer for farmland; or

(I) to carry out any other activity that the Secretary determines to be in accordance with this section.

(3) LOAN CONDITIONS.—

(A) IN GENERAL.—To be eligible to receive a loan under this section from an eligible lending entity, an eligible producer shall—

(i) supply a minimum level of support of the cost of the local farm business project, market garden project, or institution costs, as determined by the Secretary; and

(ii) submit to the eligible lending entity—

(I) documentation of, as appropriate—

(aa) a long-term land lease contract granting the right to perform local production agriculture;

(bb) a building lease; or

(cc) a deed of property ownership; and

(II) a conservation plan and a sound business plan that is likely to result in a profitable business with sustainable employment for the eligible producer and any employees.

(B) SECRETARIAL APPROVAL; GUARANTEE.—

(i) APPROVAL.—Before an eligible lending entity may make a loan or package of loans to an eligible producer under this section, the Secretary shall approve the loan or package of loans in accordance with the requirements of this section.

(ii) LOAN GUARANTEE.—The Secretary shall guarantee not more than 85 percent of the principal and interest on each loan approved under clause (i).

(4) PRIORITY.—In making loans under this subsection, the eligible lending entity shall give priority to eligible producers that are operated by, or that support—

(A) qualified beginning farmers or ranchers (as defined in section 343(a) of the Consolidated Farm and Rural Development Act (7 U.S.C. 1991(a))) and socially disadvantaged farmers or ranchers;

(B) existing eligible producers, whether owners or tenants, who use loan funds to convert to agricultural production systems approved by the Secretary;

(C) eligible producers who use loan funds to build conservation structures or carry out conservation practices;

(D) eligible producers who will supply fresh and locally produced food to underserved communities; and

(E) existing eligible producers of agriculture commodities who want to diversify farm, ranch, or market garden production and income.

(5) LOAN TERMS FOR ELIGIBLE PRODUCERS.—

(A) IN GENERAL.—A loan made by an eligible lending entity to an eligible producer under this subsection shall be in an amount that is—

(i) in the case of a local farm business project, not less than $5,000 and not more than $100,000; and

(ii) in the case of a market garden project, not less than $3,000 and not more than $50,000.

(B) TERM.—The term of a loan under this subsection shall not exceed—

(i) in the case of a loan in an amount that is not more than $35,000, 12 years from the date on which the loan is finalized; and

(ii) in the case of all other loans, 20 years from the date on which the loan is finalized.

(C) LOAN FINANCING TERMS.—In making loans under this subsection, an eligible lending entity shall—

(i) set the rate of interest at not more than 3 percent per year;

(ii) ensure that no payments are due on the loan during the first 9 months of the loan; and

(iii) ensure that only interest is due on the loan during the period beginning on the last day of the period described in clause (ii) and ending 24 months after the issuance of the loan.

(D) LOAN FORGIVENESS.—If an eligible producer has received a loan under this section to carry out a local farm business project or market garden project, and after 3 years the Secretary determines that the project is successful, the Secretary may offer to forgive—

(i) up to 10 percent of the outstanding amount of the loan; and

(ii) in the case of an eligible producer supporting sustainable agriculture practices, up to 20 percent of the outstanding amount of the loan.

(d) Authorization of appropriations.—There are authorized to be appropriated to the Secretary for each of fiscal years 2014 through 2022—

(1) $20,000,000 to provide loans and grants under subsection (b); and

(2) $100,000 for the administrative costs of carrying out this section.

SEC. 401. Weekends and holidays without hunger.

Section 18 of the Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act (42 U.S.C. 1769) is amended by adding at the end the following:

“(l) Weekends and holidays without hunger.—

“(1) DEFINITIONS.—In this subsection:

“(A) AT-RISK SCHOOL CHILD.—The term ‘at-risk school child’ has the meaning given the term in section 17(r)(1).

“(B) ELIGIBLE INSTITUTION.—

“(i) IN GENERAL.—The term ‘eligible institution’ means a public or private nonprofit institution that is determined by the Secretary to be able to meet safe food storage, handling, and delivery standards established by the Secretary.

