Text: H.R.4962 — 113th Congress (2013-2014)All Information (Except Text)

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Introduced in House (06/25/2014)


113th CONGRESS
2d Session
H. R. 4962


To provide for enhanced border security, and for other purposes.


IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

June 25, 2014

Mr. Franks of Arizona (for himself, Mr. Schweikert, Mr. Gosar, Mr. Fincher, Mr. Stockman, Mr. LaMalfa, Mr. Crenshaw, Mr. Weber of Texas, Mr. Poe of Texas, Mr. Sam Johnson of Texas, Mr. Neugebauer, Mr. McClintock, Mr. DeSantis, Mr. Posey, Mr. Yoho, Mrs. Bachmann, and Mr. Miller of Florida) introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on Homeland Security, and in addition to the Committees on the Judiciary, Natural Resources, and Agriculture, for a period to be subsequently determined by the Speaker, in each case for consideration of such provisions as fall within the jurisdiction of the committee concerned


A BILL

To provide for enhanced border security, and for other purposes.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. Short title.

This Act may be cited as the “National Border and Homeland Security Act”.

SEC. 2. Priority distributions under the State Criminal Alien Assistance Program.

Section 241(i) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1231(i)) is amended by adding at the end the following:

“(7) In distributing amounts under this subsection to a State or political subdivision of a State, including a municipality, for a fiscal year, the Attorney General shall prioritize compensating—

“(A) States that are on the northern or southern border; or

“(B) political subdivisions of States, including municipalities, that, in the determination of the Attorney General, have one of the four largest populations of aliens unlawfully present in the United States for the preceding fiscal year.”.

SEC. 3. Fencing along and operational control of the southwest border.

(a) Fencing.—Section 102(b)(1) of the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996 (8 U.S.C. 1103 note) is amended—

(1) in subparagraph (A), by inserting “, not later than December 31, 2015,” before “construct”; and

(2) in subparagraph (B)—

(A) in clause (i), by striking “370 miles, or other mileage determined by the Secretary, whose authority to determine other mileage shall expire on December 31, 2008,” and inserting “areas”; and

(B) in clause (ii), by striking “2008” and inserting “2015”.

(b) Operational control.—Subsection (a) of section 2 the Secure Fence Act of 2006 (8 U.S.C. 1701 note; Public Law 109–367) is amended, in the matter preceding paragraph (1)—

(1) by striking “18 months after the date of the enactment of this Act,” and inserting “December 31, 2015,”; and

(2) by inserting “, in consultation with State and local officials along the international border between the United States and Mexico, including border State governors, mayors of border towns and cities, and border sheriffs,” before “shall”.

SEC. 4. Border Patrol agents.

The Secretary of Homeland Security shall increase the number of positions for full-time, active-duty Border Patrol agents over the number of such agents for the preceding fiscal year as follows:

(1) Three thousand such agents for fiscal year 2015 (with 2,500 such agents deployed to the southern border and 500 such agents deployed to the northern border).

(2) One thousand such agents for fiscal year 2016 (with 800 such agents deployed to the southern border and 200 such agents deployed to the northern border).

(3) One thousand such agents for fiscal year 2017 (with 800 such agents deployed to the southern border and 200 such agents deployed to the northern border).

(4) One thousand such agents for fiscal year 2018 (with 800 such agents deployed to the southern border and 200 such agents deployed to the northern border).

SEC. 5. Customs and Border Protection.

For each of fiscal years 2015, 2016, 2017, and 2018, the Secretary of Homeland Security shall increase by not fewer than 200 the number of United States Customs and Border Protection officers at United States ports of entry over the number of such officers at such ports for the preceding fiscal year.

SEC. 6. Biometric entry and exit data system.

(a) In general.—Not later than 18 months after the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Homeland Security shall establish the biometric entry and exit data system required by section 7208 of the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 (8 U.S.C. 1365b), notwithstanding any other dates specified in such section.

(b) Requirements.—In addition to the features required by the biometric entry and exit data system in accordance with section 7208 of the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 (8 U.S.C. 1365b), the Secretary of Homeland Security shall ensure that such system is established and in operation at each port of entry in the United States.

SEC. 7. Prohibition on impeding certain activities of the Secretary of Homeland Security related to border security.

On public lands of the United States, neither the Secretary of the Interior nor the Secretary of Agriculture may impede, prohibit, or restrict activities of the Secretary of Homeland Security to achieve operational control (as defined in section 2(b) of the Secure Fence Act of 2006 (8 U.S.C. 1701 note; Public Law 109–367).

SEC. 8. Global nuclear detection architecture.

Section 1902(a) of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (6 U.S.C. 592(a)) is amended—

(1) in paragraph (1), by inserting before the semicolon at the end the following: “, particularly with respect to potential smuggling routes in land border areas between ports of entry, railcars entering the United States from Canada or Mexico, and private aircraft or small vessels”;

(2) by redesignating paragraphs (13) and (14) as paragraphs (14) and (15), respectively;

(3) by inserting after paragraph (12) the following new paragraph:

“(13) develop objectives to be accomplished to carry out this subsection, identify roles and responsibilities for meeting such objectives, ensure that the funding necessary to achieve such objectives is available, and employ monitoring mechanisms to determine progress toward achieving such objectives;”; and

(4) in paragraph (14), as so redesignated, by striking “paragraphs (10), (11), and (12)” and inserting “this subsection”.

SEC. 9. Portable radiation detectors and radioactive isotope identification devices.

Not later than one year after the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Homeland Security shall determine the number of next generation portable radiation detectors (PRD) and radioactive isotope identification devices (RIID) required by Border Patrol agents patrolling the southern and northern borders of the United States and procure such detectors and devices.

SEC. 10. Strategic plan to detect and interdict biological and chemical weapons.

(a) In general.—

(1) DEVELOPMENT.—Not later than one year after the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Homeland Security shall develop a strategic plan (in this section referred to as the “Plan”) to detect and interdict biological and chemical weapons entering the United States.

(2) IMPLEMENTATION.—The Secretary of Homeland Security shall complete implementation of the Plan not later than two years after the development of the Plan under paragraph (1).

(b) Reports to Congress.—

(1) INITIAL REPORT.—Not later than one year after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Homeland Security shall submit to Congress a report that describes the Plan.

(2) ANNUAL REPORT.—Not later than two years after the submission of the initial report under paragraph (1) and annually thereafter, the Secretary of Homeland Security shall submit reports to Congress on the implementation of the Plan.