Text: S.1487 — 113th Congress (2013-2014)All Bill Information (Except Text)

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Introduced in Senate (09/09/2013)


113th CONGRESS
1st Session
S. 1487

To limit the availability of tax credits and reductions in cost-sharing under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act to individuals who receive health insurance coverage pursuant to the provisions of a Taft-Hartley plan.


IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES
September 9, 2013

Mr. Thune (for himself, Mr. Enzi, Mr. Barrasso, Mr. Alexander, Mr. Rubio, Mr. Isakson, Mr. Scott, and Mr. McConnell) introduced the following bill; which was read twice and referred to the Committee on Finance


A BILL

To limit the availability of tax credits and reductions in cost-sharing under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act to individuals who receive health insurance coverage pursuant to the provisions of a Taft-Hartley plan.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. Short title.

This Act may be cited as the “Union Bailout Prevention Act of 2013”.

SEC. 2. Limitation on subsidies for individuals in Taft-Hartley plans.

(a) In general.—Notwithstanding any other provision of law, no premium tax credits shall be permitted under section 36B of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 and no reductions in cost-sharing shall be permitted under section 1402 of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (42 U.S.C. 18071) with respect to an individual for health insurance coverage provided pursuant to the terms of a collective bargaining agreement involving one or more employers.

(b) Qualified plans.—Section 1301(a) of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (42 U.S.C. 18021(a)) is amended by adding at the end the following:

“(5) TAFT-HARTLEY PLANS.—The term ‘qualified health plan’ shall not include health insurance coverage provided pursuant to the terms of a collective bargaining agreement involving one or more employers.”.