“(ii) INCLUSIONS.—The term ‘eligible institution’ includes—

“(I) an elementary or secondary school or school food service authority;

“(II) a food bank or food pantry;

“(III) a homeless shelter; and

“(IV) such other type of emergency feeding agency as is approved by the Secretary.

“(2) ESTABLISHMENT.—Subject to the availability of appropriations provided in advance in an appropriations Act specifically for the purpose of carrying out this subsection, the Secretary shall establish a program under which the Secretary shall provide commodities, on a competitive basis, to eligible institutions to provide nutritious food to at-risk children on weekends and during extended school holidays during the school year.

“(3) ELIGIBILITY.—

“(A) IN GENERAL.—To be eligible to receive commodities under this subsection, an eligible institution shall submit an application to the Secretary at such time, in such manner, and containing such information as the Secretary may determine.

“(B) PLAN.—An application under subparagraph (A) shall include the plan of the eligible institution for the distribution of nutritious foods to at-risk school children, including—

“(i) methods of food service delivery to at-risk school children;

“(ii) assurances that children receiving foods under the project will not be publicly separated or overtly identified;

“(iii) lists of the types of food to be provided under the project and provisions to ensure food quality and safety;

“(iv) information on the number of at-risk school children to be served and the per-child cost of providing the children with food; and

“(v) such other information as the Secretary determines to be necessary to assist the Secretary in evaluating projects that receive commodities under this subsection.

“(4) PRIORITY.—In selecting applications under this subsection, the Secretary shall give priority to eligible institutions that—

“(A) have on-going programs and experience serving populations with significant proportions of at-risk school children;

“(B) have a good record of experience in food delivery and food safety systems;

“(C) maintain high quality control, accountability, and recordkeeping standards;

“(D) provide children with readily consumable food of high nutrient content and quality;

“(E) demonstrate cost efficiencies and the potential for obtaining supplemental funding from non-Federal sources to carry out projects; and

“(F) demonstrate the ability to continue projects for the full approved term of the pilot project period.

“(5) GUIDELINES.—

“(A) IN GENERAL.—The Secretary shall issue guidelines containing the criteria for projects to receive commodities under this section.

“(B) INCLUSIONS.—The guidelines shall, to the maximum extent practicable within the funds available and applications submitted, take into account—

“(i) geographical variations in project locations to include qualifying projects in rural, urban, and suburban areas with high proportions of families with at-risk school children;

“(ii) different types of projects that offer nutritious foods on weekends and during school holidays to at-risk school children; and

“(iii) institutional capacity to collect, maintain, and provide statistically valid information necessary for the Secretary—

“(I) to analyze and evaluate the results of the pilot project; and

“(II) to make recommendations to Congress.

“(6) EVALUATION.—

“(A) INTERIM EVALUATION.—Not later than November 30, 2016, the Secretary shall complete an interim evaluation of the pilot program carried out under this subsection.

“(B) FINAL REPORT.—Not later than December 31, 2017, the Secretary shall submit to Congress a final report that contains—

“(i) an evaluation of the pilot program carried out under this subsection; and

“(ii) any recommendations of the Secretary for legislative action.

“(7) FUNDING.—

“(A) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.—There is authorized to be appropriated to carry out this section such sums as are necessary, to remain available until expended.

“(B) AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS.—Not more than 3 percent of the funds made available under subparagraph (A) may be used by the Secretary for expenses associated with review of the operations and evaluation of the projects carried out under this subsection.”.

SEC. 402. Expansion and modernization of the commodity supplemental food program.

Section 5 of the Agriculture and Consumer Protection Act of 1973 (7 U.S.C. 612c note) is amended—

(1) in subsection (a)—

(A) in paragraph (1) by striking “2008 through 2012” and inserting “2014 through 2018”, and

(B) in paragraph (2)(B) by striking “2004 through 2012” and inserting “2014 through 2018”, and

(2) in subsection (g) by striking paragraph (2) and inserting the following:

“(2) women, infants and children participating in the program as of the effective date of this paragraph.

The Secretary may not require the enrollment in the program of women, infants, and children who are not participating in the program before the effective date of this sentence.”.

SEC. 403. Expansion and modernization of the emergency food assistance program.

(a) Amendments to the Food and Nutrition Act of 2008.—Section 27(a)(2) of the Food and Nutrition Act of 2008 (7 U.S.C. 2036(a)(2)) is amended—

(1) by striking subparagraphs (A) and (B) and inserting the following:

“(A) for fiscal years 2014 through 2018, $350,000,000; plus $100,000,000 for each percentage point that unemployment exceeds the rate as of June 2008 (prorated such that each change of 0.1 percent shall result in a change in funding of $10,000,000). The unemployment rate from June of the immediately preceding fiscal year shall be used to compute change from June 2008. In any fiscal year, the amount calculated in this subparagraph shall not be less than $350,000,000.”,

(2) in subparagraph (C)—

(A) by striking “(C)” and inserting “(B)”,

(B) by striking “2010 through 2012” and inserting “2014 through 2018”,

(C) by striking “subparagraph (B)” and inserting “ subparagraph (A)”, and

(D) by striking the period at the end and inserting “; and”, and

(3) by adding at the end the following:

“(C) of the total funds made available under subparagraphs (A) and (B), not less than $100,000,000 shall be to support State and local storage and distribution costs. In addition, each year States may transfer up to 5 percent of total funds provided for commodity purchases into accounts used to fund storage and distribution costs at their discretion”.

(b) Amendments to the emergency food assistance act of 1983.—The Emergency Food Assistance Act of 1983 (7 U.S.C. 7501 et seq.) is amended—

(1) in section 202 by adding at the end the following:

“(h) In addition to other considerations, including but not limited to the need to intervene in depressed domestic agricultural markets, the Secretary shall consider the needs of States and demands on emergency food providers in making commodity purchase decisions.”, and

(2) in section 204 by striking “2008” and inserting “2014”.

(c) Authority To use section 32 funds To respond to situations of high rates of food insecurity or unemployment.—The second sentence of section 32 of the Act of August 24, 1935 (7 U.S.C. 612c) is amended in paragraph (2) by inserting after “low-income groups” the following: “or in situations of high rates of food insecurity or unemployment,”.

SEC. 404. Food bank equipment and technology program.

(a) Authority for program.—The Secretary of Agriculture shall develop and carry out a food bank equipment and technology program to make grants to eligible entities to be used within a 1-year period for the purchase of operating equipment and technology that increases the efficiency of a food bank. Eligible entities include nonprofit entities that operate food banks in urban areas.

(b) Authorization of appropriations.—There is authorized to be appropriated to carry out this section $10,000,000 for each of the fiscal years in the 3-year period beginning on the October 1 of the 1st fiscal year that begins after the date of the enactment of this Act.

SEC. 501. Green and Sustainable Schools, Museums, and Libraries Grant Program.

(a) Grant program.—The Secretary of Agriculture, in consultation with the Secretary of Energy, shall establish a program to provide competitive grants to schools, museums, and libraries to increase energy efficiency.

(b) Criteria.—In awarding grants under subsection (a), the Secretary of Agriculture shall target schools, museums, and libraries that are the most inefficient in the usage of energy and whose insulation, lighting, and equipment would benefit most by being upgraded to insulation, lighting, and equipment that is more energy efficient.

(c) Use of funds.—A school, museum, or library receiving a grant under subsection (a) shall use the funds received under such grant—

(1) to increase energy efficiency through new construction, rehabilitation, expansion, and upgrades; and

(2) for organized programs, events, and initiatives to educate employees of schools, museums, or libraries on how to become more energy efficient.

(d) Definitions.—In this section:

(1) MUSEUM.—The term “museum” means a museum accredited by the American Association of Museums.

(2) SCHOOL.—The term “school” means an elementary school or a secondary school, as those terms are defined in section 9101 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 7801).